swirls and sea glass
Minty, pink, amber and marine blue  sea glass earrings accented by hammered sterling silver designed by Debra Beard.

Q: What is sea glass, you ask?

A: Sea glass is physically and chemically weathered glass found on beaches along bodies of salt water.  Sea glass takes 20 to 30 years, and sometimes as much as 50 years, to acquire its characteristic texture and shape.  Genuine sea glass, originates as pieces of glass from broken bottles, or even shipwrecks, have tumbled in the ocean for years.

Hues of new goodies in minty, calming green and ocean blues.

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Sea glass is often called “Mermaid Tears.”

The legend of the mermaid tears:
One storm-ravaged night, a schooner fought to find safety in the San Juans. The ship was familiar to the mermaid who swam along its side. As the ship heeled in the violent wind, the captain lost his hold on the wheel, tumbling perilously close to the raging sea. In an instant, the mermaid calmed the wind and tamed the waves, changing the course of nature and saving the life of a man she had grown to love from afar.
For her impetuous act, Neptune banished the sobbing mermaid to the oceans depths, condemning her for eternity never to surface or swim with the ships again. To this day, her gleaming tears wash up on the beaches as sea glass, an eternal reminder of true love.

 

Ron Nicolaides.

High Sea. Original oil.

About the artist:

Ron Nicolaides, lives and works in Oregon and studied art at Washington University in St. Louis Missouri, but is primarily a self-taught artist. He painted his first oil seascape in his teens and credits visiting museums as a basis for his continuing knowledge of art and the style of the Hudson River School of Painting, a style he pursues.

Artist Eugene Garin has served as his mentor. However, his work is heavily inspired by the European Old Masters with his greatest stylistic influence being the Hudson River School of artists, such as Albert Bierstadt, Thomas Moran, Frederic Church and Herman Herzog.

The western landscape and Pacific coast are the predominant subjects of Nicolaides’ paintings.

Evening Surf

Wild Seas.

 Ron Nicolaides, with years of study and experience has become a powerful accomplished artist. He has captured majestic landscapes and has mastered the mesmerizing translucent waves in his depiction of the sea without freezing its energetic rhythms.

“His strength is his capacity to push the limits of oils and multiply glazes to create the masterful works that bring the viewer right into the scene.”

“His accomplishment as an artist can be clearly seen in his use of fine detail, vibrant color and the multiple glazes. The stylistic influences he uses give his compositions a sense of wonderful depth.”

 

Water and Light

Light and Water

“His accomplishment as an artist can be clearly seen in his use of fine detail, vibrant color and the multiple glazes. The stylistic influences he uses give his compositions a sense of wonderful depth.”

His paintings can be found in many private collections and selected  fine art galleries.  His work is in a permanent exhibition in the North Lincoln County Historical Museum in Lincoln City, Oregon.

Represented by:
FAIRWEATHER GALLERY

Seaside, OR

See more info about our gallery and other exhibits at http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …blog.

In addition, Ron Nicolaides is represented by:

HORIZON FINE ART GALLERY
Jackson Hole, WY

and

EISELE GALLERY OF FINE ART
Cincinnati, OH

Q: What is the Hudson River School of Painting style, you ask?

A: Hudson River School of Painting,  an American art Movement, was  originally a large group of American landscape painters of several generations who worked between about 1825 and 1870. The name, applied retrospectively, refers to a similarity of intent rather than to a geographic location, though many of the older members of the group drew inspiration from the picturesque Catskill region north of New York City, through which the Hudson River flows.
An outgrowth of the Romantic movement, the Hudson River school was the first native school of painting in the United States; it was strongly nationalistic both in its proud celebration of the natural beauty of the American landscape and in the desire of its artists to become independent of European schools of painting.

Hudson River School paintings reflect three themes of America: discovery, exploration, and settlement. The paintings also depict the American landscape as a pastoral setting, where human beings and nature coexist peacefully. Hudson River School landscapes are characterized by their realistic, detailed, and sometimes idealized portrayal of nature, often juxtaposing peaceful agriculture and the remaining wilderness, which was fast disappearing from the Hudson Valley in the 19th century just as it was coming to be appreciated for its qualities of ruggedness and sublimity.

For more info go to: https://www.britannica.com/art/Hudson-River-schoolan

Just in. Image titled: We Have Lift Off by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images. Location: Sunset Beach, Oregon. Date: April 2017. Proceeds in support of NCLC.
Please visit NCLCtrust.org to read more about North Coast Land Conservancy.

See more info about Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images and other exhibits at http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com /…artists /…Neal Maine …/blog.

Q: Where is Sunset Beach, you ask?

A: Sunset Beach is a state park in Clatsop County, Oregon. The park comprises 120 acres along the Pacific Ocean on the Clatsop Plains and is located between Gearhart and Warrenton, Oregon.

For more info please go to:
Sunset Beach State Recreation Site – Oregon State Parks and …
oregonstateparks.org/index.cfm?do=parkPage.dsp_parkPage&parkId=182
Sunset Beach State Recreation Site comes with a very famous past. The park marks the west trailhead of the historic Fort-to-Sea Trail

The osprey is a very unique raptor, standing out not only for its beauty but also for its choice of prey.
7 fun facts about ospreys:

1. The osprey is the only hawk species in North America that eats almost exclusively live fish.

2. The raptor can dive as deep as three feet into the water for fish, but prefers to hunt in shallower areas.

3. This species is also known as the river hawk, fish hawk or sea hawk. But don’t confuse it with the Seahawk, the mascot of the Seattle-based football team. First, there is no such thing as a “seahawk” (one word). Second, the team actually uses an augur hawk as its mascot, a species native to Africa. The osprey may be known as a sea hawk, but it has no connection to football.

4. The osprey is the second most widely distributed raptor species, after the peregrine falcon, and can be found on every continent except Antarctica.

5. All of the ospreys around the world are part of a single species, with the exception of the eastern osprey which is native to Australia.

6. The osprey species is at least 11 million years old and is so well adapted to fishing that it has evolved unique characteristics that set it apart from other raptor species. These include nostrils that can be closed during dives, and an outer toe that can be angled backwards to better grasp fish. The species is so unique, it is listed in its own genus (Pandion) and family (Pandionidae).

7. Ospreys can live to be 15-20 years old. The oldest known osprey was just over 25 years old. During that long lifetime, the migratory birds can rack up over 160,000 miles of travel. In fact, in 2008 an osprey being tracked by researchers flew an amazing 2,700 miles in just 13 days, traveling from Massachusetts to French Guiana, South America!

For more info about ospreys go to:
Osprey, Life History, All About Birds – Cornell Lab of Ornithology
https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Osprey/lifehistory


THE OSPREY IS BEING CONSIDERED TO BECOME THE STATE BIRD OF OREGON.

Oregon Senate chooses osprey over western … – Statesman Journal
http://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/…/oregon…osprey…state-bird…/100124452/
Apr 7, 2017

 

Seaside Osprey Cam youtube.com

 

Seaside Osprey Nest located in Broadway Park in Seaside, Oregon

 

 

 

The Seaside Osprey nest cam is up and running, in exceptional HD quality! HUGE thanks to Sunset Empire Park and Recreation District for hosting the camera, and installing fiber optic cable so the cam can be so clear!

 

Necanicum Watershed Council

 

Named the “state animal” in 1969, the American beaver builds the dams and wetlands that serve as habitat for Oregon salmon, steelhead, birds, amphibians and insects. Beavers are nature’s hydrologists, “Beaver Tales: A Celebration of Beaver Art” curator Sara Vickerman … click of the following link to read the entire front page article by Eve Marz, reporter for the Seaside Signal …

Source: From near extinction to a place in art

For more info the participating Fairweather  artists, please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com …artists … Paul Brent, Mike Brown, Susan Curington, Agnes Field, Jo Pomeroy Crockett, Neal Maine and Denise Joy McFadden.

Save the date and time.

BEAVER TALES, a celebration of art.

May 6th, 5-7:pm in the historic Gilbert District Block of downtown Seaside

For more info about the Art Walk, please go to http://www.facebook.com/SeasideFirstSaturdayArtWalk

SAVE THE DATE AND TIME!

http://www.NCLCtrust.org
Listening to the Land: Dam, Beaver! Dam!
Wednesday, April 19
6 to 8 pm
Seaside Public Library

And, too, a lot more info about Beavers and all the good things they do for us:

Dr. Stephen Ramsey, from the OSU Center for Genome Research & Biocomputing (the Center has recently announced the completion of its sequencing of the beaver genome, so this is very well timed – http://registerguard.com/rg/news/local/35185225-75/oregon-state-university-researchers-find-benny-the-beaver-fills-big-genes.html.csp)

Frances Backhouse will offer a talk based on her research and writing that appeared in her award-winning book, Once They Were Hats: In Search of the Mighty Beaver. At Beach Books on May 6th at 1:pm. http://www.backhouse.ca/books/once-they-were-hats-in-search-of-the-mighty-beaver/.

The Wetlands Conservancy has posted information on the Beaver Tales art project. The link is below. Feel free to share it with your friends and contacts.
http://wetlandsconservancy.org/stewardship/beaver-tales

http://wetlandsconservancy.org/stewardship/beaver-tales/beaver-inspiration

https://northernwoodlands.org/discoveries/pathways-to-ponds

Here’s a link to an excellent short video, with great aerial depiction of the changes that beaver dams bring to meadows . . .
http://www.animalplanet.com/tv-shows/other/videos/fooled-by-nature-beaver-dams

And for more inspiration, a video of beaver swimming on U-Tube. .https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9cwu_Wu5ONI

CBC News Posted: Apr 02, 2017Great parenting: animals that care for their young in ‘amazing’ ways BEAVERS…

Some parents are a little more dedicated than others, according to wildlife expert Frank Ritcey. Ritcey says beavers take a more paws-on approach to raising their young. They give birth inside their lodges, where kits will stay until they’re old enough to start eating solid food.

“Once they’re old enough to venture forth, they travel about with the parent to learn how to become a beaver. [Kits] follow the adult around and mimic the adults actions,” said Ritcey.

“It’s so cute to watch — but it’s also very important as the young have to learn a whole set of skills like using the right trees to fall and how to build dams and lodges, and in general — how to be as busy as a beaver should be.”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_23vuRU2Ews

 

While nothing can compare to the real beaver it is great to see more comprehensive research about the positive impacts of beaver dams.

http://www.ktvz.com/…/osu-cascades-students-scien…/394113930

 

 

 

Featuring  art by regional artists:  floral and grasses  by Susan Curington,  landscapes by Jan Shield,  pastels by Joanne Donaca, wood cut birds and blooms by Gregory Graham, mouth blown glass by Cindy DuVall, watercolor butterflies by Denise Joy McFadden, textiles by Linda Ballard  and rice paper florals by Zifen Qian.  

For more info please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com … artists.

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BLOOM, an exhibition at Fairweather’s through April. “It’s like living inside a garden, the gallery is layered  with colorful accessories, beautiful artworks, and gorgeous garden books.”

So lovely.  So perfect.  So right.  

Photo layout  by Fairweather artist and Seaside Art Walk photographer, Linda Fenton-Mendenhall featuring  the April  2017 salon-style display of art.

Selected BLOOM artists in salon style gallery display, left to right:   floral oil on linen art by Michael Muldoon,  still life oil on linen by Melissa Jander,  landscape pastels by Gretha Lindwood, encaustic (painting in beeswax) by emerging artist Rebecca Gore, abstract floral pastels by Gretha Lindwood, emerging artist mermaids in sea florals by emerging artist Ashley Howarth, and “Garden Party” tulips and hyacinths  original oil by Melissa Jander.

A round of applause for BLOOM, an exhibition at Fairweather’s throughout the month of April! You  introduced an imaginative way of displaying many diverse  NW artists.  The artwork brings together design drama in extraordinary intimacy and charm that creates a feeling of a springtime garden stroll. Thank you!” — Bonnie W.

Q: What is salon style display in the context of a gallery exhibition, you ask?

A:  Hanging art salon-style can be a dramatic and brave  way to decorate a wall, placing a range of art with unusual dimensions to create an interesting effect.   Neutral walls are considered a perfect way to cleanse the palette for the eye in  salon-style display.

 

For more info about the gallery and the artists, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com …artists

Baltimore Oriole

Image titled: Stranger in Town.

April 2017

Photographer Neal Maine, PacificLight  Images.

Just in time for BLOOM, an exhibition, at Fairweather’s.

A Baltimore Oriole visiting a backyard in Seaside, Oregon! 

Image backstory:

Once again, one Baltimore Oriole, a stranger to the North coast area, usually not a visitor to the West, has appeared, again in the spring of 2017, to the same flowering tree in the Seaside area, first visited in the spring of 2016.

Fun facts:

One of the most brilliantly colored songbirds in the east, flaming orange and black, sharing the heraldic colors of the coat of arms of 17th-century Lord Baltimore.

Widespread east of the Great Plains.

Baltimore Orioles are often very common in open woods.

Visits flowers for nectar.

http://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/baltimore-oriole

Baltimore Oriole migration map.

Open woods, riverside groves, elms, shade trees. Breeds in deciduous or mixed woodland, generally in open woods or edges rather than interior of dense forest. May be common in trees in towns. Often favors elms. Winters mostly in the tropics around forest edge and semi-open country.

Rarely west of the Rocky Mountains!!!

 

Neal Maine/ PacificLight  Images

NATURE’S TRAILS

A limpet creeps up a wave-washed rock, following the rise of the tide. A salmon follows ancient watershed trails to its natal stream. An otter travels along its living trap line for crabs in the estuary to crayfish up side creeks. A vole tunnels into the soft sponge on the forest floor. In the treetops, in the forest, across the land, in the water, and in the air, all become a living slate for NATURE’S TRAILS. This tracery of interwoven trails are unsigned but indelible to generations of travelers.

THE NEXT FRONTIER, OUR OWN BACKYARD

Humans: We take pictures, walks, deep breaths, memories, ride on waves, water, timber, in habitat that used to belong to other trail makers. We thought we could never catch all the salmon, never cut all the big trees, and never pollute the ocean. In our hubris, we thought we could make our own trails. With renewed humility, we are learning how to share this place, to live together with our partner trail makers. PacificLight Images celebrates this partnership as we use our images to inspire others to honor nature’s trails in OUR OWN BACKYARD. –Neal Maine

 Proceeds to support North Coast Land Conservancy, NCLC. 

Please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com …artists …Neal Maine for more images and info

 

And, too, the 2016 famous Baltimore Oriole photo by Neal Maine.

Baltimore Oriole