Emerging Artists


Original watercolor by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, handmade spring column candles, mouthblown glass, hand turned wood candle sticks, pottery by Suzy Holland, mouth blown stemware by Rox Heath, vintage bird feeder and bird house, silk and chenille throw pillows.

Pastel by Gretha Lindwood, pair of whimsical artworks by Marga Stanley, mouth blown art glass, hand made potter vase, hand wired silk iris stem, hand beeded flowers, contemporary floral by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett and art cards by Leah Kohlenberg, glassware by Robin and Rox Heath.

Art by Toni Avery, handmade tea pot by Kate Carlye, hand-forged candle sticks, fused glass by Carolyn Lindberg and mouth blown art vase

Pottery by Suzy Holland and oil painting by Carmela Newstead.

Art by Leah Kohlenberg, textile art by Linda Olson..

Handmade birdie pillow by Cherry Jones Harris, feather motif handmade journal by Christine Trexel, mouth blown art glass, pottery and platters hand made by Maria Hudson.

Handmade glass by Bob Heath.

Handmade glass by Sandy and Bob Lercari.

 

 

Handmade glass by Christine Downs, fused glass by Sandy and Bob Lercari, urchin rocks by Kandy Schwartz, and ocean oil by Sandy and Bob Lercari.

Outdoor garden **folly filled with  cattail dyed green spheres and handmade moss decorative moss spheres.

 

**Q:  What is a garden folly, you ask?

A: A garden folly is usually considered a building or structure that is designed for decoration with no other purpose than to add a touch of whimsy or extravagance to the surrounding landscape. The term began as “a name for any costly structure considered to have shown folly in the builder” and was often named after the individual who commissioned or designed the project. The connotations of silliness or madness in this definition are in accord with the general meaning of the French word “folie”; however, another older meaning of this word is “delight.”

Photos by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

 

“This exhibit’s expectation lies in its possibility to present fresh, new perspectives, inspiration, experiences, reflection and even the possibility for transcendence in some way. Indeed, the meaning of “fresh start” is the beginning of a new period or step.  The North Coast land, truly, is in full springtime bloom for FRESH START, Fairweather’s March exhibition.”

Vanessa K. Stokes is a young self-taught artist who has, since childhood, always had her nose in a book and hands creating art. She was born and raised in Oregon and visited Seaside every summer while growing up to spend time with her family. She has many fond memories of the beach, the winding forests that line the highway to it, and the way the moon casts shadows across the mountains visible from the resort her family always stayed at. She creates her art from her at home art studio and office, which she plans to add an outdoor space to so she can create her art in nature’s embrace. She finds Oregon’s rain especially calming and inspiring.

Her earliest memories of creating art consist of making clay sculptures and her childhood dreams of being a fashion designer. She soon discovered comics afterwards and abandoned her dreams of being a fashion designer for more vivid dreams of fantasy worlds. She used her art as an escape into another kind of world that could never exist here and did her best to imprint that world upon paper for others to see. Inspired by the unknown and unreal, she drew everyday chronicling the stories of her creations.

She quickly learned the deep connection art had to oneself. Even if an artist doesn’t intend to, every work of art tells a deep and complex story about the artist. Each artist has a unique trait as well that indicates a piece of art is their own. Moving forwards, she drew inspiration from everything around her, not just her imagination. Nothing is more inspiring than life itself and all the beautiful emotions and experiences that accompany it. Today her work is more focused around discovery and creating works of art that shine a light into other people’s lives.

Vanessa started displaying her art in eateries at the young age of 15 and showed in her first gallery at the age of 16 with her first self-published comic titled “Dream”. Her comic was focused on two main characters who explore lucid dreams together. She drew inspiration from her own experiences with sleep and continues to be inspired by her unconscious mind today. Her artwork mainly consists of one primary subject drawn in ink. She loves exploring any artist tool she can get her hands on and uses a blend of watercolor, pencils, pens, and ink to create her art. Her future goals are to own her own gallery that gives opportunities to artists of all art forms, own a clothing line that focuses on empowering people, create meaningful comics, and have lots of dogs!

She would like to give thanks to her loving parents who support her creativity, her loving grandparents who help her endlessly, and her generous friends whose kind words have given her the confidence to share herself with the world. Thank you to all the galleries and onlookers who make this dream a possibility and reality too.

 

“Get hopelessly lost in the art you make. Go down for days and come out on the other side with scrapes and bruises and a masterpiece.” – Ariel Bloomer

“It is an honor to be part the family of artists of Fairweather Gallery, not only because of its importance on the coast but, most important, for the professionalism and warmth in assisting me on my emerging art journey.”  VKS

Close up detail of Vanessa K. Stokes pen and ink art with watercolor titled “Divine”.

Vanessa K. Stokes revealed new art during the opening reception of HUE, Fairweather’s December exhibition.

Vanessa K. Stokes chose an outfit to complement her art for the Fairweather HUE exhibiton.

 

Vanessa K. Stokes  applied make up to  complement her art for the Fairweather HUE exhibiton.

 

 

In a heart warming artist talk, Vanessa shared her goal to have a gallery to promote young emerging artists.

Vanessa K. Stokes revealed new art during the opening reception of HUE, Fairweather’s December exhibition.

Photo collage by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

Read more about the artist at:

Fairweather House And Gallery — Blogs, Pictures, and more …

 

https://so.wordpress.com › tag › fairweather-house-and-gallery › page
‘Portraiture’ exhibition on view at Fairweather’s through May 29. “The secret of …. Introducing emerging artist Vanessa KStokes @ Portraiture. Art on view …

 

Fun Fact:

Vanessa K. Stokes was introduced at Fairweather’s when she was fifteen, as an artist to watch.

 

An emerging artist is someone who’s in the early stage of their career, someone who’s caught the eye of an art critic and/or gallery.

 

“We are proud to welcome Vanessa K. Stokes to the family of emerging and established artists at Fairweather Gallery.”

http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

Emerging artist Vanessa K. Stokes was the featured artist for HUE, Fairweather’s December 2019 exhibition.

 

HUE opening reception hostesses, photographers and guest speakers.

Top row: Linda Fenton-Mendenhall, photographer; Joan, Kathy, Katie, Denise, Kemy Kay, hostesses; Sara, guest speaker;  Saundra, hostess and Neal Maine, photographer AND guest speaker.

 

HUE, art sale and exhibit of NW art and artists, through December 23.

Photos by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

www,fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Handmade paper box by Christine Trexel, chenille down filled decorative pillow, handmade sequined ornament, silk ribbon by the yard, hand dipped magenta dripless candles, hand decorated ornaments, mercury glass hurricane and for the December HUE exhibition art titled “Divine” by emerging artist Vanessa K. Stokes.

 

Magenta velvet and down filled decorative pillows, silk and linen shawls and oven proof pottery by Suzy Holland.

Selected silk, linen and wool shawls reduced 30% through Dec. 23.

Oregon Sunstone and Oregon myrtlewood earrings by Fred Lukens, wood bowl and tray by Tom Willing and  purple heart stave vase by Mike Brown.

 

“Snowberry” watercolor with pen and ink by Dorota Haber-Lehigh, birdhouse by Marcia Hudson, fused glass by Christine Downs, fused glass tree and star ornament by Monet Rubin.

 

Close up detail of a unique, whimsical bird house, lovingly built and painted by hand by potter Marcia Hudson.

“Charming bird feeder for your feathered friends. Fit to adorn your garden throughout the year.  Special pricing: originally $295/ reduced to $195  through Dec. 23.”

 

At the beach, the winter garden is usually a peaceful sanctuary in hustle and bustle of the holiday season. However, this year the front yard has hosted a three week, up to 7 trucks a day repair crew with all sorts of ladders, multiple levels of scaffolding, and surely, miles of electrical cords. Discovering, at first, a simple indoor water feature/ or rather, a small leak…the issue eventually developed into an extensive time and materials on-going repair project. I had offered to park the car outside in order to allow the garage space for material and equipment storage, every plug hosted multiple portable tool charging devices. Seeing daylight on the western front of the house today (windows and doors were previously boarded up) and seeing cedar shingles on the exterior curved walls… the end is in sight. Thankful for the insurance company who has covered: Mt. St. Helens volcano eruption repair (we lived 14 miles away); boating death; 1996 Portland flooding issue; gallery destruction in a 2007 windstorm and this current matter. Thankful for the contractor who was referred, who pulled together a crew from his home building company (has built ten homes in the Reserve). “Basically, we have used all the tools and equipment to build a complete house other than the plumbing on this repair.”

I would highly recommend the contractor and his crew, as they have proven themselves knowledgeable and efficient in the task associated with this water search and destroy repair project. PM for contractor and insurance references.

“Pinecone” pen and ink art by Dorota Haber-Lehigh. Handmade shell tree and hand sewn silk and seed pearl pillow. New hammered copper, gold and silver earrings by Cher Flick for Joanie and ME.

From $24- $48.

Complementary gift wrapping.

 

“This collection of jewelry is inspired by Joanie’s fun yet classy style. The earrings and bracelets are simple in design, light weight and are made of mixed metal, including sterling silver, pewter, brass, gold filled, copper, gemstones and pearls. I live and handcraft all of the jewelry in Oregon. I received my Graduate Gemology degree from the Gemological Institute of America  and have many years of experience working with diamonds, gemstones and other boutique jewelry.  In memory of Joanie, my mother, I will be donating 10% of sales to OHSU Knight Cancer Institute.”  

Staging by Kathy Bowman.

Fun Facts:

Jewelry designer Cher FLick Kathy’s younger sister.

Kathy is the oldest of three sisters.

Kathy is Fairweather’s Director of Hospitality.

 

http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 


“Moonlight and Waves” original oil by Ron Nicolaides.

“Light and Waves” original oil by Victoria Brooks.

 

“Complete Me” original pen and ink by Vanessa K. Stokes.

 

Amber and turquoise fused glass platter by Christine Downs.

 

Turquoise and Amber Sue Sparkgo design  ™ quilted pillow by Cherry Jones Harris.

 

Fused glass Mezuzah by Rosalyn Andronescu with room for a biblical passage, a love note or a personal thought.

Earrings in Amber and Gold by Mary Hurst.

Sterling and turquoise bracelet by Mary Bottita.

 

“Whale Within” signed photograph by Neal Maine.  Three polar bears  with whale bones. Alaska trip.

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

Through December 23

 HUE, an exhibition, featuring art by Leah Kohlenberg, JoAnn Pari-Mueller  and Vanessa K. Stokes.

“Hues or colors are so pure – no white or blacks added – just rich, delightful, lose yourself in the color.”

In addition, HUE features a lavish array of handmade jewelry of mixed-metal, leather, gold-filled and semi-precious stones from many of the Northwest’s most reputable jewelry artists. It is a once a year exclusive private jewelry shopping experience to select the latest edgy fashion forward works.

In addition, new, never-before-seen photographs  and selected “encore” polar bear photographs from Neal Maine’s Arctic Light Images.

Raffle opportunity – only 14 chances to win a signed and framed Arctic Light  by Neal Maine (valued at $295).

The Last Polar Bear, a book published by Braided River. In addition to  Steven Kazlowski’s photos, the book features essays by Alaska-based writers Charles Wohlforth, Richard Nelson and Nick Jans, as well as Newsweek correspondent Dan Glick, Frances Beinecke, president of the National Resources Defense Council, and Theodore Roosevelt IV, conservationist and great-grandson of the president.

The photographs that make up the book show the polar bears and other Arctic species in their threatened natural habitat — swimming, playing, caring for their young and dozing on late-summer ice floes. One image is beautiful but the caption reminds the reader of the reality: “If we do nothing as a society, and the ice continues to melt, zoos could be the only place on Earth where polar bears can be found.”

Read more about Arctic Light:

https://www.discoverourcoast.com › coast-weekend › arts › article_1d18109…

Feb 16, 2015 – ‘Arctic Light’ draws attention to global warming Presentation, photographic … The presentation is co-sponsored by Denise Fairweather of …

“Patrons who purchase The Last Polar Bear book,  retail value of $39.99, will have the entire proceeds in support of Alaska Wilderness League and will have a raffle opportunity (1-14 chance)  to win a  signed and framed  Arctic Light Neal Maine image!   

Read more about doing good works at: http://www.alaskawild.org.  Book proceeds in support of Alaska Wilderness League.

Alaska Wilderness League protects Alaska’s public lands by fighting for wilderness, wildlife, indigenous rights and a cleaner energy future.

Each book purchase will receive a numbered ticket.  At a set time, Neal Maine will draw the winning ticket at random.

 

Read more at:

Arctic Light, the event, in support of the Alaska Wilderness …

 

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com › 2015/02/22 › arctic-li…

 

Feb 22, 2015 – Three West coast naturalists who traveled to the high Arctic last year, a trip sponsored by the … Arctic Light, the event, in support of the Alaska Wilderness League

 

Through December 23

On Hue Art Exhibit and Sale

Fairweather House and Gallery

http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

“Folklore” watercolor by JoAnn Pari-Mueller

“The watercolor evokes the redolence of roses. I’ve added a detailed floral border, inspired by my Hungarian heritage,” writes artist JoAnn Pari-Mueller

 

“Heart” by Vanessa K. Stokes.

 “My new original watercolor, colored pencil  with pen and ink art for made for your HUE show in December,” writes Fairweather’s emerging artist Vanessa K. Stokes.

 

Pink mercury glass hand made ornament with bronze hanger.

Natural rose quartz bracelet wrapped in silver by Mary Hurst.

Hammered gold earrings with pink pearls by Cher Flick.

 

Brilliant pink gemstone hammered silver ring by Nikki Hatt. 

Amethyst pendant necklace by Nikki Hatt.

Amethyst and  pink pearl necklace by Mary Bottita.

 

 

“Rising Star” original by Jan Shield.

Amethyst mercury glass bowl with hand painted purple ornaments.

 

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

Through December 23

HUE, an exhibition, featuring  art by Leah Kohlenberg, JoAnn Pari-Mueller  and Vanessa K. Stokes.

“Hues or colors are so pure – no white or blacks added – just rich, delightful, lose yourself in the color.”

In my new works this month, two are executed in watercolor, evoking warmth and redolence, one is a jewel toned mixed media work on handmade paper,” writes artist JoAnn Pari-Mueller.

In addition, HUE features a lavish array of  handmade jewelry of mixed-metal, leather, gold-filled and semi-precious stones from many of the Northwest’s most reputable jewelry artists. It is a once a year exclusive private jewelry shopping experience to select the latest edgy fashion forward works.

Complimentary gift wrapping.

 

Through December 23

On Hue Art Exhibit and Sale

Fairweather House and Gallery

http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shortie I for A FINE LINE.

Mixed media art by Bill Baily, woven bamboo basket by Charles Schweigert, black and white gull art by Leah Brown, encaustic art by Peg Wells, pen and ink drawings by Waka Takahashi Brown, photo by Susan Romersa, pottery by Suzy Holland and photographs by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

Shortie II for A FINE LINE.

Pen and ink shell studies, oak leaf watercolor and grape painting by Paul Brent.

Shortie III for A FINE LINE.

Art by Jan Shield, platter by Teresa Weisman-Knightand semi-precious bracelets by Mary Bottita.

 

Shortie IV for A FINE LINE.

Pen, ink and wax art by Dorota Haber-Lehigh.

 

Shortie V for A FINE LINE.

Handmade books by Christine Trexel and calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson.

 

Shortie VI for A FINE LINE.

Fused glass by Mike Fox with handmade glass by Bob Heath and Christine Downs.

Shortie VII for A FINE LINE.

Hand painted sea urchin rocks, signed and dated, by Kandy Schwartz.

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

A FINE LINE

On view 

October 5-31

 

A FINE LINE”  an exhibition of representational and non-representational works of art. Working with different media the selected artists experiment with linear mark making in its widest sense. Each artist produced works inspired by places and spaces in the natural environment.

For more info please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Images by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

 

 

‘Mystery’ original pen and ink by Vanessa K. Stokes

 

 

“Complete Me” by Vanessa K. Stokes.

Portraiture art work with mirror.

Vanessa Kalani Stokes  creates traditional and original anime (pronounced AH-nee-may) work. The word anime is often defined as “animation from Japan.” When you see “anime,” images of large doe-like eyes, funny and colorful hair, and peculiar fashion come to mind. Outside Japan, anime refers specifically to animation from Japan or as a Japanese-disseminated animation style often characterized by colorful graphics, vibrant characters and fantastical themes. One of the most distinctive characteristics of anime resides in the characters’ faces. While anime characters may possess bodies with relatively proportional body parts, the heads, hair, and facial expressions are usually exaggerated and brightly colored.

 

 

Vanessa K. Stokes and her art.

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

May 2018

“Portraiture” featuring regional artists Leah Kohlenberg, Susan Romersa, Patricia ClarkFinley, Rebecca Gore, Mike Mason and Russell J. Young.

Introducing new emerging artists Tamara Watanabe and Vanessa K. Stokes.

 

Emerging artist Vanessa K. Stokes speaks about her art at Fairweather’s.

 

The art selected is a debut exhibition contemplating character in portrait drawings and oil sketches displaying the relationship between artist and sitter as its central subject. Vanessa K. Stokes is a young self-taught Northwest artist who works with pen and ink to create modern pop culture inspired art with Japanese Manga influences. D. Fairweather, gallerist.

 

Q: What are some of the Fairweather’s emerging artists doing now, you ask?

A: Kristin Qian is a Princeton graduate, and currently attending Harvard;  Britney Drumheller works as an artist based in Bend for producing designs for Macy’s in NYC.; Nick Brakel, after recovering from a traumatic brain injury, has learned to paint again, and has had art selected for an upcoming exhibit at OSU;  Robert McWhirter was juried into an exhibition curated by the director of the Portland Art Museum; Michael Wing is doing commissioned photographs of collector cars, most recently a Lamborghini; Rebecca Gore  had art selected for a permanent display in a NW winery;  Gayle H. Seely has patrons who continue collect her seed pearl mosaics;  and Diane Copenhaver has had a solo show in Bellevue as well as having art selected for an upcoming exhibit at OSU.

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Shell Twins. “

Pen and Ink pen.

Black and white background by Britney Drumheller.

 

“Sand Dollar.” (Sold)

Colored ink pen on paper by Britney Drumheller.

 

 

Read more about the artist:

Britney Drumheller | Professional Artist

Britney Drumheller works with markers and colored pencils to create beach-inspired art symbolic expressions the value the North coastal tidelands and its …

Q: What are pen and ink drawings, you ask?

A:  Pen and ink drawing describes the process of using pens to apply ink to a surface. Drawing with pen and ink allows the artist to create strong areas of contrast. Most ink drawings are completed using black inks on white surfaces which leads to heavy contrast in value.

Calligraphy quote.

Colored ink and pen by master calligrapher Penelope Culbertson.

Read more about the artist:

Penelope Culbertson – Portland Society for Calligraphy

Penelope Culbertson.  … The Fairweather Gallery in Seaside, Oregon features my calligraphy. I show at the Oregon Society of …

Penelope Culbertson |  Master Calligraphy Artist

Q: What is calligraphy, you ask?

A: It is the design and execution of lettering with a broad tip instrument pen, ink brush, or other writing instruments. Calligraphy pens are a special class of fountain pen. The broader, flat edge t creates marks varying in thickness. Calligraphy pens are primarily used for stylized penmanship. The pen is usually held at a constant angle, different scripts requiring different angles. Thick and thin strokes are created by varying the direction of the stroke.

 

Back story:

First chapter: Recently, a man walked into the gallery and asked to see a painted rock depicting a sand dollar that was on display in the front window.  And, too, he asked if there was a magnifying glass to use.  Our answer: yes to both requests.

 

 

 

 

 

Emerging artist Kandy Schwartz. Painted rocks on display.

 

Second chapter: The man inspected the painted rock sand dollar closely for a few moments and then said “I will take this.”

 

Why, you ask,, this one?

 

“Rich and highly detailed. This painted rock reflects the artist’s individual experience with a single sea star. The artist depicts the species out of the water with a wonderful sense of scale. I am a marine biologist. This artist shows everything that a real sand dollar has. Quite nice!”

 

Q:  What is a marine biologist, you ask?

A:  Simply put, a marine biologist  studies the  life in the oceans and other saltwater environments such as estuaries and wetlands. All plant and animal life forms are included from the microscopic picoplankton all the way to the majestic blue whale, the largest creature in the sea—and for that matter in the world.

Fun Facts:

Sand dollars crawl along the ocean floor with their mouths toward the ground, eating microscopic particles of food. Most sand dollars live 8-10 years. The age of any particular sand dollar can be determined by counting the growth rings on the plates of its hard skeleton.

 

Sand dollars get their name, not from their value, but from their appearance. When the skeletons (called tests) of dead sand dollars wash ashore, they are usually bright white from being bleached by the Sun. Long ago, people who found these dead sand dollars thought they looked like old Spanish or American dollar coins, so they called them sand dollars.

 

Chapter three: Kandy Schwartz, Fairweather’s emerging artist,  was delighted with the  endorsement of her art and the sale.  She went back to her studio and painted more rocks.

And, too, more new painted rocks  by Kandy Schwartz!

 

Read more about sand dollars:

NPR posted an episode of Deep Look • PBS.

From KQED Science: The skeletons of sand dollars are prized by beachcombers, but these creatures look way different in their lives beneath the waves. Covered in thousands of purple spines, they have a bizarre diet that helps them exploit the turbulent waters of the sandy sea floor. https://bit.ly/2RMq55F

 

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