Gregory Bell


 

# 1 Image 2017: Beaver Tales  habitat lecture at Fairweather’s by biologist, naturalist, wildlife photographer Neal Maine. 

 

 

#2 Image from 2017: Kimberly Kent, artist and art broker  meets her art on display at Fairweather’s.

 

 

#3 Image from 2017: Most viewed  Linda Fenton-Mendenhall photo collage from a  Fairweather Art Walk.

Pictured top row/ left to right:  Reneé Hafeman; a round of applause from art patrons; Paul Brent artist talk. 

Middle row/ left to right: table top display;  Britney Drumheller  artist talk;  artist Emily Miller;  emerging artist Whelpsy Whelp. 

Bottom row/ left to right: marine debris artist Karynn Kozij;  Art Walk hostess Joan modeling art;  Fairweather sponsored Pop-Up Gallery and Studio with artist Paul Brent, Gail and Ellen, hostesses; Denise,  Kemy Kay, Joan and Saundra having fun.

 

 

 

#4 image from 2017:  Artist Carolyn Macpherson  offering a Seaside Painting LIVE ™ episode at Fairweather’s.  

 

#5 image from 2017: Michael Gilbert, wood artist, meets Mike Brown, wood artist at Fairweather’s.

 

 

 

#6 image from 2017:  Master calligrapher Penelope Culbertson offers a Seaside Scribing LIVE(tm) event at Faiweather’s.

 

 

 

 

#7 image from 2017:  Shirley 88 performs LIVE on the Fairweather grand.

 

#8 image from 2017:  Flynn, the most handsome American  Kestrel, assists Wildlife Center of the North Coast Executive Director Joshua Saranpaa, during a LIVE Doing Good Works ™ auction at Fairweather’s.

 

 

#9 image from 2017:  Artist Michael Muldoon offers a Seaside Painting LIVE  ™ episode at Fairweather’s.

 

#10 2017 image:  Irish Lands opening reception at Fairweather’s featured a family heirloom brought to America in the 1850’s.

 

 

Artists represent the heartbeat of the Fairweather Gallery.  What we strive to put out in the arts community is  the artist’s conversations.  We have been fortunate to experience the sharing and giving of many, many creative minds  for over 11 years.

 

So, for us,  in 2018, the opportunity to continue to present an arts platform forward  is all about shining a bright light on the reminder that we are all connected… artists, patrons and community.

 

Encaustic angel by Gregory Bell, wood bowls by Daniel Harris,  wood vase by Mike Brown and  jewelry by Renee Hafeman.

 

 

“When you Search for Me” oil painting  by Lee Munsell, calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson, basket by Charles Schweigert and burl ornaments by Mike Brown.

 

 

“Winter’s Ocean” oil painting, by Ron Nicolaides,  oil pastels by Joanne Donaca and calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson.

 

 

 

Handmade boxes and books  by Christine Trexel, encaustic landscape by Kimberly Kent and bracelets by Mary Boitta.

 

 

 

Grace note received:

“I’m always enthralled when entering Fairweather House and Gallery! A feeling of peace and serenity fill my senses. The beautiful books, vases, natural decor and fabrics complement amazing artworks of every medium. Oils, watercolors, mixed media, wood carvings, photographs and jewelry are displayed in unique exhibit centers that meld peacefully one to another. The gallerist is an artist when it comes to decorating and showcasing beautiful objects and art!” –K. R. 

 

To read more about the gallery, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …about/ …artists

 

Meticulous displays, like none other, with disciplined attention to design perspectives. Find harmony in exquisite materials, combined with the spirit of many artists who know how to apply the mark of being in the Northwest.


Crow by Gregory Bell.

Encaustic (beeswax) on wood panel.

 

Two crows.

Encaustic (beeswax) on wood panel.

Gregory Bell, artist.

And, too, read about crows…

By Lynette Rae McAdams• For Coast Weekend.com  

Published on October 26, 2017

 

Wild Side: Crows – Coastal Life – Coast Weekend 

www.coastweekend.com/cw/coastal-life/20171026/wild-side-crows

Cat.

Encaustic (beeswax) on wood panel by Gregory Bell.

SHADOWS, the October Fairweather Gallery exhibition.

 

Q: What is encaustic, you ask?
A: Encaustic painting, also known as hot wax painting, involves using heated beeswax to which colored pigments are added. The liquid or paste is then applied to a surface—usually wood, though canvas and other materials are often used. Encaustic painting was practiced by Greek artists as far back as the 5th century B.C. Encaustic had a variety of applications: for the painting of portraits and scenes of mythology on wood panels. The Greeks applied coatings of wax and pigment to weatherproof and decorate their ships. Mention is even made by Homer of the painted ships of the Greek warriors who fought at Troy.

Q: How to care for an encaustic work of art, you ask?
A: Occasionally, gently wipe dust off of your piece with a clean and lint free rag.

 

 

Full size, CAT, by Gregory Bell. In addition, gallery exhibit features: pastel 4×4’s by Joanna Donaca, calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson, en plein air by Karen E. Lewis, lava vases by Emily Miller.

And, too, a timely article from the Daily Astorian.

Cougar country: Sightings of the predator have increased on the Oregon Coast
State biologists will attach GPS collars to cougars to study movement
Published on October 24, 2017

By Katie Frankowicz

The Daily Astorian

Yellow signs at trailheads in Ecola and Fort Stevens state parks feature a drawing of a cougar and a blank space to write the date whenever the animal is spotted.

Most years these spaces remain empty, but state wildlife managers say cougar populations appear to be increasing elsewhere along the Oregon Coast, raising questions about what is and what could become cougar country.

Original encaustic art by NW artist Gregory Bell (available$495 to $795).

Call now (503) 738-8899 for more details.

 

 

Q: What is encaustic, you ask?
A: Encaustic painting, also known as hot wax painting, involves using heated beeswax to which colored pigments are added. The liquid or paste is then applied to a surface—usually wood, though canvas and other materials are often used.

Encaustic painting was practiced by Greek artists as far back as the 5th century B.C. Encaustic had a variety of applications: for the painting of portraits and scenes of mythology on wood panels. The Greeks applied coatings of wax and pigment to weatherproof and decorate their ships. Mention is even made by Homer of the painted ships of the Greek warriors who fought at Troy.

 

Q: How to care for an encaustic work of art, you ask?
A: Occasionally, gently wipe dust off of your piece with a clean and lint free rag.

Sacred.  Encaustic (beeswax) on wood panel by Gregory Bell.

 

 

Update:

A federal agency and five conservation groups have put together a reward totaling $15,500 for information on the illegal killing of an Oregon wolf in Klamath County.  The wolf, OR-33, died of gunshot wounds in late April but the case was not confirmed until October following tests on the wolf’s DNA.

It is a violation of the federal Endangered Species Act to kill a gray wolf in the western two-thirds of Oregon, along with a violation of Oregon state game laws.

The wolf’s carcass was found about 20 miles northwest of Klamath Falls in Fremont-Winema National Forest, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials said.

“This is a heartbreaking loss for Oregon’s wolves,” said Amaroq Weiss, West Coast wolf advocate at the Center for Biological Diversity, one of the groups that contributed money.

“Wolf recovery in Oregon depends on wolves like OR-33 making their way west and thriving, so his death is a major setback. We hope someone will do the right thing and come forward with information.”

OR-33 was a 4-year-old male gray wolf that dispersed from northeast Oregon’s Imnaha Pack to southwest Oregon, where he became well known.  He was seen by multiple residents, and his photo was captured by a hunter’s trail camera near Emigrant Reservoir, about six miles southeast of Ashland.

“This wolf is acting like David Lee Roth,” said Greg Roberts, a media personality in Southern Oregon said at the time. “I’ve had eight people in Ashland say that they’ve seen him around their property.”

 

–Zach Urness, outdoors writer, photographer and videographer/ Oct. 24, 2017

http://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/news/crime/…/oregon-wolf…or-33…/794942001/

 

“Hurt No Living Thing”

 

Hurt no living thing;

Ladybird, nor butterfly,

Nor moth with dusty wing,

Not cricket chirping cheerily,

Nor grasshopper so light of leap,

Nor dancing gnat, nor beetle fat,

Nor harmless worms that creep.

— Christina Rossetti

During the opening reception of SHADOWS, Gregory Bell offered an artist talk about the encaustic works depicting the wildlife found in coastal habitat of the area.

 

 

 

 

And, too, during the SHADOWS reception,  the artist was  inspired by FLYNN,   “the handsomest Kestrel around and one of the  WCNC Ambassador Birds!”    I will paint FLYNN next! — Gregory Bell 

 

At the opening reception of  SHADOWS on October 7th there was an  auction  of selected Neal Maine images.  More than $300 was raised in less than five minutes to benefit the  WCNC!!!

 

Wildlife Center of the North Coast (WCNC) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit Oregon corporation, that specializes in wildlife rehabilitation of resident and migratory birds, mammals and other wild creatures naturally occurring in Oregon.

WCNC provides primary services to communities along 167 miles of coastline in Oregon and southwest Washington offering humane care and professional medical treatment to sick, injured, orphaned and displaced native wildlife with the goal of releasing healthy wild animals back into their appropriate habitat; offers quality conservation + environmental education programs concerning local wildlife, their ecosystems, and the human impact on these systems and individuals.

 

 

Coastal Elk Encaustic (beeswax) on wood panel by Gregory Bell.

 

Q: What is encaustic (beeswax) painting, you ask?

 

A:  Encaustic painting involves using heated beeswax to which colored pigments are added.  The beeswax is applied to a surface –usually prepared wood though canvas and other materials are often used.  Metals tools and special brushes can be used to shape the paint before it cools.  Encaustic  painting was developed by the ancient Greek shipbuilders, who used not wax to seal their ships.

 

 

Loner.  Coyote encaustic by Gregory Bell

 

Gregory Bell is an Oregon native, born and raised here in the Pacific Northwest.

He was a student of the Oregon College of Art and Craft where he pursued studies in ceramics.

He has expressed himself visually through ceramic, glass, encaustic (wax) sculpture, encaustic painting and is an avid photographer.

He is a problem-solver and enjoys the challenge of relating his point of view through complex materials.

His work is shown locally and he has enjoyed success in juried shows.

He practices historical film photography, specifically wet-plate collodion (tintype) and platinum/palladium printing methods.

He works from his studio in Cannon Beach, Oregon.

 

 

Crow encaustic by Gregory Bell.  Two’s a Company encaustic by Gregory Bell.

 

Fairweather House and Gallery, 612 Broadway

SHADOWS, an exhibition through October,  focuses on the interplay of light and dark through selected art that expresses time as the fall season progresses.

New artwork by Northwest artists Diane Copenhaver, Gregory Bell,  Penelope Culbertson, Whelsey Whelp, Lisa Wiser, Karen E. Lewis, Tamara Johnson and Marga Stanley will be featured.

 

 

 

Diane Copenhaver, abstract artist

Diane is a resident of the northwest and recently embarked on a journey of discovery to unleash her creative talents after a successful career in business. Art classes at Bellevue College have provided foundational skills focused on the principles and elements of design, color theory and harmonies, and painting techniques and processes.

Diane is painting primarily abstract using acrylics on varied surfaces. She also produces collage and mixed media works, is studying calligraphic arts and has begun to explore encaustic painting.

Color and texture are often the focus of Diane’s paintings. She uses layers of paint, as well as a variety of tools and mediums.

 

 

“As I contemplated the subject of ‘Shadows’, I found inspiration in a variety of perspectives around the idea of shadow; shadow as opposite, reflection, repetition, companion, or as enabled by light.”

 

“I enjoy the freedom of non-representational painting and used these ideas of shadow to explore the use of black and white and the beautiful gradients of grey. I have expressed ‘Shadows’ through a variety of works; bold and expressive, muted and gentle, solid and soft edges, and layers of dark and light. I am naturally moved to create a sense of mystery in my painting and hope that my work for ‘Shadows’ provides the space to engage and create a personal story and interpretation of shadow.” –Diane Copenhaver

 

 

 

 

One of four.  Gradient series by Diane Copenhaver.

 

 

Sincerely series. I and II by Diane Copenhaver.

 

Layer series. I, II, III and IV by Diane Copenhaver.

 

 

Mysteries by Diane Copenhaver.

 

Fairweather House and Gallery, 612 Broadway

 SHADOWS, an exhibition  through October,  focuses on the interplay of light and dark with through selected art that expresses time as the fall season progresses.

New artwork by Northwest artists Diane Copenhaver, Gregory Bell,  Penelope Culbertson, Whelsey Whelp, Lisa Wiser, Karen E. Lewis, Tamara Johnson and Marga Stanley will be featured.

 

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