Emily Miller


 On August 2nd FINDINGS, an opening art exhibition introduced past and present emerging artists at the Fairweather House and Gallery.

 

Top row/ left to right images:  resident jeweler Renee Hafeman, art patrons, Joan, Art Walk hostess with Paul Brent, resident artist.

Middle row/ left to right images: art by Britney Drumheller, celebrity artist Britney Drumheller offers an art lecture, artist Emily Miller, and introducing emerging artist Whelpsy Whelp.

Bottom row/ left to right images: marine debris artist Karynn Kozij, Joan, Art Walk hostess demonstrating Octopus art, Paul Brent with Gail and Ellen, Art Walk hostesses at the Paul Brent Pop-Up Art Studio and Gallery, sponsored by Fairweather House and Gallery and The Gilbert Block Building, Denise, Kemmy Kay, Joan and Saundra FINDING art at the FINDINGS opening reception.

Q: What is an emerging artist, you ask?

A:  An emerging artist is considered an artist without commercial representation who has a dedicated art practice but has had limited opportunities to show at a gallery or non-profit spaces.

 

For more info please  go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com.  Celebrating 11 years of sponsoring  NW regional acclaimed and emerging artists in 2017.

Cape Arago Lighthouse by Emily Miller

Late summer sun illuminates the turquoise waters and rocky, forested shoreline of the southern Oregon coast near Coos Bay. Cape Arago Lighthouse is visible in the distance.

Cape Arago Lighthouse was built on Chief’s Island in 1866 to guide merchant ships into Coos Bay, just 13 years after white settlers first arrived in the area. Chief’s Island is just offshore, but proved dangerous to access with multiple washed-out bridges and boat disasters over the years. The current lighthouse is the third to be built at Cape Arago. It was deactivated in 2006 after 140 years of service.

In 2013, the last bridge to the island was removed and the land transferred to the Confederated Tribes of the Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians. The Confederate Tribes hope to establish an interpretive center on the mainland near the lighthouse.

Cleft of the Rock Lighthouse by Emily Miller

Late summer fog hangs over the horizon at Cape Perpetua, near Yachats on the central Oregon coast. The beacon from Cleft of the Rock Light can be seen 16 miles offshore, and might be welcomed at sea on these frequent foggy days.

The lighthouse and attached dwelling were built as a labor of love in 1976 by James Gibbs, a former Tillamook Rock Light attendant and lighthouse historian. He lived here until his death in 2010.

 


Yaquina Head Lighthouse from Cobble Beach by Emily Miller

Yaquina Head Lighthouse is the tallest lighthouse in Oregon, with a 93 ft. tower and a light that can be seen 19 miles out to sea. It was built in 1873 and continues to operate today. It is located on a high, exposed cliff near Newport, on Oregon’s central coast.

The lighthouse is part of the Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area, a federal reserve that is home to an incredible array of wildlife and beautiful coastline. The site has been popular with visitors since the 1930s, when nearly 12,000 visitors made it the 4th most visited lighthouse in the United States. Today it receives over 400,000 visitors per year.

A vein of magnetized iron runs through the bedrock of Yaquina Head, causing ships’ compasses to malfunction if they venture too near.

 

Tillamook Rock Lighthouse from Haystack Rock

Haystack Rock reflects in the shallow waters of an outgoing tide at Cannon Beach, on Oregon’s northern coast. A mile offshore, the Tillamook Rock lighthouse is visible in the distance. The lighthouse is located on a barren, exposed rock, situated to guide merchant ships to the mouth of the Columbia River.

Construction on the Tillamook Rock lighthouse began in 1879 and was not finished until 1881 due to powerful storms that made construction and transport of materials nearly impossible. The lighthouse became known as “Terrible Tilly”. Waves broke over the rock strong enough to drench the entire lighthouse, collapsing roofs, flooding the interior, clogging the mechanisms with debris, breaking loose boulders and sending them flying through the air. The lighthouse keepers were totally isolated and tasked with constant repairs.

In 1957 the lighthouse was deactivated after 77 years of service. After changing hands several times, it was most recently used as a columbarium where the ashes of around 30 people are stored.

“Lighthouses have a mythical quality. A lighthouse stands for untold stories of stormy nights, beautiful sunrises, and the hardship and magic of life at the edge of the sea. A lighthouse symbolizes the journey between wild ocean and safe harbor. This transition zone is one of my favorite places to explore.” –Emily Miller, artist


Emily Miller, artist

Last fall I took a road trip to visit and paint at all eleven lighthouses on the Oregon coast. Lighthouses have a mythical quality to me. They symbolize the journey between wild ocean and safe harbor. I love the ocean and have always lived near it. To me, the coast is a border between the known and unknown. This transition zone is one of my favorite places to explore.

I choose to paint the landscape view rather than close-ups or lighthouse interiors because my artwork is centered on the way we interact with our environments. I am most interested in how we alter the landscape to suit our needs, and how the landscape, in return, alters our structures over time.

The paintings were completed on location (en plein air) or in the studio from my many reference photos. The series is about half-finished.

I enjoy series projects like this because they provide a framework for exploring and understanding an area. I spend more time at beautiful places while I’m painting and photographing. The project gives me a reason to dig deeper into the history of a place, and discover new spots that I might have missed otherwise.
Each lighthouse has its own story. Tillamook Rock Lighthouse is just south of Seaside on a barren rock one mile offshore. It was pounded by incredible storms where waves broke boulders off the cliff side and crashed them into the lighthouse. You can see its silhouette from Ecola State Park and Cannon Beach. Cape Meares Lighthouse in Tillamook and Yaquina Head Light in Newport are both still active and you can go inside the tower and climb up the spiral stairs.

 

 

Emily Miller with her art:  anemone and sea urchin bowls and the Oregon light house series.

 

 

Grace Note received:

“Thanks again for a great Art Walk event FINDINGS, Fairweather opening reception. It was wonderful to see the new gallery layout and chat with the other artists. Someone asked me if I was making a book from the lighthouse painting series. I may do that once it has finished, and then you will not have to hunt down maps in the magazines anymore!–Emily Miller

 

 

 

“Quick update if you want to share with your clients. Now thru the end of 2017, I am donating 10% of my proceeds to local ocean conservancy and art organizations. Thank you for your part in making my art ventures a success!!”

 

And, too,  an encore request for the image of the Sea Urchin bowl with spines by Emily Miller.

 

Making a Difference:  Emily Miller donates 10% of all proceeds to local ocean conservancy and art organizations.

Lava vases by Emily Miller, Pelican and Buoy original art by Whelpsey Whelp, Sea Turtle original water-color by Rosemary Klein, hand-made journals and boxes by Christine Trexel, hammered copper and gold earrings by Steven Schankin and Natura shell series of original oil paintings by Paul Brent.

 

On the grass cloth wall: coral original oil by Paul Brent, coral wood cut series by Gregory Graham, Puffin on the Rock (facing left)original by Nick Brakel, Puffin fine art photograph (facing right) by Donna Geissler, and on the twig wall sculpture, Oregon myrtlewood earrings by Fred Lukens.

On the table scape: Puffin Portrait original pen and ink (facing right) by Britney Drumheller, Sea Star original pen and ink by Britney Drumheller, and  hand hemmed tie dyed silk scarves by Beth Collins.

 

Eel and pipe fish original pen and ink collage by emerging artist Whelpsey Welp (easel display), The Snorkler by Marga Stanley (on the circle table) rare CoCo Chanel vintage jewelry by Renee Hafeman,  spoons by Mike Morris,  Moulton Sky original oil seascape  by Michael Muldoon and Oregon lighthouse watercolor series by Emily Miller.

Sea Within original shell art by Jan Shield, original water colors by Carolyn Macpherson, tclam style  carry all bags by textile artist Linda Ballard  and…ta! da! …grand piano found by a friendly neighbor for the Fairweather Gallery!!!

Displays by Denise Fairweather,  Allied Member, A.S.I.D., American Society of Interior Designers.

 

For more about  the accredited interior design work at the gallery , please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …about/ Denise Faiweather page

And, too,  questions to the audience at FINDINGS, the opening reception for the August exhibition, at Fairweather House and Gallery.

What is new?

What is bigger than a bread box?

What took one and 1/2 hours to install?

What took 5 men to move?

What has the number 88 to do with this piece?

 

And, the art patron who answered the question…is it the grand  piano?  The lovely lady in black.  She graciously called for a round of applause, after listening to the piano stories  (past, current and future musical lives).

 

For more info please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

Emily Miller.  Hand made porcelain. Urchin bowls. Food-safe, microwave sale, top rack dishwasher safe.

 

I have spent my life on the coast, and all my artwork has its roots in my love of the sea. I see the coast as a border between the known and the unknown, and a place where our connection to larger natural systems becomes clear. My artwork focuses on the delight of exploring this mysterious and beautiful environment.

 

 

 

I am a lifelong artist with a passion for materials. My work ranges from realistic watercolor painting to abstract encaustic wax and collage, as well as glass and metal sculpture, functional porcelain ware, digital and darkroom photo processes, and interactive installation work. So far I haven’t met a medium I didn’t like.

My background is in California, Kauai, and Down East Maine. I am currently based in Portland, Oregon. My work is constantly inspired by the links between life on these very different coasts.

 

 

Recent Work

“A vase can hold weeds or flowers, but can’t it just be a spot of beauty?”
– Rose Cabat, studio ceramicist

 

 

Lagoon pots and anemone-pots

My recent ceramics are functional and sculptural objects with tactile, touchable surfaces, based on ocean life forms and colony growth patterns. Sea urchins, anemones, and succulents inspire my ceramics, as well as landscape features from turquoise lagoons to cooling lava. –Emily Miller

Take note! Making a Difference:  Emily Miller donates 10% of all proceeds to local ocean conservancy and art organizations.

 

My recent paintings explore the beauty and diversity of Oregon’s coastal landscapes and how water shapes these environments, from rain, rivers and wetlands to the sea. Plein air (outdoor) painting and multiple reference photos are essential to my work. Being out in the landscape, studying the details of each moment’s shifting light, color, and weather, creates a strong bond with the location and a freshness and immediacy in the finished artwork.

 

 

Encaustic Art. Squall by Peg Wells

 

Seaside summer time artist Peg Wells, who exhibits in the off-season at the Saddle Brooke Resort/ Primary Studio in Arizona, recently delivered a new encaustic painting.  Perfect for the WAVES July exhibit at Fariweather’s.

 

 “Peg Wells provocative style proves that a quiet approach can have a very powerful effect.” –Amy Kiefer, freelance Historic Gilbert District reporter.

“I have been fortunate enough to live in a variety of states and several countries and have enjoyed my exposure to a wide scope of artistic expressions. I have worked in various media including pottery, title and water-color.” –Peg Wells

 

Q: What is encaustic painting, you ask?

 

A: Pronunciation: en-caws-tick, is a paint consisting of pigment mixed with beeswax and fixed with heat after its application. –n. The Greek word is enkaustikos –to burn in.

 

Encaustic dates back to the ancient Greeks, as far back as the 5th century BC. Ancient ship builders used beeswax, resin to seal, and waterproof their vessels. Ultimately, they began adding pigment to the wax-giving rise to the decoration of spectacular ships. To paint with encaustic, a combination of beeswax, resin and pigment is combined and then melted to a liquid state. Encaustic paintings have many layers of wax and depending on the piece, it is not uncommon to have anywhere from 25-50 layers.

Grace Note:

“I am grateful that my art found a gallery presence for my sixth summer season with you! I so appreciate your support of my art and me as an artist. I hope that my art will find a new home and that it will bring as much pleasure to people as it has given me create. Thank you.” –Peg Wells

 

 

 

“My  paintings explore the beauty and diversity of Oregon’s coastal landscapes and how water shapes these environments, from rain, rivers and wetlands to the sea. Plein air (outdoor) painting and multiple reference photos are essential to my work. Being out in the landscape, studying the details of each moment’s shifting light, color, and weather, creates a strong bond with the location and a freshness and immediacy in the finished artwork. ”  —Emily Miller

Here’s a link to my Oregon lighthouses watercolor series so far: http://www.ejmillerfineart.com/painting/oregon-lighthouses
I’ll plan to have 4 new paintings in the series for the August 5th  Art Walk at Fairweather’s.  –-Emily Miller