Michael Muldoon


 

Moulton Skies over Tiilamook Head. Original oil by Micheal Muldoon.

To view more art by Michael Muldoon, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Micheal Muldoon

 

 

Eagle Sunrise by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images.

To view more images by Neal Maine, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/  …artists/ …Neal Maine

 

 

 

Art by Marga.

To view more art by Marga, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Marga Stanley

 

Calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson

To read more about the artist, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ ….artists/ …Penelope Culbertson

“We are all like the bright moon, we still have our darker side.” — Kahlil Gibran

 

“We must strive to be like the moon.’ An old man in Kabati repeated this sentence often… the adage served to remind people to always be on their best behavior and to be good to others.  No one grumbles when the moon shines. Everyone becomes happy and appreciates the moon in their own special way. Children watch their shadows and play in its light, people gather at the square to tell stories and dance through the night. A lot of happy things happen when the moon shines. These are some of the reasons why we should want to be like the moon.”   –Ishmael Beah

 

“We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard.”

–John F. Kennedy

Lava vases by Emily Miller, Pelican and Buoy original art by Whelpsey Whelp, Sea Turtle original water-color by Rosemary Klein, hand-made journals and boxes by Christine Trexel, hammered copper and gold earrings by Steven Schankin and Natura shell series of original oil paintings by Paul Brent.

 

On the grass cloth wall: coral original oil by Paul Brent, coral wood cut series by Gregory Graham, Puffin on the Rock (facing left)original by Nick Brakel, Puffin fine art photograph (facing right) by Donna Geissler, and on the twig wall sculpture, Oregon myrtlewood earrings by Fred Lukens.

On the table scape: Puffin Portrait original pen and ink (facing right) by Britney Drumheller, Sea Star original pen and ink by Britney Drumheller, and  hand hemmed tie dyed silk scarves by Beth Collins.

 

Eel and pipe fish original pen and ink collage by emerging artist Whelpsey Welp (easel display), The Snorkler by Marga Stanley (on the circle table) rare CoCo Chanel vintage jewelry by Renee Hafeman,  spoons by Mike Morris,  Moulton Sky original oil seascape  by Michael Muldoon and Oregon lighthouse watercolor series by Emily Miller.

Sea Within original shell art by Jan Shield, original water colors by Carolyn Macpherson, tclam style  carry all bags by textile artist Linda Ballard  and…ta! da! …grand piano found by a friendly neighbor for the Fairweather Gallery!!!

Displays by Denise Fairweather,  Allied Member, A.S.I.D., American Society of Interior Designers.

 

For more about  the accredited interior design work at the gallery , please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …about/ Denise Faiweather page

And, too,  questions to the audience at FINDINGS, the opening reception for the August exhibition, at Fairweather House and Gallery.

What is new?

What is bigger than a bread box?

What took one and 1/2 hours to install?

What took 5 men to move?

What has the number 88 to do with this piece?

 

And, the art patron who answered the question…is it the grand  piano?  The lovely lady in black.  She graciously called for a round of applause, after listening to the piano stories  (past, current and future musical lives).

 

For more info please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com


WAVES, Fairweather’s front counter table scape.  Art featured: Beluga Whale, mixed media by Nick Brakel, Waves, oil on board by Melissa Jander, fused glass platter by Cindy Duvall, calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson, Haystack oil on linen by Michael Muldoon.

 

Fairweather Gallery exhibition displays for WAVES.

A Fairweather Gallery  opening reception is all about meeting artists and seeing art.

 

WAVES introduced artist Karen E. Lewis.

 

Victoria Brooks.  Featured Faiweather resident artist for July.

For more info please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Victoria Brooks.

 

Regional artists greeted, spoke to and lectured about art to patrons at WAVES, an exhibition.

 

Fun with Fairweather hostesses. Surfboards by Cleanline Surf, Seaside. And, too, a blooper of sorts.

 

Featuring  art by regional artists:  floral and grasses  by Susan Curington,  landscapes by Jan Shield,  pastels by Joanne Donaca, wood cut birds and blooms by Gregory Graham, mouth blown glass by Cindy DuVall, textiles by Linda Ballard  and rice paper florals by Zifen Qian.  

For more info please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com … artists.

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BLOOM, an exhibition at Fairweather’s through April. “It’s like living inside a garden, the gallery is layered  with colorful accessories, beautiful artworks, and gorgeous garden books.”

So lovely.  So perfect.  So right.  

Photo layout  by Fairweather artist and Seaside Art Walk photographer, Linda Fenton-Mendenhall featuring  the April  2017 salon-style display of art.

Selected BLOOM artists in salon style gallery display, left to right:   floral oil on linen art by Michael Muldoon,  still life oil on linen by Melissa Jander,  landscape pastels by Gretha Lindwood, encaustic (painting in beeswax) by emerging artist Rebecca Gore, abstract floral pastels by Gretha Lindwood, emerging artist mermaids in sea florals by emerging artist Ashley Howarth, and “Garden Party” tulips and hyacinths  original oil by Melissa Jander.

A round of applause for BLOOM, an exhibition at Fairweather’s throughout the month of April! You  introduced an imaginative way of displaying many diverse  NW artists.  The artwork brings together design drama in extraordinary intimacy and charm that creates a feeling of a springtime garden stroll. Thank you!” — Bonnie W.

Q: What is salon style display in the context of a gallery exhibition, you ask?

A:  Hanging art salon-style can be a dramatic and brave  way to decorate a wall, placing a range of art with unusual dimensions to create an interesting effect.   Neutral walls are considered a perfect way to cleanse the palette for the eye in  salon-style display.

 

For more info about the gallery and the artists, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com …artists

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Irish Heather, Wicklow Gap.  Michael Muldoon, artist.

Comment on “Irish Heather”, from the artist:

Coming down out of the Wicklow Gap just southeast of Dublin into Glendalough, the site of St. Kevins stone church built in 633 The beautiful lavender heather Ireland is so famous for, and al ways the vagabond sheep traversing the narrow roadways…where else can you capture that sight?  The heather so vibrant, with its varying hues of greens strewn in and between the rocks.  I hope this rendering makes you want to go there, you will not be disappointed!  An incredible place with wonderful people.”  –Michael Muldoon

 

 

 

Connemara Morning.  Michael Muldoon, artist.

Roaming the Connemara countryside with no fences, competing on the narrow roads…truly these sheep, without any cares, are iconic Ireland!

Connerara Morning reflects just how the Connemara area of Ireland is; subdued hues of greens, weathered rock outcroppings, and hardy sheep everywhere and however slowly they wish to go!  A beautiful sight to behold, and one I know I would attempt to render on a canvas when I returned home.  Ireland…certainly a “terrible beauty” as described regarding their history with England and internal strife, but a real genuine beauty nonetheless.  Incredible place AND people!”  –Michael Muldoon

About the artist:

Growing up on the Oregon coast, traveling American and Europe throughout his career, Michael Muldoon fell in love with color and the way artists of all genres capture it on canvas.

Irish Lands through March, 2017.

Please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com …artists… Michael Muldoon for more about the artist.

 

 

Front display table at Fairweather’s  featuring calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson and ‘Irish Vista’, oil on linen,  by Michael Muldoon.

Please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com  …artists tab/  Penelope Culbertson/  Michael Muldoon for more information about the artists.

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Grace Note:

To Fairweather  artists, guests and cultural art patrons:

“Thank you for the sharing of your time at the opening reception of Irish Lands on March 4th, 2017.  The exhibition, which continues through March 28th,  all about the telling of Irish people who dance to the tune of their own muse and in doing so offer prose and art that reaches back to the beginning of time.” –Denise Fairweather

And, too, just in from Celtic jewelry designer Mary Hurst.

Braided Welsh pewter and amethyst quartz necklace.

 

For more info about the Mary Hurst please go to https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/…/tis-celtic-jewelry-by-mary-hurst-…

’tis Celtic jewelry by Mary Ryan Hurst for IRISH LANDS, an exhibition …Feb. 26, 2017

Pearls, sterling and crystal by Mary Hurst Ryan, Celtic jewelry designer. “I enjoy the blog and see how busy and involved you are in the art …

For more images  from the March 4th events in the historic Gilbert District of downtown Seaside please visit http://www.facebook.com/ Seaside First Saturday Art Walk.

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Celtic High Cross by Michael Muldoon. Original oil.

Legend says that the first Celtic cross was formed by St Patrick while bringing Christianity to the Druids. The Druids used to worship a large circular stone. St Patrick, on seeing the significance of this stone, drew a large cross through the middle of it in order to bless it. From this act, the two cultures combined to form the Celtic cross. The cross represents Christianity and the circle is the Celtic representation of eternity, no beginning and no end.

Micheal Muldoon paints LIVE.

Michael Muldoon, artist,  offered a Painting Seaside LIVE ™ episode during the opening of IRISH LANDS, an exhibition, on March 6th.

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Trinity Cathedral, location of the Books of Kells, Dublin, Ireland by Richard Newman, photographer.

Q: What is the significance of the Books of Kells, you ask?

A: One of the experts on the manuscript Bernard Meehan writes “In Ireland it symbolizes the power of learning and the spirit of artistic imagination.” The scale and ambition of The Book of Kells is incredible. Written on vellum, practically all of the 680 pages are decorated in some way or another. On some pages every corner is filled with the most detailed and beautiful Celtic designs. The Book is the most famous manuscript in the Library of Trinity College Dublin where it is permanently on display. The Book of Kells is kept in a gallery with only two pages displayed at a time, although they are turned after some period.

https://www.tcd.ie/visitors/book-of-kells/
http://www.special-ireland.com/the-book-of-kells/

 

And, too, for IRISH LANDS, an Irish  family heirloom from the 1800’s will be displayed throughout the month of March  at Fairweather’s



Irish Lands hostesses: Kathy B., Kay K., Denise F., Joan S., and Shirley Y. posing with the spinning wheel display at Fairweather’s.

Kate Hegarty came to America  from Ireland with a spinning wheel crafted in the 1800’s  during the Great Irish Potato Famine.

 

After flourishing for more than 600 years, the Weaver’s  (Spinning) Guild collapsed during the famine years (1846-1853). The Great Potato Famine of the mid-19th century is the most defining event in modern Irish history. The Famine or the Great Hunger was a period of mass starvation and emigration in Ireland between 1846 and 1853.  More than more than 5 million adults and children left Ireland to seek refuge, more than 60% did not survive the journey to America and beyond.  

 

Q: Who was Kate Hegarty, you ask?

 

A: Kate Hegarty, traveled a 16-year-old from County Limerick, Ireland to America in the mid 1800’s. She was the only member selected from a family lottery to safely leave during the Great Potato Famine in Ireland. She brought with her a family heirloom, a spinning wheel, crafted in the 1800’s and had hopes to earn a living in the textile trade. Instead, the young immigrant found work as a maid in Boston, saved her money to travel to the Washington Territory.  She worked as a mother’s helper and brought her treasured spinning wheel. She married a pioneer, Michael Curtin in 1854.  He had come to America from County Cork, Ireland traveling in a ship “around the Horn”.  He earned  money in the gold mines of San Francisco, and later Curtin settled in the Washington Territory. 

 

Curtin is the first pioneer family listed in the Clark County Historical Register, Washington Territory. The Curtin land claim is signed by Ulysses S. Grant, who served as quartermaster at Fort Vancouver from 1852 to 1853. 

Tradition gifts the spinning wheel to the eldest daughter of each generation. Denise Fairweather, founder of Fairweather House and Gallery, has  received the treasured family heirloom.

More info go to: http://www.globalgenealogy.com/countries/ireland/resources/

 

More info: The Famine Ships: Irish Exodus to America, 1846-51 – Edward Laxton, author.

 

To learn more about the gallery, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseangallery.com and view the about, blog and artists tabs.r

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