Emily Miller


Full Moon Bowl by Emily Miller

 

 

“I have a brand new full moon bowl (first one out of the kiln!) Creating a different perspective on my passion for exploring unknown environments in art. Although most of my artwork has focused on the ocean, I find the beauty, mystery, and science of outer space as compelling as the deep-sea.”  —Emily Miller, artist

 

Q: When is the full moon in June, you ask?

A: The full moon will be on June 27 and June 28. To the casual observer, however, the moon will appear full the day before and after its peak brightness. https://www.moongiant.com/moonphases/June/2018

 

 

Concept drawings by Emily Miller.

“I love the fanciful scientific names for the lunar “seas” (which are actually flat regions of dark basalt where lava oozed to the surface, pulled by Earth’s gravity up towards the near side of the moon). The Sea of Nectar and the Sea of Clouds are two of my favorites. I also love that the Seas of Tranquility and Crises are right next to each other.”  Emily Miller

 

 

“I am captivated by the beautiful contrast between light and darkness in our natural world, and the necessity of both for life to thrive. .”  Emily Miller

 

 

 Spiny urchin porcelain bowls by Emily Miller

 

 

Sea anemone porcelain vases by Emily Miller.

Heavily textured raw porcelain exteriors are  reminiscent of sunlight patterns in a shallow lagoon. Watertight.

 

Read more about Emily Miller at https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/tag/fairweather-house…gallery/…/1…

 

Save the date and time

Opening artist reception for the exhibition  “Ocean Folk”

July 7, 5-7:pm

Emily Miller launches her 100 Turtles project at the Fairweather Gallery

 

“Here is the post I just wrote about my 100 Turtles project.” Emily Miller

  http://ejmillerfineart.com/news/2018/06/14/100-turtles-project/

 

 

End note: Two Fairweather Gallery artists featuring a North Oregon coast night scene with a full moon over the Pacific Ocean, which is the largest ocean in the world.   At full moon, the Moon and Sun are in a straight line on opposite sides of the Earth. Their gravitational forces combine to create larger waves.

“Night Sea” by Ron Nicolaides.  Original oil on Linen.

 

For more info about the artist, please go to  https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/Artist/Ron/Nicolaides.html

 

  “North Coast Sea” by Nicholas Oberling.  Original oil on linen.

For more info about the artist, please go to  https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/…/welcoming-nicholas-oberling-art.

 

Precious moonstone, a translucent, opalescent, pearly blue gemstone cuff bracelet by Alan Stockam. Signed and numbered by the silversmith.

 

 

 

 

 

“Sense of Place” Fairweather’s June exhibition opened on June 2 with LIVE music featuring  western songs by guitarist Ron Burghard, luscious treats (featured watercolor art by Bill Baily), sunny weather, hostesses dressed in denim and art loving patrons.

 

 

 

Minutes before the “Sense of Place” opening, finishing touches completed for Fairweather’s front display by Kathy B., director of hospitality. Featured art:  “Dune Grass” plein air painting by Bev Drew Kindley, “Ocean” original oil on board by Melissa Jander, “Beach Finds” watercolor/ mixed media by Rosemary Klein,  raku pottery by Emily Miller, “Waves” original oil on linen by Ron Nicolaides, jewelry by Mary Boitta and calligraphy by Penelope Culberson.

Melissa Jander

“Sense of Place” oil painting artist

 

 

Christine Trexel

“Sense of Place”  paper craft artist

 

Watercolor on yupo artist Carolyn Macpherson

Seaside Painting LIVE ™ demonstration

Barbara Martin

“Sense of Place” mixed media artist


Jan Rimerman

“Sense of Place” mixed media artist

Amy Osborne

“Sense of Place” watercolor artist

 

Before the Fairweather show opening, talented and inventive regional artists arrived to pose together at the opening reception for “Sense of Place”.  Left to right: Barbara Martin, curator Denise Fairweather, Amy Osborne, Carolyn Macpherson, Jan Rimerman, Christine Trexel and Melissa Jander.

 

 

 

 

 

“Sense of Place” through June 30

Fairweather House and Gallery

www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

With appreciation to Art Walk photographer Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

 

Grace note received from artist Bev Drew Kindley:

“Thanks for choosing some of my paintings for the Sense Of Place show!     I’ll be painting in Cannon Beach June 20–24 and during the PleinAir and More event that weekend, hoping for good weather.”

 

 

“Sunset at Tillamook Head” watercolor by Emily Milller

“A stormy winter sunset over Tillamook Head as seen from Seaside beach, on the northern Oregon coast. Brilliant oranges and pinks lit up the clouds and reflected in the waves for just a few minutes between rain showers. A low fog hanging over the headland created separation between the layers of trees. I set up to paint on a log near the high tide line, stopping only when the light faded and my paper was too wet to continue!”

 

 

“I have spent my life on the coast, and all my artwork has its roots in my love of the sea. I see the coast as a border between the known and unknown, amid constant cycles of change.” –Emily Miller

 

“Needles and the Haystack” watercolor by Emily Miller

“Two narrow sea stacks known as “The Needles” at Cannon Beach, next to Oregon’s iconic Haystack Rock. This was painted on a beautiful summer day, sitting on the steps leading down to the beach. The Needles are some of my favorite sea stacks on the Oregon coast!”

 

“Kites at Cannon Beach” watercolor by Emily Miller

“Colorful kites on a summer afternoon fly over Haystack Rock at Cannon Beach, on the northern Oregon coast.”

 

“Sea Stacks at Siletz Bay” watercolor by Emily Miller

“Wind-swept trees grow on a series of sea stacks known as “Four Brothers” in Siletz Bay, outside Lincoln City on Oregon’s central coast. The water was calm and shallow on this summer morning, when I set up in the warm sand to paint with a friend.”

 

 

“Cape Meares Lighthouse” watercolor by Emily Miller

“The tiny Cape Meares lighthouse is the smallest lighthouse in Oregon, but worked as a beacon visible for 21 miles out to sea from 1890 to 1963. Its unique octagonal tower sits on a high cliff on the northern Oregon coast near Tillamook. The lighthouse is accessible down a shady, forested path, with the tower and red lens framed by mossy trees.”

 

“Exploring the Oregon coast with my painting kit and camera is one of my greatest joys. Every visit creates a stronger bond with my favorite beaches and trails, beautiful in all weathers and seasons.” –Emily Miller

 

Q:  What are sea stacks, you ask?

A:  Sea stacks are blocks of erosion-resistant rock isolated from the land by sea. Sea stacks begin as part of a headland or sea cliff. Relentless pounding by waves erodes the softer, weaker parts of a rock first leaving harder, more resistant rock behind.

The Oregon coastline naturally has areas of rocky headlands alternating with sandy coves due to variation in the local rock types. As waves approach the shore, they are refracted nearly parallel to shore so that wave energy is concentrated on headlands. Rocky cliffs develop on the headlands and sand is deposited in the bays, forming beaches.

Sea stacks sit like giants half-submerged in the ocean, not far from shore. As if they were massive, mythological sentinels set with the mission to guard Oregon’s coast. They are indeed ancient – millions and millions of years old.   www.nature.nps.gov/geology

 

For more info, go to  www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

 

 

 

“Ostrea” by Emily Miller.

A  large-scale sculpture inspired by the gnarled shells of oysters, the fluted ruffles of nudibranchs, and other beautiful and mysterious sea creatures. Sculpted with outdoor architectural stoneware ceramics. Weather-safe and water-tight. Recommended to protect from freezing. Signed by the artist.

 

 

But wait, there’s more.  See, there’s three! 

Ostrea I, Ostrea II and Ostrea III.

20″ to 30″ wide, each

 

 

Lookie here,  Emily Miller’s “Ostreas” have ocean inspired bottoms, as well.

 

Q: What is the meaning of the word “Ostrea”, you ask?

A: “Ostrea” is the Latin name / classification for oysters and the title of a set of large-scale sculptures I created, inspired by the gnarled shells of oysters, the fluted ruffles of nudibranchs, and other beautiful and mysterious sea creatures. The tactile contrast of smooth and rough surfaces is an ongoing theme in my artwork. I use these contrasts to explore ideas of inner and outer spaces, playful discovery, and delight in the unknown. Fun fact about the Ostrea: I like the rough, hidden underside as much as the top glazed surface! -Emily  Miller

 

 

Order from Chaos by Emily Miller

In addition, the 2018 rope basket project with a new palette of Pacific Ocean rope collected from Oregon, wilder and more eroded, weathered by months or years at sea. Cleaned, unraveled, and restitched, the colorful rope became a collection of unique baskets accented with local stones and other beach treasures.

Reclaimed fishing rope, 2018/ Mint Green basket

4.5″ high x 6″ diameter

Green and white fishing rope gathered from the Oregon coast and accented with a local beach stone.

“It begins with days spent hauling rope from the tide line in all weathers, connecting and collecting from other beach clean-up crews. A quick soak in water to loosen the sand, mud, and surface grime, then the long, meditative process of untangling knotted nests into their separate lengths. Each length slowly unwound by hand into its three segments, a second longer soak and scrub in hot soapy water, and a final rinse where the water runs clean. “Emily Miller

 

Fun fact:  Karynn Kozij, introduced as the 2017 Fairweather emerging artist with her Octopus ocean debris art, gifted Emily her recent beach debris.

 

Read what Eve Marx wrote about Karynn’s art: View from the Porch: Art from the ‘Octopus’s Garden’

Artist transforms marine debris/Date: 2017-08-18 Seaside Signal

Story The Daily Astorian | Signal News
http://www.dailyastorian.com/SS/news

The Daily Astorian | Signal News

http://www.dailyastorian.com/SS/news

 

 

Photo credit: Katie Frankowicz/ The Daily Astorian

Unlike plastic bottles or larger items, microplastics can be difficult to recycle and plague Clatsop County beachesAnd, so,  too, Neal Maine, Seaside naturalist, “re-gifted”  ocean debris to Emily Miller, artist. 

 

 

 

 

Your journey has uncovered the trouble the oceans are in, and drawn something beautiful from that trouble. It is a model for all of us, who each face our own perplexing tangle of strands and nets that we call “life.”   –M. Miller

 

 

“I have spent my life on the coast, and all my artwork has its roots in my love of the sea. I see the coast as a border between the known and unknown, amid constant cycles of change. My work explores these transition environments as a marker of our place within the larger network of natural systems. I believe that joyful exploration of the unknown creates a positive, active environment that enriches our relationships with ourselves, each other, and our world.  I am a lifelong artist with a passion for materials.”  —Emily Miller

c. Emily Miller

Table display featuring art by Joanna Donaca and calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson.

Art by Lisa Wiser. 

Nature photography by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images.

 

Art by Theresa O’Leary, necklace by Mary Truhler, pastel by Greta Lindwood, ceramics  by Emily Miller, glass by Rox Heath, wood bowls  by Daniel Harris and Mike Brown.

 

Miniature by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett.

Fused glass by Bob Heath and pressed floral by Mike Mason.

 

 

 

Key rings by Luan LaLonde,  encaustic art by Kimberly Kent, pen/ink by Britney Drumheller, photographs by Don Frank and metallic art by Richard Newman.

 

 

 

And, too, bunnies, of course,  amidst the green. 

 

 

FRESH GREENS, an exhibition,  through March.

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside, Oregon

 

For more info,  please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Photos by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

 

# 1 Image 2017: Beaver Tales  habitat lecture at Fairweather’s by biologist, naturalist, wildlife photographer Neal Maine. 

 

 

#2 Image from 2017: Kimberly Kent, artist and art broker  meets her art on display at Fairweather’s.

 

 

#3 Image from 2017: Most viewed  Linda Fenton-Mendenhall photo collage from a  Fairweather Art Walk.

Pictured top row/ left to right:  Reneé Hafeman; a round of applause from art patrons; Paul Brent artist talk. 

Middle row/ left to right: table top display;  Britney Drumheller  artist talk;  artist Emily Miller;  emerging artist Whelpsy Whelp. 

Bottom row/ left to right: marine debris artist Karynn Kozij;  Art Walk hostess Joan modeling art;  Fairweather sponsored Pop-Up Gallery and Studio with artist Paul Brent, Gail and Ellen, hostesses; Denise,  Kemy Kay, Joan and Saundra having fun.

 

 

 

#4 image from 2017:  Artist Carolyn Macpherson  offering a Seaside Painting LIVE ™ episode at Fairweather’s.  

 

#5 image from 2017: Michael Gilbert, wood artist, meets Mike Brown, wood artist at Fairweather’s.

 

 

 

#6 image from 2017:  Master calligrapher Penelope Culbertson offers a Seaside Scribing LIVE(tm) event at Faiweather’s.

 

 

 

 

#7 image from 2017:  Shirley 88 performs LIVE on the Fairweather grand.

 

#8 image from 2017:  Flynn, the most handsome American  Kestrel, assists Wildlife Center of the North Coast Executive Director Joshua Saranpaa, during a LIVE Doing Good Works ™ auction at Fairweather’s.

 

 

 

 

#10 2017 image:  Irish Lands opening reception at Fairweather’s featured a family heirloom brought to America in the 1850’s.

 

 

Artists represent the heartbeat of the Fairweather Gallery.  What we strive to put out in the arts community is  the artist’s conversations.  We have been fortunate to experience the sharing and giving of many, many creative minds  for over 11 years.

 

So, for us,  in 2018, the opportunity to continue to present an arts platform forward  is all about shining a bright light on the reminder that we are all connected… artists, patrons and community.

Original art by Diane Copenhaver. 

It’s beginning to look like…

 

Coastal winter table display featuring art by Paul Brent.

It’s beginning to like like…

 

Wall art by Mike Mason, Jan Shield and Joanne Donaca. Credenza table art by Charles Schweigert and Deb Curtis.

It’s beginning to look like…

 

 

 

  Calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson.  Earrings by Debra Beard and Mary Hurst. Red tipped vases  by Emily Miller.

 Fairweather House and Gallery is embracing the fa-la-la season.

Always and forever embracing regional artists.

Always and forever featuring crafts made by local hands.

 

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