Special Exhibition


Shortie I for A FINE LINE.

Mixed media art by Bill Baily, woven bamboo basket by Charles Schweigert, black and white gull art by Leah Brown, encaustic art by Peg Wells, pen and ink drawings by Waka Takahashi Brown, photo by Susan Romersa, pottery by Suzy Holland and photographs by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

Shortie II for A FINE LINE.

Pen and ink shell studies, oak leaf watercolor and grape painting by Paul Brent.

Shortie III for A FINE LINE.

Art by Jan Shield, platter by Teresa Weisman-Knight,  semi-precious bracelets by Mary Bottita and watercolor by Carolynn Wagler.

 

 

Shortie IV for A FINE LINE.

Pen, ink and wax art by Dorota Haber-Lehigh.

 

Shortie V for A FINE LINE.

Handmade books by Christine Trexel and calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson.

 

Shortie VI for A FINE LINE.

Fused glass by Mike Fox, watercolors by Carolyn Macpherson and handmade glass by Bob Heath and Christine Downs.

Shortie VII for A FINE LINE.

Hand painted sea urchin rocks, signed and dated, by Kandy Schwartz.

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

A FINE LINE

On view 

October 5-31

 

A FINE LINE”  an exhibition of representational and non-representational works of art. Working with different media the selected artists experiment with linear mark making in its widest sense. Each artist produced works inspired by places and spaces in the natural environment.

For more info please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Images by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

 

Artist Bill Baily.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

A FINE LINE slideshow.  Images by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

 

 

South Jetty Reflections”  fine art photography by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

 

Q: Where is the South Jetty, you ask?

A: The south jetty of the Columbia River is one of the most incredible sites on the Oregon coast.

Stretching six miles into the massive mouth of the river, the jetty line was constructed between 1885 and 1913, with rehabilitation done regularly ever since.

The meeting of the Columbia River and the Pacific Ocean is called “The Graveyard of the Pacific.”
Unpredictable weather conditions, fog and coastal characteristics such as shifting sandbars, tidal rips and rocky reefs and shorelines have claimed more than 2,000 shipwrecks in this area.

“Forgotten Dreams” (HERO, a storied U.S. research vessel met an ignoble end  near Willapa Bay in Washington State) fine art photography by Russell J. Young.

 

Q:  What is the story behind the end of Hero, you ask?

 

A: ChinookObserver.com › news › local › hero-sinks-vessel-built-to-withstand-a…
 — A ship that was built to withstand some of the most brutal … Hero sinks Vessel built to withstand Antarctica falls victim to Washington rain … say they asked the state and the owner of the historic R/V Hero to do …

 

“Window of Time”  fine art photography by Russell J. Young.

 

 

Photo collage for Linda Fenton-Mendenhall by LFM.

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

A FINE LINE

October 5-31

On view

 

“A FINE LINE”  an exhibition of representational and non-representational works of art.

Working with different media the selected artists experiment with linear mark making in its widest sense. Each artist produced works inspired by places and spaces in the natural environment.

Featuring regional artists: Sharon Abbott-Furze, Bill Baily, Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, Karen Doyle, Bob Kroll, Linda Fenton-Mendenhall, Carolyn Myers Lindberg, Emily Miller, Christine Trexel, and Russell J. Young.

 

“The Columbia River empties into the Pacific Ocean just west of my childhood home. A shifting sandbar that makes for one of the most hazardous stretches of water to navigate in the world. Today massive man made jetties ease maritime access. “ LFM

“I am drawn to settings that offer quiet contemplation, a destination where the viewer is free to wander, a place that revels its wonders anew, time and time again, and each viewing is the first. I find inspiration in adverse weather, dense fog, intense rain, sub-zero blizzards, often well before dawn, past the twilight.” RJY

Welcoming coastal artists Rebecca Herren and Dorota Haber-Lehigh.

Introducing emerging artists Ray Althaus and W. T.  Brown.

 

 

“Quiet Morning with Duncan NotaBeast” self-portrait Russell J. Young.

 

 Self-portrait Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

Fun Facts:

LFM is the Seaside First Saturday Art Walk photographer.

LFM was recently appointed photographer for Fairweather Gallery’s Instagram page.

LFM  has an international following for her photo calendars.

RJY https://literary-arts.org › organizer › russell-j-young

Photographer, artistic collaborator, and fine art printer Russell JYoung is motivated … His books include In the Mist: Giving Voice to Silence, a collaboration with …
RJY recently returned from a trip to Alaska and is contemplating a homestead in the far north.

 

“Jellyfish” by W. T. Brown pen and ink artist.

 

Waka Takahashi Brown, an Oregonian, hails from a family of artists; her grandfather Syunichi Miyoshi was a renowned Japanese oil painter. Waka’s parents emigrated from Japan to the United States where Waka was born and raised. While her mother pursued her own art degree, she encouraged Waka’s artistic development from an early age with weekly classes from Ault’s Academy of Art in Topeka, KS. When she was 18, Waka left Kansas to attend Stanford University where she earned both her bachelor’s and master’s degrees. Upon graduation, Waka lived and worked in Japan for two years after which she returned to the United States. It was at that time Waka decided to return to her artistic pursuits. She studied watercolor with Ferenc Besze, as well as pastel at the Palo Alto Art Center. Waka experimented with acrylics, printmaking, and Chinese brush painting as well.

She moved to Oregon to raise three children, gave up art for over a decade and has recently returned to creating art, however, albeit in different mediums.

 

 

 

Waka Takahashi Brown’s art on display at Fairweather’s.

“Owl” original by Ray Althaus pen and ink artist

“In high school, I transferred into an art class to avoid my only failing grade in another class (typing).   As my education proceeded, I focused on math and science with an eye on engineering. After a stint in civil engineering and architecture, I transferred into art and received a Master of Fine Arts in Professional Design. I  traveled with a group and spent time in Florence, Italy, studying Renaissance Art and History. I spent my career in the commercial and governmental building trades, providing design, construction coordination and contract administration.”

 

 

Kay, twin sister of artist Ray Althaus, spoke about  his pen and ink drawings during the opening reception of A FINE LINE.

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

A FINE LINE

On View 

October 5-31

“A FINE LINE”  an exhibition of representational and non-representational works of art. Working with different media the selected artists experiment with linear mark making in its widest sense. Each artist produced works inspired by places and spaces in the natural environment.

Featuring regional artists: Sharon Abbott-Furze, Bill Baily, Jo Pomeroy-Crockett,Karen Doyle, Bob Kroll, Linda Fenton-Mendenhall, Carolyn Lindberg, Emily Miller, Christine Trexel, and Russell J. Young.

Welcoming coastal artists Rebecca Herren and Dorota Haber-Lehigh.

Introducing artists Ray Althaus and W. T.  Brown.

“After retirement, with time on my hands I pulled out my watercolors, drawing materials and my pens.  Although not prolific, I found time to take up art once again. It was an opportunity to relieve tension. I took an art class and ended up with a tour back to Italy. I am amazed at the unending supply of subject matter.  I have found an increased interest in pen and ink.  Art gives me a chance to “see” the detail in objects. As a new participant in this profession, I hope you enjoy what I see in the detail of nature, as renewal takes place.” Ray Althaus

 

“I draw quickly and with materials that require little set-up and clean up. Life has become extraordinarily busy since having children, but I have found small pockets of time and try to work in locations that allow me to pursue my art. I choose to work in mediums that allow me to finish quickly, or that tolerate constant interruptions. When I travel, I’ve found that I have more time.  I take my art supplies with me. Although suitcase space is limited, I have found that a black brush pen, sketchpad, three pens, a pencil, and eraser, take up very little space and are enough for me to create my art. Occasionally, I set a 30-minute time limit of focused creation to see what I am able to come up with in that time. Sometimes, that helps free up my imagination and allows me not to focus on my mistakes.” W.T. Brown

 

 

How Creating Art Relieves Stress. Activities like painting, sculpting, drawing, and photography are relaxing and rewarding hobbies that can lower your stress level and leave you feeling mentally clear and calm. Creating art provides a distraction, giving your brain a break from your usual thoughts. https://bebrainfit.com › benefits-art

Ray Althaus creates art to relieve stress.

Ray Althaus was referred to Fairweather’s by a family member who lives in Seaside.

 

 

Ray Althaus, artist pictured with his art and Kay Foetisch-Robb (Ray’s twin sister who will share a bit of family history during the Oct. 5 opening reception at Fairweather’s).

And too, Ray Althaus has community ties to Fairweather’s family in Washington.

 

 

 

 

 


Waka Brown was a Curriculum Specialist for the Stanford Program on International and Cross-Cultural Education (SPICE).

She  served as the Coordinator and Instructor of the Reischauer Scholars Program.

She has presented teacher seminars nationally for the National Council for the Social Studies in Seattle; the National Consortium for Teaching about Asia in both Denver and Los Angeles; the National Council for the Social Studies, Phoenix; Symposium on Asia in the Curriculum, Lexington; Japan Information Center, Embassy of Japan, Washington. D.C., and the Hawaii International Conference on the Humanities.She has also presented teacher seminars internationally for the East Asia Regional Council of Overseas Schools in Tokyo, Japan, and for the European Council of International Schools in Amsterdam, Netherlands.

W. T.  Brown was introduced to the Gallery by Fairweather’s artist Peg Wells and her daughter Hilary.

 

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“The Path I’ve Chosen”  by Sharon Abbott-Furze.

Original oil on canvas

24x36x1.5

 

“Her work is expressionistic realism and sometimes heavily influenced with abstract shapes, inspired by people and their stories and the many moods of nature.”

Read more about the artist at:

‘Singular Energy’: 18 north coast artists explore the ocean in …

 

https://www.discoverourcoast.com › coast-weekend › arts › singular-energy-…
Fairweather House and Gallery in Seaside   … For oil painter Sharon AbbottFurze, who is also new to the gallery and did a …

 

Sharon Abbott-Furze, artist, speaks about her art during the opening reception of A FINE LINE @ Fairweather’s.

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

A FINE LINE

On view 

October 5-31

 “A FINE LINE”  an exhibition of representational and non-representational works of art. Working with different media the selected artists experiment with linear mark making in its widest sense. Each artist produced works inspired by places and spaces in the natural environment.

Featuring regional artists: Sharon Abbott-Furze, Bill Baily, Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, Karen Doyle, Bob Kroll, Linda Fenton-Mendenhall, Carolyn Lindberg, Emily Miller, Christine Trexel, and Russell J. Young.

Welcoming coastal artists Rebecca Herren and Dorota Haber-Lehigh.

Introducing emerging artists Ray Althaus and W. T.  Brown.

 http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Abstract originals by Bill Baily, abstract wood boxes and table by Ray Noregaard with wood bowls by Mike Brown.

“Contemporary art does not attempt to represent external reality, but seeks to achieve its effect using shapes, forms, colors, and textures.”

 

Fresco abstracts including impasto on canvas and impastos framed in basswood by Martha Lee, segmented Oregon  myrtlewood vases by Mike Brown, chenille hand made gourds and pumpkins in woven rattan basket.

 

Cold wax abstract by Peg Wells, rare wood lidded bowls by Fred Lukens,  inlaid lidded boxes by Ray Noregaard, figured edge bowl by Daniel Harris, hand made ceramic salmon by Teresa Weisman-Knight and Celtic jewelry by Mary Hurst.

 

Acrylic abstract  and painting glass jewelry by Tanya Gardner, calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson and sunset painting by Jan Shield.

 

 

Art by Gregory Bell, abstracts by Rene’e Rowe, ceramics by Teresa Weisman-Knight, glass by Bob Heath, pastels by Joanna Donaca, glass platter by Sandy and Bob Lercari, bowls by Emily Miller and rice paper abstracts by Zifen Qian.

Photos by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

 

 

CONTRASTS, an exhibition, featuring original  art from Northwest artists using bright, abstract palettes – electric yellows, brilliant blues, wild reds and shining greens.

Exhibiting  abstract artists Bill Baily, Gregory Bell, Tanya Gardner, Agnes Field, Sharon Kathleen Johnson, Jan Rimerman,  Rene’e Rowe, Gayle H. Seely, Russell J. Young, Peg Wells and Zifen Qian.

 

CONTRASTS, an exhibition of contemporary art, representing the finest in painting, photography, sculpture, ceramics, fiber art, and more—from selected regional, local and emerging artists.

On exhibit Sept. 25, 2019

Read more at http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Enigma  by Rene’e Rowe ‐ Mixed Repurposed ‐ Canvas on Board ‐ 21.5″ x 34″

 

 

“Growing up on the East coast I received a BA in Art at Rutgers University in N.J. studying with Roy Lichtenstein and George Segal.  After graduation, I moved to NYC where I lived for over 10 years taking art classes at the NY Art Students League and the New School for Social Research while working as a social worker and political activist. I have moved several times around the US, and have traveled to parts of South America and Europe. Besides social work, my careers included database engineering, consultancy and company ownership. Tiring of the computer world, I turned to my love of art, managing and owning art galleries in Denver for over 15 years and then started an art cooperative in Pueblo, CO that is going strong today.  

Abstract painting frees me to bring into being art from the inside out. At times, the works seem influenced by the beauty of nature.Other times they seem to develop from pure imagination. Recently, the works have several elements that include a movement of light fields, boxes, and color transitions.

I now make my home in Astoria, Oregon where I choose to follow my heart as a full-time artist. Painting is a great joy to me.  If viewing my art pleases others, I am very grateful.”  Rene’e Rowe

 

 

Contrasts opening reception photos featuring Renee Hafeman, mid-century jewelry designer, artists Renee Rowe and Agnes Field.

Photo collage by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

 

Fairweather House and Gallery, 612 Broadway St. located in the Historic Gilbert Block Building

CONTRASTS, an exhibition, showing art from selected regional artists using bright, abstract palettes – electric yellows, brilliant blues, wild reds and shining greens, along with displaying only black and white tones found in the natural world.

Featuring abstract artists Bill Baily, Gregory Bell, Tanya Gardner, Agnes Field, Sharon Johnson, Jan Rimerman,  Rene’e Rowe,  Russell J. Young and Zifen Qian.

 

 

Taurus 2 by Rene’e Rowe  ‐ Oil ‐ Board ‐ 14″ x 19″

 

 Renee Hafeman,  will be featuring mid-century designs in jewelry.

Gayle H. Seely, mosaic-bead artist, will reveal bright, new contemporary work.

Artist meet and greet 5:pm.

“Some art historians tell us “abstract” art is a rejection of previous standards or “confines” of art expression. Although this may be true, I believe creating a work of art is a personal experience that does not need to be analyzed historically to be enjoyed and appreciated.  Color, shape, pattern and texture interest and excite me. Using various recycled materials, scraps of paper and other found materials, I paint, assemble, scratch, drip and paste.  Creating “abstract” art provides wonderful surprises and challenges.”  Rene’e Rowe

Contrasts on view through September 25.

Read more at http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

 

 

Force of Nature  Rene’e Rowe  ‐ Mixed Repurposed ‐ Board – 24″ x 48″

 

 

 

Copyright © 2019 Rene’e Rowe   / Fairweather House and Gallery

 

 

 

 

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