Artists


Pears by Bill Baily.

Original watercolor.

 

Bill Baily has been painting for 56 years. He has studied under many well-known Northwest artists.

He has had 13 one man shows as well as being in many group shows. His work has been included in the annual Northwest Watercolor Society Show in Seattle, the Artists of Oregon Exhibit at the Portland Art Museum, the Western Federation of Watercolor Societies annual show and many of the Watercolor Society of Oregon biannual exhibits.

His work are included in the permanent collections of Sunriver Lodge and Condominiums, Georgia Pacific, Wells Fargo Bank, the Lloyd Corporation, Good Samaritan Hospital, Nabisco, Boise Cascade, Bank of America, Freightliner and the Allison Inn.

His subject matter is usually impressions of landscapes, seascapes, fruit and vegetable compositions and abstracts.

 

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside, Oregon

Opening reception for Perfect Pear (aka Perfect Pair), an exhibition through the month of May.

Regional artists were selected due to their art related to scale and perspective and the way things correlate and interact.

Featuring Oregon artists Bill Baily from Gearhart, Blue Bond from Seaside, Lynda Campbell from Seaside, Lisa Wiser from Lake Oswego, Patti Isaacs from Aloha, Jo Pomeroy-Crockett from Astoria and Marga Stanley from Astoria.

Introducing artist Kim Rose Adams from Astoria, who is a conceptual, landscape, portrait photographer and graphic designer.

Seaside/Gearhart naturalist and biologist, Neal Maine, will speak about the pairing ecology in the local habitat at 6: pm.

Artist Carolyn Macpherson will offer a Seaside Painting LIVE ™ episode.

LIVE music by Shirley 88.

 

Celebrating 14 years in 2018, the next Seaside First Saturday Art Walk, will be held on May 5, 5-7: pm. Visitors meet artists, see original art, sip wine or snag appetizers by favorite restaurants or personal chefs, view artist demonstrations and, oftentimes, enjoy live performances in music. The event is free and is all about seeing and selling art in the sponsoring businesses between Holladay and Broadway in the historic area of downtown Seaside.

 

 

 

The Mission of the Seaside First Saturday Art Walk is to provide an excellent cultural experience and to support regional talents in visual art, literature, music, theatre and dance for the benefit of our residents and visitors.

For more info go to http://www.facebook.com/ Seaside First Saturday Art Walk

 

“Ostrea” by Emily Miller.

A  large-scale sculpture inspired by the gnarled shells of oysters, the fluted ruffles of nudibranchs, and other beautiful and mysterious sea creatures. Sculpted with outdoor architectural stoneware ceramics. Weather-safe and water-tight. Recommended to protect from freezing. Signed by the artist.

 

 

But wait, there’s more.  See, there’s three! 

Ostrea I, Ostrea II and Ostrea III.

20″ to 30″ wide, each

 

 

Lookie here,  Emily Miller’s “Ostreas” have ocean inspired bottoms, as well.

 

Q: What is the meaning of the word “Ostrea”, you ask?

A: “Ostrea” is the Latin name / classification for oysters and the title of a set of large-scale sculptures I created, inspired by the gnarled shells of oysters, the fluted ruffles of nudibranchs, and other beautiful and mysterious sea creatures. The tactile contrast of smooth and rough surfaces is an ongoing theme in my artwork. I use these contrasts to explore ideas of inner and outer spaces, playful discovery, and delight in the unknown. Fun fact about the Ostrea: I like the rough, hidden underside as much as the top glazed surface! -Emily  Miller

 

 

Order from Chaos by Emily Miller

In addition, the 2018 rope basket project with a new palette of Pacific Ocean rope collected from Oregon, wilder and more eroded, weathered by months or years at sea. Cleaned, unraveled, and restitched, the colorful rope became a collection of unique baskets accented with local stones and other beach treasures.

Reclaimed fishing rope, 2018/ Mint Green basket

4.5″ high x 6″ diameter

Green and white fishing rope gathered from the Oregon coast and accented with a local beach stone.

“It begins with days spent hauling rope from the tide line in all weathers, connecting and collecting from other beach clean-up crews. A quick soak in water to loosen the sand, mud, and surface grime, then the long, meditative process of untangling knotted nests into their separate lengths. Each length slowly unwound by hand into its three segments, a second longer soak and scrub in hot soapy water, and a final rinse where the water runs clean. “Emily Miller

 

Fun fact:  Karynn Kozij, introduced as the 2017 Fairweather emerging artist with her Octopus ocean debris art, gifted Emily her recent beach debris.

 

Read what Eve Marx wrote about Karynn’s art: View from the Porch: Art from the ‘Octopus’s Garden’

Artist transforms marine debris/Date: 2017-08-18 Seaside Signal

Story The Daily Astorian | Signal News
http://www.dailyastorian.com/SS/news

The Daily Astorian | Signal News

http://www.dailyastorian.com/SS/news

 

 

Photo credit: Katie Frankowicz/ The Daily Astorian

Unlike plastic bottles or larger items, microplastics can be difficult to recycle and plague Clatsop County beachesAnd, so,  too, Neal Maine, Seaside naturalist, “re-gifted”  ocean debris to Emily Miller, artist. 

 

 

 

 

Your journey has uncovered the trouble the oceans are in, and drawn something beautiful from that trouble. It is a model for all of us, who each face our own perplexing tangle of strands and nets that we call “life.”   –M. Miller

 

 

“I have spent my life on the coast, and all my artwork has its roots in my love of the sea. I see the coast as a border between the known and unknown, amid constant cycles of change. My work explores these transition environments as a marker of our place within the larger network of natural systems. I believe that joyful exploration of the unknown creates a positive, active environment that enriches our relationships with ourselves, each other, and our world.  I am a lifelong artist with a passion for materials.”  —Emily Miller

c. Emily Miller

Oriental pear wood and “Melba’s” plum wood bowl by Daniel Harris.

Dated and signed. 10% off to veterans.” —Daniel Harris

 

Big leaf maple and cherry wood bowl with a decorative finial.

“So beautiful to create. You will just die when you.” –Daniel Harris, wood worker.

Reversible top has a battery operated LED candle. 

 

“Fellow wood worker and friend shared the idea to make the finial top with a dual purpose. Includes an extra battery”  —Daniel Harris

 

 

 

Just in! Little gem of wisdom. Original calligraphy by Diane Copenhaver.

 

But, wait!  See here!  More little gems of wisdom by Diane Copenhaver.

 

“Observing Botany” table scape by D. Fairweather, gallerist and  allied member A. S. I. D.,  featuring one of Diane Copenhaver’s little gems of wisdom.

 

 

 

“Observing Botany”  calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson.

 

Fairweather House & Gallery offers an exhibition between the study of botany and fine art.  Throughout April the “Observing Botany” exhibition offers original artwork in watercolor, graphite, colored pencil and pen-and-ink and the exploration of the many styles, forms and approaches unique to botanical illustration. Regional artists were on hand at the opening reception during the Seaside First Saturday Art Walk to answer questions, provide interesting facts or anecdotes and to demonstrate their art techniques.

 

 

 

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And, too, many of the dedicated artists traveled to the reception through high winds and sideways rain!

Indeed, an Art Walk evening is not a dress rehearsal… the gallery “proceeded as the way opened” (Amish saying) to  create an art academy evening for the artists and hostesses.

“US National Weather Service/ Apr. 7 at 10:55am: Strongest winds Saturday have been delayed, but are coming. Winds will increase Saturday reaching their peak by evening. Beaches and headlands likely to see gusts to 70 mph, coastal communities gusts to 60 mph. Exposed ridges along the Coast Range should have gusts to 60 mph. These strong winds did not  produce local power outages, falling trees and branches and power lines.”

 

 

Grace note to the artists:

Clearly, the compilation of the Fairweather exhibit, “Observing Botany”, was the work of a dedicated team of artists. and would have been impossible without your enthusiastic support and beautiful art. 

 

 

Many  enjoyed viewing your art and appreciated the opportunity to learn more about botany from fellow artists.

 

Observing Botany would have been impossible without enthusiastic support of the artists.

 

 

“Thank you, Denise, for all that you do.  Very, very nice photos from your photographer. The reception was better attended than I expected, considering the weather and the Gallery looked stunning!”  –Penelope Culbertson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Artist Mike Mason is holding “Allium onion. “
 The Allium or “onion blossom,” grows from a single bulb. Representing: unity, humility, and patience it kindly rules over these ancient ferns. Ferns are fascinators with magical powers of invisibility. They are said to assist in seeing into the future as well as facilitating eternal youthfulness.
“Love In The Mist” by Mike Mason.
Do not be tricked by her sharp presentation. Nigella Damascena or “Love In The Mist,” is a soft plant that says “Kiss me!” Historically evoking images of “The Bride,” with her hair down as a sign of purity. A concept reinforced in this image by the foundation of purity and love associated with the white rose petals on which they are placed. Printed on metal.
“Iris” by Mike Mason.
A family of friendly tiny purple Japanese Iris share their message of Purity. With Respect, Wisdom and Valor these flowers faithfully transport you to the glowing beyond. A place filled with the Joy, Optimism, and Friendship promised by the yellow Rose.
 
“Calla Lilies” by Mike Mason.
This world created by Peony petals offer an environment teaming with romance. It sings about prosperity and good fortune and is such an honorable place for a grouping of faithful, elegant and mysterious black Calla Lilies to dance.


Mike Mason, artist, spoke about his pressed flower art and demonstrated his art during the opening reception for Observing Botany at the Fairweather House and Gallery for April Seaside First Saturday Art Walk.

 

“My art is created with “nature’s paint brush.” Using dried and pressed flower and plant product to create my “brushstrokes.” Each fragile petal is glued and perfectly placed in collage style. I have the original art photographed to capture the color that only occurs in Nature.”

“Butterfly Bush”  by Lori Bedard

Most people admire glass and see its intrinsic qualities and then others, like Lori Bedard, work to bring about a beauty only imagined. By seeking to bring imagination melded with a combination of techniques, she often wanders into areas not focused on by the mainstream. Offering a unique study or a twisted perspective of art glass creations.

 

“Hidden Garden” by Lori Bedard

About the artist:

Born and raised in Oregon, nature and the environment have always been at the forefront for this Portlander. Moving and living in Hawaii for five years brought a love for the sea and ocean life, and traveling, as a military wife for sixteen years, throughout the U.S. and abroad instilled a love and respect for life and the earth. Lori earned an undergraduate degree in business, an associates in accounting and minored in art. This unusual left and right brain function combined with life experiences has emerged as art based in cold and hot glass disciplines with functionality and solid engineering.

 

Back in Oregon for the last 25 years with her husband of 37 years, glass has been a primary focus. Lori  Bedard owned, operated, and taught art glass in her Canby glass store for over 13 years. During this time, custom residential commissions were a high percentage of the work. Offering custom design and quality construction to clients throughout the west. In 07’, the business was closed and moved to a home studio (or rather, barn). For the past ten years, Lori has been free to experiment and create the unconventional in addition to servicing her business and residential clients. Her work has been viewed in a dozen galleries and shops throughout the state as well as fine art shows. Most recent, a co-op gallery on the coast in which she also curated about 3000sf and 30+ artists.

 

With thousands of square feet of glass, a few hundred pounds of frit, numerous supplies, and the potential for creativity is boundless.  Factor in skill, experience, and knowledge and you have a diverse, beautiful, and bountiful body of work offered through Lori Bedard.

 

 

 

 

 

“Nature is beauty sublime. To use the botanical as a subject for art, invokes memories of that beauty and how it inspires each of us. As an artist, if we incite that reaction with each view; we were successful.”  –-Lori Bedard

 

Q: How does the artist create, you ask?

A:  In creating Dragonfly Marsh:

 

The center piece is a fuse glass base. The dragonfly and leaves are casted separately with fine frit and then fired onto the glass base. The swirled rods are slumped into a wave shape and then fired on the base at the same time as the frit castings. The border is made of Murano glass rods above and below, the sides are leaded glass nuggets (flat on the back). The outer border is beveled glass with 14g tinned copper wire accents. This open work style I refer to as cut work glass and I believe is unique to me as an artist. –-Lori Bedard

 

A: In creating Dragonfly Meadow:

After obtaining some odd shaped beveled glass pieces, I developed this design. The dragonfly is stained glass with a lead cast body painted with an alcohol based metal paint. The rocks are polished agate and sardonyx slices. The branches are copper tubing with a mix of 12 and 14g tinned copper. The leaves are made from adventurine green Bullseye glass with glass nuggets for the seed pods. The entire piece hangs from a heavy gauge brass spinner, allowing it to turn for east viewing.  —Lori Bedard

 

Lori Bedard spoke during the opening reception for Observing Botany at the Fairweather House and Gallery for the  April Seaside First Saturday Art Walk, as well as demonstrated the art of fused glass.  Photo collage by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

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