Title: “Winged Wonder” by Neal Maine, PacificLight Images.

Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly. Location: Neacoxie Creek. Seaside/Gearhart.

Signed, matted and framed.

“Unless otherwise noted, images are presented as they were photographed. Slight adjustment by cropping, lightening or darkening may have been used, but the photo subject is presented as recorded in the Oregon coastal landscapes.”

A Certificate of Authenticity is provided with each copyrighted and signed image.

Available exclusively at Fairweather’s.

Proceeds to support North Coast Land Conservancy/NCLC.

 

 

THE NEXT FRONTIER, OUR OWN BACKYARD

Humans: We take pictures, walks, deep breaths, memories, rides on waves, water, timber, in habitat that used to belong to other trail makers. We thought we could never catch all the salmon, never cut all the big trees, and never pollute the ocean. In our hubris, we thought we could make our own trails. With renewed humility, we are learning how to share this place, to live together with our partner trail makers. PacificLight Images celebrates this partnership as we use our images to inspire others to honor nature’s trails in OUR OWN BACKYARD.Neal Maine

To read more about the photographer, please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Neal Maine

 

Save the date and time. 
Neal Maine, scientist and wildlife photographer to present a lecture on the ecology of the North Coast habitats.

August 5th, 6:pm
Fairweather House and Gallery
612 Broadway, Seaside, OR
Opening reception for FINDINGS

Seaside First Saturday Art Walk 

 

To read more about the Art Walk, please go to http://www.facebook.com/ Seaside First Saturday Art Walk.

Q: Where can the Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly be found, you ask?

A:  Habitat: Small ponds and slow streams. It perches on the tips of twigs, grasses and other vegetation.

Fun Creature Facts:

Distribution: Western U.S., West Indies and Central America south to Chile and Argentina.

Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly wings sit flat when perched and have a strong sustained flight; flitting about on gossamer wings and quiet as a whisper.

Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonflies are swift fliers, reminiscent of tiny airplanes.

Their eyes are huge, often meeting at the top of the head.

The Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly, will eat almost any soft-bodied flying insect including mosquitoes, flies, small moths, mayflies, and flying ants or termites.

The Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly are aptly named as they mimic hawks, relentlessly pursuing their prey.

The Latin name for this genus, Sympetrum, means “with rock” and refers to their habit of basking on rocks to absorb heat early in the day.

This species is one of the first dragonflies to emerge each year.

imnh.isu.edu/digitalatlas/bio/insects/drgnfly