Toni Avery


ON YOUR MARKS vignette#1: art by Bev Drew Kindley, beaded box by Gayle H. Seely, oil by Beth Collins, wood turned bowls by Tom Willing, hand-painted wine glasses, Seaside salt water taffy, and hostess gifts of linen hand towels.
ON YOUR MARKS vignette #2: Abstract art by Jackie Leloff, encaustic by Diana Copenhaver, florals by Lieta Gratteri, pottery by Marilyn Cohn, hand-painted wine glasses by Gretha Lindwood, fused glass by Carolyn Myers, handmade suede flowers, mouth blown art glass, hammered/forged iron candlesticks, with Seaside’s famous salt water taffy.
ON YOUR MARKS vignette #3: Oil florals by Melissa Jander, impressionistic landscapes by Bev Drew Kindley, pottery by Marilyn Cohn, calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson, cranes by Peggy Evans, selected spring table accessories with a collection of hostess gifts, and Seaside salt water taffy.

On YOUR MARKS art show and sale through May 25

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside

“On your marks”  a command given to runners at the beginning of a race in order to get them into the correct position to start. In the words of the Fairweather exhibition, it “ means to begin something, indicating the arts season is opening for the summertime”. on,

Featuring NW artists Gayle H. Seely, Diane Copenhaver, Mary Burgess, and Lee Munsell. Introducing he pastel art of Susan Mitchell.

“For by the coastal summer season, is that nothing is enjoyed without community, without creative collaboration, without pure joy, and resolute faith in living safely and sharing generously with friends, family, and visitors.”  FH&G

The show offers a fresh and dynamic experience with new work specially created for the upcoming summer season. 

 

INTO THE BLUE 

A FAIRWEATHER GALLERY SHOW

Opening June 5 and on exhibit through June 25

Introducing poured alcohol artist Gail Pennebaker

INTO THE BLUE

June 5-25

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

Just how fond are artists of a particular color will be demonstrated at the opening reception of INTO THE BLUE,  with fifteen selected NW artists,  100 new original paintings, art glass, and semi-precious  gemstone jewelry pieces.

Acrylic  artist Toni Avery

Printmaker Nick Brakel

Abstract painter Diane Copenhaver

En plein air painter Karen Doyle

Watermedia art Pam Haunschild

Glass artist Bob Heath

 Abstract photographer Bob Kroll

Water colorist Lieta Gratteri

Pastel artist Gretha Lindwood

Calligraphy artist JoAnn Pari-Mueller

Mixed media artist Jan Rimerman

Oil painter Lisa Wiser

Semi precious gemstone jeweler Mary Truhler

Introducing poured alcohol painter Gail Pennebaker

Welcoming Paul Brent, returning artist for his fifteenth summer in Seaside, Oregon!

 

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands.

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

Jewelry by Mary Truhler, watercolor abstracts by Lieta Gratteri, photographs by Neal Maine, triptych landscape by Toni Avery, hydrangea oil by Melissa Jander, floral still life by Emily Schultz McNeil, pen and ink portrait by Vanessa K. Stokes, and pottery by Marcia Hudson.
Heron oil painting by Paul Brent, wood sculptures by Martin Conley, landscape oil by Karen Doyle, silk and cotton ribbons by the yard, hardbound coastal cookbook, fused glass platter by Bob Lecari, wood turned bowls by Daniel Harris, bamboo and mahogany wood runner, pottery by Marilyn Cohn, jewelry by Michelle Shigemasa, raw edge trestle table, down filled silk throw pillows, and milk painted wood lyre table.
Mixed media art by Jan Rimerman, encaustic art by Emily Miller, handpainted stemware by Gretha Lindwood, cranes by Peggy Evans, fused glass bowl by Bob Lecari, ocean ghost rope baskets by Emily Miller, willow twig table by Otis, mouth blown art glass, and selected plated glass frames.
Art by Karen Doyle, cards by Dorota Haber-Lehigh, assemblage vase by Jeanne Walker, calligraphy art by Penelope Culbertson, tile earrings by Kris Zorko, silk textile wall hanging by Cicely Gilman, fused glass art platter by Bob Heath, hand turned wood candlestick, and verdigris bronze stand.

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside

Nature’s Grace on exhibition through April 25

“Truly, artists lose themselves in their work revealing the world that exists in the  imagination, transcending grace  through the muse of nature.” FH&G

Displays by KD Fairweather, allied member A.S.I.D., American Society of Interior Designers

Photographs by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall for Fairweather House and Gallery

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands.

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Watercolor by Mary Burgess, art glass, masks by Cherry Harris, and visiting art patron Jessica, beautifully dressed for the Fairweather Gallery opening reception for Nature’s Grace.

Oceanscape by Toni Avery, watercolor by Mary Burgess, fish platter by Sandy Visse, bamboo linen masks by Beth Fulton, jewelry by Mary Truhler, fused glass platter by Carolyn Myers Lindberg, and diachronic glass rectangle plate by Christine Downs.

This Orchid Collection is inspired by attending the Garden Island Orchid Society Spring Fantasy Show on the island of Kauai in Hawaii. Strolling through the colorful display of orchid plants was like traveling into a fragrant dream full of colors and shapes.  Some of the orchids were as tiny as a thumbnail while others had flowers as large as grapefruit.  I have attempted to recreate the orchid essence.” JR


“Part of the abstract composition is created by using powdered charcoal, light molding paste, and transparent fluid acrylic paint. To create the initial black and white underpainting, organic forms are used as stencils.  In this collection, you may see cedar boughs, sword ferns, or even the outlines of garden rake tines.  After the powdered charcoal is sealed onto the paper as many as 16 to 22 layers of transparent fluid acrylic paint are applied.
JR

“The most difficult part of the process is waiting for each layer to dry between each application of color and/or texture.  This building up of layers gives the impression that there is something more beyond the visible veneer.  The pieces transform and reveal new imagery in the various lights during the progression of the day.  By changing your observation angle you may see shapes and currents that were not viewed previously.” JR

“Grace helps us do more than we can on our own. Nature brings truths that we could never discover without the help of grace.”

 

NATURE’S GRACE

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

April  Exhibition

Through April 25

Features glass artist Rosalyn Andronesch, acrylic artist Toni Avery, oil painter Karen Doyle, en plein artist Bev Drew Kindley, naturalist Dorota Haber-Lehigh, watercolorist Lieta Gratteri, oil painter Emily Schultz McNiel, botanical artist Mike Mason, and emerging artist Vanessa K. Stokes.

Introducing artist Mary Lyn Gough.

Showing new art on display by Bill Baily, Neal Maine, Diana Nadal, abd Jan Rimerman.

 

“Truly, artists lose themselves in their work revealing the world that exists in the  imagination, transcending grace  through the muse of nature.” FH&G

 

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands.

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

“Watersong”  acrylic 30 x 48 by Toni Avery

Toni Avery is an artist working primarily in the Pacific Northwest. Her images reflect the range and diversity of the surrounding landscapes from the forests, beaches, and surrounding land of the Willamette Valley.

After receiving her art degree from Marylhurst University, Toni worked as a design consultant but was never far from her love of painting and photography.

Today she uses a number of her photographs as subject matter for paintings, referring to them only as “points of departure”, but it is her vision that completes a painting.

Toni’s artwork can be seen in many public collections,  such as Kaiser Permanente’s “Healing Artwork Collection,” on display at the Westside Medical Centers in Hillsboro and Beaverton, Oregon, and is also featured in their  publication, “Tranquil Relief Through Nature.”

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

 NATURE’S GRACE

On exhibition

Through April 25

“Artists lose themselves in their work revealing the world that exists in the imagination, transcending grace through the muse of nature.”

Features glass artist Rosalyn Andronesch, acrylic artist Toni Avery, oil painter Karen Doyle, en plein artist Bev Drew Kindley, naturalist Dorota Haber-Lehigh, watercolorist Lieta Gratteri, oil painter Emily Schultz McNiel, botanical artist Mike Mason, and emerging artist Vanessa K. Stokes.

Introducing artist Mary Lyn Gough.

Showing art on display by Bill Baily, Neal Maine, Diana Nadal, Jan Rimerman, among others.

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands.

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

“Hear you’ve weathered the sequester well! I’m working on new designs where I’m incorporating drift wood (tiny pieces) into the weaving.”  Martha H. Denham, pine needle weaving artist

Grace notes received

“Your virtual tours during the COVID-19 shutdown of the Gallery were wonderful! What a lot of work you have done. I am most impressed and grateful to be a part of your lovely displays.  Delightful!!!” Jo Pomeroy Crockett, artist

“You must be planning a bit to get back to your gallery. We will all come out of this a bit wiser and more caring and above all else grateful for all the little blessings in our lives. I’ll look forward to when we can meet again. Until then take good care and may you walk in beauty,” Toni Avery, artist

“Hugs! I’ve been doing a watercolor each day, and posting on social media – both good and bad. Thank you for all you do.” Leah Kohlenberg, artist

“I look forward to seeing you and will stop in soon to say hello and shop. Bless you for your strength and hard work.”  Gayle H. Seely, artist

Takeaway: “The State’s shutdown  order was meant to slow the spread of COVID-19 until a medical infrastructure was put in place. And, now, testing procedures are in place.  Businesses, indeed, the entire medical community in the North Coast, and residents have a handle on PPE supplies. Safey standards are in place for the common good.  Thankfully, today, we have a much better understanding of the pandemic than we had in early March.  Throughout the past few months, I was grateful to have conversations with my artists, patrons, and friends, just check in with them.  All created a center point for me to go back tothe gallery after the pandemic was managed,”  </em>D. Fairweather, gallerist  D. Fairweather, gallerist.

 

We will be following the State’s order for physical distancing, wearing cloth face coverings, handwashing and cleaning surfaces.

We request visitors to wear face coverings, as well.

We are in this together,

And, yet, out of an abundance of caution, during the State’s Phase One re-opening plans, we will only be able to offer limited hours.

 

Sat May 16 CLOSED

Sun May 17 Open 12-3:pm

Open thereafter every Mon, Thu, Fri, Sat, and Sun 12-3:pm

Closed Tue and Wed

Going forward our hours will remain limited until there is a convincing containment of the coronavirus.

Staying safe.

 

Since 2007 we have had the privilege representing remarkable NW artists.

We will be reopening oh-so-softly, oh-so carefully, and, truly, oh-so safely following official guidelines in protecting the health of our community.

‘Your plan sounds like a good one. Sounds as though we may all have made it safely through this. One of your over 65 staff,”  JS

Please read more about our gallery and our commitment to NW artists and products made by NW hands.

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Artist Mike Mason in his studio.

In order to protect the health and safety our guests, our community, and our staff (who are over the age of 65 and are deemed to be a high health risk), the Gallery is closing its doors to visitors through April.

“This decision comes after careful review of guidance from public health authorities and projections for the spread of COVID-19, and reflects our desire to ensure it is not contributing to transmission of the disease which could overwhelm our health care system. This is a difficult decision, but we are confident is the right choice.”

Please re-visit our previously published blog post articles throughout this time.

Questions or concerns, please email fairweatherkd@gmail.com.

Thank you for your understanding.

 

March 14, 2019 Question to the Fairweather artists.

Q: “Here is an idea. Please send images of the art being created in your studio during this crisis. We will publish  a blog post and keep it updated as you share with us what you are creating. Are you interested? Let me know your thoughts.”

 

 

 

“I am painting in my art studio.” Toni Avery

 

“Social distancing doesn’t require you to become a shut-in. I go outside to paint,”  en plein arist Emily Miller.

 

“In addition, I’m finishing up a few smaller baskets for a large collaborative display of reclaimed fishing rope ( ghost net collected by Cape Lookeout rangers).basket sculptures called Undersea Garden.”  Emily Miller

 

“I like this idea! You can use this one and will try to send a few more. Thanks for the up date about the gallery,” artist/ Professor Emeritus of Art Pacific University Jan Shield.

 

 

“It is my plan to create tomorrow, I would love to send some pictures while I am creating! I have been wondering how things will go with all of this virus worry.  If there is anything I can do to be of help, please don’t hesitate to ask.”  Rene’e Hafeman, jewelry designer.

 

“Here is an image of a book I just published in early 2020 on a series Weekend Projects  I tried to provide day-by-day instructions different projects which use one common element: stringers. Thanks for the proposal. I think it’s very useful to have a venue that helps especially during the crisis. I’m working now on a couple of new big works and will share photos as soon as I have them completed,”  fused glass artist Fyodor Zubanov.

 

“I have scheduled kids art on-line classes (ages 8-18) all week in three different time zones: Central Europe / US East Coast / and US West Coast time. We are learning how to draw puffins!”   Leah Kohlenberg www.leahkohlenberg.com/book-online

 

 

“Hope everyone is staying healthy! I’m staying home painting.” Pam Haunschild

“This strange virus has affected everyone.  We are 3 weeks behind the Italians infections so things are going to get way more interesting.  I appreciate the information and understand if other schedules need to be altered.  Thank you for keeping me updated. Stay safe!” Jan Rimerman, Artist/Art Administrator.

 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has  issued guidelines for “community mitigation strategies” to limit the spread of COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, which include recommendations for “social distancing”—a term that epidemiologists are using to refer to a conscious effort to reduce close contact between people and hopefully stymie community transmission of the virus.

 

 

  • Be in nature. Breathe fresh air. Notice things about the world around you that you didn’t see before.
  • Start birdwatching. Coronavirus hasn’t bothered the birds. Find out what species nest near you, dust off your binoculars if you’ve got ’em and download a birdwatching map.
  • Make art. Whether it’s a page out of a coloring book or paint-by-numbers masterpiece, a knitted scarf or a piece of pottery, creating will ease your mind and keep your fingers nimble.

 

 

“Thank you with the list of things to do.  It’s one of the most uplifting ones I’ve received,” artist Sandy Visse

 

Please visit us on line at www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.co

 

Original watercolor by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, handmade spring column candles, mouthblown glass, hand turned wood candle sticks, pottery by Suzy Holland, mouth blown stemware by Rox Heath, vintage bird feeder and bird house, silk and chenille throw pillows.

Pastel by Gretha Lindwood, pair of whimsical artworks by Marga Stanley, mouth blown art glass, hand made potter vase, hand wired silk iris stem, hand beeded flowers, contemporary floral by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett and art cards by Leah Kohlenberg, glassware by Robin and Rox Heath.

Art by Toni Avery, handmade tea pot by Kate Carlye, hand-forged candle sticks, fused glass by Carolyn Lindberg and mouth blown art vase

Pottery by Suzy Holland and oil painting by Carmela Newstead.

Art by Leah Kohlenberg, textile art by Linda Olson..

Handmade birdie pillow by Cherry Jones Harris, feather motif handmade journal by Christine Trexel, mouth blown art glass, pottery and platters hand made by Maria Hudson.

Handmade glass by Bob Heath.

Handmade glass by Sandy and Bob Lercari.

 

 

Handmade glass by Christine Downs, fused glass by Sandy and Bob Lercari, urchin rocks by Kandy Schwartz, and ocean oil by Sandy and Bob Lercari.

Outdoor garden **folly filled with  cattail dyed green spheres and handmade moss decorative moss spheres.

 

**Q:  What is a garden folly, you ask?

A: A garden folly is usually considered a building or structure that is designed for decoration with no other purpose than to add a touch of whimsy or extravagance to the surrounding landscape. The term began as “a name for any costly structure considered to have shown folly in the builder” and was often named after the individual who commissioned or designed the project. The connotations of silliness or madness in this definition are in accord with the general meaning of the French word “folie”; however, another older meaning of this word is “delight.”

Photos by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

 

“This exhibit’s expectation lies in its possibility to present fresh, new perspectives, inspiration, experiences, reflection and even the possibility for transcendence in some way. Indeed, the meaning of “fresh start” is the beginning of a new period or step.  The North Coast land, truly, is in full springtime bloom for FRESH START, Fairweather’s March exhibition.”

Standing Water triptych  (ea. pc. 24×36)  by Toni Avery.

“Painter of the commonplace.”

 

Downpour 36×36 by Toni Avery.

“Painter of the commonplace.”

 

Reed Grass (Diptych ea. pc. 24×24)  by Toni Avery. 

“Painter of the commonplace.”

Toni Avery Statement:

“My paintings begin where memory and emotion merge and this is where my creativity is born. As a child growing up in the small Los Angeles neighborhood of Echo Park, I was exposed to a world of art, music, and surprisingly back then, nature.

I spent countless hours outside, climbing trees, bike riding or going on endless walks over the many staircases that wind throughout the hills of Echo Park and Elysian park.  During those long summer days I became connected “to” and also a part “of” the outdoors. I would study the way the light played off of the leaves or how the rolling hills turned a deep gold; the way the wind would create waves in the tall grass and how the shadows faded to blue and purple in the late afternoon sun.

Something inside me wants to recapture those times  and I believe that is why I am fascinated by the contrast and color there may be in a shadow, or the defining opposition of a streak of light cutting through the cool darkness of the shade; the world at its most basic level.  I find the greatest joy through color, texture, shadow and light. Not perfection, but rather imperfections, limitations and nuances that bring meaning.

I’ve come to appreciate that recognizing an object and knowing it are quite different. Trying to capture the essence of ones connection to a thing, a place or a person allows it to transform into more… something unique to the artist.

My work is not seeking perfection, but rather glimpsing the beauty of the commonplace. My paintings are a reflection of times past, and of things that never change.  This is a sample of my work, my experiences, my translation of life.”

 

 

Toni Avery triptych on display.

Fairweather House and Gallery

Through March 25

612 Broadway St.

Seaside, Oregon

“A Fresh Start” featuring artists Toni Avery, Bill Baily, Karen Doyle, Christine Downs, Bob Heath, Dorota Haber-Lehigh, Gayle H. Seely and Bill Shumway.

Art glass by Christine Downs, fused glass platter by Rosalyn Andronescu and painting by Toni Avery on display.

Toni Avery experiences life and records her place in those experiences. This knowledge is both individual and distinctive.

“This exhibit’s expectation lies in its possibility to present fresh, new perspectives, inspiration, experiences, reflection and even the possibility for transcendence in some way.”

Read more at http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Grace note received:

“It was a pleasure meeting you and seeing the gallery … so interesting and the artwork is wonderful.  Rich and I were both saying how much we enjoyed hearing the stories behind the work too. Fascinating. Thanks again for including me in your beautiful gallery/store collection. I do appreciate it.” Toni