Lisa Wiser


 

Diane Copenhaver, abstract artist

Diane is a resident of the northwest and recently embarked on a journey of discovery to unleash her creative talents after a successful career in business. Art classes at Bellevue College have provided foundational skills focused on the principles and elements of design, color theory and harmonies, and painting techniques and processes.

Diane is painting primarily abstract using acrylics on varied surfaces. She also produces collage and mixed media works, is studying calligraphic arts and has begun to explore encaustic painting.

Color and texture are often the focus of Diane’s paintings. She uses layers of paint, as well as a variety of tools and mediums.

 

 

“As I contemplated the subject of ‘Shadows’, I found inspiration in a variety of perspectives around the idea of shadow; shadow as opposite, reflection, repetition, companion, or as enabled by light.”

 

“I enjoy the freedom of non-representational painting and used these ideas of shadow to explore the use of black and white and the beautiful gradients of grey. I have expressed ‘Shadows’ through a variety of works; bold and expressive, muted and gentle, solid and soft edges, and layers of dark and light. I am naturally moved to create a sense of mystery in my painting and hope that my work for ‘Shadows’ provides the space to engage and create a personal story and interpretation of shadow.” –Diane Copenhaver

 

 

 

 

One of four.  Gradient series by Diane Copenhaver.

 

 

Sincerely series. I and II by Diane Copenhaver.

 

Layer series. I, II, III and IV by Diane Copenhaver.

 

 

Mysteries by Diane Copenhaver.

 

Fairweather House and Gallery, 612 Broadway

 SHADOWS, an exhibition  through October,  focuses on the interplay of light and dark with through selected art that expresses time as the fall season progresses.

New artwork by Northwest artists Diane Copenhaver, Gregory Bell,  Penelope Culbertson, Whelsey Whelp, Lisa Wiser, Karen E. Lewis, Tamara Johnson and Marga Stanley will be featured.

 

 

Lisa Wiser is a visual artist living and working in Oregon. She draws inspiration from the scenic northwest, travel adventures and reading novels to create watercolor, acrylic, and mixed media paintings. Also an avid photographer, she chronicles her visual inspirations as she records obscure landscapes, architectural details, and other intriguing painting subjects.

 

Pursuits in life drawing and plein air painting confirms that she prefers a direct association with her subjects while working from life both outdoors or in the studio.

 

 

“The foundation of my work is a keen interest in the concept of structure in both the natural and built environment. My primary interest is capturing landscape scenes that visually articulate my emotional response upon approaching the scene.”–Lisa Wiser

 

Shadows of Butte by Lisa Wiser

 

Her representational work is characterized by vivid color, great depth of space and attention to detail.

Lisa earned a BS Degree in Art Education from the University of Oregon and has completed graduate coursework in graphic design, art education and painting. Lisa has been invited to serve in both curatorial and juror positions for various arts organizations in the area. She has taught art from pre-school through college and adult level courses and has recently retired as a substitute art teacher for her local school district to devote more time to her painting.

Aside from painting Lisa enjoys hiking, reading, gardening, skiing, and family time with her three adult children and husband, travel and fixing things. Her favorite getaways are the forests and deserts of Central Oregon and her family’s rustic retreat on Payette Lake in McCall, Idaho.

Save the date and time.

October 7th, 5-7pm

Opening reception for SHADOWS, an exhibition, Fairweather House and Gallery.

Welcoming artist Lisa Wiser.

Introducing glitter house artist Tamara Johnson.

 “SHADOWS,  expressed through a variety of works; bold and expressive, muted and gentle, solid and soft edges, and layers of dark and light.” –Diane Copenhaver

SHADOWS will feature new artwork by Fairweather resident artists Diane Copenhaver, Gregory Bell, Whelpsy Whelp, Marga Stanley and  Neal Maine.

Featured artists will be in attendance and will offer an artist talk about their works of art.

 

Special guest, FLYNN, an American Kestrel, from the Wildlife Center of the North Coast. 

Take a note!

SHADOWS,  the opening reception, will be a benefit for the WCNC.

Wildlife Center of the North Coast (WCNC) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit Oregon corporation, that specializes in wildlife rehabilitation of resident and migratory birds, mammals and other wild creatures.

 WCNC relys on the generosity of individuals and community groups for annual funding through donations, as well as grants from foundations, both local and from around the country.

 

 

More information to follow.

 

 

 

COLOR IT FALL,  an exhibition,

through September 30th.

Fairweather House and Gallery

Bamboo basket by  Charles Schweigert, pastels by Joanne Donaca, autumn original oil by Savvy Dani,  landscape plein air original by Lisa Wiser, abstracts by Renee Rowe, shell oils by Paul Brent, sunflowers by Michael Muldoon, paper textiles  by Christine Trexel, photography by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.  Design by Denise Fairweather, allied member, A. S. I. D., American Society of Interior Designers.

For more about the artists, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

Featured art on display  by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett and calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson.

 

COLOR IT FALL

Artist Lecture 

 

We see color thanks to the cones in our eyes. (The rods are for night vision.) Humans are trichromats, that is, we see red, green, and blue. . . and mixtures of all these.

Many birds and fish, on the other hand, are tetrochromats and see 4 colors including ultraviolet colors invisible to us. A small percentage of women, some 2% – 3%, are tetrachromats and see at least one additional ultraviolet color.

What is your favorite color?

Ask a few people around the room. Chances are, between 50 – 60% will favor blue.

What can color do? It can . . .
* attract attention. People see color before they see anything else.
* hold attention. People pay attention to black and white for about ½ second or less. They pay attention to color for 2 – 3 seconds.
* Color has power. Consider the colors of STOP, GO and CAUTION.
*Color increases memory.

*Color images are processed before black and white images, so they are remembered better.
*Color informs better than black and white.

Research shows color improves readership by 40%, learning by 55 – 78%, and comprehension by 73%.
*Colors have personality and meaning and personalities vary with one’s culture.
*Color combined with shape sends special messages.
*Color attracts attention to brands better than words. What colors are signs? What is on the background of a sign?
*The color of your clothing tells a lot about you, your profession, and your status.
*Color transmits messages without ever using a word.

Aren’t artists lucky?  We have free use of color which can to do and say so many different things! All we have to do is to learn to make use of the many meanings of color as we create our treasures. —Jo Pomeroy- Crockett, Ph.D, writer and artist.

To read more about the writer, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/  …artists/ …Jo Pomeroy-Crockett

 

 

 

COLOR IT FALL, table display featuring art by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett. 

 

Carolyn Macpherson, watercolor original

 

 

 Peggy Evans, handmade origami   

 

 

Lisa Wiser, en plein air original

 

Renee Rowe, abstract original 

 

Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, mixed media artist

 

 

 

Michael Muldoon, original oil

 

 

Neal Maine, fine art photograph

 

 

Catherine Mahardy, mixed media

 

 

 

Gayle H. Seely,  seed pearl original

 

 

 

 

Mike Mason, botanical blooms

 

 

Christine Trexel, handmade boxes

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 BroadwaySeptember

 

The summer season ends with a most perfect exhibition COLOR IT FALL

 

 

New original art compositions revolve around the complementary clash of the deliberately heightened blues, dazzling oranges and brilliant yellows.  

 

 

For more information, please visit:  www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com