Cat.

Encaustic (beeswax) on wood panel by Gregory Bell.

SHADOWS, the October Fairweather Gallery exhibition.

 

Q: What is encaustic, you ask?
A: Encaustic painting, also known as hot wax painting, involves using heated beeswax to which colored pigments are added. The liquid or paste is then applied to a surface—usually wood, though canvas and other materials are often used. Encaustic painting was practiced by Greek artists as far back as the 5th century B.C. Encaustic had a variety of applications: for the painting of portraits and scenes of mythology on wood panels. The Greeks applied coatings of wax and pigment to weatherproof and decorate their ships. Mention is even made by Homer of the painted ships of the Greek warriors who fought at Troy.

Q: How to care for an encaustic work of art, you ask?
A: Occasionally, gently wipe dust off of your piece with a clean and lint free rag.

 

 

Full size, CAT, by Gregory Bell. In addition, gallery exhibit features: pastel 4×4’s by Joanna Donaca, calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson, en plein air by Karen E. Lewis, lava vases by Emily Miller.

And, too, a timely article from the Daily Astorian.

Cougar country: Sightings of the predator have increased on the Oregon Coast
State biologists will attach GPS collars to cougars to study movement
Published on October 24, 2017

By Katie Frankowicz

The Daily Astorian

Yellow signs at trailheads in Ecola and Fort Stevens state parks feature a drawing of a cougar and a blank space to write the date whenever the animal is spotted.

Most years these spaces remain empty, but state wildlife managers say cougar populations appear to be increasing elsewhere along the Oregon Coast, raising questions about what is and what could become cougar country.

Original encaustic art by NW artist Gregory Bell (available$495 to $795).

Call now (503) 738-8899 for more details.

 

 

Q: What is encaustic, you ask?
A: Encaustic painting, also known as hot wax painting, involves using heated beeswax to which colored pigments are added. The liquid or paste is then applied to a surface—usually wood, though canvas and other materials are often used.

Encaustic painting was practiced by Greek artists as far back as the 5th century B.C. Encaustic had a variety of applications: for the painting of portraits and scenes of mythology on wood panels. The Greeks applied coatings of wax and pigment to weatherproof and decorate their ships. Mention is even made by Homer of the painted ships of the Greek warriors who fought at Troy.

 

Q: How to care for an encaustic work of art, you ask?
A: Occasionally, gently wipe dust off of your piece with a clean and lint free rag.