JoAnn Pari-Mueller


 

 

 

“Observing Botany”  calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson.

 

Fairweather House & Gallery offers an exhibition between the study of botany and fine art.  Throughout April the “Observing Botany” exhibition offers original artwork in watercolor, graphite, colored pencil and pen-and-ink and the exploration of the many styles, forms and approaches unique to botanical illustration. Regional artists were on hand at the opening reception during the Seaside First Saturday Art Walk to answer questions, provide interesting facts or anecdotes and to demonstrate their art techniques.

 

 

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

 

 

And, too, many of the dedicated artists traveled to the reception through high winds and sideways rain!

Indeed, an Art Walk evening is not a dress rehearsal… the gallery “proceeded as the way opened” (Amish saying) to  create an art academy evening for the artists and hostesses.

“US National Weather Service/ Apr. 7 at 10:55am: Strongest winds Saturday have been delayed, but are coming. Winds will increase Saturday reaching their peak by evening. Beaches and headlands likely to see gusts to 70 mph, coastal communities gusts to 60 mph. Exposed ridges along the Coast Range should have gusts to 60 mph. These strong winds did not  produce local power outages, falling trees and branches and power lines.”

 

 

Grace note to the artists:

Clearly, the compilation of the Fairweather exhibit, “Observing Botany”, was the work of a dedicated team of artists. and would have been impossible without your enthusiastic support and beautiful art. 

 

 

Many  enjoyed viewing your art and appreciated the opportunity to learn more about botany from fellow artists.

 

Observing Botany would have been impossible without enthusiastic support of the artists.

 

 

“Thank you, Denise, for all that you do.  Very, very nice photos from your photographer. The reception was better attended than I expected, considering the weather and the Gallery looked stunning!”  –Penelope Culbertson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Tulip” original watercolor by JoAnn Pari-Mueller

 

 

“Canna and Butterfly” by JoAnn Pari-Mueller
Pacific NW artist specializing in watercolor, pastels, and calligraphy

 

Artist Statement & Bio

“I have always lived in the countryside and always been a collector. I was raised in farmland Wisconsin and moved to farmland Oregon in my mid-twenties, continuously amassing interesting objects of nature and hand-made textiles and crafts from around the world.

I use watercolors, pastels, marbling, collage, and/or calligraphy to put down on paper the observations I make about the colors, lines, shapes, and patterns of these natural and handcrafted items. It is my goal to have others take away some of the awe I feel when studying their intricacies.

Often fine details catch my eye; other times I’m interested in the relationship between objects – the “collector mentality.” I like the starkness of a subject against a white background, but may also intersperse geometric lines or shapes with the mostly curvilinear subjects. Often I use richly colored or detailed borders or backgrounds – influences of the many patterns and colors in my collections. I always use 100% rag paper and high-quality pigments, so care should always be taken to protect these materials from light with archival framing.

After 15 years as an art museum tour guide, in 2009 I began immersing myself in art classes at area art schools and colleges. I am an active member of the Oregon Society of Artists, the Watercolor Society of Oregon, and the Portland Society for Calligraphy and have participated in numerous exhibits throughout the state and my county’s October Open Art Studio.”

 

 

 

 

 


“Keep a Tree in your Heart.” Artist Diane Copenhaver.

“Keep a Green Tree in Your Heart and Perhaps a Singing Bird will come.” –Chinese Proverb/ art  inspiration

 

 

For more info about the artist,  please visit https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/category/artists/diane-copenhaver/

 

“Shaped by Nature.”
Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images.
Great Blue Heron.

West Lake/ Highway 101 near Warrenton.

 

“Feather Delight.”

Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images.

Great Blue Heron.

Proceeds from PacificLight Images/ Neal Maine are  given back in support of North Coast Land Conservancy/ NCLC.

For more images and info, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com … artists/  …Neal Maine

 

Calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson.

For more info about the artist, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com …/ artists/ … Penelope Culbertson

 

Cut work stained glass hanging sculpture by Lori Bedard.

 

 

 

 

 “Nature is beauty sublime. To use the botanical as a subject for art, invokes memories of that beauty and how it inspires each of us. As an artist, if we incite that reaction with each view; we were successful.” —Lori 

 

 

 

 

COLOR IT FALL,  an exhibition,

through September 30th.

Fairweather House and Gallery

Bamboo basket by  Charles Schweigert, pastels by Joanne Donaca, autumn original oil by Savvy Dani,  landscape plein air original by Lisa Wiser, abstracts by Renee Rowe, shell oils by Paul Brent, paper textiles  by Christine Trexel, photography by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.  Design by Denise Fairweather, allied member, A. S. I. D., American Society of Interior Designers.

For more about the artists, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

Featured art on display  by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett and calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson.

 

COLOR IT FALL

Artist Lecture 

 

We see color thanks to the cones in our eyes. (The rods are for night vision.) Humans are trichromats, that is, we see red, green, and blue. . . and mixtures of all these.

Many birds and fish, on the other hand, are tetrochromats and see 4 colors including ultraviolet colors invisible to us. A small percentage of women, some 2% – 3%, are tetrachromats and see at least one additional ultraviolet color.

What is your favorite color?

Ask a few people around the room. Chances are, between 50 – 60% will favor blue.

What can color do? It can . . .
* attract attention. People see color before they see anything else.
* hold attention. People pay attention to black and white for about ½ second or less. They pay attention to color for 2 – 3 seconds.
* Color has power. Consider the colors of STOP, GO and CAUTION.
*Color increases memory.

*Color images are processed before black and white images, so they are remembered better.
*Color informs better than black and white.

Research shows color improves readership by 40%, learning by 55 – 78%, and comprehension by 73%.
*Colors have personality and meaning and personalities vary with one’s culture.
*Color combined with shape sends special messages.
*Color attracts attention to brands better than words. What colors are signs? What is on the background of a sign?
*The color of your clothing tells a lot about you, your profession, and your status.
*Color transmits messages without ever using a word.

Aren’t artists lucky?  We have free use of color which can to do and say so many different things! All we have to do is to learn to make use of the many meanings of color as we create our treasures. —Jo Pomeroy- Crockett, Ph.D, writer and artist.

To read more about the writer, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/  …artists/ …Jo Pomeroy-Crockett

 

 

 

COLOR IT FALL, table display featuring art by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett. 

“My studio has great light and views of our inspirational garden out each window. It is filled with quirky art and unique and stimulating objects. My two Papillion’s, Daphne and Minerva (collectively known as the “goddesses”), like to hang out with me there.”

“I have a huge file of ideas. I am often inspired by the flower or bird or bug “du jour” in the garden. I always take a small journal and paints with me when I travel, too.”

I have many acquaintances that write stories, poetry, music, or create paintings, weavings, sewing, or knitting and realized that I lacked the ability to do any of those things. I had always loved decorating and collecting art, but had never before felt the urge to create. I especially credit my mother and her best friend (both painter/printmakers) with inspiring me to start. I took many classes and tried to work on my art almost daily. I literally started from ground zero, never having touched paper to pencil in an artistic way before.
Finding that hidden creative niche of the brain may take a while, but once you open that door – watch out!”

“I often combine watercolors with calligraphy and like the looks of the colors and curves of nature juxtaposed with black and white and the straight lines of grids.”