Christine Trexel


Jewelry by Mary Truhler, watercolor abstracts by Lieta Gratteri, photographs by Neal Maine, triptych landscape by Toni Avery, hydrangea oil by Melissa Jander, floral still life by Emily Schultz McNeil, pen and ink portrait by Vanessa K. Stokes, and pottery by Marcia Hudson.
Heron oil painting by Paul Brent, wood sculptures by Martin Conley, landscape oil by Karen Doyle, silk and cotton ribbons by the yard, hardbound coastal cookbook, fused glass platter by Bob Lecari, wood turned bowls by Daniel Harris, bamboo and mahogany wood runner, pottery by Marilyn Cohn, jewelry by Michelle Shigemasa, raw edge trestle table, down filled silk throw pillows, and milk painted wood lyre table.
Mixed media art by Jan Rimerman, encaustic art by Emily Miller, handpainted stemware by Gretha Lindwood, cranes by Peggy Evans, fused glass bowl by Bob Lecari, ocean ghost rope baskets by Emily Miller, willow twig table by Otis, mouth blown art glass, and selected plated glass frames.
Art by Karen Doyle, cards by Dorota Haber-Lehigh, assemblage vase by Jeanne Walker, calligraphy art by Penelope Culbertson, tile earrings by Kris Zorko, silk textile wall hanging by Cicely Gilman, fused glass art platter by Bob Heath, hand turned wood candlestick, and verdigris bronze stand.

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside

Nature’s Grace on exhibition through April 25

“Truly, artists lose themselves in their work revealing the world that exists in the  imagination, transcending grace  through the muse of nature.” FH&G

Displays by KD Fairweather, allied member A.S.I.D., American Society of Interior Designers

Photographs by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall for Fairweather House and Gallery

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands.

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Watercolor by Mary Burgess, art glass, masks by Cherry Harris, and visiting art patron Jessica, beautifully dressed for the Fairweather Gallery opening reception for Nature’s Grace.

Oceanscape by Toni Avery, watercolor by Mary Burgess, fish platter by Sandy Visse, bamboo linen masks by Beth Fulton, jewelry by Mary Truhler, fused glass platter by Carolyn Myers Lindberg, and diachronic glass rectangle plate by Christine Downs.

One-of-a-kind handmade blue paper triangle box by Christine Trexel.

Triangle bow with four handmade boxes within accented with seed pearls pulls by NW paper artist Christine Trexel.

Indeed, blue signifies life-giving air and often signifies hope and courage.

“Spring 2021” encaustic composition art by Peg Wells.

 Wells, a retired nurse, remains consistent with hopeful art emerging from this time of change.

“We’ve all gone inside to reflect and heal, but after this period of isolation, there was always time to create comforting and healing art. Everyone is uneasy, all over the globe, but art can help us process the fear. Art also has the power to transform. Artists let their creativity flow, as a tool for understanding and courage.”

 

 

Aquamarine and turquoise gemstone necklace by jewelry designer Mary Truhler.

 

“Some people think that the blue colors of the gemstones symbolize the sky and sea, and that this means truth, sincerity and inspiration.”

 

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

“Spring work is going on with joyful enthusiasm.” — John Muir

 

 

“There is the wilderness of innocence. It is  a reminder of all that: the beauty, the power of nature, the fragility of nature and the fragility of our nature and our own being. Nature will always be here.”   Carol Jazzar

 

Oil paintings by Leo Brew, rice paper art by Zifen Qian, glass by Christine Downs, burl wood frames, and speciality wood photo frames.

 

Snowy owl photo by Neal Maine, watercolor by Don Nisbett, handmade box by Christine Trexel, mouth blown art glass, gift cards by Dorota Haber-Lehigh, carved wood candlesticks, and knitted cloches by Linda Olson.

 

Encaustic art by Claudia Fuenzalida Johns, wood  bowl and tops  by Tom Willing, hand woven wire baskets, glass by Monet Rubin,  hand sewn COVID masks by Robin Montero (with the ‘nosey-bendy- thingy’), spooled velvet ribbon, and hand decorated ornaments(fa-la-la is coming).

Watercolor bird blocks by Lieta Gratteri, seed pearl box by Gayle H. Seely, framed watercolor by Mary Burgess, and floral by Mini’s Flower’s.

 

Graphite on yupo by Patricia Clark-Finley, silk and down accent pillows, and mouth blown art glass vessels.

 

Glass by Monet Rubin, sand blasted stemware by Rox Heath, abstract mirror by Neal Small, and hammered nickel candlesticks.

 

 

Impasto oils by Tedd Chilless, watercolors by Lieta Gratteri and drawings by Lori Wallace-Lloyd.

 P-s-s-t… can you spot the first hint in the photo above for ALL THAT GLITTERS, Fairweather’s upcoming December exhibition?

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside, Oregon

 WILD BEAUTY Exhibition and Art Sale

Through Nov. 24th

Featuring NW artists Leopoldine “LEO” Brew, Agnes Field, Patricia Clark-Finley, Dorota Haber-Leligh, Ron Nicolaides, Neal Maine, Jan Rimerman, and Vanessa K. Stokes, among others.

The strength of WILD BEAUTY lies in the detailed and multivariate perspectives each artist brings showing us a different viewpoint.

They all use WILD BEAUTY as the theme of their work but they use different techniques and the way they see it is distinctively unique.

 

The Fairweather’s WILD BEAUTY exhibition is finely nuanced — in the selection of works, their judicious placement and the mastery of composition and diverse spot lighting.” —KR

 

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands.

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Displays by D. Fairweather, gallerist/ allied member A.S.I.D., American Society of Interior Designers. Photos by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

 Iridescent glass plate by Carolyn Meyers Lindberg

“The glass changes according to the angle from which it is viewed with a source of light. The iridescence is a deliberate effect achieved by the introduction of metallic substances into the glass.”

Handmade box with handmade paper by Christine Trexel

Christine Trexel  makes special boxes. “It is intensive hand work. And, I like the piece to have a function.”  From her days helping those with neurological deficits back to health as a former occupational therapist, Christine puts her heart and soul into her work.

And, now, to see the story of a tree requires stillness beside near beauty…

“Part art, part science, and all heart. We are blessed to have Neal Maine as a gifted interpreter.”

“Designed by Nature” black and white photograph by Neal Maine.

An ancient crab apple tree on the North Coast by Neal Maine

30″ x 22″ Framed, matted, and signed.

$395.

Available exclusively at Fairweather’s.

When Neal Maine looks at a tree, what he sees isn’t just a static object but a story—an adventure story, one full of unexpected plot twists and plenty of character development. Take this crab apple tree growing in NCLC’s Neacoxie Forest Habitat Reserve near Seaside, for example.

“It could be just a pretty picture,” he says, “but trees are products of their life histories. They have all these capacities for change and adaptation. So when you look at a tree like this, you’re saying, Thank you, wind, thank you, shade’—all these forces that made the tree like that.”

It’s not hard to see trees as stories, Neal says. “You just have to get tuned into in a different way of seeing than you might normally walk around with in a forest.”

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

LIGHT and SHADOWS Fairweather’s October Art Sale and Show featuring artists Paul Brent, Diane Copenhaver, Linda Fenton-Mendenhall, Neal Maine, Emily Miller, Diana Nadal, and Vanessa K. Stokes.

On exhibit through Oct. 31st

Bringing together works by very different artists – in terms of age, geography, and medium – this exhibition draws the viewer’s attention to the beauty of the understated, giving the viewer a chance to focus on texture.

Renewing Fairweather’s pledge to forward the proceeds from Neal Maine’s art in support of NCLC, North Coast Land Conservancy.

 Go to nclctrust.org for more information

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands.

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

 

 

Christine Trexel  makes special boxes. “It is intensive hand work. And, I like the piece to have a function.”  From her days helping those with neurological deficits back to health as a former occupational therapist, Christine puts her heart and soul into her work.

 

 

 

 

In addition, Christine makes papers from natural fibers. From her yard she uses plants like artichoke, lemon grass, and iris leaves. Christine’s lifetime of service to others has not stopped during the pandemic. She shares her art with others. Getting in touch with other people, with other artists is what she finds rewarding. Christine also repairs books that have been damaged or are worn from use.

 

 

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Lyn Cohn is a snowbird, a summertime resident on the Oregon coast who migrates to another state during the wintertime.  She creates lovely, functional, and unique  bowls on her potter’s wheel and carves a distinctive marker’s mark with a winking face. Wheel thrown pottery is her obsession.

 

 

 

 

Strike off showing artist trademark

 

“Fabric, needle, and thread became a part of my experience at an early age. Mother gave me a needle and thread of my own when I was about five and I embroidered my first tea towel. The desire to embellish is inherent in me. Art is everywhere. With a studio filled with machines and fabrics which had been gathered over the years is my creative haven now. I design quilts, utility items and, dare I say, art work, without restraint. Dreams keep me motivated.”

Textile artist Betty Huffman

 

 

 

 

 

Why is working with your hands good, you ask?
They actually produce endorphins, reducing your stress and anxiety levels. Working with your hands is a way of improving your mental health. They’re also a great way to relieve stress, improve neuroplasticity, and work on your skills, concentration, and calmness.

 

 

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands.

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

Gardening in place 2020

 “A collage of my garden at the beach, ”  D. Fairweather, gallerist/ interior designer/  OSU master gardener

The breeze blows, things get dew on them, things flower; the sounds, the smells…gardening helped.

Photos by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall

 

March-15th – May 15th

Stay-at-home quarantine

“That’s me back there!. This plant is outrageous!  I cut 9 artichokes today.”  Christine Trexel, artist/ fellow gardener.

Comments to CT:

“Wow. I did not know the plants got that big. I have never grown them.”

“Never seen them growing before! They look so healthy!!!”
“You will have tasty eats during stay home time.”
“What!!!! I love artichokes! You are so lucky!”
“Cute posts on the garden, I may just have to try some recipes!” Christine Trexel
And, so, the stay-at-home order baked a lot of delicious artichoke dishes.
http://www.bonappetit.com › ingredient › artichoke

 

Gardening and cooking became an excellent way to fight stress and attention fatigue.

In quarantine, many of us were more alone than we’ve ever been, experiencing, for the first time, prolonged solitude.

Looking back. 

 

Follow up to the first edition from past five May exhibitions 2019-2014


Telling picture stories from past five May exhibitions @ Fairweather’s …

fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com › 2020/05/04

 

“Lost in the…” watercolor by Penelope Culbertson

 

MAY 2013

MAY 2012

 

MAY 2011

 

MAY 2010

 

MAY 2009

These days, when we are isolated from each other due to COVID 19, it seemed just as good a time as any to revisit some of the artistic events Fairweather House and Gallery has had over the past years.  So by request, we are revisiting severa; past May exhibitions, from the painting LIVE events to memorable performances by classical violinist  Kirstin Qian to former bright, bubbly visitors and hosteses.

 

Truly,  looking back marries itself to looking forward, in our world.

Fairweather House and Gallery shut its doors mid-March following the Governor’s order that nonessential retailers and services must be closed.

Fairweather’s  is currently operating by virtual and phone appointment.

Call us anytime at 503-738-4003, contact us through our website, and through social media.

Read more blog articles on the Fairweather Gallery website.

Enjoy a performance from a former Fairweather guest of honor.

Kirstin Qian has  performed at Fairweather’s several times.

 

“At a moment when our physical location is closed due to the health crisis, online viewing is offered as a primary means to present Northwest art and to connect with art enthusiasts,”  galleriest D. Fairweather.

We are stronger together.

Surely this challenge we are facing will come to an end.

Hopefully when it does Fairweather House and Gallery will still be here for you!

We promise you we will try our utmost see you on the other side of the pandemic.

Since 2007 we have had the privilege representing remarkable NW artists.

We are looking forward to reopening safely following official guidelines in protecting the health of our community.

Please read more about our gallery and our commitment to NW artists and products made by NW hands.

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Original watercolor by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, handmade spring column candles, mouthblown glass, hand turned wood candle sticks, pottery by Suzy Holland, mouth blown stemware by Rox Heath, vintage bird feeder and bird house, silk and chenille throw pillows.

Pastel by Gretha Lindwood, pair of whimsical artworks by Marga Stanley, mouth blown art glass, hand made potter vase, hand wired silk iris stem, hand beeded flowers, contemporary floral by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett and art cards by Leah Kohlenberg, glassware by Robin and Rox Heath.

Art by Toni Avery, handmade tea pot by Kate Carlye, hand-forged candle sticks, fused glass by Carolyn Lindberg and mouth blown art vase

Pottery by Suzy Holland and oil painting by Carmela Newstead.

Art by Leah Kohlenberg, textile art by Linda Olson..

Handmade birdie pillow by Cherry Jones Harris, feather motif handmade journal by Christine Trexel, mouth blown art glass, pottery and platters hand made by Maria Hudson.

Handmade glass by Bob Heath.

Handmade glass by Sandy and Bob Lercari.

 

 

Handmade glass by Christine Downs, fused glass by Sandy and Bob Lercari, urchin rocks by Kandy Schwartz, and ocean oil by Sandy and Bob Lercari.

Outdoor garden **folly filled with  cattail dyed green spheres and handmade moss decorative moss spheres.

 

**Q:  What is a garden folly, you ask?

A: A garden folly is usually considered a building or structure that is designed for decoration with no other purpose than to add a touch of whimsy or extravagance to the surrounding landscape. The term began as “a name for any costly structure considered to have shown folly in the builder” and was often named after the individual who commissioned or designed the project. The connotations of silliness or madness in this definition are in accord with the general meaning of the French word “folie”; however, another older meaning of this word is “delight.”

Photos by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

 

“This exhibit’s expectation lies in its possibility to present fresh, new perspectives, inspiration, experiences, reflection and even the possibility for transcendence in some way. Indeed, the meaning of “fresh start” is the beginning of a new period or step.  The North Coast land, truly, is in full springtime bloom for FRESH START, Fairweather’s March exhibition.”

Handmade paper box by Christine Trexel, chenille down filled decorative pillow, handmade sequined ornament, silk ribbon by the yard, hand dipped magenta dripless candles, hand decorated ornaments, mercury glass hurricane and for the December HUE exhibition art titled “Divine” by emerging artist Vanessa K. Stokes.

 

Magenta velvet and down filled decorative pillows, silk and linen shawls and oven proof pottery by Suzy Holland.

Selected silk, linen and wool shawls reduced 30% through Dec. 23.

Oregon Sunstone and Oregon myrtlewood earrings by Fred Lukens, wood bowl and tray by Tom Willing.

 

“Snowberry” watercolor with pen and ink by Dorota Haber-Lehigh, birdhouse by Marcia Hudson, fused glass by Christine Downs, fused glass tree and star ornament by Monet Rubin.

 

Close up detail of a unique, whimsical bird house, lovingly built and painted by hand by potter Marcia Hudson.

“Charming bird feeder for your feathered friends. Fit to adorn your garden throughout the year.  Special pricing: originally $295/ reduced to $195  through Dec. 23.”

 

At the beach, the winter garden is usually a peaceful sanctuary in hustle and bustle of the holiday season. However, this year the front yard has hosted a three week, up to 7 trucks a day repair crew with all sorts of ladders, multiple levels of scaffolding, and surely, miles of electrical cords. Discovering, at first, a simple indoor water feature/ or rather, a small leak…the issue eventually developed into an extensive time and materials on-going repair project. I had offered to park the car outside in order to allow the garage space for material and equipment storage, every plug hosted multiple portable tool charging devices. Seeing daylight on the western front of the house today (windows and doors were previously boarded up) and seeing cedar shingles on the exterior curved walls… the end is in sight. Thankful for the insurance company who has covered: Mt. St. Helens volcano eruption repair (we lived 14 miles away); boating death; 1996 Portland flooding issue; gallery destruction in a 2007 windstorm and this current matter. Thankful for the contractor who was referred, who pulled together a crew from his home building company (has built ten homes in the Reserve). “Basically, we have used all the tools and equipment to build a complete house other than the plumbing on this repair.”

I would highly recommend the contractor and his crew, as they have proven themselves knowledgeable and efficient in the task associated with this water search and destroy repair project. PM for contractor and insurance references.

“Pinecone” pen and ink art by Dorota Haber-Lehigh. Handmade shell tree and hand sewn silk and seed pearl pillow. New hammered copper, gold and silver earrings by Cher Flick for Joanie and ME.

From $24- $48.

Complementary gift wrapping.

 

“This collection of jewelry is inspired by Joanie’s fun yet classy style. The earrings and bracelets are simple in design, light weight and are made of mixed metal, including sterling silver, pewter, brass, gold filled, copper, gemstones and pearls. I live and handcraft all of the jewelry in Oregon. I received my Graduate Gemology degree from the Gemological Institute of America  and have many years of experience working with diamonds, gemstones and other boutique jewelry.  In memory of Joanie, my mother, I will be donating 10% of sales to OHSU Knight Cancer Institute.”  

Staging by Kathy Bowman.

Fun Facts:

Jewelry designer Cher FLick Kathy’s younger sister.

Kathy is the oldest of three sisters.

Kathy is Fairweather’s Director of Hospitality.

 

http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

Shortie I for A FINE LINE.

Mixed media art by Bill Baily, woven bamboo basket by Charles Schweigert, black and white gull art by Leah Brown, encaustic art by Peg Wells, pen and ink drawings by Waka Takahashi Brown, photo by Susan Romersa, pottery by Suzy Holland and photographs by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

Shortie II for A FINE LINE.

Pen and ink shell studies, oak leaf watercolor and grape painting by Paul Brent.

Shortie III for A FINE LINE.

Art by Jan Shield, platter by Teresa Weisman-Knightand semi-precious bracelets by Mary Bottita.

 

Shortie IV for A FINE LINE.

Pen, ink and wax art by Dorota Haber-Lehigh.

 

Shortie V for A FINE LINE.

Handmade books by Christine Trexel and calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson.

 

Shortie VI for A FINE LINE.

Fused glass by Mike Fox with handmade glass by Bob Heath and Christine Downs.

Shortie VII for A FINE LINE.

Hand painted sea urchin rocks, signed and dated, by Kandy Schwartz.

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

A FINE LINE

On view 

October 5-31

 

A FINE LINE”  an exhibition of representational and non-representational works of art. Working with different media the selected artists experiment with linear mark making in its widest sense. Each artist produced works inspired by places and spaces in the natural environment.

For more info please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Images by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

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