Jo Pomeroy-Crockett


 

 

COLOR IT FALL,  an exhibition,

through September 30th.

Fairweather House and Gallery

Bamboo basket by  Charles Schweigert, pastels by Joanne Donaca, autumn original oil by Savvy Dani,  landscape plein air original by Lisa Wiser, abstracts by Renee Rowe, shell oils by Paul Brent, sunflowers by Michael Muldoon, paper textiles  by Christine Trexel, photography by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.  Design by Denise Fairweather, allied member, A. S. I. D., American Society of Interior Designers.

For more about the artists, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

Featured art on display  by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett and calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson.

 

COLOR IT FALL

Artist Lecture 

 

We see color thanks to the cones in our eyes. (The rods are for night vision.) Humans are trichromats, that is, we see red, green, and blue. . . and mixtures of all these.

Many birds and fish, on the other hand, are tetrochromats and see 4 colors including ultraviolet colors invisible to us. A small percentage of women, some 2% – 3%, are tetrachromats and see at least one additional ultraviolet color.

What is your favorite color?

Ask a few people around the room. Chances are, between 50 – 60% will favor blue.

What can color do? It can . . .
* attract attention. People see color before they see anything else.
* hold attention. People pay attention to black and white for about ½ second or less. They pay attention to color for 2 – 3 seconds.
* Color has power. Consider the colors of STOP, GO and CAUTION.
*Color increases memory.

*Color images are processed before black and white images, so they are remembered better.
*Color informs better than black and white.

Research shows color improves readership by 40%, learning by 55 – 78%, and comprehension by 73%.
*Colors have personality and meaning and personalities vary with one’s culture.
*Color combined with shape sends special messages.
*Color attracts attention to brands better than words. What colors are signs? What is on the background of a sign?
*The color of your clothing tells a lot about you, your profession, and your status.
*Color transmits messages without ever using a word.

Aren’t artists lucky?  We have free use of color which can to do and say so many different things! All we have to do is to learn to make use of the many meanings of color as we create our treasures. —Jo Pomeroy- Crockett, Ph.D, writer and artist.

To read more about the writer, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/  …artists/ …Jo Pomeroy-Crockett

 

 

 

COLOR IT FALL, table display featuring art by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett. 

 

Carolyn Macpherson, watercolor original

 

 

 Peggy Evans, handmade origami   

 

 

Lisa Wiser, en plein air original

 

Renee Rowe, abstract original 

 

Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, mixed media artist

 

 

 

Michael Muldoon, original oil

 

 

Neal Maine, fine art photograph

 

 

Catherine Mahardy, mixed media

 

 

 

Gayle H. Seely,  seed pearl original

 

 

 

 

Mike Mason, botanical blooms

 

 

Christine Trexel, handmade boxes

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 BroadwaySeptember

 

The summer season ends with a most perfect exhibition COLOR IT FALL

 

 

New original art compositions revolve around the complementary clash of the deliberately heightened blues, dazzling oranges and brilliant yellows.  

 

 

For more information, please visit:  www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

 

Named the “state animal” in 1969, the American beaver builds the dams and wetlands that serve as habitat for Oregon salmon, steelhead, birds, amphibians and insects. Beavers are nature’s hydrologists, “Beaver Tales: A Celebration of Beaver Art” curator Sara Vickerman … click of the following link to read the entire front page article by Eve Marz, reporter for the Seaside Signal …

Source: From near extinction to a place in art

For more info the participating Fairweather  artists, please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com …artists … Paul Brent, Mike Brown, Agnes Field, Jo Pomeroy Crockett and  Neal Maine.

Save the date and time.

BEAVER TALES, a celebration of art.

May 6th, 5-7:pm in the historic Gilbert District Block of downtown Seaside

For more info about the Art Walk, please go to http://www.facebook.com/SeasideFirstSaturdayArtWalk

SAVE THE DATE AND TIME!

http://www.NCLCtrust.org
Listening to the Land: Dam, Beaver! Dam!
Wednesday, April 19
6 to 8 pm
Seaside Public Library

And, too, a lot more info about Beavers and all the good things they do for us:

Dr. Stephen Ramsey, from the OSU Center for Genome Research & Biocomputing (the Center has recently announced the completion of its sequencing of the beaver genome, so this is very well timed – http://registerguard.com/rg/news/local/35185225-75/oregon-state-university-researchers-find-benny-the-beaver-fills-big-genes.html.csp)

Frances Backhouse will offer a talk based on her research and writing that appeared in her award-winning book, Once They Were Hats: In Search of the Mighty Beaver. At Beach Books on May 6th at 1:pm. http://www.backhouse.ca/books/once-they-were-hats-in-search-of-the-mighty-beaver/.

The Wetlands Conservancy has posted information on the Beaver Tales art project. The link is below. Feel free to share it with your friends and contacts.
http://wetlandsconservancy.org/stewardship/beaver-tales

http://wetlandsconservancy.org/stewardship/beaver-tales/beaver-inspiration

https://northernwoodlands.org/discoveries/pathways-to-ponds

Here’s a link to an excellent short video, with great aerial depiction of the changes that beaver dams bring to meadows . . .
http://www.animalplanet.com/tv-shows/other/videos/fooled-by-nature-beaver-dams

And for more inspiration, a video of beaver swimming on U-Tube. .https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9cwu_Wu5ONI

CBC News Posted: Apr 02, 2017Great parenting: animals that care for their young in ‘amazing’ ways BEAVERS…

Some parents are a little more dedicated than others, according to wildlife expert Frank Ritcey. Ritcey says beavers take a more paws-on approach to raising their young. They give birth inside their lodges, where kits will stay until they’re old enough to start eating solid food.

“Once they’re old enough to venture forth, they travel about with the parent to learn how to become a beaver. [Kits] follow the adult around and mimic the adults actions,” said Ritcey.

“It’s so cute to watch — but it’s also very important as the young have to learn a whole set of skills like using the right trees to fall and how to build dams and lodges, and in general — how to be as busy as a beaver should be.”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_23vuRU2Ews

 

While nothing can compare to the real beaver it is great to see more comprehensive research about the positive impacts of beaver dams.

http://www.ktvz.com/…/osu-cascades-students-scien…/394113930

 

 

 

And, too, from @MightyBeaver
This page features updates on what’s happening in the beaver world and news about the book.

http://www.cbc.ca/…/canada/hamilton/trapped-beaver-1.4086804

A new addition to the beaver’s resumé — cattle wrangler!
http://www.cbc.ca/…/…/sask-ranchers-stunned-beaver-1.4073018

Beavers get a shout-out for their great parenting skills (especially their “paws-on approach to raising their young”) in this CBC News story. http://www.cbc.ca/…/great-parenting-4-animals-that-care-for…
A successful rescue of a wandering young beaver in London, Ontario.
http://www.thelondoner.ca/…/salthavens-patient-of-the-week-…
What does it mean to coexist with beavers and how do we do that? This short video offers good answers to both questions. https://vimeo.com/96040603

Source: Beaver Tales arriving to the historic Gilbert District for an Art Walk! May 6th.

Soon we will be moving the display tables into the next season.  We embrace change.

untitled-2

Art walk hostesses amidst fall foliages.

We help one another.  We live for the moment.  

fall-better-table

Gary Pearlman, Sherrie Stahl,  Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, Sarah Lippold, Penelope Culbertson, Mary Boitta and Diane Klausner featured works on display.

We do what others are not willing to do. We feature original work by regional artists.

We accept social responsibility.  We give generously. We honor our artists, our community and our causes to the utmost of our abilities.

We do the right things.

We have hosted more than 100 art events in more than 10 years!!!

We take pride in discovering and promoting the many, many creative minds who shape our beloved community.

We are grateful.  We are thankful.  We are hopeful.

Please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com for more about us.

Photos courtesy of Linda Fenton-Mendenhall Photography.

jos-art

Nebulae Series. Birthplace of the stars. Butterfly Nebula, Eagle Nebula, Canissa Nebula and Carina Nebula: mixed media, watercolor art by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett

 

And, too, Drama in Art lecture notes by
Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, Ph.D., writer/artist
 @ the Fairweather House and Gallery

Drama in art comes from the subject matter and the emotion that the artist conveys. While a memorable scene may be rendered in a technically competent way, the drama is lessened if the artist does not imbue it with emotion. If a painting touches a viewer deeply, chances are that the artist put heart and soul into the painting.

Nature is filled with drama. Take, for example, the universe — that immense, mysterious entity that is almost beyond understanding. It is filled with empty space (1 atom per cubic centimeter compared with earth at 30 quillion molecules per cubic centimeter) as well as with solar systems, black holes, stars, nebulae, and more.

Nebulae, Latin for “cloud”, are billowing masses of dust and gases which are birth places for stars. Many are visible as either a bright patch or as a dark silhouette against starlight. Humans have seen nebulae probably forever, but the earliest written records go back Ptolemy in 150 CE and later to Abd al-Rahman al-Sufi in 964 CE. The Crab nebula was observed in 1054 by astronomers in Europe, Asia, and China. Since then, more nebulae have been identified. At this time, some 2500 have been recorded.

The Hubble project has photographed numerous nebulae. They are colorful, dramatic clouds which can be as close as 50 light years away to over 600 light years away. Dust and gases cause the bright colors. Some famous nebulae are the Rosette, Pelican, Crab, Orion, Cat’s Eye, Horsehead, Butterfly, Carina Tarantula, Fox Fur, and more.

Nebulae have fascinated me for years. My favorite is the Eagle with its huge vibrant clouds and dark mysterious corners. Astronomers have speculated that the Eagle may have exploded and disappeared but we will not know for sure for 600 light years. Portraying nebulae in watercolor and acrylic has become a passion for me. —Jo Pomeroy-Crockett

 

 

Nebula exhibition through October 31st @ Fairweather’s.

For more information about the artist please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/artists/Jo Pomeroy-Crockett

Fun Fact:
Jo Pomeroy-Crockett is co-founder of the Astoria Art Loft. For more information please visit http://www.astoriaartloft.com/

just-in-from-neal-maine

Just in from Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images.

“Winter Seeds” Towsend chipmunk with rose hips in the Gearhart Fen.(*)

Proceeds in support of NCLC.

Fairweather House and Gallery

October 2016

 DRAMA IN ART.

With selected works by artist/writer Jo Pomeroy-Crockett Ph.D., artists Renee Rowe, Paul Brent, Jan Shield and photographer Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

Introducing new photography about drama found in the coastal habitat “within steps from our own backyards” from Seaside/Gearhart naturalist and ecologist Neal Maine/PacificLight Images.

For more information please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/artists

(*) reprinted article  nclctrust.org/expanding-our-footprint-in-the-gearhart-fen/

The Gearhart Fen is the largest contiguous wetland of its kind remaining on the Oregon Coast. And it is now the location of North Coast Land Conservancy’s largest expanse of conserved lands. The Nature Conservancy’s Oregon office transferred a 466-acre conservation easement and ownership of 47.01 acres to NCLC. Together with two properties it already owned there, North Coast Land Conservancy is now the steward of some 533 contiguous acres of the fen—a type of quagmire that is similar to but, according to botanists, different from a bog.

This dynamic ecosystem is a mosaic of several rare wetland community types associated with sphagnum moss. Carnivorous sundew plants grow on the fen’s moist ground, luring insects with their bright red coloring. Songbirds migrate through the fen’s stunted pines, and swallows bring their young and teach them to feed. Ospreys nest here, bald eagles perch in the trees, and waterfowl rest on patches of open water. A herd of elk calls it home. The Gearhart Fen is located in a dune swale south of Cullaby Lake in the southeastern corner of the Clatsop Plains, east of US 101.

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