Emily Miller


“Sea Star” by Paul Brent. Original oil on linen.

Table top display features one-of-a-kind accessories: mouth blown glass, driftwood garland, vintage glass and handmade glass spheres.

 

Table displays feature the art  and artists that, truly, offer endless inspirations for idyllic times at the beach.

More than 200 artists from across the Pacific Northwest are featured in the Faiweather House and Gallery, a business that has been an anchor for Seaside’s growing arts scene for more than 12 years. A variety of mediums include original paintings, sculptures, ceramics and jewelry.

New pieces and artists are added each month, making the Fairweather House and Gallery a must-visit destination in Seaside, Oregon for art connoisseurs.

 

Art by Jan Shield,  glass by Sandy and Bob Lercari,  coral platter by Rinee Merritt, handmade box by Christine Trexel and origami garland by Peggy Evans.
Fairweather House and Gallery is a place to see finished creations of bowls, platters and sculpture, as well as contemporary paintings.

Jewelry by Cher Flick, Mary Hurst and Alan Stockam.  Myrtle wood by Fred and Janice Lukens.  Ocean scape painting by Ron Nicolaides. Gull portrait by Leah Brown.  Nantucket basket by Carol Bolster.  Sea anemone study by Jon Anni. Sail boat water colors by Paul Brent.

 

With appreciation to Linda Fenton-Mendenhall,  photographer.

 

To learn more about the gallery, please go to www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

For more info, go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ Paul Brent

 

 


Marga Stanley, artist

 

 

Emily Miller with her 100 Turtles Project

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Victoria Brooks

For more info go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ Victoria Brooks

 

For more images, please go to http://www.facebook.com/  Seaside First Saturday Art Walk

 

Photo collages by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall

Photo by Neal Maine / PacificLight Images
Bald eagles on Clatsop Beach.

Image title:  Eagle Speak

 

After a thirty-year career as an award-winning biology teacher at Seaside High School, Neal Maine became the first executive director of North Coast Land Conservancy, which he co-founded in 1986. Since his retirement from the land trust in 2010, he has pursued his passion for nature photography through PacificLight Images dedicated to raising awareness of coastal ecology and the wildlife with whom we share the region’s estuaries, freshwater wetlands and forests. His photography centers around coastal and Columbia River landscape, ecology and the rich estuary habitat with the surrounding wetlands and forest systems.

PacificLight Images is dedicated to working with coastal communities to protect wildlife habitat and its connectivity. A percentage of all photography sales are donated to North Coast Land Conservancy to help further this goal.

Eagle Sunrise by Neal Maine

 

On June 20th, 1782 the American Bald eagle was chosen as the symbol of the United States of American because of its long life, strength, majestic look and its representation of the freedoms enshrined in out constitution.

 

 

Image title:  Shaped by Wind.  Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images

 

Eagle conservation lecture  notes by naturalist Neal Maine:

Neal Maine graduated from Seaside High, returned as an educator in the Seaside School District.

It was not until 20 years after collage that he viewed an eagle on the North coast for the first time!

In 1961, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) counted  only 471 pairs of Amercian Bald Eagles.

 

 

Neal Maine lectures during a Fairweather Gallery event.

 

 

July 7- July 31

Fairweather House and Gallery

100 Turtles project by Emily Miller

 

“I have spent my life on the coast, and all my artwork has its roots in my love of the sea. I see the coast as a border between the known and the unknown, and a place where our connection to larger natural systems becomes clear. My artwork focuses on the delight of exploring this mysterious and beautiful environment. I found a positive voice in SeaLegacy, a conservation group creating a movement towards healthy oceans through visual storytelling. 25% of July sale proceeds in support of SeaLegacy,”  Emily Miller.

Launching of the 100 Turtles project by artist Emily Miller, who has spent the early summer sculpting tiny ceramic sea turtles: curling and shaping two hundred front flippers and carving details into two hundred eyes.

 

 

 

 I found a positive voice in SeaLegacy, a conservation group creating a movement towards healthy oceans through visual storytelling. 25% of July sale proceeds in support of SeaLegacy,”  Emily Miller.

 

 

For more info go to

 

http://ejmillerfineart.com/news/2018/06/14/100-turtles-project/

 

 

Read more:

The Story of Silent Spring. How a courageous woman took on the chemical industry and raised important questions about humankind’s impact …

http://www.rachelcarson.org/

Perhaps the finest nature writer of the Twentieth Century, Rachel Carson (1907-1964) is remembered more today as the woman who challenged the notion that …

 

To view more Neal Maine images, please visit  www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 Last call.

“Sense of Place”, an exhibition through June 30 featuring regional artists Melissa Jander, Karen Lewis, Emily Miller, Rebecca Gore, Christine Trexel and more.

 

“Seaside Dreams”  by Melissa Jander. Original oil on linen.

 

For “Cascade Melody” by artist Karen E. Lewis. Original oil.

 

“Kites at Cannon Beach” by Emily Miller.  Original watercolor.

 

Christine Trexel handmade paper, hand made journal.

 

In addition, the gallery continues to show new artists Jan Rimerman and Barbara Martin through June 30.

 

“Secrets of the Stream” by Jan Rimerman.  Mixed media.

 

“Everyone connects with their own experiences whether from their childhood, recent memories or perhaps where they would like to be in the future,”  Jan Rimerman.

 

“Across from…” mixed media by Barbara Martin

Barbara Martin has work contemporary in style and that leans toward the abstract and sometimes surreal or visionary.

 

Don’t miss our June exhibition, celebrating original art created specifically for “Sense of Place!”

And, too, see and find  exclusive accessories, selected specifically for “Sense of Place.”

 

For more information, please visit www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

Take a note!

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside

July 7, 5-7:pm

Opening artist’s reception for “Ocean Folk”, an exhibition featuring regional artists: fused glass by Lori Bedard, oil and watercolor paintings by Paul Brent, oil paintings by Victoria Brooks, abstract art by Barbara Martin, whimsical art by Marga Stanley and acrylic paintings by Jan Shield.

Introducing watercolorist Bonnie Belden-Doney, who has been painting since her youth and has a uniqueness that is captivating of time and moment. Her paintings are beyond enjoying from a passing glance and tend to draw viewers to a memory of visiting the beach.

Launching of the 100 Turtles project by artist Emily Miller, who has spent the early summer sculpting tiny ceramic sea turtles: curling and shaping two hundred front flippers and carving details into two hundred eyes. 25% of July sale proceeds in support of conservation.

“I have spent my life on the coast, and all my artwork has its roots in my love of the sea. I see the coast as a border between the known and the unknown, and a place where our connection to larger natural systems becomes clear. My artwork focuses on the delight of exploring this mysterious and beautiful environment. I found a positive voice in SeaLegacy, a conservation group creating a movement towards healthy oceans through visual storytelling. 25% of July sale proceeds in support of SeaLegacy,”  Emily Miller.

Artists will offer talks about their “Ocean Folk” artwork.

Eagle conservation lecture by naturalist Neal Maine at 6:pm.

Painting Seaside LIVE™ demonstrations by Paul Brent, Victoria Brooks and Carolyn Macpherson.

Light bites.

LIVE music by Shirley 88.

Full Moon Bowl by Emily Miller

 

 

“I have a brand new full moon bowl (first one out of the kiln!) Creating a different perspective on my passion for exploring unknown environments in art. Although most of my artwork has focused on the ocean, I find the beauty, mystery, and science of outer space as compelling as the deep-sea.”  —Emily Miller, artist

 

Q: When is the full moon in June, you ask?

A: The full moon will be on June 27 and June 28. To the casual observer, however, the moon will appear full the day before and after its peak brightness. https://www.moongiant.com/moonphases/June/2018

 

 

Concept drawings by Emily Miller.

“I love the fanciful scientific names for the lunar “seas” (which are actually flat regions of dark basalt where lava oozed to the surface, pulled by Earth’s gravity up towards the near side of the moon). The Sea of Nectar and the Sea of Clouds are two of my favorites. I also love that the Seas of Tranquility and Crises are right next to each other.”  Emily Miller

 

 

“I am captivated by the beautiful contrast between light and darkness in our natural world, and the necessity of both for life to thrive. .”  Emily Miller

 

 

Deep blue spiny sea urchin bowl

 

 

White moonlight spiny sea urchin bowl

 Hand made and artist signed porcelain bowls by Emily Miller

 

 

Sea anemone porcelain vases by Emily Miller.

Heavily textured raw porcelain exteriors are  reminiscent of sunlight patterns in a shallow lagoon.

Hand made and signed by the artist.

Watertight.

 

Read more about Emily Miller at https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/tag/fairweather-house…gallery/…/1…

 

Save the date and time

Opening artist reception for the exhibition  “Ocean Folk”

July 7, 5-7:pm

Emily Miller launches her 100 Turtles project at the Fairweather Gallery

 

“Here is the post I just wrote about my 100 Turtles project.” Emily Miller

  http://ejmillerfineart.com/news/2018/06/14/100-turtles-project/

 

 

End note: Two Fairweather Gallery artists featuring a North Oregon coast night scene with a full moon over the Pacific Ocean, which is the largest ocean in the world.   At full moon, the Moon and Sun are in a straight line on opposite sides of the Earth. Their gravitational forces combine to create larger waves.

“Night Sea” by Ron Nicolaides.  Original oil on Linen.

 

For more info about the artist, please go to  https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/Artist/Ron/Nicolaides.html

 

  “North Coast Sea” by Nicholas Oberling.  Original oil on linen.

For more info about the artist, please go to  https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/…/welcoming-nicholas-oberling-art.

 

Precious moonstone, a translucent, opalescent, pearly blue gemstone cuff bracelet by Alan Stockam. Signed and numbered by the silversmith.

 

 

 

For more about the gallery, please go to www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

“Sense of Place” Fairweather’s June exhibition opened on June 2 with LIVE music featuring  western songs by guitarist Ron Burghard, luscious treats (featured watercolor art by Bill Baily), sunny weather, hostesses dressed in denim and art loving patrons.

 

 

 

Minutes before the “Sense of Place” opening, finishing touches completed for Fairweather’s front display by Kathy B., director of hospitality. Featured art:  “Dune Grass” plein air painting by Bev Drew Kindley, “Ocean” original oil on board by Melissa Jander, “Beach Finds” watercolor/ mixed media by Rosemary Klein,  raku pottery by Emily Miller, “Waves” original oil on linen by Ron Nicolaides, jewelry by Mary Boitta and calligraphy by Penelope Culberson.

Melissa Jander

“Sense of Place” oil painting artist

 

 

Christine Trexel

“Sense of Place”  paper craft artist

 

Watercolor on yupo artist Carolyn Macpherson

Seaside Painting LIVE ™ demonstration

Barbara Martin

“Sense of Place” mixed media artist


Jan Rimerman

“Sense of Place” mixed media artist

 

 

Before the Fairweather show opening, talented and inventive regional artists arrived to pose together at the opening reception for “Sense of Place”.  Left to right: Barbara Martin, curator Denise Fairweather, Amy Osborne, Carolyn Macpherson, Jan Rimerman, Christine Trexel and Melissa Jander.

 

 

 

 

 

“Sense of Place” through June 30

Fairweather House and Gallery

www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

With appreciation to Art Walk photographer Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

 

Grace note received from artist Bev Drew Kindley:

“Thanks for choosing some of my paintings for the Sense Of Place show!”   

 

 

“Sunset at Tillamook Head” watercolor by Emily Milller

“A stormy winter sunset over Tillamook Head as seen from Seaside beach, on the northern Oregon coast. Brilliant oranges and pinks lit up the clouds and reflected in the waves for just a few minutes between rain showers. A low fog hanging over the headland created separation between the layers of trees. I set up to paint on a log near the high tide line, stopping only when the light faded and my paper was too wet to continue!”

 

 

“I have spent my life on the coast, and all my artwork has its roots in my love of the sea. I see the coast as a border between the known and unknown, amid constant cycles of change.” –Emily Miller

 

“Needles and the Haystack” watercolor by Emily Miller

“Two narrow sea stacks known as “The Needles” at Cannon Beach, next to Oregon’s iconic Haystack Rock. This was painted on a beautiful summer day, sitting on the steps leading down to the beach. The Needles are some of my favorite sea stacks on the Oregon coast!”

 

“Kites at Cannon Beach” watercolor by Emily Miller

“Colorful kites on a summer afternoon fly over Haystack Rock at Cannon Beach, on the northern Oregon coast.”

 

“Sea Stacks at Siletz Bay” watercolor by Emily Miller

“Wind-swept trees grow on a series of sea stacks known as “Four Brothers” in Siletz Bay, outside Lincoln City on Oregon’s central coast. The water was calm and shallow on this summer morning, when I set up in the warm sand to paint with a friend.”

 

 

“Cape Meares Lighthouse” watercolor by Emily Miller

“The tiny Cape Meares lighthouse is the smallest lighthouse in Oregon, but worked as a beacon visible for 21 miles out to sea from 1890 to 1963. Its unique octagonal tower sits on a high cliff on the northern Oregon coast near Tillamook. The lighthouse is accessible down a shady, forested path, with the tower and red lens framed by mossy trees.”

 

“Exploring the Oregon coast with my painting kit and camera is one of my greatest joys. Every visit creates a stronger bond with my favorite beaches and trails, beautiful in all weathers and seasons.” –Emily Miller

 

Q:  What are sea stacks, you ask?

A:  Sea stacks are blocks of erosion-resistant rock isolated from the land by sea. Sea stacks begin as part of a headland or sea cliff. Relentless pounding by waves erodes the softer, weaker parts of a rock first leaving harder, more resistant rock behind.

The Oregon coastline naturally has areas of rocky headlands alternating with sandy coves due to variation in the local rock types. As waves approach the shore, they are refracted nearly parallel to shore so that wave energy is concentrated on headlands. Rocky cliffs develop on the headlands and sand is deposited in the bays, forming beaches.

Sea stacks sit like giants half-submerged in the ocean, not far from shore. As if they were massive, mythological sentinels set with the mission to guard Oregon’s coast. They are indeed ancient – millions and millions of years old.   www.nature.nps.gov/geology

 

For more info, go to  www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

 

 

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