Emily Miller


#10. Seaside Painting LIVE ™ demonstrations.  At the easel is artist Carolyn Macpherson.

 

#9. Fourth annual harp petting zoo. Faiweather’s December Seaside First Saturday Art Walk.

 

#8.  Artist Emily Miller’s 100 Turtles project. Doing good works.

 

#7.  Shirley 88 performing LIVE on the Fairweather grand.

#6.  Celebrity artists Jorjett Strumme, Agnes Field and Barbara Rosbe Felisky lecturing.

 

#5.  Five rescued Fairweather greyhounds made an appearance in the gallery.

 

#4. Share and Share Alike exhibition.  Indeed, a  show with a personal backstory. Pictured with calligrapher Penelope Culbertson.

 

#3.  The Perfect Pair, Perfect Pare and Perfect Pear exhibition.  Jo-Pomeroy-Crockett, PhD., explains.

 

#2.  All the Neal Maine naturalist and habitat lectures at 6:pm during the Seaside First Saturday Art Walks.

 

#1.  Paul and Lana Jane Brent. Looking back and, surely, looking forward to 2019.

 

“Truly, it’s the people that offer the energy and talent that propels Fairweather House and Gallery.”

Please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com for more information.

 

Joanie, “the Bouncer”

“You must finish the wine before stepping out to the street”.

That’s a Seaside Wine Walk  rule.

 

“Best place to stand in line.”  Comment heard.

 

“Best wine ever and I am a wine connoisseur.”  Comment heard.

Marlene Grant pouring.  

Parrett Mountain Cellars

 

May 2018 Wine Walk. Just minutes before “Shirley 88 and the Boys”  started playing LIVE music.

 

A group of mermaids arrived complete with a “Mermaid Security” person.

 

November Wine Walk.

 

Lovely start to the  2018 November Wine Walk evening.

November 2018.

Photo by Cathy Tippin.

 

LIVE music performed by Larry Allred on percussion, Ray Coffy on sax & flute and Dan Golden on classical guitar.

November 2018.

Photo by Cathy Tippin.

 

 

Dennis Grant pouring.  

Parrett Mountain Cellars

November 2018.

Photo by Cathy Tippin.

 

November 2018

Dennis Grant pouring  

Joan assisting Parrett Mountain Cellars

Denise visiting

Photo by Cathy Tippin

 

 

Artists who created gorgeous original art for the Seaside Wine Walk at Fairweather’s:  wine bottle still life by Barbara Rosbe Felisky  (two oil paintings on canvas),  framed watercolor by Emily Miller and watercolor cluster of grapes by Paul Brent.   Photo by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

 

Take a note

2019

Spring Downtown Wine Walk

Fall Downtown Wine Walk

Wine Walks are when Seaside opens its doors – and its bottles – to welcome wine enthusiasts during two wine tasting events. More than twenty participating wineries sell unopened bottles, allowing visitors to take home their favorite new find. Most of the wineries charge a small tasting fee, making it an inexpensive way to experience new wines and also see what downtown Seaside has to offer. The event also includes live music in several venues, complimentary appetizers, and a prize drawing for future Wine Walks.

director@seasidedowntown.com

http://www.seasidedowntown.com

For more details contact the Seaside Downtown Development Association (SDDA) at (503) 717-1914

 


 Abstract watercolors by Donna Sanson, Oregon  myrtlewood cribbage board, segmented vase and nautilus sculptures by Mike Brown.

Crafted by NW hands.

Folded book art by Mary Boitta, en caustic art (aptly titled “Remembering Autumn”) by Peg Wells, origami by Peggy Evans, leather work by Luans Leathers, en caustic crows by Kathryn Delany and hand painted tiles by Sandy Applegate.

Abstracts by Diane Copenhaver and glass art by Bob Heath.

 


Handmade curly willow, mouth blown glass,  hand-made book and box by Christine Trexel.

Coral glass by Rinee Merritt, glass platters by Sandy and Bob Lecari and plein air oil by Lisa Wiser.

 

En caustic  art, ocean debris baskets, sea urchin bowls, moon platter by Emily Miller, mixed media stone art by Peggy Stein, abstract drip by Kimberly Reed and oil paintings by Sharon Kathleen Johnson.

 


Abstract miniatures by Tanya Gardner.

 

Calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson, watercolor by Bill Baily and pottery by Suzy Holland.

 

Abstract oil by Carmela Newstead.

 

 

Abstracts by Zifen Qian, maple bowls by Daniel Harris, watercolor by Paul Brent, landscape by Bill Baily and seascape  by Victoria Brooks.

 

 

For Shape and Color.

Art masks by Jorjett Strumme.

Paintings with pressed flowers on metal by Mike Mason. Anny Sears, model, with pressed foliages by Mike Mason.

 

 

Pastel landscape by Carmela Newstead, vintage jewelry necklace by Reneé Hafeman and en caustic blue abstract by Kimberly Kent.

Sunset oil paintings  by Nicholas Oberling, photograph by Neal Maine, pastels by Lynda Campbell and seascapes by Ron Nicolaides.

 

Mixed media diptych by Gary Pearlman, raw edged walnut bowl by Mike Brown and paper box sculpture by Christine Trexel.

Miniature oils by Barbara Rosbe Felisky.

 

Photos by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

“Color and Shape” exhibition through September 30th.

The show covers every aspect of art, textures, materials and finishes, highlighting the quintessentially colorful fall season.

Grace note to the artists…

 

“Shape and Color, Fairweather’s September exhibition, would not be such a success without the beautiful work created by NW hands.  The selected artists provided new work to highlight the annual fall show.  We thank them all for the extraordinary opportunity to tell a seasonal story with their art.  Truly, the artists offered new exceptional work, and by doing so, they encourage those of us in the arts, to do more.”  Fairweather Gallery

Abstract series of three by Jan Rimmerman, seascape oil by Karen E. Lewis and pottery by Suzy Holland.  Shape and Color gallery hostesses Katie, Kemy Kay, Joan, Bonnie and Denise.

 

And, too, a grace note received from a gallery hostess to share.

“Thank you for the beautiful crystal I picked out for a gift.  Most, of all, thanks for bringing the utmost beauty to many, many people.  Most of all, thanks for inviting me to work in your stunning establishment.  It delights my eyes every time I come in.  Your artists are beyond comparison.” Kemy Kay

A grace note received from an artist.

 

“Don’t ask yourself what the world needs.  Ask yourself  what makes you come alive and then do that.  Because what the world needs is people who have come alive.” –Howard Thurman, educator and theologian.
“Thank you for your encouragement and support in showing and growing my art.  You have created such a wonderful group of artists, and display our work in beautiful ways.  I am extremely grateful for your friendship and aliveness in out shared vision.”  Gayle H. Seely

For more about the gallery, please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com.

2018 Pacific Coast ghost baskets by Emily Miller

The baskets begin as ghost nets: fishing rope washed ashore on the beaches of  Oregon.  Cleaned, unraveled, and restitched, the colorful rope becomes a collection of unique baskets accented with local stones and other treasures.

The color and condition of each unique piece of rope serves as an artist’s palette – from freshly cut potwarp lines at local fisheries, to wild and eroded flotsam weathered by months or years at sea.

 

Encaustic beeswax and pigment art series by Emily Miller

 

River to Sea follows the water through brackish estuaries, out to the open ocean, and back again over tidal shallows up to a sandy coastline. River to Sea is the first in a planned series of “progression” pieces, exploring transition environments and natural cycles of change.

 

 

“I have spent my life on the coast, and all my artwork has its roots in my love of the sea. I see the coast as a border between the known and unknown, amid constant cycles of change. My work explores these transition environments as a marker of our place within the larger network of natural systems. I believe that joyful exploration of the unknown creates a positive, active environment that enriches our relationships with ourselves, each other, and our world.”  Emily Miller

 

 

100 Turtles Project at Fairweather Gallery by Emily Miller

Conservation

“The ocean is what I love most in the world. As I started weaving Rope Baskets with reclaimed fishing rope, and sculpting these 100 turtles, I struggled with the associated research that felt overwhelmingly negative. I found a positive voice in SeaLegacy, a conservation group creating a movement towards healthy oceans through visual storytelling. SeaLegacy’s expeditions bring the spotlight to critical regions and share success stories of people working in harmony with the sea. Their stance on storytelling rings especially true to me, as an artist whose work remains centered around beauty and joy despite the depressing statistics.”  Emily Miller

 

 

 

“The ghost basket project and 100 sea turtle project got me thinking about my work with multiples, a fascination that has developed in my sculpture practice. I recalled the story of Sadako and the 1000 Paper Cranes, and how she turned to repetition, creation, and beauty in the face of despair. Repetition as meditation is a common practice around the world, engaging your body and freeing your mind to step back and take a different look at things. It is a way of making peace with things we cannot seem to fix, and centering ourselves in the knowledge of what we are capable of doing, so we have the energy to go out and try again to accomplish what seems out of reach.”   Emily Miller

Copyright © Emily Miller/ Fairweather House and Gallery

 

 

 

“I am a lifelong artist with a passion for materials. My work in different media ranges from watercolor painting to glass and metal sculpture, functional porcelain ware, digital and darkroom photo processes, and interactive installation work. So far I haven’t met a medium I didn’t like. I am bringing 10-15 rope baskets and some abstract encaustic paintings for Shape & Color. See you soon!”  Emily Miller

Shape and Color Fairweather presentation of the art by Emily Miller.

 

Photo collage by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall, photographer.

“Sea Star” by Paul Brent. Original oil on linen.

Table top display features one-of-a-kind accessories: mouth blown glass, driftwood garland, vintage glass and handmade glass spheres.

 

Table displays feature the art  and artists that, truly, offer endless inspirations for idyllic times at the beach.

More than 200 artists from across the Pacific Northwest are featured in the Faiweather House and Gallery, a business that has been an anchor for Seaside’s growing arts scene for more than 12 years. A variety of mediums include original paintings, sculptures, ceramics and jewelry.

New pieces and artists are added each month, making the Fairweather House and Gallery a must-visit destination in Seaside, Oregon for art connoisseurs.

 

Art by Jan Shield,  glass by Sandy and Bob Lercari,  coral platter by Rinee Merritt, handmade box by Christine Trexel and origami garland by Peggy Evans.
Fairweather House and Gallery is a place to see finished creations of bowls, platters and sculpture, as well as contemporary paintings.

Jewelry by Cher Flick, Mary Hurst and Alan Stockam.  Myrtle wood by Fred and Janice Lukens.  Ocean scape painting by Ron Nicolaides. Gull portrait by Leah Brown.  Nantucket basket by Carol Bolster.  Sea anemone study by Jon Anni. Sail boat water colors by Paul Brent.

 

With appreciation to Linda Fenton-Mendenhall,  photographer.

 

To learn more about the gallery, please go to www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

For more info, go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ Paul Brent

 

 


Marga Stanley, artist

 

 

Emily Miller with her 100 Turtles Project

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Victoria Brooks

For more info go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ Victoria Brooks

 

For more images, please go to http://www.facebook.com/  Seaside First Saturday Art Walk

 

Photo collages by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall

Photo by Neal Maine / PacificLight Images
Bald eagles on Clatsop Beach.

Image title:  Eagle Speak

 

After a thirty-year career as an award-winning biology teacher at Seaside High School, Neal Maine became the first executive director of North Coast Land Conservancy, which he co-founded in 1986. Since his retirement from the land trust in 2010, he has pursued his passion for nature photography through PacificLight Images dedicated to raising awareness of coastal ecology and the wildlife with whom we share the region’s estuaries, freshwater wetlands and forests. His photography centers around coastal and Columbia River landscape, ecology and the rich estuary habitat with the surrounding wetlands and forest systems.

PacificLight Images is dedicated to working with coastal communities to protect wildlife habitat and its connectivity. A percentage of all photography sales are donated to North Coast Land Conservancy to help further this goal.

Eagle Sunrise by Neal Maine

 

On June 20th, 1782 the American Bald eagle was chosen as the symbol of the United States of American because of its long life, strength, majestic look and its representation of the freedoms enshrined in out constitution.

 

 

Image title:  Shaped by Wind.  Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images

 

Eagle conservation lecture  notes by naturalist Neal Maine:

Neal Maine graduated from Seaside High, returned as an educator in the Seaside School District.

It was not until 20 years after collage that he viewed an eagle on the North coast for the first time!

In 1961, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) counted  only 471 pairs of Amercian Bald Eagles.

 

 

Neal Maine lectures during a Fairweather Gallery event.

 

 

July 7- July 31

Fairweather House and Gallery

100 Turtles project by Emily Miller

 

“I have spent my life on the coast, and all my artwork has its roots in my love of the sea. I see the coast as a border between the known and the unknown, and a place where our connection to larger natural systems becomes clear. My artwork focuses on the delight of exploring this mysterious and beautiful environment. I found a positive voice in SeaLegacy, a conservation group creating a movement towards healthy oceans through visual storytelling. 25% of July sale proceeds in support of SeaLegacy,”  Emily Miller.

Launching of the 100 Turtles project by artist Emily Miller, who has spent the early summer sculpting tiny ceramic sea turtles: curling and shaping two hundred front flippers and carving details into two hundred eyes.

 

 

 

 I found a positive voice in SeaLegacy, a conservation group creating a movement towards healthy oceans through visual storytelling. 25% of July sale proceeds in support of SeaLegacy,”  Emily Miller.

 

 

For more info go to

 

http://ejmillerfineart.com/news/2018/06/14/100-turtles-project/

 

 

Read more:

The Story of Silent Spring. How a courageous woman took on the chemical industry and raised important questions about humankind’s impact …

http://www.rachelcarson.org/

Perhaps the finest nature writer of the Twentieth Century, Rachel Carson (1907-1964) is remembered more today as the woman who challenged the notion that …

 

To view more Neal Maine images, please visit  www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

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