Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, PhD.


“Hear you’ve weathered the sequester well! I’m working on new designs where I’m incorporating drift wood (tiny pieces) into the weaving.”  Martha H. Denham, pine needle weaving artist

Grace notes received

“Your virtual tours during the COVID-19 shutdown of the Gallery were wonderful! What a lot of work you have done. I am most impressed and grateful to be a part of your lovely displays.  Delightful!!!” Jo Pomeroy Crockett, artist

“You must be planning a bit to get back to your gallery. We will all come out of this a bit wiser and more caring and above all else grateful for all the little blessings in our lives. I’ll look forward to when we can meet again. Until then take good care and may you walk in beauty,” Toni Avery, artist

“Hugs! I’ve been doing a watercolor each day, and posting on social media – both good and bad. Thank you for all you do.” Leah Kohlenberg, artist

“I look forward to seeing you and will stop in soon to say hello and shop. Bless you for your strength and hard work.”  Gayle H. Seely, artist

Takeaway: “The State’s shutdown  order was meant to slow the spread of COVID-19 until a medical infrastructure was put in place. And, now, testing procedures are in place.  Businesses, indeed, the entire medical community in the North Coast, and residents have a handle on PPE supplies. Safey standards are in place for the common good.  Thankfully, today, we have a much better understanding of the pandemic than we had in early March.  Throughout the past few months, I was grateful to have conversations with my artists, patrons, and friends, just check in with them.  All created a center point for me to go back tothe gallery after the pandemic was managed,”  </em>D. Fairweather, gallerist  D. Fairweather, gallerist.

 

We will be following the State’s order for physical distancing, wearing cloth face coverings, handwashing and cleaning surfaces.

We request visitors to wear face coverings, as well.

We are in this together,

And, yet, out of an abundance of caution, during the State’s Phase One re-opening plans, we will only be able to offer limited hours.

 

Sat May 16 CLOSED

Sun May 17 Open 12-3:pm

Open thereafter every Mon, Thu, Fri, Sat, and Sun 12-3:pm

Closed Tue and Wed

Going forward our hours will remain limited until there is a convincing containment of the coronavirus.

Staying safe.

 

Since 2007 we have had the privilege representing remarkable NW artists.

We will be reopening oh-so-softly, oh-so carefully, and, truly, oh-so safely following official guidelines in protecting the health of our community.

‘Your plan sounds like a good one. Sounds as though we may all have made it safely through this. One of your over 65 staff,”  JS

Please read more about our gallery and our commitment to NW artists and products made by NW hands.

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Enjoy this behind-the-scenes look at how Fairwweather’s has captured NW artists’ artwork during past May art exhibitions.

May 2019

Artist lectures.

Artists Patricia Clark-Finley, Carolyn Wagler, Russell J. Young and Deirdra Doan

May 2018

Artist lectures.

May 2017

Special visitors, special art and artist visit.

May 2016

Featured artists.

May 2015

LIVE performance, painting LIVE and artist patron.

May 2014

Painting LIVE and performing LIVE,

Hope you enjoyed this behind-the-scenes look at how Fairwweather’s has captured NW artists’ artwork during five past May exhibitions.

 

Fairweather House and Gallery shut its doors mid-March following the Governor’s order that nonessential retailers and services must be closed.

 

“At a moment when our physical location is closed due to the health crisis, online viewing is offered as a primary means to present art and to connect with art enthusiasts,”  galleriest D. Fairweather.

Please read more about the gallery and its commitment to NW artists and products made by NW hands.

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

Soon, we hope to be on the other side of the pandemic crisis.

The arts play a vital role in supporting tourism efforts in our community, and while we are currently in a holding pattern,

there is no time like the present for a bit of looking back and, hopefully, for moving forward.

We will continue sharing and connecting in the arts with the artists and you.

 

Want more info contact gallery curator @fairweatherkd@gmail.com or message on FB @fairweatherhouseandgallery

 

 

No barriers to art this month – Seaside First Saturday Art Walk will be 100% online May 2-25!

May Art Walk is a concept of gallery-coordinated virtual exhibits.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CyYvHpqQI9g

As we continue following the State’s stay at home order,  Seaside galleries remain closed until further notice.

Galleries have gone on-line and are committed to assist you with during  COVID-19 via e-mail and through social media platforms.

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

On-line until further notice

A curatorial virtual NW exhibiton titled ‘In Full Bloom’

Fairweather House and Gallery brings together artists’ works in a variety of genres and interpretations, grouping them into an on-line spectrum of theme and color.

Featuring art by Jo Pomeroy Crockett, Christine Downs, Bev Drew Kindley, Dorota Haber-Leligh, Greta Lindwood, Melissa Jander, Carmela Newstead, and Zifen Qian.

“I love flowers. If I could, I would have flowers for dessert and live in a greenhouse surrounded by them. I actually crave flowers for their lovely colors, textures, fragrance, and beauty,   D. Fairweather, galleriest

Featured floral art work includes botanical, realism, abstraction, and surrealism.

Research has found that being around flowers increases the level of compassion that they feel for others and are more willing to extend a helping hand to those in need.

Art can be purchased and picked-up by curbside appointment or delivered free locally.

Contact gallery curator @fairweatherkd@gmail.com or message on FB @fairweatherhouseandgallery

We will see you, hopefully, on the other side of the pandemic crisis.

 

 

Just viewing floral art causes joy in the same way as walking in nature and losing oneself in music.

“For if you think art is not necessary try to spend time without music, books, poems, movies and… art.”

Sharing a video recently posted by North Coast Land Conservancy.

 

 

Thank you for reading about the arts in Seaside.

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

In my professional work, I listened to many people talk about their goals, their problems, and occasionally, those things they really loved doing. More often than not, the things they really loved were not the work-related activities they considered essential to earning a living. They relegated their personal passions to sometime in the future, when “the kids are out on their own, when I can have time to myself, . ..” Many gifts seem to be pushed into the background in the interest of earning a living. One can understand, certainly, but what a price we pay.

I think each of us has a responsibility to develop our gifts, our talents. And yes, we also have a responsibility to support our families. And yes, life does interfere in developing our gifts. HOWEVER, I have observed that most of us, at some time in our lives, manage to heed that inner voice and to develop our talents.

I taught art classes for many years, often in retirement communities such as Sun City, AZ, I worked with many budding artists who were finally tapping into their artistic gifts. Whether their artistic talents were just appearing in the lifelong developmental process or the artists were finally acknowledging their artistic bent, I have no way of knowing. But, the budding artists were, at last, listening to their inner gifts demanding to get out . One painting student, at 96 and with macular degeneration never missed a watercolor class because he was determined to “paint well”.

I was blessed to have a grandfather who was an artist and an engraver. From the time I was 3 yrs. old, he encouraged me to draw and regularly critiqued by creations. One time, when I was about 10, he added a nose extension to one of my ballerinas saying, “Even beautiful dancers have noses.” To this day, I am very conscious about drawing people with plenty of nose.

As for today, I am  thankful for the gifts I have been given. I work hard to develop my art gift and daily do something “artful” – drawing, painting, thinking, planning.

I believe that gratitude is essential as a mindset. I think it helps avoid arrogance, the sense of self-importance, and depression. In art or other artistic endeavors, I believe it leads to willingness to experiment, to try new materials, and to grow as an artist. (Reprinted lecture JPC)

The essence of all beautiful art, all good art, is gratitude.” F. Nietzche.

As part of her lifelong interest in and enjoyment of art, Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, PhD. , has been painting in watercolor, water media including marbling and inks, pastel, and collage for many years. In combination with her work as a free-lance writer and educator, her painting allows her to continue developing her creativity and technical skills.

 

Pomeroy-Crockett works primarily wet-into-wet and strives for dramatic value patterns. Bright colors, an emphasis on the play of light, and a touch of whimsy mark her paintings. The artist’s body of work includes florals on unusual painting supports such as yupo, a paper made from recycled products, challenging glass like surfaces, and birch bark. When asked what she likes to best paint, she answers “Anything that will hold still for a few minutes.”

Pomeroy-Crockett was a juried member of the Arizona Artists Guild and is currently a juried member of the Watercolor Society of Oregon. She has exhibited in numerous juried art competitions. Her work is in private collections in various parts of the U.S., England, Canada, and Switzerland.

 

No barriers to art this month – Seaside First Saturday Art Walk for May 2 will be 100% online!

So, here it goes, the May 2 Art Walk  will be a concept of gallery-coordinated virtual exhibits.

As we continue following the State’s stay at home order,  Seaside galleries remain closed until further notice.

However, a few of the galleries have gone on-line and are committed to assist you with your art needs during this time via e-mail and through social media platforms. Virtual tour movie will be released May 2.  Thank you for following the arts in Seaside.

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery, 612 Broadway St./ on-line until further notice

A curatorial virtual NW exhibiton titled ‘In Full Bloom’

Fairweather House and Gallery brings together artists’ works in a variety of genres and interpretations, grouping them into an on-line spectrum of theme and color.

Featuring art by Jo Pomeroy Crockett, Christine Downs, Bev Drew Kindley, Dorota Haber-Leligh, Greta Lindwood, Melissa Jander, Carmela Newstead, and Zifen Qian.

In response to the beauty of nature, the artwork by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett celebrates hope, appreciation and the goodness of the world around.

Her work includes botanical realism, abstraction, and surrealism.

Art can be purchased and picked-up by curbside appointment or delivered free locally.

Contact gallery curator @fairweatherkd@gmail.com

Visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com or contact contact@fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway, Seaside Oregon

Closed until it is safe to reopen

Due to the  novel coronavirus the gallery shut its doors on March 15, 2020

We hope make to it possible to enjoy some of what we have to offer to while you are at home in during the order to Stay at Home, Save Lives. Publishing articles is a way that we can continue to feature our resident artists during the situation,” chief curator Denise Fairweather.

 

 

Close up of Lysichiton americanus/ AKA Skunk Cabbage or Swamp Lantern  watercolor by Jo Pomeroy Crockett

Adored by many and ridiculed by some, Lysichiton americanus, aka skunk cabbage or swamp lantern is one of the first plants to emerge in late winter. Pushing its way through snow and peeking out of bogs, this bright yellow curvaceous “leaf” (spathe) with its inner structure of numerous small flowers (spadix) provides a warm resting and mating place for beetles and other insects. the calla lily. It has a distinctive fragrance similar to garlic or apples that give rise to its popular name.

Lysichton has many uses. Some Native peoples used it as an emergency food and a medicine. Hanis Coos elder Lottie Evanoff reportedly said she liked skunk cabbage very much and found it curious that settlers did not eat it. “Bears eats skunk cabbage, is just crazy for it. So, it must be good eating; everything bear eats is good eating.”  Jo Pomeroy Crockett, PhD/ artist

Jo Pomeroy Crockett

GATHER notes:

Importance of Quality Watercolor Paper

Watercolor, while not fussy is particular about the kind of paper it prefers. A special rough paper, handmade in India, with a very deep tooth is especially suited to this medium. Pigment just skims over the top but if given enough water, likes to settle into the valleys. Gentle glazes provide depth and effects not possible with other papers. The watercolors were painted on this special paper.  JPC

 

 

Jo Pomeroy Crockett, Phd., has often lectured at Fairweather’s.

Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, a North coast resident, works primarily wet-into-wet and strives for dramatic patterns. Vivid colors, an emphasis on the play of light and a touch of whimsy mark her paintings. Although she enjoys painting a variety of subjects, she especially enjoys painting nature. She has exhibited in numerous juried art competitions in the Southwest and the Pacific Northwest. Her work is in private collections in various parts of the United States, England, Canada and Switzerland. In combination with her art, she works as a free-lance writer and educator

 

 

“First Leap” by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images. Proceeds in support of NCLC.

 “This mallard chick seems to be enjoying life to the fullest as it scurries across a lily pad in a pond near my home.”  Neal Maine

After a thirty-year career as an award winning biology teacher at Seaside High School, Neal Maine became the first executive director of North Coast Land Conservancy, which he co-founded in 1986. Since his retirement from the land trust in 2010, he has pursued his passion for nature photography through PacificLight Images, a partnership with Michael Wing, dedicated to raising awareness of coastal ecology and the wildlife with whom we share the region’s estuaries, freshwater wetlands and forests. Their photography centers around coastal and Columbia River landscape, ecology and the rich estuary habitat with the surrounding wetlands and forest systems.

 

Habitat lectures by Neal Maine at Fairweather’s will return when it is safe to re-open the gallery.

 

Artists and speakers were booked for the exhibition, GATHER,  several booked more than one year ago, with some of art delivered before the gallery closed mid-March.

The April exhibition, titled GATHER, which was meant to open in the gallery April 4 and run through April 25, was canceled  due to the novel coronavirus.

 

Elk in the dunes by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images.  Proceeds in support of NCLC.

North Coast Land Conservancy/ reprint
Elk have been on the Oregon Coast a long, long, long, long time. Scientists believe elk migrated from Asia to North America over Beringia—better known as the Bering Land Bridge—some 120,000 years ago. The animals would have been a familiar sight to the first human hunters who migrated here tens of thousands of years later. Elk survived, and continue to survive, by being able to eat almost any kind of plant they can find, while we humans are limited to eating “soft fruits, a few easily digestible seeds, and the milk and flesh of our more versatile animal cousins,” as David Haskell writes in The Forest Unseen, one of naturalist and photographer Neal Maine’s favorite books.

 

 

Chasing the Light by Neal Maine/PacificLight Images.  Proceeds in support of NCLC.

We are all are holed up at home to slow the spread of the virus, hopefully,  this “Fairweather fix” will give moods and psyches a lift with some online R&R.

 

Watch time lapse video showing efforts in creating space for last year’s April exhibition, LIFE ABUNDANT.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dhKYvSZM3bg

Soon, when it is safe to re-open, we will be back in the gallery.

Stay safe at home, save lives.

Fairweather House and Gallery will continue to reach out with on-line blog articles about the arts.

And, too, on a regular basis, during these uncertain times, we will continue to re-post previous LIVE  Fairweather arts events…until it is safe to re-open the gallery.

http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

End note:

Flowers heal broken hearts.
https://youtu.be/ryUxrFUk6MY

Original watercolor by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, handmade spring column candles, mouthblown glass, hand turned wood candle sticks, pottery by Suzy Holland, mouth blown stemware by Rox Heath, vintage bird feeder and bird house, silk and chenille throw pillows.

Pastel by Gretha Lindwood, pair of whimsical artworks by Marga Stanley, mouth blown art glass, hand made potter vase, hand wired silk iris stem, hand beeded flowers, contemporary floral by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett and art cards by Leah Kohlenberg, glassware by Robin and Rox Heath.

Art by Toni Avery, handmade tea pot by Kate Carlye, hand-forged candle sticks, fused glass by Carolyn Lindberg and mouth blown art vase

Pottery by Suzy Holland and oil painting by Carmela Newstead.

Art by Leah Kohlenberg, textile art by Linda Olson..

Handmade birdie pillow by Cherry Jones Harris, feather motif handmade journal by Christine Trexel, mouth blown art glass, pottery and platters hand made by Maria Hudson.

Handmade glass by Bob Heath.

Handmade glass by Sandy and Bob Lercari.

 

 

Handmade glass by Christine Downs, fused glass by Sandy and Bob Lercari, urchin rocks by Kandy Schwartz, and ocean oil by Sandy and Bob Lercari.

Outdoor garden **folly filled with  cattail dyed green spheres and handmade moss decorative moss spheres.

 

**Q:  What is a garden folly, you ask?

A: A garden folly is usually considered a building or structure that is designed for decoration with no other purpose than to add a touch of whimsy or extravagance to the surrounding landscape. The term began as “a name for any costly structure considered to have shown folly in the builder” and was often named after the individual who commissioned or designed the project. The connotations of silliness or madness in this definition are in accord with the general meaning of the French word “folie”; however, another older meaning of this word is “delight.”

Photos by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

 

“This exhibit’s expectation lies in its possibility to present fresh, new perspectives, inspiration, experiences, reflection and even the possibility for transcendence in some way. Indeed, the meaning of “fresh start” is the beginning of a new period or step.  The North Coast land, truly, is in full springtime bloom for FRESH START, Fairweather’s March exhibition.”

Handmade ceramic beads, mouth blown glass and semi-precious gemstone necklaces and earrings by jewelry artist Mary Truhler.

Spring Day  Approaching encaustic art by Peg Wells.

Q: What do the three Fairweather artists have in common, you ask?

A: The artists  Mary Truhler and Peg Wells have a nursing background.  Some of the fundamental values that drive art — compassion, humanity, empathy, creativity and expression — are the very same values that influence nursing. The creation of art is a wonderful vehicle for nurses, whether the goal is to unwind, replenish the soul or share the nursing experience with the world. Proof that nursing and creative mindsets can live harmoniously.

Case studies of the scientific  mind engaging in art and vice versa are often presented as being unusual. However, psychologists recently conducted a comprehensive review of the extent to which Nobel Prize winners in the sciences, members of the Royal Society and US National Academy of Sciences, and members of the US public reported engaging in arts and crafts-based pursuits. They found that members of the Royal Society and National Academy of Sciences were almost twice as likely to report engaging in arts and crafts pursuits as the general public. Eminent Nobel laureate scientists were almost three times more likely to report such activities.  http://www.discovermagazine.com › mind › does-evidence-support-the-artis..

As Einstein, himself noted: “The greatest scientists are artists as well”.

http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

Artist Bill Baily.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

A FINE LINE slideshow.  Images by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

 

 

Artist’s lecture notes for A FINE LINE opening reception from Jo Pomeroy-Crockett.

 

A line is the connection of points. It has direction but no absolute thickness. Line is one of the elements that artists use to create compositions. Other elements include shape, color, value, form, texture, and space.

As an artist, I have mixed feelings about line. As children, we were taught to stay within the lines and on the line. Some people deny their art ability by saying, “I can’t draw a straight line.” In drawing, too many lines may say everything for the viewer and not let the viewer’s eye finish the object.

Lines around an object or outlining produce cartoon-like figures. Thus, line should be used with restraint.

However, as G.K. Chesterton said, “Art, like morality, consists in drawing the line somewhere.”

In everyday speech, line has various connotations. We may “draw the line” at something, or appreciate the “fine line” between things. Someone may try to “give us line” about something, we may ask a friend to “send us a line” or we may “get a line” on something we want.

When drawing, I use line, but frequently, I shade the area around the line where the line would be, rather than using a line to show an object. When painting, I avoid the use of obvious line by drawing with a brush dipped in a very diluted cobalt blue, which disappears under other watercolors.

I do use line in my compositions to direct a viewer’s eye, to help establish shape and space, and add a bit of a statement. Whether or not I use line, art is a joy for me.

I think Picasso said this best: “Art washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life.” —Jo Pomeroy-Crockett.

 

 

 

As part of her lifelong passion for art, Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, Ph.D., paints in watercolor, water media including acrylics and inks, pastel and collage including assemblage. In addition to her work as a free-lance writer and educator, her painting allows her to continue developing her creativity and technical skills.

“Fall Beginnings” original watercolor by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett.

Pomeroy-Crockett was a juried member of the Arizona Artists Guild and is currently a juried member of the Watercolor Society of Oregon. She has exhibited in numerous juried art competitions. She exhibits art at Fairweather House and Gallery in Seaside.  Her work is in private collections in various parts of the U.S., England, Canada, and Switzerland.

 

 

 

http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/  artist tab Jo Pomeroy-Crockett

“A FINE LINE” on view through October 31 at Fairweather House and Gallery.

 

“The Weavers” mixed media by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett

Fun Fact: Pomeroy-Crockett is part owner of the Astoria Art Loft where she gives painting classes.


Back wall display featuring acrylics  by Jan Shield, landscapes by Judy Horning Shaw, cabbage by Sandy Caghill, and vintage Hunt Slohem bunny art.

On the trestle table display: floral oil by Blue Bond, Landscape by Jan Shield, art glass by Mike Fox, calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson, handmade journal by Christine Trexel, segmented vase by Mike Brown, bracelets by Barbara Walker, floral cards by Mike Mason,  sand blasted beverage glasses by Bob Heath, hand-made candles and mouth blown glass.

Pillar wall display features oils by Melissa Jander.

 

 

Cabinet top featuring bamboo basket art by Charles Schweigert and vintage Chanel necklaces by Reneé Hafeman.

Cabinet interior featuring beaded mosaic box by Gayle H. Seely, rice paper art by Zifen Qian, dragonfly book matched box by Ray Noregaard, oak spoons by Mike Morris, wood bowl by Mike Brown, encaustic poppy by Kimberly Kent, floral oil by Melissa Jander and wood canisters by Fred Lukens.

 

Floral oil by Paul Brent, wood canister by Fred Lukens and mouth blown art glass.

 

Art by James Waterman, laser cut bronze bowls, wood bowl by Mike Brown with wire garden follies.

 

Calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson, portrait oil by Blue Bond,  impasto floral by Melissa Jander, mouth blown glass vase with mercury glass candlesticks, hand-made ribbed candles and one-of-a-kind asymmetrical necklaces by Mary Truhler.

 

Floral art  by Barbara Bacon Folawn, art glass by Bob Heath, handmade paper box by Christine Trexel, knitted shawl by Karen Johnson, jewelry boxes by Ray Noregaard,  wood shells by Mike Brown, bracelets by Mary Boitta and abstract watercolor by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett.

 

Fused glass by Mike Fox, floral art by Bev Drew-Kindley,  glass platter by Sandy and Bob Lercari with floral teapot set by Kate Caryle.

 

 

“Displaying for ‘Life Abundant’  Fairweather’s April exhibition, was a delight working with selected regional artists.”  D. Fairweather, gallerist and allied member, A.S.I.D., American Society of Interior Designers.

 

For more about the gallery, please go to www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Nature- the garden that we all inhabit, called Mother Earth. It is our safe haven.” 

Photos by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall

Copyright © 2019

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