WaterSign Fiber Arts by Mariana Mace

For almost my entire life, I have been fascinated by using my hands to make things, to put materials together, to interconnect elements. Yarns, beads, fabric pieces, parts of plants – each small stitch, or row, or piece of fabric is much like every other, but, oh, how they combine to create endless variety!
Working with my hands connects me to family – to the aunt who taught me to knit, the parents who encouraged me to bead, the daughter who wound skeins and balls of yarn for my weaving, and the granddaughters who learn basketry from me. Hand work also connects me to artisans of other times and other cultures.

My academic background is in anthropology, Native American art history, and world textiles. I study the art and fine craft of many cultures in museums, books, and world markets. My goal is to respectfully use some of their ideas, materials and techniques in my own way, in my own work, creating new art from old traditions.

I enjoy collecting or creating the materials I use, going out in the woods to pull bark from cedar trees and grub in the dirt for spruce root or tules. The weaving that travels through my loom is inspired by my handspun or hand dyed yarns.  –Mariana Mace

 

 

 

Woven Fire Designs by Deb Curtis

I create baskets using traditional basketry materials combined with abalone shells. I link traditional basket materials with tapestry weaving, beading, stitching and surface design. By combining a variety of fiber techniques in one vessel that uses basketry materials I create “new” baskets. By blending colors and textures I change the character of the basket from only a functional vessel to a container that expresses a concept. Some of my latest work explores shape and uses beading and stitching with birch bark and creating wall pieces using a variety of fiber techniques. Currently I’m focusing on knitting basketry using materials that represent Northwest native tribes. I’ve been taught by Ed Carriere (Suquamish), Bruce Miller (Skokomish), Anna Jefferson (Lummi) and Dawn Walden (Ojibway).  –Deb Curtis

Fun facts:

Abalone shell is sacred to the Native Americans and is used in smudging ceremonies. These shells are up to 6″ long, just right for holding sage and other herbal leaves.

Lore: Abalone helps one shift to comprehend and really hear other viewpoints. In addition, it is used as a shamanic tool for cleansing & stabilizing energy.

Deb Curtis and Marianna Mace were juried into the 2017 BEAVER TALES ART SHOW and EXHIBITION.

 

To read the latest news  about the traveling  beaver exhibition, go to The Daily Astorian:

A celebration of beavers
Beaver Tales comes to Nehalem
Date: 2017-07-20
story

The Mighty Beaver

Beavers are back in Los Gatos Creek in Santa Clara County, California, for the first time since the mid-1800s. This spontaneous return is a fantastic affirmation for members of the South Bay Clean Creeks Coalition, who prepared the ground for this historic event.

http://abc7news.com/…/family-of-beavers-moves-to-l…/2264864/

 

And, too, a grace note received:

Thank you for your generous gift of $747.30.  Your donation will result in conserving more of Oregon’s wetlands. Thank you for all you did to make Beaver Takes happen on the North Coast.  I am so impressed and grateful for your vision, energy, gallery and the community you have created around art  and the environment.

Please visit http://www.wetlandsconservnacy.org to see how we’re using your donation to make a lasting difference.  Thank you.  We are happy to have you as a partner.  –Esther Lev, Executive Director, The  Wetlands Conservancy.