Lynda Campbell


“Sea Star” by Paul Brent. Original oil on linen.

Table top display features one-of-a-kind accessories: mouth blown glass, driftwood garland, vintage glass and handmade glass spheres.

 

Table displays feature the art  and artists that, truly, offer endless inspirations for idyllic times at the beach.

More than 200 artists from across the Pacific Northwest are featured in the Faiweather House and Gallery, a business that has been an anchor for Seaside’s growing arts scene for more than 12 years. A variety of mediums include original paintings, sculptures, ceramics and jewelry.

New pieces and artists are added each month, making the Fairweather House and Gallery a must-visit destination in Seaside, Oregon for art connoisseurs.

 

Art by Jan Shield,  glass by Sandy and Bob Lercari,  coral platter by Rinee Merritt, handmade box by Christine Trexel and origami garland by Peggy Evans.
Fairweather House and Gallery is a place to see finished creations of bowls, platters and sculpture, as well as contemporary paintings.

Jewelry by Cher Flick, Mary Hurst and Alan Stockam.  Myrtle wood by Fred and Janice Lukens.  Ocean scape painting by Ron Nicolaides. Gull portrait by Leah Brown.  Nantucket basket by Carol Bolster.  Sea anemone study by Jon Anni. Sail boat water colors by Paul Brent.

 

With appreciation to Linda Fenton-Mendenhall,  photographer.

 

To learn more about the gallery, please go to www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Lynda Campbell, artist, spoke at the opening reception of “Perfect Pear, Perfect Pair, Perfect Pare” on May 5 at Fairweather’s.

 

 

And, too, a grace note:

“Thank you for your interest and support of my work. Your gallery is highly regarded among artists so it is special to be included in one of your showings. The “pear, pair, pare” theme was fun and it was interesting to see everyone’s interpretations. I appreciate all your did (and all you do) to share artists accomplishments. It is a lot of work for you each month. My best.”  —Lynda Campbell

 

 

Read more about the artist lecture at:

Fairweather House and Gallery | https://www

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/tag/fairweather-house-and-gallery/

A “pear”antly by Lynda Campbell for Perfect Pear…

 

“Those that live for the arts, support the arts.” Art patrons capture the artist lecture presented by Lynda Campbell.

 

Read more about the opening reception at:

https://www.seasideor.com/event/first-saturday-art-walk-3/ …Blue Bond, Marga Stanley, Bill Baily, and Lynda Campbell

 

Pastel Pears by Lynda Campbell

Read more about the artist at:

https://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com | extraordinary home …

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/

Lynda Campbell, pastel artist, has worked in the medium for about 14 years. She has a BS degree in Art Education from the University of Oregon. She has lived …

 

 

 

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside, Oregon

Through May 31

Perfect Pear, Pair, Pare Exhibition

Regional artists were selected due to their art related to scale and perspective, and the way things correlate and interact.

Featuring artists Lisa Wiser, Patti Isaacs, Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, Blue Bond, Marga Stanley, Bill Baily, and Lynda Campbell.

 

Take a note

Upcoming Fairweather Exhibition

June 2, 5-7pm

Seaside First Saturday Art Walk

Artist Reception

“Sense of Place”

 

TO PARE:  The theme for May 2018 for the Fairweather Gallery

 

“When I first reviewed the Fairweather Gallery’s list of themes for 2018, I was intrigued.  So many interesting choices.  As a lover of words and all that they imply, I was attracted to the theme “pare”, “pear” or “pair.  How unusual!  What to choose?  I selected “pare.”

“Pare” usually means “to cut back”, to “slice away”, to “remove”, and even “to simplify.”  When I thought of the “to simplify”, I was hooked.  Little did I know that I nearly shot myself in the foot!

As an artist, “to simplify” means to remove all that is not absolutely necessary to say what I want to say.  The challenge is how few lines, how few colors, how few marks on my paper convey my meaning.  I thought of the cave paintings from 30,000- 40,000 years ago in France and Spain.  How simple and how elegant.

 

 https://www.smithsonianmag.com/…/journey-oldest-cave-paintings-world

Later, Picasso who was also intrigued by simplifying, drew a series of bulls.  The merest line conveyed the strength, the majesty of this noble animal.

 

www.dailyartmagazine.com/pablo-picassos-bulls-road-simplicity

 

So, “to pare” is good for one’s art.  No more worrying about what is pretty, what will sell, just get to the point!  If one line can convey your message, use it.  Do not be too wordy or explain too much! 

 

 

Too much thinking about “to pare”; going back to the homonyms?  Pear, pair, pare, or au pair?  That opens up a world. 

 

There is a painting here by Marga that is an eye-stopper and it is about “pears”.  What a hoot!

“Pears Illustrated, Swimsuit edition” by Marga Stanley

 And the many others which the artists translated “to pare”, “to pair”, or quite simply “pears”.

 

 

I must admit that I gave into to all in my artwork.  This was a challenging theme that made me think.  I will move toward more line work in my efforts to come to the point, and I shall work “to pare”. 

 

 

Jo Pomeroy-Crockett and her art.

And, as I always discover when stretching, thinking is hard work.”  —Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, PhD., writer, educator and artist.

 

For more info about the artist, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Jo Pomeroy-Crockett.

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside, Oregon

Through May 31

Perfect Pear, Pair,  Pare Exhibition

Regional artists were selected due to their art related to scale and perspective, and the way things correlate and interact.

Featuring artists Lisa Wiser, Patti Isaacs, Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, Blue Bond, Marga Stanley, Bill Baily, and Lynda Campbell.

 

 

 

Q: Why do artists often study painting pears, you ask?

A: Indeed, every artist has spent hours staring at pears, later to paint pears to learn the study of light, shading and perspective.

 

Cézanne once proclaimed, “With a pear I want to astonish Paris,” and he succeeded, even in his most deceptively simple still life paintings, to dazzle and delight.

L.1988.62.32

Turning to the pears grown in the vicinity of the family’s estate, Cézanne dispensed with traditional one-point perspective and examined the fruit, plates, and table from various viewpoints—straight on, above, and sideways.

 

Display featuring pear art by Bill Baily, abstract paintings by Kimberly Reed and abstract art by Diane Copenhaver.

The exhibitions(s) “To Pare Perfect”, aka “Perfect Pear”,  and, too, aka “Perfect Pair” through May 31 at Fairweather House and Gallery.

 

PEARS by Lynda Campbell.

A “pear” antly by Lynda Campbell, pastel artist.

“More often than not I’m noticing as I age, that the days are fleeting. Many are consumed with extraneous piddly stuff! They seem to evaporate. Is that what I want? Is that what pleases me? Those are 2 questions I ask myself. At this point, having some escape time is becoming more important. This happens when I pick up my pastels to paint. It is therapeutic and relaxing whether or not a successful painting evolves.

My interests vary as often as the seasons. I’ve found over the years I am attracted to organic shapes and contortions. In winter lab time I often look at gourds and especially PEARS. The oval, earthy shapes are appealing and sensual.

I’ve worked in soft pastels about 14 years. They allow a wonderful, immediate, vibrant palette of colors. I tend to be bold. I lean more towards impressionism.

There is such a great feeling when escaping into a piece. Time disappears. Very few efforts result in a masterpiece but I’ve occasionally had a satisfying conclusion.

With that mention, you notice I’ve accumulated a few observations of PEAR motifs. Some share a bit of humor, all share a pleasurable painting experience for me.”   Lynda Campbell

PEARS by Lynda Campbell.

Lynda Campbell, pastel artist, has worked in the medium for about 14 years. She has a BS degree in Art Education from the University of Oregon. She has lived with her husband and children in Seaside for almost 50 years. She spent the majority of her 24 teaching career years as an Art Education teacher primarily in Broadway Middle School in Seaside Oregon. She was fortunate to start a formal Art Education program in Briggs Junior High in Springfield, Oregon and Seaside High School.

Over the years she has taken classes and workshops from various known artists. Eric Weigardt, Shirley Dahlsten, Tom Benenati, Royal Nebeker, Marla Bagetta, Susan Ogilivie and has appreciated having Kathy Moberg as a mentor.

Her work has been represented in several local galleries over the last 12 years from Astoria to Cannon Beach and collected by various private patrons. She has had awards and recognitions for her soft pastels.

 

Q: What are  pastels, you ask?

A: A  pastel consists of pure powdered pigment and binder in a stick. It’s basically the same pigment that  is used in all art mediums. In appearance, it’s sort of a cross between a stick of chalk and a crayon. They are held in the same way that you would hold a pencil, crayon or paint brush.

Renaissance masters, such as Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1510) and Michelangelo (1475-1564), used chalks for drawing, and it was from this that pastel developed.

 

Today there are now many different hues and shades available and many have an almost limitless shelf-life.

For more info go to https://www.britannica.com/art/pastel-art

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside, Oregon

Through May 31

Perfect Pear, Pair,  Pare Exhibition

Regional artists were selected due to their art related to scale and perspective, and the way things correlate and interact.

Featuring artists Lisa Wiser, Patti Isaacs, Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, Blue Bond, Marga Stanley, Bill Baily, and Lynda Campbell.

 

For more info about the gallery, please visit  www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com