Peg Wells


Shortie I for A FINE LINE.

Mixed media art by Bill Baily, woven bamboo basket by Charles Schweigert, black and white gull art by Leah Brown, encaustic art by Peg Wells, pen and ink drawings by Waka Takahashi Brown, photo by Susan Romersa, pottery by Suzy Holland and photographs by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

Shortie II for A FINE LINE.

Pen and ink shell studies, oak leaf watercolor and grape painting by Paul Brent.

Shortie III for A FINE LINE.

Art by Jan Shield, platter by Teresa Weisman-Knight,  semi-precious bracelets by Mary Bottita and watercolor by Carolynn Wagler.

 

 

Shortie IV for A FINE LINE.

Pen, ink and wax art by Dorota Haber-Lehigh.

 

Shortie V for A FINE LINE.

Handmade books by Christine Trexel and calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson.

 

Shortie VI for A FINE LINE.

Fused glass by Mike Fox, watercolors by Carolyn Macpherson and handmade glass by Bob Heath and Christine Downs.

Shortie VII for A FINE LINE.

Hand painted sea urchin rocks, signed and dated, by Kandy Schwartz.

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

A FINE LINE

On view 

October 5-31

 

A FINE LINE”  an exhibition of representational and non-representational works of art. Working with different media the selected artists experiment with linear mark making in its widest sense. Each artist produced works inspired by places and spaces in the natural environment.

For more info please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Images by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

Abstract originals by Bill Baily, abstract wood boxes and table by Ray Noregaard with wood bowls by Mike Brown.

“Contemporary art does not attempt to represent external reality, but seeks to achieve its effect using shapes, forms, colors, and textures.”

 

Fresco abstracts including impasto on canvas and impastos framed in basswood by Martha Lee, segmented Oregon  myrtlewood vases by Mike Brown, chenille hand made gourds and pumpkins in woven rattan basket.

 

Cold wax abstract by Peg Wells, rare wood lidded bowls by Fred Lukens,  inlaid lidded boxes by Ray Noregaard, figured edge bowl by Daniel Harris, hand made ceramic salmon by Teresa Weisman-Knight and Celtic jewelry by Mary Hurst.

 

Acrylic abstract  and painting glass jewelry by Tanya Gardner, calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson and sunset painting by Jan Shield.

 

 

Art by Gregory Bell, abstracts by Rene’e Rowe, ceramics by Teresa Weisman-Knight, glass by Bob Heath, pastels by Joanna Donaca, glass platter by Sandy and Bob Lercari, bowls by Emily Miller and rice paper abstracts by Zifen Qian.

Photos by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

 

 

CONTRASTS, an exhibition, featuring original  art from Northwest artists using bright, abstract palettes – electric yellows, brilliant blues, wild reds and shining greens.

Exhibiting  abstract artists Bill Baily, Gregory Bell, Tanya Gardner, Agnes Field, Sharon Kathleen Johnson, Jan Rimerman,  Rene’e Rowe, Gayle H. Seely, Russell J. Young, Peg Wells and Zifen Qian.

 

CONTRASTS, an exhibition of contemporary art, representing the finest in painting, photography, sculpture, ceramics, fiber art, and more—from selected regional, local and emerging artists.

On exhibit Sept. 25, 2019

Read more at http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

From the Valley of Love. Russell J. Young.

 

Russell JYoung is a self-taught photographer and fine art printer who has a passion for visual works and draws influence from the elements of various art forms.Nov 17, 2014  

 

“I have found ways to express my artistic style in the magic of cold wax, encaustic and epoxy resin.”   Peg Wells

 

 

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

located in the Historic Gilbert Block Building

CONTRASTS, an exhibition, showing art from selected regional artists using bright, abstract palettes – electric yellows, brilliant blues, wild reds and shining greens, along with displaying only black and white tones found in the natural world.

CONTRASTS, an exhibition of contemporary art, representing the finest in painting, photography, sculpture, ceramics, fiber art, and more—from selected regional, local and emerging artists.

Featuring abstract artists Bill Baily, Gregory Bell, Tanya Gardner, Agnes Field, Sharon Johnson, Jan Rimerman,  Rene’e Rowe, Russell J. Young, Peg Wells  and Zifen Qian.

Photographer and artistic collaborator, and fine art printer Russell J. Young is motivated by his love of nature and the performing arts. His photographs have been exhibited in the Abbaye de Neumunster (Luxembourg), Maryhill Museum of Art (Goldendale, WA), Mingei International Museum of Art (San Diego, CA), Romanian Embassy (Sweden), and Sibiu International Theatre Festival (Romania). Russell’s commercial photography is represented by agencies in London, Stockholm, and Seattle.

 

“I was a Navy Wife, Mother, Critical Care Nurse and Golfer for many years. We lived in many different states and countries.  I spend summers on the Oregon Coast, enjoying family, and live in the Willamette Valley during the winter. My art background has been with clay – hand built, pottery and tile design, until discovering painting with wax and epoxy. ”   Peg Wells

Renee Hafeman features mid-century abstract designs in vintage jewelry.

Gayle H. Seely, mosaic-bead artist, reveals bright, new contemporary work.

On exhibit Sept. 7-25, 2019

Read more at http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Read more about the artists: 

Jul 12, 2018 – Indeed, the artist is back in Seaside with new work! Inspired by the beach and nature, Peg Wells has prepared a gallery exhibit composed of hot wax encaustic and cold wax collage. The work is decorative, but with a purpose that is secure in the strength of using natural elements.

 

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com › 2019/04/28 › for-port…

Apr 28, 2019 – “Man with a Mask” fine art portraiture by Russell J. Young “I go to great lengths, to create stories and or fairy tale style portraits tailored to a …

Salt enhanced watercolor by Paul Brent, encaustic beeswax painting by Peg Wells, pastel by Kathy Moberg,  archival papyrus pen and ink, rice paper by Zifen Qian, mixed media on easel by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett.

Photo collage by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall

“The works included in this exhibit use either new materials or methods and techniques to amplify the meaning in the content of their art. Adding or embedding new materials to the surface creates surprise, and occasionally, deeper interpretation and understanding of the subject.” –Agnes Field, curator

Mixed media art mask by Jorjett Strumme, miniature oil by Barbara Rosbe Felisky, impasto oil paintings by Leah Kohlenberg and Painting Seaside LIVE(tm) Paul Brent.

Photo collage by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall

 

Art in photo:   Carmela Newstead chiseled oil on linen, Agnes Field fresco art and a series of three impasto oils framed in basswood by Martha Lee. Photo by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

 

Exploring New Surfaces, a Fairweather exhibition, through October 31.


 Abstract watercolors by Donna Sanson, Oregon  myrtlewood cribbage board, segmented vase and nautilus sculptures by Mike Brown.

Crafted by NW hands.

Folded book art by Mary Boitta, en caustic art (aptly titled “Remembering Autumn”) by Peg Wells, origami by Peggy Evans, leather work by Luans Leathers, en caustic crows by Kathryn Delany and hand painted tiles by Sandy Applegate.

Abstracts by Diane Copenhaver and glass art by Bob Heath.

 


Handmade curly willow, mouth blown glass,  hand-made book and box by Christine Trexel.

Coral glass by Rinee Merritt, glass platters by Sandy and Bob Lecari and plein air oil by Lisa Wiser.

 

En caustic  art, ocean debris baskets, sea urchin bowls, moon platter by Emily Miller, mixed media stone art by Peggy Stein, abstract drip by Kimberly Reed and oil paintings by Sharon Kathleen Johnson.

 


Abstract miniatures by Tanya Gardner.

 

Calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson, watercolor by Bill Baily and pottery by Suzy Holland.

 

Abstract oil by Carmela Newstead.

 

 

Abstracts by Zifen Qian, maple bowls by Daniel Harris, watercolor by Paul Brent, landscape by Bill Baily and seascape  by Victoria Brooks.

 

 

For Shape and Color.

Art masks by Jorjett Strumme.

Paintings with pressed flowers on metal by Mike Mason. Anny Sears, model, with pressed foliages by Mike Mason.

 

 

Pastel landscape by Carmela Newstead, vintage jewelry necklace by Reneé Hafeman and en caustic blue abstract by Kimberly Kent.

Sunset oil paintings  by Nicholas Oberling, photograph by Neal Maine, pastels by Lynda Campbell and seascapes by Ron Nicolaides.

 

Mixed media diptych by Gary Pearlman, raw edged walnut bowl by Mike Brown and paper box sculpture by Christine Trexel.

Miniature oils by Barbara Rosbe Felisky.

 

Photos by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

“Color and Shape” exhibition through September 30th.

The show covers every aspect of art, textures, materials and finishes, highlighting the quintessentially colorful fall season.

Grace note to the artists…

 

“Shape and Color, Fairweather’s September exhibition, would not be such a success without the beautiful work created by NW hands.  The selected artists provided new work to highlight the annual fall show.  We thank them all for the extraordinary opportunity to tell a seasonal story with their art.  Truly, the artists offered new exceptional work, and by doing so, they encourage those of us in the arts, to do more.”  Fairweather Gallery

Abstract series of three by Jan Rimmerman, seascape oil by Karen E. Lewis and pottery by Suzy Holland.  Shape and Color gallery hostesses Katie, Kemy Kay, Joan, Bonnie and Denise.

 

And, too, a grace note received from a gallery hostess to share.

“Thank you for the beautiful crystal I picked out for a gift.  Most, of all, thanks for bringing the utmost beauty to many, many people.  Most of all, thanks for inviting me to work in your stunning establishment.  It delights my eyes every time I come in.  Your artists are beyond comparison.” Kemy Kay

A grace note received from an artist.

 

“Don’t ask yourself what the world needs.  Ask yourself  what makes you come alive and then do that.  Because what the world needs is people who have come alive.” –Howard Thurman, educator and theologian.
“Thank you for your encouragement and support in showing and growing my art.  You have created such a wonderful group of artists, and display our work in beautiful ways.  I am extremely grateful for your friendship and aliveness in out shared vision.”  Gayle H. Seely

For more about the gallery, please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com.

“Sea Star” by Paul Brent. Original oil on linen.

Table top display features one-of-a-kind accessories: mouth blown glass, driftwood garland, vintage glass and handmade glass spheres.

 

Table displays feature the art  and artists that, truly, offer endless inspirations for idyllic times at the beach.

More than 200 artists from across the Pacific Northwest are featured in the Faiweather House and Gallery, a business that has been an anchor for Seaside’s growing arts scene for more than 12 years. A variety of mediums include original paintings, sculptures, ceramics and jewelry.

New pieces and artists are added each month, making the Fairweather House and Gallery a must-visit destination in Seaside, Oregon for art connoisseurs.

 

Art by Jan Shield,  glass by Sandy and Bob Lercari,  coral platter by Rinee Merritt, handmade box by Christine Trexel and origami garland by Peggy Evans.
Fairweather House and Gallery is a place to see finished creations of bowls, platters and sculpture, as well as contemporary paintings.

Jewelry by Cher Flick, Mary Hurst and Alan Stockam.  Myrtle wood by Fred and Janice Lukens.  Ocean scape painting by Ron Nicolaides. Gull portrait by Leah Brown.  Nantucket basket by Carol Bolster.  Sea anemone study by Jon Anni. Sail boat water colors by Paul Brent.

 

With appreciation to Linda Fenton-Mendenhall,  photographer.

 

To learn more about the gallery, please go to www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Inspired by the beach and nature, Peg Wells has prepared a gallery exhibit composed of  hot wax encaustic  and cold wax collage. The work is decorative, but with a purpose that is secure in the strength of using natural elements. Her provocative style proves that a quiet approach can have a very powerful effect.  Summer time resident and artist Peg Wells, who exhibits in the winter-season at the Saddle Brooke Resort/ Primary Studio in Arizona, presents new work in an ocean theme for Fairweather’s.  WELCOME BACK TO SEASIDE!

 

 

“Wonder of the Sea” by Peg Wells.  Cold Wax Painting.

“From the Depths” by Peg Wells.  Cold Wax Painting.

 

Q: What is Cold Wax Painting, you ask?

 

A: Cold Wax Painting is not defined by subject matter nor the degree of realism or abstraction, Cold Wax Painting is unified by artists’ shared interest in experimentation, texture and the physicality of paint layers. In its own way, Cold Wax Painting blurs the line between oil painting and encaustic painting.

 

Cold Wax is a mixture of natural beeswax, solvent and a small amount of  resin. The term “cold” in beeswax painting refers to the fact that heat is not required for working with this wax medium – as it dries by solvent evaporation, rather than the cooling of the wax, as in encaustic painting. As the solvent evaporates out of the medium, the soft wax hardens to the density of a beeswax candle.

Cold Wax is creating a variety of textures within a painting. It gives a clean break off the brush or knife, retaining the sharp peaks of impasto. These working properties allow for expressive brush marks and the ability to carve into paint layers with palette knives. Cold Wax also gives oil colors a beautiful translucent quality, similar to the seductive surfaces of encaustic paintings.

 

Q: What is encaustic painting, you ask?

A: Pronunciation: en-caws-tick, is a paint consisting of pigment mixed with beeswax and fixed with heat after its application. –n. The Greek word is enkaustikos –to burn in.

 

Encaustic dates back to the ancient Greeks, as far back as the 5th century BC. Ancient ship builders used beeswax, resin to seal, and waterproof their vessels. Ultimately, they began adding pigment to the wax-giving rise to the decoration of spectacular ships. To paint with encaustic, a combination of beeswax, resin and pigment is combined and then melted to a liquid state. Encaustic paintings have many layers of wax. Depending on the piece, it is not uncommon to have anywhere from 25-50 layers.

 

 

“Surf” Encaustic by Peg Wells

 

It’s not always obvious whether an abstract work of art should be hung vertically or horizontally.  Oftentimes on a contemporary piece, the artist signs that work on the back, which  allows the  gallerist and interested clients to determine how the art could be oriented for display.

 

 

 

Artist grace note

 

“I am grateful that my art found a gallery presence for my seventh summer season with you! I do appreciate your support of my art and me as an artist. I hope that my art will find new homes and that it will bring as much pleasure to people as it has given me create. Thank you.”Peg Wells

 

WELCOME BACK TO SEASIDE!

 

For more information about the gallery, please go to  www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

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