Agnes Field II

Here is the work on paper and other pieces for the exhibit opening May 6. I have one slightly larger on panel…similar image and color. –Agnes Field

Artist Statement:

“This work is assembled from my surrounding using ephemeral and commonly accessible materials, such as styrofoam, plastic, cardboard, wood and fabric. Tied to the contemporary legacy of Arte Povera, the work attempts to create intrinsic objects that minimize the boundary between everyday experience and the commercialization of formal practice.” –AgF

For more about the artist please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Agnes Field

Q: What is the art movement called, Arte Povera, you ask?
A: Arte Povera means literally ‘poor art’ but the word poor here refers to the movement’s signature exploration of a wide range of materials beyond the traditional ones of oil paint on canvas, bronze, or carved marble. Materials used by the artists included soil, rags and twigs. In using such throwaway materials they aimed to challenge and disrupt the values of the commercialised contemporary gallery system.

For more info about Arte Povera go to:

http://www.visual-arts-cork.com/history-of-art/arte-povera.htm
https://news.artnet.com/market/an-introduction-to-arte-povera-

Fairweather House and Gallery
Seaside First Saturday Art Walk
May 6th, 5-7: pm

Opening reception for HELLO…BEAVER TALES!

New original work by Fairweather resident artists Paul Brent, Mike Brown, Susan Curington, Agnes Field, Mike Brown, Jo Pomeroy Crockett, PhD., and Neal Maine, as well as selected NW artists.

Beaver, our beloved state animal, is woefully misunderstood and blamed for dam building, flooding and munching on plants. In fact, Oregon beaver creates wetlands, habitat for salmon and create pools that keep water clean and moderate fluctuations in water flow.

They are nature’s hydrologists. There is a slow but growing appreciation and recognition of the positive benefits that beaver play in Oregon. It is time for more Oregonians to know about and celebrate our state mammal. Art exhibits are a great way to raise the profile of beaver, wetlands and Oregon artists.
The goal of the exhibition is to recognize the aesthetic and ecological significance our state animal plays in the creation and maintenance of wetland habitats.

Speaker guest speaker at Fairweather’s BEAVER TALES will be Katie Voelke, executive director of the North Coast Land Conservancy.

NCLC is a nonprofit based in Seaside, working toward a Oregon Coast where healthy communities of people, plants and wildlife all thrive.

Please go to http://www.NCLC.org for more information about the land trust.

Katie Voelke grew up in Sacramento and earned a bachelor’s degree in biology at the University of California, Santa Cruz. She worked as a field biologist for the U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife before joining NCLC as its first stewardship director in 2005; three years later, she became its second executive director.

She and her husband, Scott Kirby, are the parents of three boys. They live in Nehalem.

Seaside/ Gearhart nature photographer Neal Maine, co-founder of NCLC, North Coast Land Conservancy, will be available to meet and greet visiting artists, guests and art patrons.

Please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/… Neal Maine to view a catalog of images available. Proceeds in support of NCLC.

Seaside First Saturday Art Walk hostesses will assist with photo ops, lite bites, and beverages.

Q: What is an  Art Walk, you ask?
A: Residents and visitors alike enjoy an evening of community and culture as various art venues within walking distance of each other host art exhibits, between 5-7 p.m. with the Seaside First Saturday Art Walk. The Art Walk, celebrating 13 years in 2017, is in the historic Gilbert Block Building. It is free and open to the public. Motto: “Those that live for the arts, support the arts.”

FUN FACT:
The Gilbert District, established in 1914, celebrated 100 years of rich history and timeless tradition in 2014. The historic district was awarded the 2004 Oregon Main Street Downtown Gateway Award.

The area is now home to shops, restaurants, galleries and boutiques. Dedicated parking for the district is located one block West off the Pacific Coast Highway 101, on the corner of Holladay and Broadway. Next Art Walk is May 6th, 2017.

For more about the Art Walk, please go to http://www.facebook.com/SeasideFirstSaturdayArtWalk.