Ray Noregaard


R.J. Marx performed LIVE on May 4.  Art by Lisa Sofia Robinson and Barbara Rosbe Felisky; calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson and Brenda Gordon.

 

Art walk hostesses staged a photo for the opening reception of Portraiture, Fairweather’s May exhibition.

Carolyn Macpherson painted LIVE during a gallery event. Segmented wood vases and shells by Mike Brown; pottery by Suzy Holland; painting by James Waterman and wood boxes by Ray Noregaard.

 

Blue Bond painted en plein air  outside on Broadway at Fairweather’s.

 

Neal Maine lectured during Fairweather’s ‘Portraiture’ opening reception.  Photographs by Neal Maine and Michael Wing; glass are by Bob and Rox Heath.

 

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Photos and collages by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall for the opening reception of Portraiture.

 

Photographer Scott Saulsbury stepped up to the plate to fill-in for Linda Fenton-Mendenhall, Faiweather’s after hours event photographer.

Fun Fact: Linda selected Scott and they both had Neal Maine as a teacher at Seaside High.

 

Guy and Karen Rainsberger poured for Parrett Mountain Cellars at Fairweather’s Wine Walk.  Art by Britney Drumheller, Diane Copenhaver and Emily Miller.

 

Shirley 88 played  LIVE during the SDDA Spring Wine Walk at Fairweather’s.  Fused glass by Mike Fox.

 

More than 800 tid-bits were consumed during four hours of the SDDA Spring Wine Walk at Fairweather’s.  In addition, back up “In the Mist” books by Russell J. Young and stored Odes to the Tides flyers, Fairweather’s JUNE exhibition.

 

Seaside First Saturday Art Walk hostesses served as SDDA Spring Wine Walk hostesses on May 18 at Fairweather’s.   And, yes, the ladies  dressed to complement each other.

Hundreds of  guests came to the SDDA Spring Wine Walk at Fairweather’s. Art by Paul Brent;  Chanel jewelry by Reneé Hafeman and photographs on bamboo by Don Frank.

 

Late in the month of May, Blue Bond made the announcement that he sold his painting  of “Willie Nelson” to the country music legend Willie Nelson!!!

 

For more about the gallery, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 


Back wall display featuring acrylics  by Jan Shield, landscapes by Judy Horning Shaw, cabbage by Sandy Caghill, and vintage Hunt Slohem bunny art.

On the trestle table display: floral oil by Blue Bond, Landscape by Jan Shield, art glass by Mike Fox, calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson, handmade journal by Christine Trexel, segmented vase by Mike Brown, bracelets by Barbara Walker, floral cards by Mike Mason,  sand blasted beverage glasses by Bob Heath, hand-made candles and mouth blown glass.

Pillar wall display features oils by Melissa Jander.

 

 

Cabinet top featuring bamboo basket art by Charles Schweigert,  watercolor by Carolyn Macpherson and vintage Chanel necklaces by Reneé Hafeman.

Cabinet interior featuring beaded mosaic box by Gayle H. Seely, rice paper art by Zifen Qian, dragonfly book matched box by Ray Noregaard, oak spoons by Mike Morris, wood bowl by Mike Brown, encaustic poppy by Kimberly Kent, floral oil by Melissa Jander and wood canisters by Fred Lukens.

 

Floral oil by Paul Brent, wood canister by Fred Lukens and mouth blown art glass.

 

Art by James Waterman, laser cut bronze bowls, wood bowl by Mike Brown with wire garden follies.

 

Calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson, portrait oil by Blue Bond,  impasto floral by Melissa Jander, mouth blown glass vase with mercury glass candlesticks, hand-made ribbed candles and one-of-a-kind asymmetrical necklaces by Mary Truhler.

 

Floral art  by Barbara Bacon Folawn, art glass by Bob Heath, handmade paper box by Christine Trexel, knitted shawl by Karen Johnson, jewelry boxes by Ray Noregaard,  wood shells by Mike Brown, bracelets by Mary Boitta and abstract watercolor by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett.

 

Fused glass by Mike Fox, floral art by Bev Drew-Kindley,  yupo art by Carolyn Macpherson, glass platter by Sandy and Bob Lercari with floral teapot set by Kate Caryle.

 

 

“Displaying for ‘Life Abundant’  Fairweather’s April exhibition, was a delight working with selected regional artists.”  D. Fairweather, gallerist and allied member, A.S.I.D., American Society of Interior Designers.

 

For more about the gallery, please go to www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Nature- the garden that we all inhabit, called Mother Earth. It is our safe haven.” 

Photos by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall

Copyright © 2019


 ‘Shannon’ crystal candle sticks.

Ireland is home to some of the world’s most impressive crystal designs, among them ‘Shannon’  crystal. The craft of Irish crystal making is an art form that has been developed and modified over hundreds of years, going back as far as the Celts, who brought the first glass to Ireland in for jewelry making.

Table design featuring ‘Shannon’ crystal, mixed-media beach stone and lichen art by Peggy Stein, ‘Great Blue Heron’ oil painting by Paul Brent, miniature abstract by  Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, semi-precious gemstone necklaces by Mary Bottita.  Tables by D. Fairweather, gallerist and  allied member A.S.I.D., American Society of Interior Designers. Photo collage by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

 

 

Green art glass: no other medium captures the dance of light and color so perfectly, mouth blown gracefully into a free-form shape. Approximately 20’ diameter at rim.

Kemy Kay, art hostess in dressed in the wearing of green, Carol Johansen, frequent gallery visitor. She is a cousin to Fairweather resident artist Linda Fenton-Mendenhall, did you know?

Pastels on table by Leah Kohlenberg,  raw edged coffee table by Ray Noregaard, birch wood framed acrylics on grass cloth  by Barbara Bacon Folawn, abstract 12×12 by Diane Copenhaver, pen and ink framed and matted art by emerging artist Brenda Gordon, paper cloth beaded origami by Peggy Evans and table display featuring the liquid beauty of a hand blown fluted glass bowl. Photo collage by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall

 

One-of-a-kind hand-crafted art jewelry at the Fairweather Gallery. Distinctive  NW artist-made necklaces and earrings.

 

Concert grand piano display for ‘March’ featuring watch necklaces by Brigitte Willse, sea glass jewelry by Barbara Walker, calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson and earrings by Mary Boitta, Mary Hurst, Karen Johnson and Tanya Gardner.

 

 

 

Leather key ring cross by Luan and silver cuff by Alan Stockam and Heather Rieder.

 

 

 

To read about the history of the Celtic cross, please visit https://www.gaelicmatters.com/celtic-cross-meaning.html

 

To read more about past Irish and March articles about  Fairweather’s go to:

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/…/a-round-of-applause-for-after-pa…

Mar 12, 2017 – A round of applause for after party images from IRISH LANDS, an exhibition opening at Fairweather’s.

Feb 14, 2017 – Posted by Fairweather House and Gallery under Q&A | Tags: Art Galleries, … Kate Hegarty came to America from Ireland with a spinning wheel …
Mar 2, 2016 – The Wildlife Center of the North Coast will bring a live American kestrel to FairweatherHouse and Gallery during …

 

Making the Dollar: Fairweather House & Gallery. Published: March 26, 2009. During 25 years of interior design experience she …

Top left: Rain painting by Jeni Lee, mixed media 12 x 12 painting by Jan Rimerman, mini words in wisdom by Diane Copenhaver, ceramics, lava vases and pottery by Emily Miller, mouth blown glass platters by Sandy and Bob Lercari, pastel “Pond Reflection” by Dan Mackerman, as well as calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson.

Top center: “Great Blue Heron” oil painting by Paul Brent.

Top right:  pair of whimsical art by Marga Stanley.

Bottom left: Seaside Visitors Bureau/ Tourism booklet 2019 open to a page about the Fairweather Gallery.  Nature photography by Neal Maine.

Bottom center:  Watercolors on yupo by Carolyn Macpherson and wood boxes by Ray Noregaard.

Bottom right: IIumne  candle collection on piano,  Fine Art lamps,  mirror by Currey and Co., indoor/outdoor garden stool by Art Interiors and limited edition rabbit lithographs.

2019 March postcard by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

 

 

 

“Whales at Play”  handmade box by Ray Noregaard.

Black walnut box with poplar wood pulls and feet.

Signed.

 

 

“Ribbons” box by Ray Noregaard, wood artist who uses no nails or screws.

Signed.

 

“Keepsake” triple tray box with three compartments by Ray Noregaard.

Signed.

 

 

“Treasure” two drawer raw edge cedar box by Ray  Noregaard.

Signed.

 

From the artist:

I cannot remember when I was not working with wood.  As a small child, I was making and repairing my toys. We were living in Vanport, the World War II housing project and our family lost everything in the 1948 Vanport flood.  After that event we lived in a tent for one year falling and cutting logs using a seven foot long cross cut saw.  I was thirteen years old and worked with my father twelve hours each day. 

After high school, I start working with houses, doing cabinets and finish work.  I make custom furniture, as well.  For more than fifty years I built houses all around the Northwest, moving to the North coast in 2004, where I built more than ten houses, having completed my last house in 2017.  I have retired from building and am turning wood and doing a lot of small wood craft work.

 

I realize with all the beauty of God’s creation that my calling is to help show what he has created.  I have always loved learning new methods and being challenged in making any of my art work.  IT has been a true blessing and one of my joys to receive cards and letters from my friends and family for my work.  I appreciate all the beautiful wood that God has supplied.  Ray Noregaard

 

To read more about the Vanport flood, go to…

How Oregon’s Second Largest City Vanished in a Day/  History … 

 A 1948 flood washed away the WWII housing project Vanport

 

Manzanita”  three drawer keepsake box by Ray Noregaard.

Spalted chestnut box, black walnut pulls with maple base.

Signed.

 

 

Q: What is spalted wood, you ask?

A: The partial decay, called spalting, gives the wood dark contrasting lines and streaks where fungus has begun to attack the wood. If the wood has been rescued from the spalting at the right time, the lumber should still be sound and usable, with little to no soft spots or rotten wood.

 

In the decorative wood market, spalted wood is in high demand. Spalting is caused by certain white-rot decay fungi growing in wood–primarily hardwoods. The fungi create zone lines in the wood where territories of competing fungi meet.

The partial decay, called spalting, gives the wood dark contrasting lines and streaks where fungus has begun to attack the wood.

Spalted wood has dark veins caused by fungi. This wood is very decorative and therefore very popular with woodworkers.

 

Fairweather House and Gallery features unique Northwest wood artists Fred Lukens, Mike Brown, Michael Gilbert, Daniel Harris, Mike Morris, Ray Noregaard, and Duane Bolster.

Fairweather House and Gallery believes that art, craft and service are best provided by local artisans.  We are proud to represent passionate local people.

 

 

To read more about selected wood artists, go to:

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/category/artists/daniel-harris/

 

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/category/artists/duane-bolster/

 

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/Artist/Mike/Brown.html

 

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/category/artists/michael-gilbert/

 

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/…/presenting-fred-lukens-and-his-h

 

The wood artists create one-of-kind wood objects from fallen timbers that include Douglas Fir, Red Cedar, Maple, Western Walnut, Oregon Mrytlewood, Oak and Cherry.

 

“Two Hearts” two drawer burl wood box by Ray Noregaard.

Signed.

 

And, too, vintage burl vase with glass liner.

 

Q: What is burl wood, you ask?

A: Burl wood is a tree growth in which the grain has grown in an unusual manner. It is commonly found in the form of a rounded outgrowth on a tree trunk or branch that is filled with small knots from dormant buds.

 

 

A burl results from a tree undergoing some form of stress. Most burls grow beneath the ground, attached to the roots as a type of growth that is generally not discovered until the blows over. Almost all burl wood is covered by bark, even if it is underground.

 

 

Burls yield a very peculiar and highly figured wood, prized for its beauty and rarity. It is sought after by wood sculptors. Burl wood is very hard to work with hand tools or on a lathe because its grain is twisted and interlocked, causing it to chip and shatter unpredictably. This “wild grain” makes burl wood valued for bowls and vases.

 

For more about the gallery, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

Note received:

“The wood crafter, Ray,  in your gallery has a steady hand.  He uses hard to find wood. Wow.  His work is a labor of love. I know, for I worked in the bi-fuels department of Weyerhauser for years and know wood.”