Jo Pomeroy-Crockett



Back wall display featuring acrylics  by Jan Shield, landscapes by Judy Horning Shaw, cabbage by Sandy Caghill, and vintage Hunt Slohem bunny art.

On the trestle table display: floral oil by Blue Bond, Landscape by Jan Shield, art glass by Mike Fox, calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson, handmade journal by Christine Trexel, segmented vase by Mike Brown, bracelets by Barbara Walker, floral cards by Mike Mason,  sand blasted beverage glasses by Bob Heath, hand-made candles and mouth blown glass.

Pillar wall display features oils by Melissa Jander.

 

 

Cabinet top featuring bamboo basket art by Charles Schweigert,  watercolor by Carolyn Macpherson and vintage Chanel necklaces by Reneé Hafeman.

Cabinet interior featuring beaded mosaic box by Gayle H. Seely, rice paper art by Zifen Qian, dragonfly book matched box by Ray Noregaard, oak spoons by Mike Morris, wood bowl by Mike Brown, encaustic poppy by Kimberly Kent, floral oil by Melissa Jander and wood canisters by Fred Lukens.

 

Floral oil by Paul Brent, wood canister by Fred Lukens and mouth blown art glass.

 

Art by James Waterman, laser cut bronze bowls, wood bowl by Mike Brown with wire garden follies.

 

Calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson, portrait oil by Blue Bond,  impasto floral by Melissa Jander, mouth blown glass vase with mercury glass candlesticks, hand-made ribbed candles and one-of-a-kind asymmetrical necklaces by Mary Truhler.

 

Floral art  by Barbara Bacon Folawn, art glass by Bob Heath, handmade paper box by Christine Trexel, knitted shawl by Karen Johnson, jewelry boxes by Ray Noregaard,  wood shells by Mike Brown, bracelets by Mary Boitta and abstract watercolor by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett.

 

Fused glass by Mike Fox, floral art by Bev Drew-Kindley,  yupo art by Carolyn Macpherson, glass platter by Sandy and Bob Lercari with floral teapot set by Kate Caryle.

 

 

“Displaying for ‘Life Abundant’  Fairweather’s April exhibition, was a delight working with selected regional artists.”  D. Fairweather, gallerist and allied member, A.S.I.D., American Society of Interior Designers.

 

For more about the gallery, please go to www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Nature- the garden that we all inhabit, called Mother Earth. It is our safe haven.” 

Photos by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall

Copyright © 2019


 ‘Shannon’ crystal candle sticks.

Ireland is home to some of the world’s most impressive crystal designs, among them ‘Shannon’  crystal. The craft of Irish crystal making is an art form that has been developed and modified over hundreds of years, going back as far as the Celts, who brought the first glass to Ireland in for jewelry making.

Table design featuring ‘Shannon’ crystal, mixed-media beach stone and lichen art by Peggy Stein, ‘Great Blue Heron’ oil painting by Paul Brent, miniature abstract by  Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, semi-precious gemstone necklaces by Mary Bottita.  Tables by D. Fairweather, gallerist and  allied member A.S.I.D., American Society of Interior Designers. Photo collage by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

 

 

Green art glass: no other medium captures the dance of light and color so perfectly, mouth blown gracefully into a free-form shape. Approximately 20’ diameter at rim.

Kemy Kay, art hostess in dressed in the wearing of green, Carol Johansen, frequent gallery visitor. She is a cousin to Fairweather resident artist Linda Fenton-Mendenhall, did you know?

Pastels on table by Leah Kohlenberg,  raw edged coffee table by Ray Noregaard, birch wood framed acrylics on grass cloth  by Barbara Bacon Folawn, abstract 12×12 by Diane Copenhaver, pen and ink framed and matted art by emerging artist Brenda Gordon, paper cloth beaded origami by Peggy Evans and table display featuring the liquid beauty of a hand blown fluted glass bowl. Photo collage by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall

 

One-of-a-kind hand-crafted art jewelry at the Fairweather Gallery. Distinctive  NW artist-made necklaces and earrings.

 

Concert grand piano display for ‘March’ featuring watch necklaces by Brigitte Willse, sea glass jewelry by Barbara Walker, calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson and earrings by Mary Boitta, Mary Hurst, Karen Johnson and Tanya Gardner.

 

 

 

Leather key ring cross by Luan and silver cuff by Alan Stockam and Heather Rieder.

 

 

 

To read about the history of the Celtic cross, please visit https://www.gaelicmatters.com/celtic-cross-meaning.html

 

To read more about past Irish and March articles about  Fairweather’s go to:

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/…/a-round-of-applause-for-after-pa…

Mar 12, 2017 – A round of applause for after party images from IRISH LANDS, an exhibition opening at Fairweather’s.

Feb 14, 2017 – Posted by Fairweather House and Gallery under Q&A | Tags: Art Galleries, … Kate Hegarty came to America from Ireland with a spinning wheel …
Mar 2, 2016 – The Wildlife Center of the North Coast will bring a live American kestrel to FairweatherHouse and Gallery during …

 

Making the Dollar: Fairweather House & Gallery. Published: March 26, 2009. During 25 years of interior design experience she …

Top left: Rain painting by Jeni Lee, mixed media 12 x 12 painting by Jan Rimerman, mini words in wisdom by Diane Copenhaver, ceramics, lava vases and pottery by Emily Miller, mouth blown glass platters by Sandy and Bob Lercari, pastel “Pond Reflection” by Dan Mackerman, as well as calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson.

Top center: “Great Blue Heron” oil painting by Paul Brent.

Top right:  pair of whimsical art by Marga Stanley.

Bottom left: Seaside Visitors Bureau/ Tourism booklet 2019 open to a page about the Fairweather Gallery.  Nature photography by Neal Maine.

Bottom center:  Watercolors on yupo by Carolyn Macpherson and wood boxes by Ray Noregaard.

Bottom right: IIumne  candle collection on piano,  Fine Art lamps,  mirror by Currey and Co., indoor/outdoor garden stool by Art Interiors and limited edition rabbit lithographs.

2019 March postcard by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

 

#10. Seaside Painting LIVE ™ demonstrations.  At the easel is artist Carolyn Macpherson.

 

#9. Fourth annual harp petting zoo. Faiweather’s December Seaside First Saturday Art Walk.

 

#8.  Artist Emily Miller’s 100 Turtles project. Doing good works.

 

#7.  Shirley 88 performing LIVE on the Fairweather grand.

#6.  Celebrity artists Jorjett Strumme, Agnes Field and Barbara Rosbe Felisky lecturing.

 

#5.  Five rescued Fairweather greyhounds made an appearance in the gallery.

 

#4. Share and Share Alike exhibition.  Indeed, a  show with a personal backstory. Pictured with calligrapher Penelope Culbertson.

 

#3.  The Perfect Pair, Perfect Pare and Perfect Pear exhibition.  Jo-Pomeroy-Crockett, PhD., explains.

 

#2.  All the Neal Maine naturalist and habitat lectures at 6:pm during the Seaside First Saturday Art Walks.

 

#1.  Paul and Lana Jane Brent. Looking back and, surely, looking forward to 2019.

 

“Truly, it’s the people that offer the energy and talent that propels Fairweather House and Gallery.”

Please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com for more information.

 

Salt enhanced watercolor by Paul Brent, encaustic beeswax painting by Peg Wells, pastel by Kathy Moberg,  archival papyrus pen and ink, rice paper by Zifen Qian, mixed media on easel by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett.

Photo collage by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall

“The works included in this exhibit use either new materials or methods and techniques to amplify the meaning in the content of their art. Adding or embedding new materials to the surface creates surprise, and occasionally, deeper interpretation and understanding of the subject.” –Agnes Field, curator

Mixed media art mask by Jorjett Strumme, miniature oil by Barbara Rosbe Felisky, impasto oil paintings by Leah Kohlenberg and Painting Seaside LIVE(tm) Paul Brent.

Photo collage by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall

 

Art in photo:   Carmela Newstead chiseled oil on linen, Agnes Field fresco art and a series of three impasto oils framed in basswood by Martha Lee. Photo by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

 

Exploring New Surfaces, a Fairweather exhibition, through October 31.

“Sea Star” by Paul Brent. Original oil on linen.

Table top display features one-of-a-kind accessories: mouth blown glass, driftwood garland, vintage glass and handmade glass spheres.

 

Table displays feature the art  and artists that, truly, offer endless inspirations for idyllic times at the beach.

More than 200 artists from across the Pacific Northwest are featured in the Faiweather House and Gallery, a business that has been an anchor for Seaside’s growing arts scene for more than 12 years. A variety of mediums include original paintings, sculptures, ceramics and jewelry.

New pieces and artists are added each month, making the Fairweather House and Gallery a must-visit destination in Seaside, Oregon for art connoisseurs.

 

Art by Jan Shield,  glass by Sandy and Bob Lercari,  coral platter by Rinee Merritt, handmade box by Christine Trexel and origami garland by Peggy Evans.
Fairweather House and Gallery is a place to see finished creations of bowls, platters and sculpture, as well as contemporary paintings.

Jewelry by Cher Flick, Mary Hurst and Alan Stockam.  Myrtle wood by Fred and Janice Lukens.  Ocean scape painting by Ron Nicolaides. Gull portrait by Leah Brown.  Nantucket basket by Carol Bolster.  Sea anemone study by Jon Anni. Sail boat water colors by Paul Brent.

 

With appreciation to Linda Fenton-Mendenhall,  photographer.

 

To learn more about the gallery, please go to www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

TO PARE:  The theme for May 2018 for the Fairweather Gallery

 

“When I first reviewed the Fairweather Gallery’s list of themes for 2018, I was intrigued.  So many interesting choices.  As a lover of words and all that they imply, I was attracted to the theme “pare”, “pear” or “pair.  How unusual!  What to choose?  I selected “pare.”

“Pare” usually means “to cut back”, to “slice away”, to “remove”, and even “to simplify.”  When I thought of the “to simplify”, I was hooked.  Little did I know that I nearly shot myself in the foot!

As an artist, “to simplify” means to remove all that is not absolutely necessary to say what I want to say.  The challenge is how few lines, how few colors, how few marks on my paper convey my meaning.  I thought of the cave paintings from 30,000- 40,000 years ago in France and Spain.  How simple and how elegant.

 

 https://www.smithsonianmag.com/…/journey-oldest-cave-paintings-world

Later, Picasso who was also intrigued by simplifying, drew a series of bulls.  The merest line conveyed the strength, the majesty of this noble animal.

 

www.dailyartmagazine.com/pablo-picassos-bulls-road-simplicity

 

So, “to pare” is good for one’s art.  No more worrying about what is pretty, what will sell, just get to the point!  If one line can convey your message, use it.  Do not be too wordy or explain too much! 

 

 

Too much thinking about “to pare”; going back to the homonyms?  Pear, pair, pare, or au pair?  That opens up a world. 

 

There is a painting here by Marga that is an eye-stopper and it is about “pears”.  What a hoot!

“Pears Illustrated, Swimsuit edition” by Marga Stanley

 And the many others which the artists translated “to pare”, “to pair”, or quite simply “pears”.

 

 

I must admit that I gave into to all in my artwork.  This was a challenging theme that made me think.  I will move toward more line work in my efforts to come to the point, and I shall work “to pare”. 

 

 

Jo Pomeroy-Crockett and her art.

And, as I always discover when stretching, thinking is hard work.”  —Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, PhD., writer, educator and artist.

 

For more info about the artist, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Jo Pomeroy-Crockett.

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside, Oregon

Through May 31

Perfect Pear, Pair,  Pare Exhibition

Regional artists were selected due to their art related to scale and perspective, and the way things correlate and interact.

Featuring artists Lisa Wiser, Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, Blue Bond, Marga Stanley, Bill Baily, and Lynda Campbell.

 

 

 

Q: Why do artists often study painting pears, you ask?

A: Indeed, every artist has spent hours staring at pears, later to paint pears to learn the study of light, shading and perspective.

 

Cézanne once proclaimed, “With a pear I want to astonish Paris,” and he succeeded, even in his most deceptively simple still life paintings, to dazzle and delight.

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Turning to the pears grown in the vicinity of the family’s estate, Cézanne dispensed with traditional one-point perspective and examined the fruit, plates, and table from various viewpoints—straight on, above, and sideways.

 

Display featuring pear art by Bill Baily, abstract paintings by Kimberly Reed and abstract art by Diane Copenhaver.

The exhibitions(s) “To Pare Perfect”, aka “Perfect Pear”,  and, too, aka “Perfect Pair” through May 31 at Fairweather House and Gallery.

 

Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, Ph.D. 

 

A Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.,  Latin Philosophiae doctor) is the highest academic degree awarded by universities in most countries.

 

As part of her lifelong interest in and enjoyment of art, Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, PhD. has been painting in watercolor, water media including marbling and inks, pastel, and collage for many years. In combination with her work as a free-lance writer and educator, her painting allows her to continue developing her creativity and technical skills.

Jo Pomeroy-Crockett works primarily wet-into-wet and strives for dramatic value patterns. Bright colors, an emphasis on the play of light, and a touch of whimsy mark her paintings. She enjoys painting a wide variety of subjects.

Jo Pomeroy-Crockett was a juried member of the Arizona Artists Guild and is currently a juried member of the Watercolor Society of Oregon. She has exhibited in numerous juried art competitions. Her work is in private collections in various parts of the U.S., England, Canada, and Switzerland.

 

 

 

Jo Pomeroy-Crockett leads classes in watercolor, water media including marbling and inks, pastel, collage and paper marbling.

 

And, too, Jo Pomeroy Crockett is co-founder of the Astoria Art Loft located at 106 Third Street.

Jo Pomeroy-Crockett leads classes at Dots and Doodles located at 303 Marine Drive in Astoria, as well.

 

Q: What is paper marbling, you ask?

A: Paper marbling is a method of aqueous surface design, which can produce patterns similar to smooth marble or other kinds of stone. Early in its history, marbled paper was used for important documents. Marbling always creates a one-of-a-kind monograph. Even if the exact same process was used, variations in the water, the artist’s hand movements, even the dust particles in the air prevent an exact duplicate. As such, marbled paper was used to prevent forgeries and erasure. For centuries, the secrets of marbling paper were kept closely among the masters.  In the business of book binding, marbling was also used on the edges of ledgers. Theoretically, if a single leaf of the ledger was taken, the pattern would be disrupted.

Go to: https://blog.bookstellyouwhy.com/the-history-and-techniques-of-marbled-paper

And too, for more info: Richard J. Wolfe author, Marbled Paper: Its History, Techniques, and Patterns: With Special Reference to the Relationship of Marbling to Bookbinding in Europe and the Western World.

 

Marbled paper art by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett.

 

Marbled paper art by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett.

For more about Jo Pomeroy-Crockett,  please visit the artist’s tab at  www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

Reprinting a  2014 grace note received:

“I particularly enjoyed the artist, Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, who shared her comments regarding gratitude. I thought about her as I read  Rick Warren. His sentiments mirror those of your guest. I hope that you will share them with her.”  –– Gary

Sidenote:  Yes, the note was shared with Jo Pomeroy-Crockett.   

And, too, by  request, reprinting the Gratitude lecture by Jo Pomeroy-Crockettt/ May, 2014:

“Denise Fairweather asked me to speak briefly on GRATITUDE. GRATITUDE, as you may know, is the theme of the May exhibit. Last October, when I was privileged to exhibit some of my artwork here in this gallery, Denise gave me the opportunity to select a month in 2014 to exhibit more of my paintings. We looked over the various themes for 2014 and while all the themes were of interest, I was drawn to GRATITUDE. At this point in my life, I am very thankful, grateful for so many things.

As an artist, I appreciate Nietzsche’s view that “The essence of all beautiful art, all great art, is gratitude. No matter what one’s level of experience, there is sheer magic as a painting comes into being. Joy and gratitude are essential to the creative process as are perseverance, determination, and work. When a painting turns out well, I always breathe a sigh of relief and say THANK YOU. As someone once said, “If the only prayer you said was thank you, that would be enough.” Eckhert

GRATITUDE, in my view, is central to good mental and spiritual health. I think that it is virtually impossible to be grateful for one’s life and to be depressed at the same time. As Steve Maraboli wrote, “Those with a grateful mindset tend to see the message in the mess. Even though life may knock them down, the grateful find reasons, if even small ones, to get up.”

The act of doing art also leads to good mental and spiritual health. Many of us have an inner drive to draw or paint or sculpt. It is so strong that if we do not do art, we grow restless and uneasy. The way to peace is simply, to draw or paint or think art. We also know the value of doing art in treating emotional/mental problems. Psychotic patients in one treatment center were taught that when they suspected a psychotic episode was coming, they immediately began to do art. In almost all cases, the psychotic episode was avoided.

GRATITUDE has many shades and much depth. We all know about being thankful, in general. But what about the gifts we are born with, the talents we have been given. Most of us discover our special gifts by adolescence, or before, or sometimes, later. Do we have a responsibility to develop those gifts?

In my professional work, I listened to many people talk about their goals, their problems, and occasionally, those things they really loved doing. More often than not, the things they really loved were not the work-related activities they considered essential to earning a living. They relegated their personal passions to sometime in the future, when “the kids are out on their own, when I can have time to myself, . ..” Many gifts seem to be pushed into the background in the interest of earning a living. One can understand, certainly, but what a price we pay.

I think each of us has a responsibility to develop our gifts, our talents. And yes, we also have a responsibility to support our families. And yes, life does interfere in developing our gifts. HOWEVER, I have observed that most of us, at some time in our lives, manage to heed that inner voice and to develop our talents.

I taught art classes for many years, often in retirement communities such as Sun City, AZ, I worked with many budding artists who were finally tapping into their artistic gifts. Whether their artistic talents were just appearing in the lifelong developmental process or the artists were finally acknowledging their artistic bent, I have no way of knowing. But, the budding artists were, at last, listening to their inner gifts demanding to get out . One painting student, at 96 and with macular degeneration never missed a watercolor class because he was determined to “paint well”.

I was blessed to have a grandfather who was an artist and an engraver. From the time I was 3 yrs. old, he encouraged me to draw and regularly critiqued by creations. One time, when I was about 10, he added a nose extension to one of my ballerinas saying, “Even beautiful dancers have noses.” To this day, I am very conscious about drawing people with plenty of nose.

As for today, I am grateful and thankful for the gifts I have been given. I work hard to develop my art gift and daily do something “artful” – drawing, painting, thinking, planning.

I believe that gratitude is essential as a mindset. I think it helps avoid arrogance, the sense of self-importance, and depression. In art or other artistic endeavors, I believe it leads to willingness to experiment, to try new materials, and to grow as an artist.

As Cicero noted, “Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues, it is the parent of all others.”  —Jo Pomeroy Crockett, PhD.

 

Indeed, Fairweather House and Gallery is grateful to represent Jo Pomeroy-Crockett  in Seaside, Oregon.

 

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside, Oregon

Through May 31

Perfect Pear, Pair,  Pare Exhibition

Regional artists were selected due to their art related to scale and perspective, and the way things correlate and interact.

Featuring artists Lisa Wiser, Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, Blue Bond, Marga Stanley, Bill Baily, and Lynda Campbell.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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