Events


Cape Arago Lighthouse by Emily Miller

Late summer sun illuminates the turquoise waters and rocky, forested shoreline of the southern Oregon coast near Coos Bay. Cape Arago Lighthouse is visible in the distance.

Cape Arago Lighthouse was built on Chief’s Island in 1866 to guide merchant ships into Coos Bay, just 13 years after white settlers first arrived in the area. Chief’s Island is just offshore, but proved dangerous to access with multiple washed-out bridges and boat disasters over the years. The current lighthouse is the third to be built at Cape Arago. It was deactivated in 2006 after 140 years of service.

In 2013, the last bridge to the island was removed and the land transferred to the Confederated Tribes of the Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians. The Confederate Tribes hope to establish an interpretive center on the mainland near the lighthouse.

Cleft of the Rock Lighthouse by Emily Miller

Late summer fog hangs over the horizon at Cape Perpetua, near Yachats on the central Oregon coast. The beacon from Cleft of the Rock Light can be seen 16 miles offshore, and might be welcomed at sea on these frequent foggy days.

The lighthouse and attached dwelling were built as a labor of love in 1976 by James Gibbs, a former Tillamook Rock Light attendant and lighthouse historian. He lived here until his death in 2010.

 


Yaquina Head Lighthouse from Cobble Beach by Emily Miller

Yaquina Head Lighthouse is the tallest lighthouse in Oregon, with a 93 ft. tower and a light that can be seen 19 miles out to sea. It was built in 1873 and continues to operate today. It is located on a high, exposed cliff near Newport, on Oregon’s central coast.

The lighthouse is part of the Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area, a federal reserve that is home to an incredible array of wildlife and beautiful coastline. The site has been popular with visitors since the 1930s, when nearly 12,000 visitors made it the 4th most visited lighthouse in the United States. Today it receives over 400,000 visitors per year.

A vein of magnetized iron runs through the bedrock of Yaquina Head, causing ships’ compasses to malfunction if they venture too near.

 

Tillamook Rock Lighthouse from Haystack Rock

Haystack Rock reflects in the shallow waters of an outgoing tide at Cannon Beach, on Oregon’s northern coast. A mile offshore, the Tillamook Rock lighthouse is visible in the distance. The lighthouse is located on a barren, exposed rock, situated to guide merchant ships to the mouth of the Columbia River.

Construction on the Tillamook Rock lighthouse began in 1879 and was not finished until 1881 due to powerful storms that made construction and transport of materials nearly impossible. The lighthouse became known as “Terrible Tilly”. Waves broke over the rock strong enough to drench the entire lighthouse, collapsing roofs, flooding the interior, clogging the mechanisms with debris, breaking loose boulders and sending them flying through the air. The lighthouse keepers were totally isolated and tasked with constant repairs.

In 1957 the lighthouse was deactivated after 77 years of service. After changing hands several times, it was most recently used as a columbarium where the ashes of around 30 people are stored.

“Lighthouses have a mythical quality. A lighthouse stands for untold stories of stormy nights, beautiful sunrises, and the hardship and magic of life at the edge of the sea. A lighthouse symbolizes the journey between wild ocean and safe harbor. This transition zone is one of my favorite places to explore.” –Emily Miller, artist


Emily Miller, artist

Last fall I took a road trip to visit and paint at all eleven lighthouses on the Oregon coast. Lighthouses have a mythical quality to me. They symbolize the journey between wild ocean and safe harbor. I love the ocean and have always lived near it. To me, the coast is a border between the known and unknown. This transition zone is one of my favorite places to explore.

I choose to paint the landscape view rather than close-ups or lighthouse interiors because my artwork is centered on the way we interact with our environments. I am most interested in how we alter the landscape to suit our needs, and how the landscape, in return, alters our structures over time.

The paintings were completed on location (en plein air) or in the studio from my many reference photos. The series is about half-finished.

I enjoy series projects like this because they provide a framework for exploring and understanding an area. I spend more time at beautiful places while I’m painting and photographing. The project gives me a reason to dig deeper into the history of a place, and discover new spots that I might have missed otherwise.
Each lighthouse has its own story. Tillamook Rock Lighthouse is just south of Seaside on a barren rock one mile offshore. It was pounded by incredible storms where waves broke boulders off the cliff side and crashed them into the lighthouse. You can see its silhouette from Ecola State Park and Cannon Beach. Cape Meares Lighthouse in Tillamook and Yaquina Head Light in Newport are both still active and you can go inside the tower and climb up the spiral stairs.

 

 

Emily Miller with her art:  anemone and sea urchin bowls and the Oregon light house series.

 

 

Grace Note received:

“Thanks again for a great Art Walk event FINDINGS, Fairweather opening reception. It was wonderful to see the new gallery layout and chat with the other artists. Someone asked me if I was making a book from the lighthouse painting series. I may do that once it has finished, and then you will not have to hunt down maps in the magazines anymore!–Emily Miller

 

 

 

“Quick update if you want to share with your clients. Now thru the end of 2017, I am donating 10% of my proceeds to local ocean conservancy and art organizations. Thank you for your part in making my art ventures a success!!”

 

And, too,  an encore request for the image of the Sea Urchin bowl with spines by Emily Miller.

Renee Hafeman, vintage jewelry artist

FINDINGS in my work is a collection of tools and other articles used by an artisan to make jewelry.

 

Q:  What is the difference Between “Art Nouveau” and “Art Deco”, you ask?

A: Art Nouveau: means “new art,” reigned from roughly 1880 until just before World War I. It features naturalistic but stylized forms, often combined with more geometric shapes, particularly arcs, parabolas, and semicircles (think of the Eiffel Tower). The movement brought in natural forms that had often been overlooked like insects, weeds, even mythical faeries, as evidenced by Lalique jewelry or Tiffany lamps.

Art Deco emerged after World War I. In fact, the deprivations of the Great War years gave way to a whole new opulence and extravagance that defined the Jazz Age and the Art Deco aesthetic. The movement, prevalent from the 1920s until roughly the start of World War II, took its name from the 1925 Exposition Internationales des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes, held in France and is characterized by streamlined and geometric shapes. It also utilized modern materials like chrome, stainless steel, and inlaid wood. If Art Deco dabbled with natural materials, they tended to be graphic or textural, like jagged fern leaves. As a result, Deco featured bold shapes like sunbursts and zigzags and broad curves.

Renee Hafeman offered an artist’s lecture during the opening reception of FINDINGS, an exhibition through August at Fairweather’s.

Note the difference?

Hours and Events for the Paul Brent Studio

608 Broadway

Seaside, Oregon 

Sponsored by the Gilbert Block Building

 

Open Studio: you are invited to come in, look at the artwork and watch Paul Brent paint on his latest painting.

Paintings may be purchased through Fairweather’s Gallery next door.
Sign up for classes at Fairweathers.

Classes will be kept to a maximum of 12 participants and no prior experience with painting is necessary.

A minimum of 5 participants is necessary for the class to make.

All materials will be provided.

Wed. Aug. 23: Create a painting in water-mixable oil paint
on canvas 10am to 1pm

Thurs. Aug. 24: Open studio 11 am to 3pm

Tues. Aug. 29: Open studio 11 am to 3pm

Wed. Aug. 30: Open studio 11 am to 3pm

Thurs. Aug. 31: Create a Painting in Watercolor Class 10am-12pm

Call 503-738-8899 or email fairweatherkd@gmail.com to register.

For more about the artist, please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Paul Brent

 

For Fairweather’s FINDINGS exhibition, Paul Brent’s paintings.

Found for FINDINGS  before the artist created…

 

 

and after= Frazzled Model Mom by Karynn Kozij, marine debris artist.

 

 

Q: Who is Karynn Kozij, you ask?
A: Growing up on a farm in the province of Saskatchewan in Canada, Karynn Kozij loved perusing her Dad’s stash of materials in his shop, shed, garage and outbuildings. He had everything to create anything from a bird house or a toolbox, to a trailer or a potato planter.

She can’t pass up anything that at first seems to be trash but could possibly be turned into something else. She’s the one you see stopping on the sidewalk to pick up a squashed flat metal bottle cap or pull tab from a beer can, or a scrap of wire that is lying near a utility pole. She takes apart dried up writing pens before they go into the trash can to salvage the metal spring inside it. She is picking up trash, going through trash and making something out of nothing.

March 2016 spring storms spilled a treasure chest of marine debris onto our Northwest coast. It was sad and depressing to find so much trash on our shores. Karynn drove down onto the beach daily and hauled carloads of trash off the beach. The sadness and depression turned into fascination and obsession. With that awakening, she was unable to throw away so much perfectly good rope and became inspired.

Karynn saw possibility in those hundreds of feet of rope with an elaborate entry into the Marine Debris Art contest in Cannon Beach where she won the People’s Choice Award and third place in the judged contest with her entry, Octopus Family Reunion at the Beach.

Karynn works in many media. Something first destined as trash really grabs her eye; it’s a win win! Look closely in her art to see some part of it that was something else in a former life.

She was FOUND while picking up mail.

 

 

Foreign exchange student Kim visiting the Gearhart beach with Tillamook Head  of Seaside in the distance. Indeed, every piece found had foreign letters and numbers, hence, the name!  And, too, SOLD at FINDINGS, the exhibition.

 

But, wait,  there’s more…

 

Fortune teller, Pearl

 

Great Great Grandfather Kraken…

 

fondly watching over his offspring at the Gearhart beach.

 

Appreciation to Don Frank Photography.

Shoutout clues:

Karynn  Kozij lives in ____________, is the postmistress at the US Post Office in _____________, and will be at the Fairweather Gallery FINDINGS opening reception, Aug 5th with her marine debris art.  Octopus family reunion  at the ______________beach. The artist and her story of finding things was found while picking up mail in __________________.  Don Frank shows selected  art photos in the ____________Gallery in Seaside, as well.

 

Read what Eve Marx wrote about Karynn’s art:

View from the Porch: Art from the ‘Octopus’s Garden’

Artist transforms marine debris

Date: 2017-08-18 Seaside Signal

Story The Daily Astorian | Signal News
http://www.dailyastorian.com/SS/news

The Daily Astorian | Signal News

http://www.dailyastorian.com/SS/news

Celebrity artist Britney Drumheller

Save the date and time. 

August 5th, 5-7pm
Fairweather House and Gallery
612 Broadway, Seaside, OR
Opening reception for FINDINGS

Britney Drumheller arrives with new art for 2017.

 

Opening reception for the exhibit “Findings,” which juxtaposes an array of art by Emily Miller, Mariana Mace, JoAnn Pari-Mueller and Chris Boyer about the pleasures of beach combing.

“Findings,” will be the 11th annual emerging artist exhibition in the  Fairweather Gallery and will include former emerging artists Britney Drumheller, Nick Brakel, Linda Trexler, Ashley Howarth, Diane Copenhaver,  Gayle H. Seely, Kristin Qian and Rebecca Gore.

Each of the artists in attendance will discuss the development of their work and the ideas that drive their creativity.

Seaside nature photographer, ecologist and biologist Neal Maine will speak at 6 p.m. Summertime beverages and light bites.

 

Britney Drumheller has a degree from the Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising in Los Angeles, but moved back to her hometown of Cannon Beach – she could not leave the beauty and inspiration of the beach behind. Her work functions as symbolic expressions relating to the value people attach to the North coastal tidelands and its marine life.

 

 

Artist statement:

Art has always been a part of me; in all of its forms, it enriches my life. After graduating from the Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising in Los Angeles, my career in fashion design focused on fashion illustration – until my Dad suggested I try to sell some beach-inspired art. I went to the beach, studied all of the creatures in the tide pools, and tried to put onto paper my discoveries.

 

My good friends suggested I bring my sketches to Fairweather House & Gallery in Seaside, and I was so pleased to be able to put my art in such a beautiful gallery.

My favorite media is to work with markers and colored pencils. The markers I use can give the allure of looking like watercolors, but can also give you crisp, clean lines. I enjoy working within the contrast of the freedom of watercolor and the preciseness of markers. Always sketching when I have a chance, I can get lost in a sketch for hours.

“Through my art, I hope to beautifully translate the sea life that I do so dearly love and honor.” the North coastal tidelands and its marine life.”

FUN FACT:

Fairweather’s launched Britney Drumheller in an emerging artist exhibition several years ago.

Q: Where in the world is Britney’s art today, you ask?

A:  Here, there and everywhere.

OREGON

Fairweather Gallery, Seaside OR

Found, Cannon Beach OR

Inn at Cannon Beach Cannon Beach OR

Purple Moon Boutique, Cannon Beach OR

The Ocean Spa, Cannon Beach, OR

Insomnia Coffee, Cannon Beach, OR

Re/max Reality, Cannon Beach & Manzanita OR

TerHars, Seaside & Cannon Beach OR

Ocean Lodge, Cannon Beach, OR

Cousins, Dalles OR

Cousins, Pasco OR

Red Hills Market, Dundee OR

Village Gifts, Yachats OR

Unique Store Grand Market Place, Portland OR

Marvels by the Sea, Florence OR

Bella, Baker City

Bella, La Grande

 

WASHINGTON

Alki Surf Shop, Seattle WA

Wild Seafood Market, Seattle WA

City Center Drug, Aberdeen WA

For the Love of Spice, Gig Harbor WA

Cotton & Cashmere, Bainbridge Island WA

Manitou Lodge Bed & Breakfast, Forks WA

 

HAWAII

Sandpeople, Moana Surfrider – Honolulu HI

Sandpeople, Sheraton Waikiki – Honolulu HI

Sandpeople, Ala Moana Mall – Honolulu HI

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“My studio has great light and views of our inspirational garden out each window. It is filled with quirky art and unique and stimulating objects. My two Papillion’s, Daphne and Minerva (collectively known as the “goddesses”), like to hang out with me there.”

“I have a huge file of ideas. I am often inspired by the flower or bird or bug “du jour” in the garden. I always take a small journal and paints with me when I travel, too.”

I have many acquaintances that write stories, poetry, music, or create paintings, weavings, sewing, or knitting and realized that I lacked the ability to do any of those things. I had always loved decorating and collecting art, but had never before felt the urge to create. I especially credit my mother and her best friend (both painter/printmakers) with inspiring me to start. I took many classes and tried to work on my art almost daily. I literally started from ground zero, never having touched paper to pencil in an artistic way before.
Finding that hidden creative niche of the brain may take a while, but once you open that door – watch out!”

“I often combine watercolors with calligraphy and like the looks of the colors and curves of nature juxtaposed with black and white and the straight lines of grids.”


WAVES, Fairweather’s front counter table scape.  Art featured: Beluga Whale, mixed media by Nick Brakel, Waves, oil on board by Melissa Jander, fused glass platter by Cindy Duvall, calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson, Haystack oil on linen by Michael Muldoon.

 

Fairweather Gallery exhibition displays for WAVES.

A Fairweather Gallery  opening reception is all about meeting artists and seeing art.

 

WAVES introduced artist Karen E. Lewis.

 

Victoria Brooks.  Featured Faiweather resident artist for July.

For more info please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Victoria Brooks.

 

Regional artists greeted, spoke to and lectured about art to patrons at WAVES, an exhibition.

 

Fun with Fairweather hostesses. Surfboards by Cleanline Surf, Seaside. And, too, a blooper of sorts.

 

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