celtic-high-cross-gallery-wrap

Celtic High Cross by Michael Muldoon. Original oil.

Legend says that the first Celtic cross was formed by St Patrick while bringing Christianity to the Druids. The Druids used to worship a large circular stone. St Patrick, on seeing the significance of this stone, drew a large cross through the middle of it in order to bless it. From this act, the two cultures combined to form the Celtic cross. The cross represents Christianity and the circle is the Celtic representation of eternity, no beginning and no end.

Micheal Muldoon paints LIVE.

Michael Muldoon, artist,  offered a Painting Seaside LIVE ™ episode during the opening of IRISH LANDS, an exhibition, on March 6th.

dublin-trinity-college

Trinity Cathedral, location of the Books of Kells, Dublin, Ireland by Richard Newman, photographer.

Q: What is the significance of the Books of Kells, you ask?

A: One of the experts on the manuscript Bernard Meehan writes “In Ireland it symbolizes the power of learning and the spirit of artistic imagination.” The scale and ambition of The Book of Kells is incredible. Written on vellum, practically all of the 680 pages are decorated in some way or another. On some pages every corner is filled with the most detailed and beautiful Celtic designs. The Book is the most famous manuscript in the Library of Trinity College Dublin where it is permanently on display. The Book of Kells is kept in a gallery with only two pages displayed at a time, although they are turned after some period.

https://www.tcd.ie/visitors/book-of-kells/
http://www.special-ireland.com/the-book-of-kells/

 

And, too, for IRISH LANDS, an Irish  family heirloom from the 1800’s will be displayed throughout the month of March  at Fairweather’s



Irish Lands hostesses: Kathy B., Kay K., Denise F., Joan S., and Shirley Y. posing with the spinning wheel display at Fairweather’s.

Kate Hegarty came to America  from Ireland with a spinning wheel crafted in the 1800’s  during the Great Irish Potato Famine.

 

After flourishing for more than 600 years, the Weaver’s  (Spinning) Guild collapsed during the famine years (1846-1853). The Great Potato Famine of the mid-19th century is the most defining event in modern Irish history. The Famine or the Great Hunger was a period of mass starvation and emigration in Ireland between 1846 and 1853.  More than more than 5 million adults and children left Ireland to seek refuge, more than 60% did not survive the journey to America and beyond.  

 

Q: Who was Kate Hegarty, you ask?

 

A: Kate Hegarty, traveled a 16-year-old from County Limerick, Ireland to America in the mid 1800’s. She was the only member selected from a family lottery to safely leave during the Great Potato Famine in Ireland. She brought with her a family heirloom, a spinning wheel, crafted in the 1800’s and had hopes to earn a living in the textile trade. Instead, the young immigrant found work as a maid in Boston, saved her money to travel to the Washington Territory.  She worked as a mother’s helper and brought her treasured spinning wheel. She married a pioneer, Michael Curtin in 1854.  He had come to America from County Cork, Ireland traveling in a ship “around the Horn”.  He earned  money in the gold mines of San Francisco, and later Curtin settled in the Washington Territory. 

 

Curtin is the first pioneer family listed in the Clark County Historical Register, Washington Territory. The Curtin land claim is signed by Ulysses S. Grant, who served as quartermaster at Fort Vancouver from 1852 to 1853. 

Tradition gifts the spinning wheel to the eldest daughter of each generation. Denise Fairweather, founder of Fairweather House and Gallery, has  received the treasured family heirloom.

More info go to: http://www.globalgenealogy.com/countries/ireland/resources/

 

More info: The Famine Ships: Irish Exodus to America, 1846-51 – Edward Laxton, author.

 

To learn more about the gallery, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseangallery.com and view the about, blog and artists tabs.r