Emerging Artists


Back story:

First chapter: Recently, a man walked into the gallery and asked to see a painted rock depicting a sand dollar that was on display in the front window.  And, too, he asked if there was a magnifying glass to use.  Our answer: yes to both requests.

 

 

 

 

 

Emerging artist Kandy Schwartz. Painted rocks on display.

 

Second chapter: The man inspected the painted rock sand dollar closely for a few moments and then said “I will take this.”

 

Why, you ask,, this one?

 

“Rich and highly detailed. This painted rock reflects the artist’s individual experience with a single sea star. The artist depicts the species out of the water with a wonderful sense of scale. I am a marine biologist. This artist shows everything that a real sand dollar has. Quite nice!”

 

Q:  What is a marine biologist, you ask?

A:  Simply put, a marine biologist  studies the  life in the oceans and other saltwater environments such as estuaries and wetlands. All plant and animal life forms are included from the microscopic picoplankton all the way to the majestic blue whale, the largest creature in the sea—and for that matter in the world.

Fun Facts:

Sand dollars crawl along the ocean floor with their mouths toward the ground, eating microscopic particles of food. Most sand dollars live 8-10 years. The age of any particular sand dollar can be determined by counting the growth rings on the plates of its hard skeleton.

 

Sand dollars get their name, not from their value, but from their appearance. When the skeletons (called tests) of dead sand dollars wash ashore, they are usually bright white from being bleached by the Sun. Long ago, people who found these dead sand dollars thought they looked like old Spanish or American dollar coins, so they called them sand dollars.

 

Chapter three: Kandy Schwartz, Fairweather’s emerging artist,  was delighted with the  endorsement of her art and the sale.  She went back to her studio and painted more rocks.

And, too, more new painted rocks  by Kandy Schwartz!

 

Read more about sand dollars:

NPR posted an episode of Deep Look • PBS.

From KQED Science: The skeletons of sand dollars are prized by beachcombers, but these creatures look way different in their lives beneath the waves. Covered in thousands of purple spines, they have a bizarre diet that helps them exploit the turbulent waters of the sandy sea floor. https://bit.ly/2RMq55F

 


 Abstract watercolors by Donna Sanson, Oregon  myrtlewood cribbage board, segmented vase and nautilus sculptures by Mike Brown.

Crafted by NW hands.

Folded book art by Mary Boitta, en caustic art (aptly titled “Remembering Autumn”) by Peg Wells, origami by Peggy Evans, leather work by Luans Leathers, en caustic crows by Kathryn Delany and hand painted tiles by Sandy Applegate.

Abstracts by Diane Copenhaver and glass art by Bob Heath.

 


Handmade curly willow, mouth blown glass,  hand-made book and box by Christine Trexel.

Coral glass by Rinee Merritt, glass platters by Sandy and Bob Lecari and plein air oil by Lisa Wiser.

 

En caustic  art, ocean debris baskets, sea urchin bowls, moon platter by Emily Miller, mixed media stone art by Peggy Stein, abstract drip by Kimberly Reed and oil paintings by Sharon Kathleen Johnson.

 


Abstract miniatures by Tanya Gardner.

 

Calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson, watercolor by Bill Baily and pottery by Suzy Holland.

 

Abstract oil by Carmela Newstead.

 

 

Abstracts by Zifen Qian, maple bowls by Daniel Harris, watercolor by Paul Brent, landscape by Bill Baily and seascape  by Victoria Brooks.

 

 

For Shape and Color.

Art masks by Jorjett Strumme.

Paintings with pressed flowers on metal by Mike Mason. Anny Sears, model, with pressed foliages by Mike Mason.

 

 

Pastel landscape by Carmela Newstead, vintage jewelry necklace by Reneé Hafeman and en caustic blue abstract by Kimberly Kent.

Sunset oil paintings  by Nicholas Oberling, photograph by Neal Maine, pastels by Lynda Campbell and seascapes by Ron Nicolaides.

 

Mixed media diptych by Gary Pearlman, raw edged walnut bowl by Mike Brown and paper box sculpture by Christine Trexel.

Miniature oils by Barbara Rosbe Felisky.

 

Photos by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

“Color and Shape” exhibition through September 30th.

The show covers every aspect of art, textures, materials and finishes, highlighting the quintessentially colorful fall season.

Grace note to the artists…

 

“Shape and Color, Fairweather’s September exhibition, would not be such a success without the beautiful work created by NW hands.  The selected artists provided new work to highlight the annual fall show.  We thank them all for the extraordinary opportunity to tell a seasonal story with their art.  Truly, the artists offered new exceptional work, and by doing so, they encourage those of us in the arts, to do more.”  Fairweather Gallery

Abstract series of three by Jan Rimmerman, seascape oil by Karen E. Lewis and pottery by Suzy Holland.  Shape and Color gallery hostesses Katie, Kemy Kay, Joan, Bonnie and Denise.

 

And, too, a grace note received from a gallery hostess to share.

“Thank you for the beautiful crystal I picked out for a gift.  Most, of all, thanks for bringing the utmost beauty to many, many people.  Most of all, thanks for inviting me to work in your stunning establishment.  It delights my eyes every time I come in.  Your artists are beyond comparison.” Kemy Kay

A grace note received from an artist.

 

“Don’t ask yourself what the world needs.  Ask yourself  what makes you come alive and then do that.  Because what the world needs is people who have come alive.” –Howard Thurman, educator and theologian.
“Thank you for your encouragement and support in showing and growing my art.  You have created such a wonderful group of artists, and display our work in beautiful ways.  I am extremely grateful for your friendship and aliveness in out shared vision.”  Gayle H. Seely

For more about the gallery, please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com.

 

 

Painted Rocks by Kandy Schwartz

 

 

“For the most part, my inspiration comes from the rocks themselves. I am constantly on the lookout for a shape that speaks to me saying I am not just a rock. I am a three-dimensional sea creature. Just add some color to me and I will come to life.”– Kandy Schwartz

 

 

 

 Artist Peggy Stein, while delivering new  Fairweather fall art, meets emerging artist Kandy Schwartz, whose art will be introduced during the upcoming Art Walk.

 

 

“Untitled” mixed media art by Peggy Stein

 

“I love details. On my walks in the woods I pick up twigs and pretty moss on the path. On the beach its sea glass, pebbles, dried kelp, and shells. My pebble art was inspired by a trip to the UK where I found marvelous small, smooth pebbles along the coast of the North Sea. I love combining all of these into three-dimensional art pieces. You might look at my work and say anybody can do that. The true challenge is taking a pile of rocks and a box of sticks and moss and combining them in a way that speaks to someone. I find inspiration in ordinary things, and I love to stage them in extraordinary circumstances.” — Peggy Stein

 

Kandy Schwartz rock art

 

 

 

EMERGING artist Hall of Fame display featuring Diane Copenhaver, Ashley Howarth, Rebecca Gore, Whelpsey Whelp, Michael Wing & Gayle H. Seely.

 

 

 

2018 artist Veronica Russell listens as her name added to Fairweather House and Gallery Emerging Artist Hall of Fame.

EMERGING, an exhibition, through August 30

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside

 

 

Q: What are the Hall of Fame emerging artists doing now, you ask?

 Kristin Qian is a Princeton graduate.

Britney Drumheller works as an artist in NYC.

Nick Brakel, after recovering from a traumatic brain injury,  has learned to paint again.

Robert McWhirter was juried into an exhibition curated by the director of the Portland Art Museum.

Michael Wing is doing commissioned photographs of collector cars, most recently a Lamborghini.

Michele Bettger moved to Hawaii and shows art there.

Rebecca Gore  had art selected for a permanent display in a winery.

Gayle H. Seely  has patrons who collect her seed pearl mosaics.

Linda Trexler has most of her art in a private collection.

Diane Copenhaver has had a solo show in Bellevue.

Ashley Howarth graduated from college and works in an insurance office where her art is displayed.

Whelpsy Whelp had the majority of her art selected for a private residence.

Veronica Russell continues to work in lino-cut print art, currently working on  abstract portraits.

Photos by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

Emerging artists are selected through an audition process and receive gallery mentoring. Since 2006 Fairweather House and Gallery has championed  emerging visionaries who take risks, embrace challenges and are rigorous in their approach to creation and production.

For more information about doing good works, please visit www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

 

Kristin Qian,  2006 Emerging Artist Hall of Fame

Kristin Qian (class of 2018) plans to concentrate in science, having completed Princeton’s rigorous interdisciplinary Integrated Science Curriculum. She pursued certificates in French Language & Culture and Musical Performance.

Kristin has traveled to Europe, South America, North America, and Asia from time to time for study, international music competitions, and solo recitals. Kristin has obtained high proficiency in a number of foreign languages: German, Japanese, and Spanish, including English, French, and Chinese as her native languages. Kristin joins the EU program not only interested in Europe’s economic and political background but also in its cultural diversity, natural sciences, and art. Kristin herself is also a visual artist and has held a number of solo and group exhibitions nationally and internationally.

Kristin was an active member of the Princeton University Art Museum Student Advisory Board, staff news writer for The Daily Princetonian, involved in the science journal Innovation, and performs with the Princeton University Orchestra and Princeton Pianists Ensemble. Kristin Qian enters Harvard in the fall of 2018.

August 4, 2018 It seems we are not be able to make it to your Emerging reception due to traffic. Sending you art for Shape and Colors. Best to Fairweather! Zifen, Li and Kristin Qian

 

 


Zifen Qian, self portrait

Zifen Qian, a modern romanticism artist who combines eastern and western cultures in his works. He graduated from Shanghai University and Portland State University with MFA.

He has taught art in both Chinese colleges and US as a professor. His paintings have been selected into the Shanghai Fine Arts Exhibition and Across East China National Oil Painting Exhibition.  He had numerous solo and group exhibitions in New York, Chicago, Portland, Paris, London and other cities in the world.

 

SAVE THE DATE!!!

SAVE THE TIME!!!

September 1, 2018

5-7pm

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside

Opening reception for Color and Shape, an exhibition, featuring new contemporary art from regional artists Bill Baily, Diane Copenhaver, Tanya Gardner, Renée Hafeman, Mike Mason, Emily Miller, Zifen Qian and Jorjett Strumme, as well as  introducing new artists Donna Sanson and Candy Swartz. The show covers every aspect of abstract art, textures, materials and finishes, highlighting the quintessentially colorful fall season.

“Color and Shape are key elements in the language of abstract art.  Both of these elements of design offer infinite possibilities to communicate visually. Both have the power to create an energy that is almost palpable.   Whether cool and calming, warm and energizing, light or dark, color can transport us to another place or time.   Shape can create an illusion, a feeling, or sense of something.  In my current art work, I have used both of these elements of design incorporating colors inspired by the beautiful Oregon coast and explored the continuum of abstraction through shape,” Diane Copenhaver.

Fall habitat lecture by naturalist and wildlife photographer Neal Maine at 6: pm.  Live music by Shirley 88.  Light bites and beverages.

For more info, please visit www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

P.S.S.T!!! You have just one week left to see EMERGING art work before our next opening!

 

Gayle H. Seely  spoke during the opening reception of EMERGING, Fairweather’s August exhibition.

“As a four-year emerging artist I am happy to identify with the Latin word emerge. A combination of the sounds ‘e’ for out, and ‘mergere’ meaning dip or immerse. Such an appropriate description of my process: filling all sides of the box with colors, shapes, textures, emotion.

Turning it around and around to see what develops…bringing to mind the Mobius strip:
Discovered by the German mathematician August Ferdinand Mobius in the early 1800’s. “A surface with only one side, formed by giving a half twist to a narrow, rectangular strip of paper and then pasting its two ends together.”

 

Give it a try…let the twist be room for creativity and apply the idea to your day, to enliven your moments.” Gayle H. Seely

 

 

Photo collage of Gayle H. Seely and her art by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall, Seaside First Saturday Art Walk photographer

 

For more about the gallery, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Fairweather House and Gallery

Emerging Artist Hall of Fame

 Kristin Qian

Britney Drumheller

Nick Brakel

Robert McWhirter

Michael Wing

Michele Bettger

Rebecca Gore

Gayle H. Seely

Linda Trexler

Diane Copenhaver

Ashley Howarth

Whelpsy Whelp

Veronica Russell

 

12th Annual Emerging Artist exhibition

Through August 30

Veronica Russell artist launch

 

“Beneath the Aquamarine” lino wood block print by Veronica Russell 

 

Veronica Russell is a mixed media artist whose work explores her fascination with the natural world, and also at times, her avid fandom for sci-fi. Her pieces are typically built around printmaking, for example an original lino cut printed in black on the foundation of a watercolor background, with finish details painted in metallics as a third, light-catching layer.

 

Russell’s current series Lost & Found at Seaside depicts everyday organic objects that one may find lying around on the beach. Pieces in this series draw from Russell’s previous work in macro photography, encouraging beachcombers to look closer at what they may have considered “common.” In looking closer we discover unexpected beauty, the intricacies that most people don’t stop to notice: a faint pattern in the texture of a sand dollar skeleton, the ridges looping in ovals around the shell of a clam with razor-sharp edges, the slick other-worldly pods adorning the strands of a bull kelp tangle at surf’s edge.

 

However, it’s not only beauty one finds when looking so closely. This is where those touches of the surreal may come in to Russell’s work. Looking closely at this series, one may notice that the subjects are beautiful and interesting pieces of nature, but they are all either dead, dying, or about to be eaten!

Russell hopes her work celebrates the fleeting beauty and some of the mystery in our naturally imperfect world.

Veronica Russell at work in her studio.

 

Veronica Russell is a mixed media artist who has lived on the Oregon coast for 25+ years. While studying creative writing at Pacific University in 2001, she took as many art courses as she could: photography, pottery & sculpture, graphic design, and her favorite, printmaking. Her fascination for creating wood and linocuts stuck. After college, while her art was relegated to a hobby, she spent time as managing editor and graphic designer for travel publications on the coast. Russell feels blessed to be able to work on her art full time now. Her work draws from her deep admiration for the natural world, and on occasion, her avid fandom for film and literature, particularly the sci-fi genres. Russell’s current mixed-media work centers around a block print, using other media to layer in texture, color, and overall finish to her multilayered pieces.

 

 

 

Emerging artists are selected through an audition process and receive gallery mentoring. Since 2006 Fairweather House and Gallery has championed regional emerging visionaries who take risks, embrace challenges and are rigorous in their approach to creation and production.

For more about the gallery, please go to www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

 

 

Gayle H. Seely, artist,  spoke about her art at the Fresh Greens Opening reception.

 

Opening reception hostesses,  Denise, Joan and Kemy Kay,  with arms full of  fresh-cut Bells of Ireland.

“Lively, bright, fresh and spontaneous.”Gayle H. Seely


FRESH GREENS, Fairweather March exhibition, opening reception trays.

“Recent, original, stimulating, cool and refreshing.”  —Gayle H. Seely

 

 

Close up of Gayle H. Seely’s seed pearl beaded box.

“Green: the color associated with nature.” — Gayle

Chasing the Light by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Nature Images.

“Green. Brings to mind the  chosen to sooth the soul.”-Gayle H. Seely

Gayle H.  Seely showing the http://www.coastweekend.com article written about her art.

“Green:  Brings to mind the special place for art to please the eye.”  –Gayle H. Seely

 

 

Gallery patrons listen to Neal Maine’s ecology lecture, at Fairweather’s FRESH GREENS opening reception.

“Fresh: flourishing, active and new.”  Gayle H. Seely

 

“Lately, I’ve been fascinated by the idea of objects as functional, not in how they hold liquid or whatever, but in how they hold history.” Tim Christensen, potter

“There are very few human beings who receive the truth, complete and staggering, by instant illumination. Most of them acquire it fragment by fragment, on a small scale, by successive developments, cellular, like a laborious mosaic.” Anaiis Nin

“The voyage of discovery is not in seeking new landscapes but in having new eyes.” Marcel Proust

“He paints like a man going over the top of a hill, singing.” THE ART SPIRIT Robert Henri

 

“Have fun, enjoy your creativity, and surround yourself with beauty.” Gayle H. Seely

Next Page »