Agnes Field



Pastel by Kathy Moberg

 

 

What a journey it has been! I have painted for fifty years now and each painting is still a new adventure…a mystery to be solved. My work evolves in layers of texture and color. Sometimes I paint from life or from a series of sketches or photos letting my imagination take hold from there.

A specific style is not something I worked to develop but came quite naturally. I have a light touch and rather loose stroke. My mantra is, ‘Every stroke affects every other stroke, every line affects every other line, every color affects every other color’. I approach painting from a more abstract, broader perspective, and work the entire canvas at once rather than small areas at a time. The first layer is usually painted in watercolor using the compliment in the following layers of pastel, often letting the watercolor show through to build continuity throughout the work.

 

One of my favorite quotes by Marc Chagall is “If I create from the heart everything works: if from the head, almost nothing works.”

Since the mid 80’s I have been painting with a community of women artists. Some women have left our group, and others have continued through the years, opening their arms and hearts to newcomers. In turn, they instill new and fresh ideas. We share our lives, our hopes, our aspirations…and our art. Painting connects us. These women sustain my art. My inspiration is enhanced by their physical presence…coming together to paint. Their mentoring spirit, their tenacity and perseverance gives me the boost I need to press on. This spiritual presence carries me through the slumps and the moments of self-doubt.

These women create a momentum for me. They offer themselves to the nurturing of art, and in so doing enrich my life.   Kathy Moberg

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery
612 Broadway Street
Seaside, Oregon

 

Exploring New Surfaces, an exhibition curated by Agnes Field, Astoria based artist with a Master’s Degree in Studio Fine Art from New York University, through October 31st.

Artist, curator Agnes Field

 

“The works included in this exhibit use either new materials or methods and techniques to amplify the meaning in the content of their art. Adding or embedding new materials to the surface creates surprise, and occasionally, deeper interpretation and understanding of the subject.” –Agnes Field

 

 

October  exhibit includes Leah Kohlenberg, Kathy Moberg and Carmela Newstead.

 

 

Agnes Field discusses the art of Linda Moberg during the opening reception of “Exploring New Surfaces” at Faiweather’s.

For more about the curator, please go to artists tab Agnes Field  http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Display of Kathy Moberg’s art.

Photo collage by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

 

 

Close up detail of the oil pastel art by Kathy Moberg.

 

 

“Cauldron” by Leah Kohlenberg

 

Leah Kohlenberg,  artist statement:

I have been drawing and painting for 18 years, but the work you see today is entirely new for me.

These pastels and oil paintings are inspired by the Oregon coast, but the colors are wild and bright (sometimes wacky) and the land forms are intentionally abstract. This is to allow some of the raw brushwork and initial power that comes from an artistic first impression. It’s also an attempt to share the more vibrantly colorful world that’s in my head onto the canvas.

I started painting in my 30s, so have always had a sense of being “behind” – there were people who’d been doing art much longer than me, who knew more about the craft than I, who were way better artists than I. As I practiced my skills, I also did a lot of painting over my first attempts until I made the work “correct.”

My lack of confidence resulted in a stuttering “over-painting” that could lose the initial rawness and beauty of the initial strokes. I sometimes missed what I had created in the first pass, and at the same time, I didn’t trust it.

Now 18 years later, this series is an attempt to trust and honor that first pass. You are the first people to see these works. They have all been made this year, with this venue in mind. Many thanks for being the number one audience.

 

October 2018

Exploring New Surfaces

Fairweather House and Gallery
612 Broadway Street
Seaside, Oregon

 

Exploring New Surfaces, an exhibition curated by Agnes Field, Astoria based artist with a Master’s Degree in Studio Fine Art from New York University through October 31st.

 

Artist, curator Agnes Field

 

“The works included in this exhibit use either new materials or methods and techniques to amplify the meaning in the content of their art. Adding or embedding new materials to the surface creates surprise, and occasionally, deeper interpretation and understanding of the subject.” –Agnes Field

 

The October 2018 exhibit includes Leah Kohlenberg and Kathy Moberg and Carmela Newstead.

“I have been drawing and painting for 18 years, but the work you will see for Exploring New Surfaces is entirely new for me. These pastels and oil paintings are inspired by the Oregon coast, but the colors are wild and bright (sometimes wacky) and the land forms are intentionally abstract. This is to allow some of the raw brushwork and initial power that comes from an artistic first impression. It’s also an attempt to share the more vibrantly colorful world that’s in my head onto the canvas. Art Walk visitors will be the first people to see these works. They have all been made this year, with this venue in mind. Many thanks for being the number one audience.” Leah Kohlenberg

For more about the curator, please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/  artists/  Agnes Field

 

The art of Leah Kohlenberg on display.

 

Close up of the art by Leah Kohlenberg

 

Reprinting ART ON article/ Oct 18  hipfishmonthly.com

Exploring New Surface

Leah Kohlenberg at Fairweather

Review

“The work inspired by the Oregon coast artist uses raw brush work and unexpected colors to focus on the initial power that comes from the first artistic impressions.  An experienced painter for over 18 years  Kohlenberg also teaches drawing to many local professionals.”

Agnes Field II

Here is the work on paper and other pieces for the exhibit opening May 6. I have one slightly larger on panel…similar image and color. –Agnes Field

Artist Statement:

“This work is assembled from my surrounding using ephemeral and commonly accessible materials, such as styrofoam, plastic, cardboard, wood and fabric. Tied to the contemporary legacy of Arte Povera, the work attempts to create intrinsic objects that minimize the boundary between everyday experience and the commercialization of formal practice.” –AgF

For more about the artist please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Agnes Field

Q: What is the art movement called, Arte Povera, you ask?
A: Arte Povera means literally ‘poor art’ but the word poor here refers to the movement’s signature exploration of a wide range of materials beyond the traditional ones of oil paint on canvas, bronze, or carved marble. Materials used by the artists included soil, rags and twigs. In using such throwaway materials they aimed to challenge and disrupt the values of the commercialised contemporary gallery system.

For more info about Arte Povera go to:

http://www.visual-arts-cork.com/history-of-art/arte-povera.htm
https://news.artnet.com/market/an-introduction-to-arte-povera-

Fairweather House and Gallery
Seaside First Saturday Art Walk
May 6th, 5-7: pm

Opening reception for HELLO…BEAVER TALES!

New original work by Fairweather resident artists Paul Brent, Mike Brown, Agnes Field, Mike Brown, Jo Pomeroy Crockett, PhD., and Neal Maine, as well as selected NW artists.

Beaver, our beloved state animal, is woefully misunderstood and blamed for dam building, flooding and munching on plants. In fact, Oregon beaver creates wetlands, habitat for salmon and create pools that keep water clean and moderate fluctuations in water flow.

They are nature’s hydrologists. There is a slow but growing appreciation and recognition of the positive benefits that beaver play in Oregon. It is time for more Oregonians to know about and celebrate our state mammal. Art exhibits are a great way to raise the profile of beaver, wetlands and Oregon artists.
The goal of the exhibition is to recognize the aesthetic and ecological significance our state animal plays in the creation and maintenance of wetland habitats.

Speaker guest speaker at Fairweather’s BEAVER TALES will be Katie Voelke, executive director of the North Coast Land Conservancy.

NCLC is a nonprofit based in Seaside, working toward a Oregon Coast where healthy communities of people, plants and wildlife all thrive.

Please go to http://www.NCLC.org for more information about the land trust.

Katie Voelke grew up in Sacramento and earned a bachelor’s degree in biology at the University of California, Santa Cruz. She worked as a field biologist for the U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife before joining NCLC as its first stewardship director in 2005; three years later, she became its second executive director.

She and her husband, Scott Kirby, are the parents of three boys. They live in Nehalem.

Seaside/ Gearhart nature photographer Neal Maine, co-founder of NCLC, North Coast Land Conservancy, will be available to meet and greet visiting artists, guests and art patrons.

Please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/… Neal Maine to view a catalog of images available. Proceeds in support of NCLC.

Seaside First Saturday Art Walk hostesses will assist with photo ops, lite bites, and beverages.

Q: What is an  Art Walk, you ask?
A: Residents and visitors alike enjoy an evening of community and culture as various art venues within walking distance of each other host art exhibits, between 5-7 p.m. with the Seaside First Saturday Art Walk. The Art Walk, celebrating 13 years in 2017, is in the historic Gilbert Block Building. It is free and open to the public. Motto: “Those that live for the arts, support the arts.”

FUN FACT:
The Gilbert District, established in 1914, celebrated 100 years of rich history and timeless tradition in 2014. The historic district was awarded the 2004 Oregon Main Street Downtown Gateway Award.

The area is now home to shops, restaurants, galleries and boutiques. Dedicated parking for the district is located one block West off the Pacific Coast Highway 101, on the corner of Holladay and Broadway. Next Art Walk is May 6th, 2017.

For more about the Art Walk, please go to http://www.facebook.com/SeasideFirstSaturdayArtWalk.

Named the “state animal” in 1969, the American beaver builds the dams and wetlands that serve as habitat for Oregon salmon, steelhead, birds, amphibians and insects. Beavers are nature’s hydrologists, “Beaver Tales: A Celebration of Beaver Art” curator Sara Vickerman … click of the following link to read the entire front page article by Eve Marz, reporter for the Seaside Signal …

Source: From near extinction to a place in art

For more info the participating Fairweather  artists, please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com …artists … Paul Brent, Mike Brown, Agnes Field, Jo Pomeroy Crockett and  Neal Maine.

Save the date and time.

BEAVER TALES, a celebration of art.

May 6th, 5-7:pm in the historic Gilbert District Block of downtown Seaside

For more info about the Art Walk, please go to http://www.facebook.com/SeasideFirstSaturdayArtWalk

SAVE THE DATE AND TIME!

http://www.NCLCtrust.org
Listening to the Land: Dam, Beaver! Dam!
Wednesday, April 19
6 to 8 pm
Seaside Public Library

And, too, a lot more info about Beavers and all the good things they do for us:

Dr. Stephen Ramsey, from the OSU Center for Genome Research & Biocomputing (the Center has recently announced the completion of its sequencing of the beaver genome, so this is very well timed – http://registerguard.com/rg/news/local/35185225-75/oregon-state-university-researchers-find-benny-the-beaver-fills-big-genes.html.csp)

Frances Backhouse will offer a talk based on her research and writing that appeared in her award-winning book, Once They Were Hats: In Search of the Mighty Beaver. At Beach Books on May 6th at 1:pm. http://www.backhouse.ca/books/once-they-were-hats-in-search-of-the-mighty-beaver/.

The Wetlands Conservancy has posted information on the Beaver Tales art project. The link is below. Feel free to share it with your friends and contacts.
http://wetlandsconservancy.org/stewardship/beaver-tales

http://wetlandsconservancy.org/stewardship/beaver-tales/beaver-inspiration

https://northernwoodlands.org/discoveries/pathways-to-ponds

Here’s a link to an excellent short video, with great aerial depiction of the changes that beaver dams bring to meadows . . .
http://www.animalplanet.com/tv-shows/other/videos/fooled-by-nature-beaver-dams

And for more inspiration, a video of beaver swimming on U-Tube. .https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9cwu_Wu5ONI

CBC News Posted: Apr 02, 2017Great parenting: animals that care for their young in ‘amazing’ ways BEAVERS…

Some parents are a little more dedicated than others, according to wildlife expert Frank Ritcey. Ritcey says beavers take a more paws-on approach to raising their young. They give birth inside their lodges, where kits will stay until they’re old enough to start eating solid food.

“Once they’re old enough to venture forth, they travel about with the parent to learn how to become a beaver. [Kits] follow the adult around and mimic the adults actions,” said Ritcey.

“It’s so cute to watch — but it’s also very important as the young have to learn a whole set of skills like using the right trees to fall and how to build dams and lodges, and in general — how to be as busy as a beaver should be.”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_23vuRU2Ews

 

While nothing can compare to the real beaver it is great to see more comprehensive research about the positive impacts of beaver dams.

http://www.ktvz.com/…/osu-cascades-students-scien…/394113930

 

 

 

And, too, from @MightyBeaver
This page features updates on what’s happening in the beaver world and news about the book.

http://www.cbc.ca/…/canada/hamilton/trapped-beaver-1.4086804

A new addition to the beaver’s resumé — cattle wrangler!
http://www.cbc.ca/…/…/sask-ranchers-stunned-beaver-1.4073018

Beavers get a shout-out for their great parenting skills (especially their “paws-on approach to raising their young”) in this CBC News story. http://www.cbc.ca/…/great-parenting-4-animals-that-care-for…
A successful rescue of a wandering young beaver in London, Ontario.
http://www.thelondoner.ca/…/salthavens-patient-of-the-week-…
What does it mean to coexist with beavers and how do we do that? This short video offers good answers to both questions. https://vimeo.com/96040603

Source: Beaver Tales arriving to the historic Gilbert District for an Art Walk! May 6th.

As 2016 ends, we take a moment to reflect on the past. 

We  look forward to the future.

We honor those who have demonstrated the transformative power of art.

Top ten 2016  Fairweather Seaside First Saturday Art Walk moments.

Enjoy!  Thank you!!!

 

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“Ultimately, the success of an image being selected a top ten moment is finding a personalized, very local, one-on-one connection that brings back a Faiweather House and Gallery feeling. It’s all about building that great experience, which leads to a place that is loved, which leads to building a great community.”–Denise Fairweather, gallerist.

For more information about the artists and images please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com and
http://www.facebook.com/lindafentonmendenhallphotography

Upcoming 2017 Fairweather House and Gallery Seaside First Saturday Art Walk dates.

Feb 4th

Mar 4th

Apr 1st

May 6th

Jun 3rd

Jul 1st

Aug 5th

Sep 2nd

Oct 7th

Nov 4th

Dec 2nd

Residents and visitors alike enjoy an evening of community and culture as various art venues within walking distance of each other host art exhibits and refreshments, between 5-7 p.m. with the Seaside First Saturday Art Walk.

The art walk, celebrating 13 years in 2017, is in the historic Gilbert District. The Gilbert District, established in 1914, celebrated 100 years of rich history and timeless tradition in 2014. Awarded the 2004 Oregon Main Street Downtown Gateway Award, the area is now home to shops, restaurants, galleries and boutiques. Dedicated parking is located one block West off the Pacific Coast Highway 101, on the corner of Holladay and Broadway.

Motto: “Those that live for the arts, support the arts.” All rights reserved.

For more information please visit http://www.facebook.com/Seaside First Saturday Art Walk

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Black Hole Sun/ Monotype 11″x15″/ Sarah Lippold

Sarah Lippold is intrigued and challenged with replicating imagery without the use of technology. She prints and stencils with just about any material that can be found and used. She considers the images colorful snapshots of memory from the world around her. She began studying printmaking at Clatsop Community College in 2004 and has taken many printmaking workshops with many local and regional printmakers. She currently teaches art at the Fire Mountain School and The Tamata School.

 

“Regionalism is, at best, a rooted jumping off place that can bring a fresh eye and a sense of special observation to that which we see every day. The work in this exhibit uses material and images outside usual ways to urge viewers to areas beyond expected vision. The use of collage, found materials, fabric and light, add to the pattern and texture of the surface, as well as to the meaning. The work pushes against the usual process, not for novelty, but for heightened meaning”.–Agnes Field.

 

Trepassers by Don Frank

Trepassers by Don Frank


Don Frank a professional photographer living on the Oregon Coast, creates varied colorful imagery. His work is found in many galleries and collections across the country, including the Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago and the Center for Fine Art Photography in Colorado. Many photographers simply observe. Don likes to participate.

Don Frank engaging friends and patrons at the opening reception for Against the Current.

How to Paint a Sunset

How to Paint a Sunset/Agnes Field/ Mixed Media: Paint, plaster, wood and collage/ 36″x48″

 

Agnes Field, a native Oregonian, worked in Italy, Finland, was awarded several residencies and completed her graduate work at New York University. She produces mixed media paintings assembled from her surroundings commonly accessible materials, such as cardboard, wood and fabric. The artwork attempts to create intrinsic objects that minimize the boundary between everyday experience and the commercialization of products.

 

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Sarah Lippold lectures about her print making art at the opening reception for Against the Current in Sept. 2016.

 “I am intrigued and challenged with replicating imagery without the use of technology.  The printing press is my copy machine, rollers add the color and stencils are made with just about any material you can imagine.  For these stencils an image is formed.  I present recognizable images (here in wood grain) always with a dreamy landscape (against the current).  This represents what I see every day around me.  Colors change throughout the day, shadows come and go.  My prints offer you a snapshot of my memory.” —Sarah Lippold

 

Against the Current opening reception.

Agnes Field, curator, opens the exhibit Against the Current, with an art lecture.

Agnes Field, artist/curator, lectures during the opening reception of “Against the Current”, an exhibition,  at Fairweather’s.

“Design and representation anchor art in the known world.  Draw a line horizontally across a blank canvas and we see a horizon and the beginning of a landscape. We complete the images because of our perceptual conditioning and try to make images into something we recognize–part of our known universe.  Abstract art seeks the unknown and stretches the perception of the known world.” —Agnes Field

Against the Grain through September   2016.

For more information about the gallery please visit http://www.faiweatherhouseandgallery.com.

For more info please visit www.facebook.com/SeasideFirstSaturdayArtWalk

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