Kandy Schwartz


Shortie I for A FINE LINE.

Mixed media art by Bill Baily, woven bamboo basket by Charles Schweigert, black and white gull art by Leah Brown, encaustic art by Peg Wells, pen and ink drawings by Waka Takahashi Brown, photo by Susan Romersa, pottery by Suzy Holland and photographs by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

Shortie II for A FINE LINE.

Pen and ink shell studies, oak leaf watercolor and grape painting by Paul Brent.

Shortie III for A FINE LINE.

Art by Jan Shield, platter by Teresa Weisman-Knight,  semi-precious bracelets by Mary Bottita and watercolor by Carolynn Wagler.

 

 

Shortie IV for A FINE LINE.

Pen, ink and wax art by Dorota Haber-Lehigh.

 

Shortie V for A FINE LINE.

Handmade books by Christine Trexel and calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson.

 

Shortie VI for A FINE LINE.

Fused glass by Mike Fox, watercolors by Carolyn Macpherson and handmade glass by Bob Heath and Christine Downs.

Shortie VII for A FINE LINE.

Hand painted sea urchin rocks, signed and dated, by Kandy Schwartz.

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

A FINE LINE

On view 

October 5-31

 

A FINE LINE”  an exhibition of representational and non-representational works of art. Working with different media the selected artists experiment with linear mark making in its widest sense. Each artist produced works inspired by places and spaces in the natural environment.

For more info please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Images by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

Back story:

First chapter: Recently, a man walked into the gallery and asked to see a painted rock depicting a sand dollar that was on display in the front window.  And, too, he asked if there was a magnifying glass to use.  Our answer: yes to both requests.

 

 

 

 

 

Emerging artist Kandy Schwartz. Painted rocks on display.

 

Second chapter: The man inspected the painted rock sand dollar closely for a few moments and then said “I will take this.”

 

Why, you ask,, this one?

 

“Rich and highly detailed. This painted rock reflects the artist’s individual experience with a single sea star. The artist depicts the species out of the water with a wonderful sense of scale. I am a marine biologist. This artist shows everything that a real sand dollar has. Quite nice!”

 

Q:  What is a marine biologist, you ask?

A:  Simply put, a marine biologist  studies the  life in the oceans and other saltwater environments such as estuaries and wetlands. All plant and animal life forms are included from the microscopic picoplankton all the way to the majestic blue whale, the largest creature in the sea—and for that matter in the world.

Fun Facts:

Sand dollars crawl along the ocean floor with their mouths toward the ground, eating microscopic particles of food. Most sand dollars live 8-10 years. The age of any particular sand dollar can be determined by counting the growth rings on the plates of its hard skeleton.

 

Sand dollars get their name, not from their value, but from their appearance. When the skeletons (called tests) of dead sand dollars wash ashore, they are usually bright white from being bleached by the Sun. Long ago, people who found these dead sand dollars thought they looked like old Spanish or American dollar coins, so they called them sand dollars.

 

Chapter three: Kandy Schwartz, Fairweather’s emerging artist,  was delighted with the  endorsement of her art and the sale.  She went back to her studio and painted more rocks.

And, too, more new painted rocks  by Kandy Schwartz!

 

Read more about sand dollars:

NPR posted an episode of Deep Look • PBS.

From KQED Science: The skeletons of sand dollars are prized by beachcombers, but these creatures look way different in their lives beneath the waves. Covered in thousands of purple spines, they have a bizarre diet that helps them exploit the turbulent waters of the sandy sea floor. https://bit.ly/2RMq55F

 

 

 

Painted Rocks by Kandy Schwartz

 

 

“For the most part, my inspiration comes from the rocks themselves. I am constantly on the lookout for a shape that speaks to me saying I am not just a rock. I am a three-dimensional sea creature. Just add some color to me and I will come to life.”– Kandy Schwartz

 

 

 

 Artist Peggy Stein, while delivering new  Fairweather fall art, meets emerging artist Kandy Schwartz, whose art will be introduced during the upcoming Art Walk.

 

 

“Untitled” mixed media art by Peggy Stein

 

“I love details. On my walks in the woods I pick up twigs and pretty moss on the path. On the beach its sea glass, pebbles, dried kelp, and shells. My pebble art was inspired by a trip to the UK where I found marvelous small, smooth pebbles along the coast of the North Sea. I love combining all of these into three-dimensional art pieces. You might look at my work and say anybody can do that. The true challenge is taking a pile of rocks and a box of sticks and moss and combining them in a way that speaks to someone. I find inspiration in ordinary things, and I love to stage them in extraordinary circumstances.” — Peggy Stein

 

Kandy Schwartz rock art