Renee Hafeman, vintage jewelry artist

FINDINGS in my work is a collection of tools and other articles used by an artisan to make jewelry.

 

Q:  What is the difference Between “Art Nouveau” and “Art Deco”, you ask?

A: Art Nouveau: means “new art,” reigned from roughly 1880 until just before World War I. It features naturalistic but stylized forms, often combined with more geometric shapes, particularly arcs, parabolas, and semicircles (think of the Eiffel Tower). The movement brought in natural forms that had often been overlooked like insects, weeds, even mythical faeries, as evidenced by Lalique jewelry or Tiffany lamps.

Art Deco emerged after World War I. In fact, the deprivations of the Great War years gave way to a whole new opulence and extravagance that defined the Jazz Age and the Art Deco aesthetic. The movement, prevalent from the 1920s until roughly the start of World War II, took its name from the 1925 Exposition Internationales des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes, held in France and is characterized by streamlined and geometric shapes. It also utilized modern materials like chrome, stainless steel, and inlaid wood. If Art Deco dabbled with natural materials, they tended to be graphic or textural, like jagged fern leaves. As a result, Deco featured bold shapes like sunbursts and zigzags and broad curves.

Renee Hafeman offered an artist’s lecture during the opening reception of FINDINGS, an exhibition through August at Fairweather’s.

Note the difference?