Lisa Wiser



 Abstract watercolors by Donna Sanson, Oregon  myrtlewood cribbage board, segmented vase and nautilus sculptures by Mike Brown.

Crafted by NW hands.

Folded book art by Mary Boitta, en caustic art (aptly titled “Remembering Autumn”) by Peg Wells, origami by Peggy Evans, leather work by Luans Leathers, en caustic crows by Kathryn Delany and hand painted tiles by Sandy Applegate.

Abstracts by Diane Copenhaver and glass art by Bob Heath.

 


Handmade curly willow, mouth blown glass,  hand-made book and box by Christine Trexel.

Coral glass by Rinee Merritt, glass platters by Sandy and Bob Lecari and plein air oil by Lisa Wiser.

 

En caustic  art, ocean debris baskets, sea urchin bowls, moon platter by Emily Miller, mixed media stone art by Peggy Stein, abstract drip by Kimberly Reed and oil paintings by Sharon Kathleen Johnson.

 


Abstract miniatures by Tanya Gardner.

 

Calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson, watercolor by Bill Baily and pottery by Suzy Holland.

 

Abstract oil by Carmela Newstead.

 

 

Abstracts by Zifen Qian, maple bowls by Daniel Harris, watercolor by Paul Brent, landscape by Bill Baily and seascape  by Victoria Brooks.

 

 

For Shape and Color.

Art masks by Jorjett Strumme.

Paintings with pressed flowers on metal by Mike Mason. Anny Sears, model, with pressed foliages by Mike Mason.

 

 

Pastel landscape by Carmela Newstead, vintage jewelry necklace by Reneé Hafeman and en caustic blue abstract by Kimberly Kent.

Sunset oil paintings  by Nicholas Oberling, photograph by Neal Maine, pastels by Lynda Campbell and seascapes by Ron Nicolaides.

 

Mixed media diptych by Gary Pearlman, raw edged walnut bowl by Mike Brown and paper box sculpture by Christine Trexel.

Miniature oils by Barbara Rosbe Felisky.

 

Photos by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

“Color and Shape” exhibition through September 30th.

The show covers every aspect of art, textures, materials and finishes, highlighting the quintessentially colorful fall season.

Grace note to the artists…

 

“Shape and Color, Fairweather’s September exhibition, would not be such a success without the beautiful work created by NW hands.  The selected artists provided new work to highlight the annual fall show.  We thank them all for the extraordinary opportunity to tell a seasonal story with their art.  Truly, the artists offered new exceptional work, and by doing so, they encourage those of us in the arts, to do more.”  Fairweather Gallery

Abstract series of three by Jan Rimmerman, seascape oil by Karen E. Lewis and pottery by Suzy Holland.  Shape and Color gallery hostesses Katie, Kemy Kay, Joan, Bonnie and Denise.

 

And, too, a grace note received from a gallery hostess to share.

“Thank you for the beautiful crystal I picked out for a gift.  Most, of all, thanks for bringing the utmost beauty to many, many people.  Most of all, thanks for inviting me to work in your stunning establishment.  It delights my eyes every time I come in.  Your artists are beyond comparison.” Kemy Kay

A grace note received from an artist.

 

“Don’t ask yourself what the world needs.  Ask yourself  what makes you come alive and then do that.  Because what the world needs is people who have come alive.” –Howard Thurman, educator and theologian.
“Thank you for your encouragement and support in showing and growing my art.  You have created such a wonderful group of artists, and display our work in beautiful ways.  I am extremely grateful for your friendship and aliveness in out shared vision.”  Gayle H. Seely

For more about the gallery, please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com.

TO PARE:  The theme for May 2018 for the Fairweather Gallery

 

“When I first reviewed the Fairweather Gallery’s list of themes for 2018, I was intrigued.  So many interesting choices.  As a lover of words and all that they imply, I was attracted to the theme “pare”, “pear” or “pair.  How unusual!  What to choose?  I selected “pare.”

“Pare” usually means “to cut back”, to “slice away”, to “remove”, and even “to simplify.”  When I thought of the “to simplify”, I was hooked.  Little did I know that I nearly shot myself in the foot!

As an artist, “to simplify” means to remove all that is not absolutely necessary to say what I want to say.  The challenge is how few lines, how few colors, how few marks on my paper convey my meaning.  I thought of the cave paintings from 30,000- 40,000 years ago in France and Spain.  How simple and how elegant.

 

 https://www.smithsonianmag.com/…/journey-oldest-cave-paintings-world

Later, Picasso who was also intrigued by simplifying, drew a series of bulls.  The merest line conveyed the strength, the majesty of this noble animal.

 

www.dailyartmagazine.com/pablo-picassos-bulls-road-simplicity

 

So, “to pare” is good for one’s art.  No more worrying about what is pretty, what will sell, just get to the point!  If one line can convey your message, use it.  Do not be too wordy or explain too much! 

 

 

Too much thinking about “to pare”; going back to the homonyms?  Pear, pair, pare, or au pair?  That opens up a world. 

 

There is a painting here by Marga that is an eye-stopper and it is about “pears”.  What a hoot!

“Pears Illustrated, Swimsuit edition” by Marga Stanley

 And the many others which the artists translated “to pare”, “to pair”, or quite simply “pears”.

 

 

I must admit that I gave into to all in my artwork.  This was a challenging theme that made me think.  I will move toward more line work in my efforts to come to the point, and I shall work “to pare”. 

 

 

Jo Pomeroy-Crockett and her art.

And, as I always discover when stretching, thinking is hard work.”  —Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, PhD., writer, educator and artist.

 

For more info about the artist, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Jo Pomeroy-Crockett.

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside, Oregon

Through May 31

Perfect Pear, Pair,  Pare Exhibition

Regional artists were selected due to their art related to scale and perspective, and the way things correlate and interact.

Featuring artists Lisa Wiser, Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, Blue Bond, Marga Stanley, Bill Baily, and Lynda Campbell.

 

 

 

Q: Why do artists often study painting pears, you ask?

A: Indeed, every artist has spent hours staring at pears, later to paint pears to learn the study of light, shading and perspective.

 

Cézanne once proclaimed, “With a pear I want to astonish Paris,” and he succeeded, even in his most deceptively simple still life paintings, to dazzle and delight.

L.1988.62.32

Turning to the pears grown in the vicinity of the family’s estate, Cézanne dispensed with traditional one-point perspective and examined the fruit, plates, and table from various viewpoints—straight on, above, and sideways.

 

Display featuring pear art by Bill Baily, abstract paintings by Kimberly Reed and abstract art by Diane Copenhaver.

The exhibitions(s) “To Pare Perfect”, aka “Perfect Pear”,  and, too, aka “Perfect Pair” through May 31 at Fairweather House and Gallery.

 

“Negotiation” original art by Lisa Wiser.

“I do have a pair of pears on canvas as well as a few other perfect pairs of other items. Ha! Confusing eh? I will focus on pairs of pears. Heading down into the studio now! ”  — 😍🍐🍐Lisa Wiser

 

About  Lisa Wiser, pear artist:

Lisa Wiser is a visual artist living and working in Lake Oswego, Oregon. Her representational work is characterized by vivid color, great depth of space and attention to detail. She credits her father for instilling a love of drawing and painting while teaching her to draw at a young age.

“Leafy Pears” original oil on canvas by Lisa Wiser.

 

More about Lisa Wiser, pear artist:

Lisa earned a BS Degree in Art Education from the University of Oregon in 1978 and has completed graduate coursework in graphic design, art education and painting. Lisa has been invited to serve in both curatorial and juror positions for various arts organizations in the area. She has taught art from pre-school through college and adult level courses and has recently retired as a substitute art teacher for her local school district to devote more time to her painting.

 

 

“Bartlett Pears” original art by Lisa Wiser.

The Bartlett pear  carries a true pyriform “pear shape:” a rounded bell on the bottom half of the fruit, then a definitive shoulder with a smaller top.

 

 

 

Q: Why do artists often study painting pears, you ask?

A:  Cézanne once proclaimed, “With a pear I want to astonish Paris,” and he succeeded, even in his most deceptively simple still lifes, to dazzle and delight.  Turning to the pears grown in the vicinity of the family’s estate, he dispensed with traditional one-point perspective and examined the fruit, plates, and table from various viewpoints—straight on, above, and sideways.

 

 

Still Life Pears, Paul Cezanne, 1885

 

Indeed, every artist has spent hours staring at pears, later to paint pears to learn the study of light, shading and perspective.


 

 

 

And, too, a grace note received about the blog article:

“I love the post. Fun and informative. I really like the information about why artists chose pears as a subject.”  —Lisa Wiser

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside, Oregon

Through May 31

Perfect Pear, Pair,  Pare Exhibition

Regional artists were selected due to their art related to scale and perspective, and the way things correlate and interact.

Featuring artists Lisa Wiser, Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, Blue Bond, Marga Stanley, Bill Baily, and Lynda Campbell.

 

Table display featuring art by Joanna Donaca and calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson.

Art by Lisa Wiser. 

Nature photography by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images.

 

Art by Theresa O’Leary, necklace by Mary Truhler, pastel by Greta Lindwood, ceramics  by Emily Miller, glass by Rox Heath, wood bowls  by Daniel Harris and Mike Brown.

 

Miniature by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett.

Fused glass by Bob Heath and pressed floral by Mike Mason.

 

 

 

Key rings by Luan LaLonde,  encaustic art by Kimberly Kent, pen/ink by Britney Drumheller, photographs by Don Frank and metallic art by Richard Newman.

 

 

 

And, too, bunnies, of course,  amidst the green. 

 

 

FRESH GREENS, an exhibition,  through March.

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside, Oregon

 

For more info,  please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Photos by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

 

Diane Copenhaver, abstract artist

Diane is a resident of the northwest and recently embarked on a journey of discovery to unleash her creative talents after a successful career in business. Art classes at Bellevue College have provided foundational skills focused on the principles and elements of design, color theory and harmonies, and painting techniques and processes.

Diane is painting primarily abstract using acrylics on varied surfaces. She also produces collage and mixed media works, is studying calligraphic arts and has begun to explore encaustic painting.

Color and texture are often the focus of Diane’s paintings. She uses layers of paint, as well as a variety of tools and mediums.

 

 

“As I contemplated the subject of ‘Shadows’, I found inspiration in a variety of perspectives around the idea of shadow; shadow as opposite, reflection, repetition, companion, or as enabled by light.”

 

“I enjoy the freedom of non-representational painting and used these ideas of shadow to explore the use of black and white and the beautiful gradients of grey. I have expressed ‘Shadows’ through a variety of works; bold and expressive, muted and gentle, solid and soft edges, and layers of dark and light. I am naturally moved to create a sense of mystery in my painting and hope that my work for ‘Shadows’ provides the space to engage and create a personal story and interpretation of shadow.” –Diane Copenhaver

 

 

 

 

One of four.  Gradient series by Diane Copenhaver.

 

 

Sincerely series. I and II by Diane Copenhaver.

 

Layer series. I, II, III and IV by Diane Copenhaver.

 

 

Mysteries by Diane Copenhaver.

 

Fairweather House and Gallery, 612 Broadway

 SHADOWS, an exhibition  through October,  focuses on the interplay of light and dark with through selected art that expresses time as the fall season progresses.

New artwork by Northwest artists Diane Copenhaver, Gregory Bell,  Penelope Culbertson, Whelsey Whelp, Lisa Wiser, Karen E. Lewis, Tamara Johnson and Marga Stanley will be featured.

 

 

Lisa Wiser is a visual artist living and working in Oregon. She draws inspiration from the scenic northwest, travel adventures and reading novels to create watercolor, acrylic, and mixed media paintings. Also an avid photographer, she chronicles her visual inspirations as she records obscure landscapes, architectural details, and other intriguing painting subjects.

 

Pursuits in life drawing and plein air painting confirms that she prefers a direct association with her subjects while working from life both outdoors or in the studio.

 

 

“The foundation of my work is a keen interest in the concept of structure in both the natural and built environment. My primary interest is capturing landscape scenes that visually articulate my emotional response upon approaching the scene.”–Lisa Wiser

 

Shadows of Butte by Lisa Wiser

 

Her representational work is characterized by vivid color, great depth of space and attention to detail.

Lisa earned a BS Degree in Art Education from the University of Oregon and has completed graduate coursework in graphic design, art education and painting. Lisa has been invited to serve in both curatorial and juror positions for various arts organizations in the area. She has taught art from pre-school through college and adult level courses and has recently retired as a substitute art teacher for her local school district to devote more time to her painting.

Aside from painting Lisa enjoys hiking, reading, gardening, skiing, and family time with her three adult children and husband, travel and fixing things. Her favorite getaways are the forests and deserts of Central Oregon and her family’s rustic retreat on Payette Lake in McCall, Idaho.

Save the date and time.

October 7th, 5-7pm

Opening reception for SHADOWS, an exhibition, Fairweather House and Gallery.

Welcoming artist Lisa Wiser.

Introducing glitter house artist Tamara Johnson.

 “SHADOWS,  expressed through a variety of works; bold and expressive, muted and gentle, solid and soft edges, and layers of dark and light.” –Diane Copenhaver

SHADOWS will feature new artwork by Fairweather resident artists Diane Copenhaver, Gregory Bell, Whelpsy Whelp, Marga Stanley and  Neal Maine.

Featured artists will be in attendance and will offer an artist talk about their works of art.

 

Special guest, FLYNN, an American Kestrel, from the Wildlife Center of the North Coast. 

Take a note!

SHADOWS,  the opening reception, will be a benefit for the WCNC.

Wildlife Center of the North Coast (WCNC) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit Oregon corporation, that specializes in wildlife rehabilitation of resident and migratory birds, mammals and other wild creatures.

 WCNC relys on the generosity of individuals and community groups for annual funding through donations, as well as grants from foundations, both local and from around the country.

 

 

More information to follow.

 

 

 

COLOR IT FALL,  an exhibition,

through September 30th.

Fairweather House and Gallery

Bamboo basket by  Charles Schweigert, pastels by Joanne Donaca, autumn original oil by Savvy Dani,  landscape plein air original by Lisa Wiser, abstracts by Renee Rowe, shell oils by Paul Brent, paper textiles  by Christine Trexel, photography by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.  Design by Denise Fairweather, allied member, A. S. I. D., American Society of Interior Designers.

For more about the artists, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

Featured art on display  by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett and calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson.

 

COLOR IT FALL

Artist Lecture 

 

We see color thanks to the cones in our eyes. (The rods are for night vision.) Humans are trichromats, that is, we see red, green, and blue. . . and mixtures of all these.

Many birds and fish, on the other hand, are tetrochromats and see 4 colors including ultraviolet colors invisible to us. A small percentage of women, some 2% – 3%, are tetrachromats and see at least one additional ultraviolet color.

What is your favorite color?

Ask a few people around the room. Chances are, between 50 – 60% will favor blue.

What can color do? It can . . .
* attract attention. People see color before they see anything else.
* hold attention. People pay attention to black and white for about ½ second or less. They pay attention to color for 2 – 3 seconds.
* Color has power. Consider the colors of STOP, GO and CAUTION.
*Color increases memory.

*Color images are processed before black and white images, so they are remembered better.
*Color informs better than black and white.

Research shows color improves readership by 40%, learning by 55 – 78%, and comprehension by 73%.
*Colors have personality and meaning and personalities vary with one’s culture.
*Color combined with shape sends special messages.
*Color attracts attention to brands better than words. What colors are signs? What is on the background of a sign?
*The color of your clothing tells a lot about you, your profession, and your status.
*Color transmits messages without ever using a word.

Aren’t artists lucky?  We have free use of color which can to do and say so many different things! All we have to do is to learn to make use of the many meanings of color as we create our treasures. —Jo Pomeroy- Crockett, Ph.D, writer and artist.

To read more about the writer, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/  …artists/ …Jo Pomeroy-Crockett

 

 

 

COLOR IT FALL, table display featuring art by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett. 

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