Special Exhibition


Oils by Melissa Jander.  Hand forged candle sticks, wood table by Ray Noregaard, candles by Illume,  hand fringed wool shawl, mouth blown pink art glass and jewelry by Mary Bottita.

Impasto oil by Lean Kohlenberg, pottery by Suzy Holland, hand made glass by Christine Downs and jewelry by Mary Bottita.

 

Impasto oil on canvas by Leah Kohlenberg, oil landscapes by Karen E. Lewis, watercolor by Bev Drew Kindley, seascape by Lee Munsell and  hand made  glass by Bob Heath.

 

Encaustic by Elina  Zebergs, pottery by Suzy Holland, hand forged pewter candle sticks with Illumne column candles.

 

Oils by Vicky Combs-Snider, landscape by Lee Munsell, watercolors by Paul Brent and jewelry boxes by Ray Noregaard.

 

Mixed media art work by Shelby Silver.

Watercolor with wax on rice paper by Helen Brown, calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson, encaustic birds by Kathryn Delaney and hand made  glass by Bob Heath.

 

Buoy, regetta  and beach oils by Paul Brent and landscape oils by Barbara Rosbe Felisky.

 

Handmade autumn wreath, land spaces by Bev Drew Kindley,   hand made paper box by Christine Trexel, crane art by Peggy Evans, with jewelry by Tanya Gardner and Mary Hurst.

 

Oils by Vicky Combs-Snider, encaustics by Elina Zebergs and handmade light stand by Andrew Nelson.

Photos by Scott Saulsbury for OUTSIDE INTERESTS.

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

ON EXHIBITION

Through August 25 

OUTSIDE INTERESTS featuring local painters and artisans hugely impressed with the wide-open, majestic vistas of the Pacific Northwest.

Selected art, all original work, conveys nature’s shifting moods, with no human presence visible.

 

http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

“A Pile of Pelicans” by Neal Maine/ PaicificLight Images. Proceeds in support of NCLC.

White pelicans photographed in Youngs Bay, Oregon, rarely spotted in the Pacific Northwest. White Pelicans forage by swimming on surface, dipping bill into water and scooping up fish in pouch.

 

 

Q: Where in the world is Youngs Bay, you ask?

A: Youngs Bay, or Youngs River Bay, is located in the northwestern corner of the U.S. state of Oregon. The Youngs River meets the Columbia River at this point, which is situated between Astoria and Warrenton.

 

White pelican normal migration:  Northern breeding populations migrate to southern California, the Gulf States, Mexico, and Central America. Yet, too, white pelicans were spotted along the North coast, recently! In fact, have been banded in the Columbia River.

 

 

 

Neal Maine lectured during the opening reception of OUTSIDE INTERESTS.

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

located in the Historic Gilbert Block Building

August 3-25 Exhibition

OUTSIDE INTERESTS featuring local painters and artisans hugely impressed with the wide-open, majestic vistas of the Pacific Northwest. Selected art, new original work, conveys nature’s shifting moods, with no human presence visible. Artists include Paul Brent, Melissa Jander, Sharon Kathleen Johnson, Bev Drew Kindley, Martha Lee, Gretha Lindwood, Ron Nicolaides, Susan Romersa and Dale J. Veith.

Welcoming new artists:  oil painter Vicky Combs-Snider, glass artist Christine Downs and encaustic artist Elina Zebergs to the gallery.

“Pelican Point” photographed on Youngs Bay by Neal Maine.  Proceeds in support of NCLC.

 

Look closely. In the top tier of the white pelicans, one band sighted. Neal Maine will explain the backstory about the photograph.

“White pelicans forage cooperatively, lining up as a flock before feeding.”

 

 

 

 

“Mt. Hood”  handmade glass by Christine Downs

 

“Glass is mesmerizing. Did you know it is not a solid? Scientifically it is considered a supercool liquid due to its unique crystalline structure. There is no other art medium like it. The combination of color & light alone is magical. Its depth and visual allure pulls us in, seduces & invites the sense of touch. We want to swim in it, to feel its warmth or coolness, to look at the world through it. When such visceral responses as these are experienced, I feel I have created a work of art.”

“Happy Mountain Scene”  handmade glass by Christine Downs

“The beauty of Oregon, the western landscape, rivers, trees, ocean & my own backyard feed my aboriginal eye & fuel my creativity on a nearly daily basis.”

 

 

“After the Fire in the Columbia River Gorge” handmade glass by Christine Downs

 

“Rich pattern and simplicity of design is a dichotomy I strive to balance.”

 

“Misty Mountains” handmade glass plate by Christine Downs

 

“My work often entails cosmic, geometric, zoomorphic & vegetal symbols such as spirals, mandalas, leaves, and other universal symbols and elements of sacred geometry.”

 

“Using a variety of techniques, I add visual texture & richness to my works. Combining sheets of glass with glass powders and granules called frit, I often create patterns or images in the glass, removing glass granules as I draw. This “scraffito” technique’s results sometimes resemble monotype printmaking or wild gestural drawing.”

 

“Recently I have been using glass powder mixed in a gelatinous medium to actually draw lines or “paint” with a palette knife as one would with acrylic paint.

Another technique I employ is imbedding designs created by copper sheet or wire between two sheets of glass. The mass of the metal between the two sheets of glass introduces another element to the design: bubbles! Only partially controllable, bubbles add an airy lightness to many of my works.”

 

“After the Fire” diptych of Columbia Gorge Fire of 2017 handmade glass by Christine Downs

 

“My pieces are typically fired at least three times. I sometimes fire a piece, cut it up & re-fire the cut-up elements into a new design. I am always experimenting, in partnership with the glass for inspiration, and permission for what it will allow me to do. As they emerge still warm from the kiln, I sometimes embrace these beloved “artifacts” to my heart. My work is dear to me.”

 

 

Christine Downs, glass artist.

 

Christine taught at Portland State University, Graduate School of Education for many years, preparing candidates becoming special education teachers. She taught entry-level PSU Interpersonal Neurobiology courses, Learning & the Brain & co-taught Meditation & the Brain with Caverly Morgan, founder of Portland’s Peace in Schools.  Christine Downs, MEd, teacher, artist, yoga and mindfulness practitioner,  was a special education teacher for many years. Christine taught students identified as having social‐emotional, behavioral, and/or learning challenges.

 

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

located in the Historic Gilbert Block Building

August 3-25 Exhibition

OUTSIDE INTERESTS featuring local painters and artisans hugely impressed with the wide-open, majestic vistas of the Pacific Northwest. Selected art, new original work, conveys nature’s shifting moods, with no human presence visible. Artists include Paul Brent, Melissa Jander, Sharon Kathleen Johnson, Bev Drew Kindley, Martha Lee, Gretha Lindwood, Ron Nicolaides, Susan Romersa and Dale J. Veith.

Welcoming new artists:  oil painter Vicky Combs-Snider, glass artist Christine Downs and encaustic artist Elina Zebergs to the gallery.

 

“I’ve been having lots of fun in the studio, playing with some techniques I have not visited in a while.  The collection I have made for OUTSIDE INTERESTS is representative of things I like to do. The miniatures are quite time consuming and glass, as the ray material is quite expensive,”  writes glass artist Christine Downs.

 

“Atmospheric Changes” by glass artist Christine Downs

 

 

 

Thank you Coast Weekend and reporter Katherine Lacaze for supporting the arts.

Art pictured:

On the ledge pair of abstracts by Diane Copenhaver, seascape by Lisa Sofia Robinson, oil by Blue Bond and fresco by Agnes Field.

On the wall photographs by Dale Veith and Russell J. Young, watercolors by Mary Burgess, oils by Phil Juttlestad, Judy Horning Shaw and Karen E. Lewis, abstract by Leah Kohlenberg, mixed media by Sandy Visse, glass art by Bob Heath, seed mosaics by Gayle H. Seely and acrylic by Nick Brakel.

 

 

“Deep” by Emily Miller encaustic

Emily Miller is a lifelong artist with a passion for materials. Her ocean-inspired artwork ranges from plein air watercolor landscapes to abstract encaustic wax paintings, ceramics, fiber art, and more. Her artwork often focuses on conservation issues, recycled materials, and ecology themes, with a portion of sales benefiting ocean conservation.

Born in California, Emily spent childhood summers on the tiny island of Deer Isle, Maine, and moved to Kauai at the age of sixteen. After twelve years on Kauai as an award-winning artist and graphic designer, Emily relocated to Oregon where her artwork continues to explore the coast and the seasons.

Emily fell in love with watercolor over 25 years ago, painting landscapes and local culture on Kauai and around the world. Her paintings now specialize in sharing the beauty of Oregon landscapes and seascapes in a variety of mediums including watercolor, acrylic, and encaustic wax.

“Kelp Shadows” by Emily Miller encaustic

 

 

 

 

During the opening reception of MAKING WAVES, Emily Miller offered an artist talk.

Photo collage by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

Seaside, Oregon

July 6 – July 30

MAKING WAVES

Fairweather’s July exhibition explores the deep, multifaceted relationship with the ocean.

Art for the exhibition, largely significant pieces include new original work, created entirely by North coast artists.

Featuring selected Fairweather artists: Blue Bond, Victoria Brooks, Paul Brent, Nick Brakel, Karen Doyle,Leah Kohlenberg, Karen Lewis, Emily Miller, Lee Munsell, Richard Newman, Ron Nicolaides, Jan Rimerman, Lisa Sofia Robinson, Peg Wells, Russell J. Young and Dale Veith.

 

“Tideline” by Emily Miller  encaustic

“The rhythms of the ocean are my greatest source of inspiration. I find painting with encaustic wax to be a spontaneous and intuitive process reminiscent of the ocean’s movement. I use techniques that generate sweeping, gestural forms to create my most fluid and abstract artwork. Bold color, unpredictable detail and collaged natural elements explore the ocean’s deep currents and ever-changing tideline.” Emily Miller

Introducing artists Sharon Abbott-Furze and Phil Juttelstad.

The range in the show reveals the extraordinary impact of the sea and waves.

Q: Where in the world has Emily Miller been recently, you ask?

A: Emily Miller was the artist behind the paper moon for her work that was juried into the Ode to the Tides Art Show and Sale May-December 2019.

Q; Where was the artist, most recently, you ask?

A:  Emily Miller was the artist in residence at Elisabeth Jones Art Center May 2 – June 23 for the Ghost Net Landscape, a community interactive installation & performance.

 

 

Q: Anywhere else in the last 30 days, you ask?

A: Emily Miller was the artist on the ledge at the group art show for Ode to the Tides at Art-in-the-Loft Gallery in Seaside, installing on May 30 and de-installing the exhibition on May 30.

 

 

After ten years as a painter, Emily began her study of sculpture and ceramics with an endless enthusiasm for exploring new materials. Her recent projects include the “100 Turtles” ceramics project, “Ghost Net Baskets” made with reclaimed fishing rope, and “Urchin Bowls,” a line of sea urchin-inspired porcelain bowls.

#12 _Morning Crest Oil 30x40 Morning speaks to me of hope and energy and new possibilities. Each bright day is new and will be as rich as i make it.

ARTIST STATEMENT

“I have spent my life on the coast, and all my artwork has its roots in my love of the sea. My work explores natural beauty and cycles of change centered on coastal environments, where our human connection to nature becomes clear.

“A central part of my art practice deals with changes at the meeting point of the natural and human worlds. I see the coast as a border between the known and the unknown, and I am fascinated with what lies beyond this dividing line.”

© Emily Miller 2018- 2019

http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

“The Rocks at Ecola” oil on canvas by Phil Juttelstad

“My work has been influenced by prior training in architecture and related disciplines.  My design aesthetic is also inspired by the environment of the Pacific Northwest- the skies; the land and the water.”

Q: Where is Ecola, you ask?

A:   Wrapping around Tillamook Head, between Seaside and Cannon BeachEcola State Park stretches along 9 miles of coastline and offers outstanding sightseeing and recreation opportunities combined with a storied past. Read more at…

Ecola State Park – Oregon State Parks and Recreation

https://oregonstateparks.org/index.cfm?do=parkPage.dsp_parkPage&parkId=136

 

 

“Over the Bar” oil on canvas by Phil Juttelstad

 

“My work is primarily executed in the studio from reference photographs and on-site sketches. I prepare preliminary color studies to establish volume and value relations and then work directly on canvas or gessoed panels in either oil or acrylic mediums.”

Q:  What does the term “over the bar” mean, you ask?

A:  A bar is a sandy bank or shoal that forms at the mouth of a river, harbor, bay or … Between these driving winds and the large waves, vessels crossing the bar … Read more at…

The Columbia River Bar | Oceanscape Network – Oregon Coast …

oceanscape.aquarium.org/explore/general_articles/the-columbia-river-bar

 

“Shore Acres over Quiet Waves”  oil on canvas by Phil Juttelstad

 

“Forms and Structures; Lines and Shapes…these are the elements that interest me and are depicted in my work. Whether abstract or contemporarily realistic, this dynamic between the built and natural environment is explored and rendered in my work.”

Q: Where is Shore Acres, you ask?

A:  Perched on rugged sandstone cliffs high above the ocean,Shore Acres State Park is an exciting and unexpected combination of beautiful natural and … Read more at…

Shore Acres State Park – Oregon State Parks and Recreation

https://oregonstateparks.org/index.cfm?do=parkPage.dsp_parkPage&parkId=68

 

Philip Juttelstad, artist

“I have enjoyed the study of the regional artists of the Pacific Northwest that have contributed to this style of work; Carl Hall, Carl Morris and C.C. McKim, among others. In my work that depicts the built environment, I look for the hand of man on the face of nature and try to depict the shapes, planes and spatial relations of structure and the interesting interdependencies that buildings can create within the landscape. Tonality within the landscape is also a favorite subject of mine and I enjoy the exploration of the effects of atmosphere, light and shadow.”

 

 

During the opening reception of MAKING WAVES, artist Phil Juttelstad offered an artist lecture.

Art patrons viewed the art of Phil Juttelstad during the Jul. 06th Seaside First Saturday Art Walk.

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

Seaside, Oregon

July 6 – July 30

 

 MAKING WAVES

Fairweather’s July exhibition explores the deep, multifaceted relationship with the ocean.

Art for the exhibition, largely significant pieces include new original work, created entirely by North coast artists.

Featuring selected Fairweather artists: Blue Bond, Victoria Brooks, Paul Brent, Nick Brakel, Karen Doyle,Leah Kohlenberg, Karen Lewis, Emily Miller, Lee Munsell, Richard Newman, Ron Nicolaides, Jan Rimerman, Lisa Sofia Robinson, Peg Wells, Russell J. Young and Dale Veith.

Introducing artists Sharon Abbott-Furze and Phil Juttelstad.

The range in the show reveals the extraordinary impact of the sea and waves.

 

Read more about the artist and the exhibition MAKING WAVES at:

 

Thank you Coast Weekend and reporter Katherine Lacaze for supporting the arts.

https://www.discoverourcoast.com/…/article_7a1c4f88-a704-11…

 

Feb. 2019

“Thank you so much for the conversation and the invitation to join you in your July show. My wife Holly and I enjoyed your gallery and look forward to working with you in the near future. Cheers.” Phil Juttelstad.

 

Copyright © 2019  Phil Juttelstad/ Fairweather House and Galllery

http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

 

Before picture of the west wall of the Fairweather Gallery.

Art traveling to Seaside from OSU.

Walls are painted and spot lights set in place for the selected art.

Table displays completed.

Note: Abstract ODE to the Tides art will be displayed in less than 24 hours.

Before picture of the north wall of the gallery, as well as a blank grand piano surface.

Note: Tidal three-dimensional ODE to the TIDES art to be displayed in less than 24 hours.

Before picture of the barn door and grass cloth wall in the gallery.

Note: Under the sea ODE to the TIDES art to be hung in less than 24 hours.

Before photo of the east wall in the Fairweather Gallery.

Note: Green and blue ODE to the TIDES art will be displayed.

Note on the right side of the ladder is a plaque designating D.  Fairweather, gallerist, Allied Member, A.S.I.D., American Society of Interior Designers 1986- present day.

 

“Through education, knowledge sharing, advocacy, community building and outreach, members strive to advance the interior design profession and, in the process, to demonstrate and celebrate the power of design to positively change people’s lives. A.S.I.D. showcases the impact of design on the human experience and the value interior designers provide.”

 

 

Ode to the Tides art arrives in Seaside in a 15′  moving van on May 29 from OSU.

 

More than 215 works of art from selected NW artists arrives in Seaside on May 29. It has taken  more than one year of curating and selecting Ode to the Tides art. The artists selected for the exhibit created separate and secure boxes and shipping containers as the ODE to the TIDES Art Show and Sale is a traveling exhibit throughout Oregon May-December 2019.

North east wall of the gallery.

Note: In the estuary critters Ode to the Tides art to be displayed in less than 24 hours.

A team of dedicated volunteers unpacked art on May 30 in the wee hours of the morning.

 

“All of this made possible within 24 hours with a lot of help from volunteer artists who worked tirelessly Just to name a few: Mary Burgess, Tom Willing, Jane McGeehan, Emily Miller, curator Sara Vickerman and driver Jeff Gage. Thank you to the City of Seaside for saving the parking spaces on Broadway for the caravan of deliveries as it was transported (by SUV’s one trip at a time from the airport hangar/warehouse).”  D. Fairweather

 

Note received
“The Corvallis/OSU run of the Ode to the Tides art exhibit has been a success.   Tina, the La Sells Stewart  Gallery director said there has been a lot of traffic and excitement about the show and pieces sold. The show has now been installed in Seaside at Fairweather Gallery and Beach Books, where it is being promoted as part of the Seaside Art Walk with a harp concert. There will also be a lecture by Neal Maine (local naturalist and photographer) on June 13 at the Library from 6-8 PM.  

 

Thank you all for your involvement in this project, as it is a great opportunity to get people excited about the conservation of our oceans and estuaries through your beautiful art work. Next to the ocean and estuaries themselves, you are the best ambassadors. We are expecting a great turnout of artists in Seaside Saturday for the opening. If you miss Art Walk, hopefully you can make it Seaside before the show closes at the end of June. We are planning lots of special events for later this summer when the show moves to Newport. We will keep you posted.”

Esther and Sara

Sara Vickerman, art curator

Ode to the Tides Art Show and Sale

Esther Lev, Executive Director

The Wetlands Conservancy

4640 SW Macadam, #50

Portland OR, 97239

Office: 503.227.0778

https://1drv.ms/f/s!AjaRSCzcuL-sgddpIJtG6NQMGFerAQ

 

Link to the images of the  art arriving.

 

Grace note:

In gratitude to Neal Maine for suggesting that the ODE to the TIDES art could be displayed in his PacificLight Images section of the Fairweather Gallery.  Do not fret, dear NCLC friends, Neal’s art will be on display in the front window and on the south wall of the gallery.

 

http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

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