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Image titled: “Testing: by Neal Maine, nature photographer.

Coastal bull elk  in the Neacoxie, Gearhart, Oregon.

  • During the rut season in the fall bulls gather cows and calves into small groups called harems
  • Bulls wallow in mud to coat themselves to attract cows
  • They also bugle and rub trees, shrubs and the ground with their antlers to attract cows and intimidate other bulls
  • Bulls guard their harems from other bulls
  • Sometimes, bulls wage battles for a harem

    For more information about elk go to https://www.rmef.org

“Unless otherwise noted, images are presented as they were photographed. Slight adjustment by cropping, lightening or darkening may have been used, but the photo subject is presented as recorded in the Oregon coastal landscapes.” —Neal Maine

Proceeds in support of NCLC.

Please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/artists/ Neal Maine for more images.

 

 

Word nerd by Ryan Hume/ CoastWeekend article June 15, 2015
Neacoxie [nē•käk•sē] noun

1. Neacoxie Creek: this stream that drains the Clatsop Plains has undergone a major change over the years due in part to drifting sand. Where it once flowed north to empty into Cullaby Lake, since the completion of Clatsop Canal Project, the creek now spills into the Necanicum River as the last tributary before that river dumps into the Pacific Ocean.

2. Neacoxie Lake: Also known as Sunset Lake due to its proximity to Sunset Beach just west of U.S. Highway 101, this 107-acre lake is stocked with rainbow trout but also has natural populations of black crappie, bluegill and perch.

Neahcoxie by way of niak-ákwsi or ni-a-kok-si, which means “where the little pines are.” The creek takes its name from the Indian village that sat on the mouth of the creek.

“Columbia Beach will have two roomy and well-equipped boat-houses, one on Neacoxie Creek and the other on Smith’s lake. The former will house the new rowboats and canoes placed there by the company and the latter will make a home for the new 24-foot launch.

Columbia Trust Company, “We Are Doing Great Things,” The Morning Oregonian, May, 1909

“G. B. Johnson, of Astoria, has become a frequent visitor at Columbia Beach, the chief attraction being the finny fish tribe in Neacoxie Creek. Mr. Johnson is a great angler and succeeds at getting a fine string of bass at each visit.”

—“Ocean Resort Grows,” The Sunday Oregonian, July, 1909

Save the date and time.
Fairweather House and Gallery, 612 Broadway

November 5th, 5-7: pm

Opening reception for the exhibition A SIMPLE APPROACH.

The essence of every sanctuary one creates in the approaching season can be distilled down to the principles of classic neutrals, materials that endure and soothing sight lines in art pulled from a serene environment.

At 6: pm, Neal Maine, ecologist, premier wildlife photographer, and co-founder of the North Coast Land Conservancy, will offer a lecture on the local habitat.