Jo Pomeroy-Crockett


TO PARE:  The theme for May 2018 for the Fairweather Gallery

 

“When I first reviewed the Fairweather Gallery’s list of themes for 2018, I was intrigued.  So many interesting choices.  As a lover of words and all that they imply, I was attracted to the theme “pare”, “pear” or “pair.  How unusual!  What to choose?  I selected “pare.”

“Pare” usually means “to cut back”, to “slice away”, to “remove”, and even “to simplify.”  When I thought of the “to simplify”, I was hooked.  Little did I know that I nearly shot myself in the foot!

As an artist, “to simplify” means to remove all that is not absolutely necessary to say what I want to say.  The challenge is how few lines, how few colors, how few marks on my paper convey my meaning.  I thought of the cave paintings from 30,000- 40,000 years ago in France and Spain.  How simple and how elegant.

 

 https://www.smithsonianmag.com/…/journey-oldest-cave-paintings-world

Later, Picasso who was also intrigued by simplifying, drew a series of bulls.  The merest line conveyed the strength, the majesty of this noble animal.

 

www.dailyartmagazine.com/pablo-picassos-bulls-road-simplicity

 

So, “to pare” is good for one’s art.  No more worrying about what is pretty, what will sell, just get to the point!  If one line can convey your message, use it.  Do not be too wordy or explain too much! 

 

 

Too much thinking about “to pare”; going back to the homonyms?  Pear, pair, pare, or au pair?  That opens up a world. 

 

There is a painting here by Marga that is an eye-stopper and it is about “pears”.  What a hoot!

“Pears Illustrated, Swimsuit edition” by Marga Stanley

 And the many others which the artists translated “to pare”, “to pair”, or quite simply “pears”.

 

 

I must admit that I gave into to all in my artwork.  This was a challenging theme that made me think.  I will move toward more line work in my efforts to come to the point, and I shall work “to pare”. 

 

 

Jo Pomeroy-Crockett and her art.

And, as I always discover when stretching, thinking is hard work.”  —Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, PhD., writer, educator and artist.

 

For more info about the artist, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Jo Pomeroy-Crockett.

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside, Oregon

Through May 31

Perfect Pear, Pair,  Pare Exhibition

Regional artists were selected due to their art related to scale and perspective, and the way things correlate and interact.

Featuring artists Lisa Wiser, Patti Isaacs, Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, Blue Bond, Marga Stanley, Bill Baily, and Lynda Campbell.

 

 

 

Q: Why do artists often study painting pears, you ask?

A: Indeed, every artist has spent hours staring at pears, later to paint pears to learn the study of light, shading and perspective.

 

Cézanne once proclaimed, “With a pear I want to astonish Paris,” and he succeeded, even in his most deceptively simple still life paintings, to dazzle and delight.

L.1988.62.32

Turning to the pears grown in the vicinity of the family’s estate, Cézanne dispensed with traditional one-point perspective and examined the fruit, plates, and table from various viewpoints—straight on, above, and sideways.

 

Display featuring pear art by Bill Baily, abstract paintings by Kimberly Reed and abstract art by Diane Copenhaver.

The exhibitions(s) “To Pare Perfect”, aka “Perfect Pear”,  and, too, aka “Perfect Pair” through May 31 at Fairweather House and Gallery.

 

Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, Ph.D. 

 

A Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.,  Latin Philosophiae doctor) is the highest academic degree awarded by universities in most countries.

 

As part of her lifelong interest in and enjoyment of art, Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, PhD. has been painting in watercolor, water media including marbling and inks, pastel, and collage for many years. In combination with her work as a free-lance writer and educator, her painting allows her to continue developing her creativity and technical skills.

Jo Pomeroy-Crockett works primarily wet-into-wet and strives for dramatic value patterns. Bright colors, an emphasis on the play of light, and a touch of whimsy mark her paintings. She enjoys painting a wide variety of subjects.

Jo Pomeroy-Crockett was a juried member of the Arizona Artists Guild and is currently a juried member of the Watercolor Society of Oregon. She has exhibited in numerous juried art competitions. Her work is in private collections in various parts of the U.S., England, Canada, and Switzerland.

 

 

 

Jo Pomeroy-Crockett leads classes in watercolor, water media including marbling and inks, pastel, collage and paper marbling.

 

And, too, Jo Pomeroy Crockett is co-founder of the Astoria Art Loft located at 106 Third Street.

Jo Pomeroy-Crockett leads classes at Dots and Doodles located at 303 Marine Drive in Astoria, as well.

 

Q: What is paper marbling, you ask?

A: Paper marbling is a method of aqueous surface design, which can produce patterns similar to smooth marble or other kinds of stone. Early in its history, marbled paper was used for important documents. Marbling always creates a one-of-a-kind monograph. Even if the exact same process was used, variations in the water, the artist’s hand movements, even the dust particles in the air prevent an exact duplicate. As such, marbled paper was used to prevent forgeries and erasure. For centuries, the secrets of marbling paper were kept closely among the masters.  In the business of book binding, marbling was also used on the edges of ledgers. Theoretically, if a single leaf of the ledger was taken, the pattern would be disrupted.

Go to: https://blog.bookstellyouwhy.com/the-history-and-techniques-of-marbled-paper

And too, for more info: Richard J. Wolfe author, Marbled Paper: Its History, Techniques, and Patterns: With Special Reference to the Relationship of Marbling to Bookbinding in Europe and the Western World.

 

Marbled paper art by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett.

 

Marbled paper art by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett.

For more about Jo Pomeroy-Crockett,  please visit the artist’s tab at  www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

Reprinting a  2014 grace note received:

“I particularly enjoyed the artist, Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, who shared her comments regarding gratitude. I thought about her as I read  Rick Warren. His sentiments mirror those of your guest. I hope that you will share them with her.”  –– Gary

Sidenote:  Yes, the note was shared with Jo Pomeroy-Crockett.   

And, too, by  request, reprinting the Gratitude lecture by Jo Pomeroy-Crockettt/ May, 2014:

“Denise Fairweather asked me to speak briefly on GRATITUDE. GRATITUDE, as you may know, is the theme of the May exhibit. Last October, when I was privileged to exhibit some of my artwork here in this gallery, Denise gave me the opportunity to select a month in 2014 to exhibit more of my paintings. We looked over the various themes for 2014 and while all the themes were of interest, I was drawn to GRATITUDE. At this point in my life, I am very thankful, grateful for so many things.

As an artist, I appreciate Nietzsche’s view that “The essence of all beautiful art, all great art, is gratitude. No matter what one’s level of experience, there is sheer magic as a painting comes into being. Joy and gratitude are essential to the creative process as are perseverance, determination, and work. When a painting turns out well, I always breathe a sigh of relief and say THANK YOU. As someone once said, “If the only prayer you said was thank you, that would be enough.” Eckhert

GRATITUDE, in my view, is central to good mental and spiritual health. I think that it is virtually impossible to be grateful for one’s life and to be depressed at the same time. As Steve Maraboli wrote, “Those with a grateful mindset tend to see the message in the mess. Even though life may knock them down, the grateful find reasons, if even small ones, to get up.”

The act of doing art also leads to good mental and spiritual health. Many of us have an inner drive to draw or paint or sculpt. It is so strong that if we do not do art, we grow restless and uneasy. The way to peace is simply, to draw or paint or think art. We also know the value of doing art in treating emotional/mental problems. Psychotic patients in one treatment center were taught that when they suspected a psychotic episode was coming, they immediately began to do art. In almost all cases, the psychotic episode was avoided.

GRATITUDE has many shades and much depth. We all know about being thankful, in general. But what about the gifts we are born with, the talents we have been given. Most of us discover our special gifts by adolescence, or before, or sometimes, later. Do we have a responsibility to develop those gifts?

In my professional work, I listened to many people talk about their goals, their problems, and occasionally, those things they really loved doing. More often than not, the things they really loved were not the work-related activities they considered essential to earning a living. They relegated their personal passions to sometime in the future, when “the kids are out on their own, when I can have time to myself, . ..” Many gifts seem to be pushed into the background in the interest of earning a living. One can understand, certainly, but what a price we pay.

I think each of us has a responsibility to develop our gifts, our talents. And yes, we also have a responsibility to support our families. And yes, life does interfere in developing our gifts. HOWEVER, I have observed that most of us, at some time in our lives, manage to heed that inner voice and to develop our talents.

I taught art classes for many years, often in retirement communities such as Sun City, AZ, I worked with many budding artists who were finally tapping into their artistic gifts. Whether their artistic talents were just appearing in the lifelong developmental process or the artists were finally acknowledging their artistic bent, I have no way of knowing. But, the budding artists were, at last, listening to their inner gifts demanding to get out . One painting student, at 96 and with macular degeneration never missed a watercolor class because he was determined to “paint well”.

I was blessed to have a grandfather who was an artist and an engraver. From the time I was 3 yrs. old, he encouraged me to draw and regularly critiqued by creations. One time, when I was about 10, he added a nose extension to one of my ballerinas saying, “Even beautiful dancers have noses.” To this day, I am very conscious about drawing people with plenty of nose.

As for today, I am grateful and thankful for the gifts I have been given. I work hard to develop my art gift and daily do something “artful” – drawing, painting, thinking, planning.

I believe that gratitude is essential as a mindset. I think it helps avoid arrogance, the sense of self-importance, and depression. In art or other artistic endeavors, I believe it leads to willingness to experiment, to try new materials, and to grow as an artist.

As Cicero noted, “Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues, it is the parent of all others.”  —Jo Pomeroy Crockett, PhD.

 

Indeed, Fairweather House and Gallery is grateful to represent Jo Pomeroy-Crockett  in Seaside, Oregon.

 

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside, Oregon

Through May 31

Perfect Pear, Pair,  Pare Exhibition

Regional artists were selected due to their art related to scale and perspective, and the way things correlate and interact.

Featuring artists Lisa Wiser, Patti Isaacs, Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, Blue Bond, Marga Stanley, Bill Baily, and Lynda Campbell.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table display featuring art by Joanna Donaca and calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson.

Art by Lisa Wiser. 

Nature photography by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images.

 

Art by Theresa O’Leary, necklace by Mary Truhler, pastel by Greta Lindwood, ceramics  by Emily Miller, glass by Rox Heath, wood bowls  by Daniel Harris and Mike Brown.

 

Miniature by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett.

Fused glass by Bob Heath and pressed floral by Mike Mason.

 

 

 

Key rings by Luan LaLonde,  encaustic art by Kimberly Kent, pen/ink by Britney Drumheller, photographs by Don Frank and metallic art by Richard Newman.

 

 

 

And, too, bunnies, of course,  amidst the green. 

 

 

FRESH GREENS, an exhibition,  through March.

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside, Oregon

 

For more info,  please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Photos by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

 

 

COLOR IT FALL,  an exhibition,

through September 30th.

Fairweather House and Gallery

Bamboo basket by  Charles Schweigert, pastels by Joanne Donaca, autumn original oil by Savvy Dani,  landscape plein air original by Lisa Wiser, abstracts by Renee Rowe, shell oils by Paul Brent, paper textiles  by Christine Trexel, photography by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.  Design by Denise Fairweather, allied member, A. S. I. D., American Society of Interior Designers.

For more about the artists, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

Featured art on display  by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett and calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson.

 

COLOR IT FALL

Artist Lecture 

 

We see color thanks to the cones in our eyes. (The rods are for night vision.) Humans are trichromats, that is, we see red, green, and blue. . . and mixtures of all these.

Many birds and fish, on the other hand, are tetrochromats and see 4 colors including ultraviolet colors invisible to us. A small percentage of women, some 2% – 3%, are tetrachromats and see at least one additional ultraviolet color.

What is your favorite color?

Ask a few people around the room. Chances are, between 50 – 60% will favor blue.

What can color do? It can . . .
* attract attention. People see color before they see anything else.
* hold attention. People pay attention to black and white for about ½ second or less. They pay attention to color for 2 – 3 seconds.
* Color has power. Consider the colors of STOP, GO and CAUTION.
*Color increases memory.

*Color images are processed before black and white images, so they are remembered better.
*Color informs better than black and white.

Research shows color improves readership by 40%, learning by 55 – 78%, and comprehension by 73%.
*Colors have personality and meaning and personalities vary with one’s culture.
*Color combined with shape sends special messages.
*Color attracts attention to brands better than words. What colors are signs? What is on the background of a sign?
*The color of your clothing tells a lot about you, your profession, and your status.
*Color transmits messages without ever using a word.

Aren’t artists lucky?  We have free use of color which can to do and say so many different things! All we have to do is to learn to make use of the many meanings of color as we create our treasures. —Jo Pomeroy- Crockett, Ph.D, writer and artist.

To read more about the writer, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/  …artists/ …Jo Pomeroy-Crockett

 

 

 

COLOR IT FALL, table display featuring art by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett. 

 

Carolyn Macpherson, watercolor original

 

 

 Peggy Evans, handmade origami   

 

 

Lisa Wiser, en plein air original

 

Renee Rowe, abstract original 

 

Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, mixed media artist

 

 

 

 

 

 

Neal Maine, fine art photograph

 

 

Catherine Mahardy, mixed media

 

 

 

Gayle H. Seely,  seed pearl original

 

 

 

 

Mike Mason, botanical blooms

 

 

Christine Trexel, handmade boxes

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 BroadwaySeptember

 

The summer season ends with a most perfect exhibition COLOR IT FALL

 

 

New original art compositions revolve around the complementary clash of the deliberately heightened blues, dazzling oranges and brilliant yellows.  

 

 

For more information, please visit:  www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

 

Named the “state animal” in 1969, the American beaver builds the dams and wetlands that serve as habitat for Oregon salmon, steelhead, birds, amphibians and insects. Beavers are nature’s hydrologists, “Beaver Tales: A Celebration of Beaver Art” curator Sara Vickerman … click of the following link to read the entire front page article by Eve Marz, reporter for the Seaside Signal …

Source: From near extinction to a place in art

For more info the participating Fairweather  artists, please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com …artists … Paul Brent, Mike Brown, Agnes Field, Jo Pomeroy Crockett and  Neal Maine.

Save the date and time.

BEAVER TALES, a celebration of art.

May 6th, 5-7:pm in the historic Gilbert District Block of downtown Seaside

For more info about the Art Walk, please go to http://www.facebook.com/SeasideFirstSaturdayArtWalk

SAVE THE DATE AND TIME!

http://www.NCLCtrust.org
Listening to the Land: Dam, Beaver! Dam!
Wednesday, April 19
6 to 8 pm
Seaside Public Library

And, too, a lot more info about Beavers and all the good things they do for us:

Dr. Stephen Ramsey, from the OSU Center for Genome Research & Biocomputing (the Center has recently announced the completion of its sequencing of the beaver genome, so this is very well timed – http://registerguard.com/rg/news/local/35185225-75/oregon-state-university-researchers-find-benny-the-beaver-fills-big-genes.html.csp)

Frances Backhouse will offer a talk based on her research and writing that appeared in her award-winning book, Once They Were Hats: In Search of the Mighty Beaver. At Beach Books on May 6th at 1:pm. http://www.backhouse.ca/books/once-they-were-hats-in-search-of-the-mighty-beaver/.

The Wetlands Conservancy has posted information on the Beaver Tales art project. The link is below. Feel free to share it with your friends and contacts.
http://wetlandsconservancy.org/stewardship/beaver-tales

http://wetlandsconservancy.org/stewardship/beaver-tales/beaver-inspiration

https://northernwoodlands.org/discoveries/pathways-to-ponds

Here’s a link to an excellent short video, with great aerial depiction of the changes that beaver dams bring to meadows . . .
http://www.animalplanet.com/tv-shows/other/videos/fooled-by-nature-beaver-dams

And for more inspiration, a video of beaver swimming on U-Tube. .https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9cwu_Wu5ONI

CBC News Posted: Apr 02, 2017Great parenting: animals that care for their young in ‘amazing’ ways BEAVERS…

Some parents are a little more dedicated than others, according to wildlife expert Frank Ritcey. Ritcey says beavers take a more paws-on approach to raising their young. They give birth inside their lodges, where kits will stay until they’re old enough to start eating solid food.

“Once they’re old enough to venture forth, they travel about with the parent to learn how to become a beaver. [Kits] follow the adult around and mimic the adults actions,” said Ritcey.

“It’s so cute to watch — but it’s also very important as the young have to learn a whole set of skills like using the right trees to fall and how to build dams and lodges, and in general — how to be as busy as a beaver should be.”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_23vuRU2Ews

 

While nothing can compare to the real beaver it is great to see more comprehensive research about the positive impacts of beaver dams.

http://www.ktvz.com/…/osu-cascades-students-scien…/394113930

 

 

 

And, too, from @MightyBeaver
This page features updates on what’s happening in the beaver world and news about the book.

http://www.cbc.ca/…/canada/hamilton/trapped-beaver-1.4086804

A new addition to the beaver’s resumé — cattle wrangler!
http://www.cbc.ca/…/…/sask-ranchers-stunned-beaver-1.4073018

Beavers get a shout-out for their great parenting skills (especially their “paws-on approach to raising their young”) in this CBC News story. http://www.cbc.ca/…/great-parenting-4-animals-that-care-for…
A successful rescue of a wandering young beaver in London, Ontario.
http://www.thelondoner.ca/…/salthavens-patient-of-the-week-…
What does it mean to coexist with beavers and how do we do that? This short video offers good answers to both questions. https://vimeo.com/96040603

Source: Beaver Tales arriving to the historic Gilbert District for an Art Walk! May 6th.

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