“Sunset at Tillamook Head” watercolor by Emily Milller

“A stormy winter sunset over Tillamook Head as seen from Seaside beach, on the northern Oregon coast. Brilliant oranges and pinks lit up the clouds and reflected in the waves for just a few minutes between rain showers. A low fog hanging over the headland created separation between the layers of trees. I set up to paint on a log near the high tide line, stopping only when the light faded and my paper was too wet to continue!”

 

 

“I have spent my life on the coast, and all my artwork has its roots in my love of the sea. I see the coast as a border between the known and unknown, amid constant cycles of change.” –Emily Miller

 

“Needles and the Haystack” watercolor by Emily Miller

“Two narrow sea stacks known as “The Needles” at Cannon Beach, next to Oregon’s iconic Haystack Rock. This was painted on a beautiful summer day, sitting on the steps leading down to the beach. The Needles are some of my favorite sea stacks on the Oregon coast!”

 

“Kites at Cannon Beach” watercolor by Emily Miller

“Colorful kites on a summer afternoon fly over Haystack Rock at Cannon Beach, on the northern Oregon coast.”

 

“Sea Stacks at Siletz Bay” watercolor by Emily Miller

“Wind-swept trees grow on a series of sea stacks known as “Four Brothers” in Siletz Bay, outside Lincoln City on Oregon’s central coast. The water was calm and shallow on this summer morning, when I set up in the warm sand to paint with a friend.”

 

 

“Cape Meares Lighthouse” watercolor by Emily Miller

“The tiny Cape Meares lighthouse is the smallest lighthouse in Oregon, but worked as a beacon visible for 21 miles out to sea from 1890 to 1963. Its unique octagonal tower sits on a high cliff on the northern Oregon coast near Tillamook. The lighthouse is accessible down a shady, forested path, with the tower and red lens framed by mossy trees.”

 

“Exploring the Oregon coast with my painting kit and camera is one of my greatest joys. Every visit creates a stronger bond with my favorite beaches and trails, beautiful in all weathers and seasons.” –Emily Miller

 

Q:  What are sea stacks, you ask?

A:  Sea stacks are blocks of erosion-resistant rock isolated from the land by sea. Sea stacks begin as part of a headland or sea cliff. Relentless pounding by waves erodes the softer, weaker parts of a rock first leaving harder, more resistant rock behind.

The Oregon coastline naturally has areas of rocky headlands alternating with sandy coves due to variation in the local rock types. As waves approach the shore, they are refracted nearly parallel to shore so that wave energy is concentrated on headlands. Rocky cliffs develop on the headlands and sand is deposited in the bays, forming beaches.

Sea stacks sit like giants half-submerged in the ocean, not far from shore. As if they were massive, mythological sentinels set with the mission to guard Oregon’s coast. They are indeed ancient – millions and millions of years old.   www.nature.nps.gov/geology

 

For more info, go to  www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com