Kimberly Kent



 Abstract watercolors by Donna Sanson, Oregon  myrtlewood cribbage board, segmented vase and nautilus sculptures by Mike Brown.

Crafted by NW hands.

Folded book art by Mary Boitta, en caustic art (aptly titled “Remembering Autumn”) by Peg Wells, origami by Peggy Evans, leather work by Luans Leathers, en caustic crows by Kathryn Delany and hand painted tiles by Sandy Applegate.

Abstracts by Diane Copenhaver and glass art by Bob Heath.

 


Handmade curly willow, mouth blown glass,  hand-made book and box by Christine Trexel.

Coral glass by Rinee Merritt, glass platters by Sandy and Bob Lecari and plein air oil by Lisa Wiser.

 

En caustic  art, ocean debris baskets, sea urchin bowls, moon platter by Emily Miller, mixed media stone art by Peggy Stein, abstract drip by Kimberly Reed and oil paintings by Sharon Kathleen Johnson.

 


Abstract miniatures by Tanya Gardner.

 

Calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson, watercolor by Bill Baily and pottery by Suzy Holland.

 

Abstract oil by Carmela Newstead.

 

 

Abstracts by Zifen Qian, maple bowls by Daniel Harris, watercolor by Paul Brent, landscape by Bill Baily and seascape  by Victoria Brooks.

 

 

For Shape and Color.

Art masks by Jorjett Strumme.

Paintings with pressed flowers on metal by Mike Mason. Anny Sears, model, with pressed foliages by Mike Mason.

 

 

Pastel landscape by Carmela Newstead, vintage jewelry necklace by Reneé Hafeman and en caustic blue abstract by Kimberly Kent.

Sunset oil paintings  by Nicholas Oberling, photograph by Neal Maine, pastels by Lynda Campbell and seascapes by Ron Nicolaides.

 

Mixed media diptych by Gary Pearlman, raw edged walnut bowl by Mike Brown and paper box sculpture by Christine Trexel.

Miniature oils by Barbara Rosbe Felisky.

 

Photos by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

“Color and Shape” exhibition through September 30th.

The show covers every aspect of art, textures, materials and finishes, highlighting the quintessentially colorful fall season.

Grace note to the artists…

 

“Shape and Color, Fairweather’s September exhibition, would not be such a success without the beautiful work created by NW hands.  The selected artists provided new work to highlight the annual fall show.  We thank them all for the extraordinary opportunity to tell a seasonal story with their art.  Truly, the artists offered new exceptional work, and by doing so, they encourage those of us in the arts, to do more.”  Fairweather Gallery

Abstract series of three by Jan Rimmerman, seascape oil by Karen E. Lewis and pottery by Suzy Holland.  Shape and Color gallery hostesses Katie, Kemy Kay, Joan, Bonnie and Denise.

 

And, too, a grace note received from a gallery hostess to share.

“Thank you for the beautiful crystal I picked out for a gift.  Most, of all, thanks for bringing the utmost beauty to many, many people.  Most of all, thanks for inviting me to work in your stunning establishment.  It delights my eyes every time I come in.  Your artists are beyond comparison.” Kemy Kay

A grace note received from an artist.

 

“Don’t ask yourself what the world needs.  Ask yourself  what makes you come alive and then do that.  Because what the world needs is people who have come alive.” –Howard Thurman, educator and theologian.
“Thank you for your encouragement and support in showing and growing my art.  You have created such a wonderful group of artists, and display our work in beautiful ways.  I am extremely grateful for your friendship and aliveness in out shared vision.”  Gayle H. Seely

For more about the gallery, please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com.

Table display featuring art by Joanna Donaca and calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson.

Art by Lisa Wiser. 

Nature photography by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images.

 

Art by Theresa O’Leary, necklace by Mary Truhler, pastel by Greta Lindwood, ceramics  by Emily Miller, glass by Rox Heath, wood bowls  by Daniel Harris and Mike Brown.

 

Miniature by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett.

Fused glass by Bob Heath and pressed floral by Mike Mason.

 

 

 

Key rings by Luan LaLonde,  encaustic art by Kimberly Kent, pen/ink by Britney Drumheller, photographs by Don Frank and metallic art by Richard Newman.

 

 

 

And, too, bunnies, of course,  amidst the green. 

 

 

FRESH GREENS, an exhibition,  through March.

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside, Oregon

 

For more info,  please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Photos by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

 

# 1 Image 2017: Beaver Tales  habitat lecture at Fairweather’s by biologist, naturalist, wildlife photographer Neal Maine. 

 

 

#2 Image from 2017: Kimberly Kent, artist and art broker  meets her art on display at Fairweather’s.

 

 

#3 Image from 2017: Most viewed  Linda Fenton-Mendenhall photo collage from a  Fairweather Art Walk.

Pictured top row/ left to right:  Reneé Hafeman; a round of applause from art patrons; Paul Brent artist talk. 

Middle row/ left to right: table top display;  Britney Drumheller  artist talk;  artist Emily Miller;  emerging artist Whelpsy Whelp. 

Bottom row/ left to right: marine debris artist Karynn Kozij;  Art Walk hostess Joan modeling art;  Fairweather sponsored Pop-Up Gallery and Studio with artist Paul Brent, Gail and Ellen, hostesses; Denise,  Kemy Kay, Joan and Saundra having fun.

 

 

 

#4 image from 2017:  Artist Carolyn Macpherson  offering a Seaside Painting LIVE ™ episode at Fairweather’s.  

 

#5 image from 2017: Michael Gilbert, wood artist, meets Mike Brown, wood artist at Fairweather’s.

 

 

 

#6 image from 2017:  Master calligrapher Penelope Culbertson offers a Seaside Scribing LIVE(tm) event at Faiweather’s.

 

 

 

 

#7 image from 2017:  Shirley 88 performs LIVE on the Fairweather grand.

 

#8 image from 2017:  Flynn, the most handsome American  Kestrel, assists Wildlife Center of the North Coast Executive Director Joshua Saranpaa, during a LIVE Doing Good Works ™ auction at Fairweather’s.

 

 

 

 

#10 2017 image:  Irish Lands opening reception at Fairweather’s featured a family heirloom brought to America in the 1850’s.

 

 

Artists represent the heartbeat of the Fairweather Gallery.  What we strive to put out in the arts community is  the artist’s conversations.  We have been fortunate to experience the sharing and giving of many, many creative minds  for over 11 years.

 

So, for us,  in 2018, the opportunity to continue to present an arts platform forward  is all about shining a bright light on the reminder that we are all connected… artists, patrons and community.

 

Encaustic angel by Gregory Bell, wood bowls by Daniel Harris,  wood vase by Mike Brown and  jewelry by Renee Hafeman.

 

 

“When you Search for Me” oil painting  by Lee Munsell, calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson, basket by Charles Schweigert and burl ornaments by Mike Brown.

 

 

“Winter’s Ocean” oil painting, by Ron Nicolaides,  oil pastels by Joanne Donaca and calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson.

 

 

 

Handmade boxes and books  by Christine Trexel, encaustic landscape by Kimberly Kent and bracelets by Mary Boitta.

 

 

 

Grace note received:

“I’m always enthralled when entering Fairweather House and Gallery! A feeling of peace and serenity fill my senses. The beautiful books, vases, natural decor and fabrics complement amazing artworks of every medium. Oils, watercolors, mixed media, wood carvings, photographs and jewelry are displayed in unique exhibit centers that meld peacefully one to another. The gallerist is an artist when it comes to decorating and showcasing beautiful objects and art!” –K. R. 

 

To read more about the gallery, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …about/ …artists

 

Meticulous displays, like none other, with disciplined attention to design perspectives. Find harmony in exquisite materials, combined with the spirit of many artists who know how to apply the mark of being in the Northwest.

 

 

Kimberly Kent artist 

 

Kimberly has worked in the art community for over 30 years as an artist, teacher, curator, gallery owner and art broker. She holds a degree in painting, drawing and printmaking from Portland State University.

 


Her oil and encaustic paintings germinate from plein air studies that bear the torch for larger paintings. Her work ranges in style from expressive landscape to abstract, working with a vibrant palette and a close look at light, reflection and color.

 


As an art broker Kimberly curates and procures art for hospitals, clinics and multi family housing projects. Her business focuses on bringing local art to high mission clients.

 

 

Q:  What is encaustic art, you ask?

A: Encaustic is a Greek word meaning “to heat or burn in” (enkaustikos). Heat is used throughout the process, from melting the beeswax and varnish to fusing the layers of wax. Encaustic consists of natural bees wax and crystallized tree sap. The medium is melted and applied with a tool or brush.  Each layer is then reheated to fuse it to the previous layer with colored pigments added.

 

Fun fact: encaustic painting is an ancient technique, dating back to the Greeks, who used wax to caulk ship hulls!

The 20th century has seen a rebirth of encaustic on a major scale. It is an irony of our modern age, with its emphases on advanced technology, that a painting technique as ancient and involved as encaustic should receive such widespread interest. Earlier attempts to revive encaustic failed to solve the one problem that had made painting in encaustic so laborious – the melting of the wax. The availability of portable electric heating implements and the variety of tools made the use of encaustic more accessible.

 

www.eainm.com/what-is-encaustic/  .. Encaustic Art Institute