Judy Horning Shaw


“Across Over There, Evening” oil on gessoed paper 8″ x 23″ by Judy Horning Shaw

ARTIST’S STATEMENT

“When I began my art career it was an act for which I was punished—drawing and coloring on my bedroom walls. That did not stop me, though I did move on to art that uses more traditional materials—currently oil paints with some acrylics, watercolors or drawing materials thrown in for spice. At that young age, I was making drawings and botanical notes about the plants of my surroundings along the coast. Later I began drawing or painting people, places, and things. My focus is still largely representational—painting the things I experience and feel that have an inherent beauty either of appearance or of being. I also enjoy an occasional foray into abstraction.”-Judy Horning Shaw

“Across Over There, Morning” oil on gessoed paper 8″ x 23″ by Judy Horning Shaw

 

 

Note from Judy

 

“These are  for the Expanding Horizons show in November. I have attached  images of work for the show.  Thank you.”–Judy

 

THROUGH NOVEMBER

Judy Horning Shaw. 

Art for Expanding Horizons.

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway Street

Expanding Horizons, an exhibition, featuring artists turning to nature seeking to express its evocative power on personal level.

Painters and photographers included in this exhibit are Linda Fenton-Mendenhall,  Lee Munsell, Ron Nicolaides, Judy Horning Shaw,  Jim Young and Russell Young.

Introducing Michael Fox, Jeni Lee and Barbara Folawn.

 

 

 

 

 

“Windswept.” 16×20. Oil on Canvas

 Judy Horning Shaw

ARTIST’S STATEMENT

“When I began my art career it was an act for which I was punished—drawing and coloring on my bedroom walls. That did not stop me, though I did move on to art that uses more traditional materials—currently oil paints with some acrylics, watercolors or drawing materials thrown in for spice.  At that young age, I was making drawings and botanical notes about the plants of my surroundings along the coast.  Later I began drawing or painting people, places, and things. My focus is still largely representational—painting the things I experience and feel that have an inherent beauty either of appearance or of being. I also enjoy an occasional foray into abstraction.

 

 

“Far Reaching.” 18×24. Oil on canvas

 Judy Horning Shaw

The purpose of my art-making continues to be much the same as when I was six and making those wall drawings—I am curious about what I am actually experiencing—beyond the obvious, beyond just appearances. I paint as a way to understand. When painting people, I am trying to understand who they are; how does their accumulated life experience show in their appearance, posture or surroundings? If more than one, how do they relate? The same could be true of trees, mountains or the ocean.

“Sentinels.”  12x 24. Oil on canvas

Judy Horning Shaw

A landscape is a living thing trying to fulfill its nature, but often constrained by forces outside its control. What does that look or feel like? How do I come to understand it? First, I paint from direct observation as much as possible as this enables me to see and feel the subject first hand. My painting technique is to marry various thicknesses of paint and types of marks to express the appearance and nature of the subject. I also aim to use colors in a naturalistic way to fine-tune the light that expresses time of day, season and/or emotion. It is my hope you will explore with me in my journey to seek an understanding of the nature of things, and take away from it a deeper appreciation for connecting to the world.

 

March 2018 Exhibition

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside, Oregon

Fresh Greens 

Featuring resident artists: Karen E. Lewis, Fred Lukens, Carolyn Macpherson, Richard Newman, Mike Mason and Gayle H. Seely.

Welcoming artist Judy Horning Shaw.

 

 

Grace note received:

“I am very happy to see the Statement woven in with the thumbnails;  it is just lovely, and I am very appreciative of the time and effort you have put in to promoting my work.” –-Judy Horning Shaw

 

Judy Horning Shaw offered an artist lecture during the FRESH GREENS opening reception.