Events


Sacred.  Encaustic (beeswax) on wood panel by Gregory Bell.

 

During the opening reception of SHADOWS, Gregory Bell offered an artist talk about the encaustic works depicting the wildlife found in coastal habitat of the area.

 

 

And, too, during the SHADOWS reception,  the artist was  inspired by FLYNN,   “the handsomest Kestrel around and one of the  WCNC Ambassador Birds!”    I will paint FLYNN next! — Gregory Bell 

 

At the opening reception of  SHADOWS on October 7th there was an  auction  of selected Neal Maine images.  More than $300 was raised in less than five minutes to benefit the  WCNC!!!

 

Wildlife Center of the North Coast (WCNC) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit Oregon corporation, that specializes in wildlife rehabilitation of resident and migratory birds, mammals and other wild creatures naturally occurring in Oregon.

WCNC provides primary services to communities along 167 miles of coastline in Oregon and southwest Washington offering humane care and professional medical treatment to sick, injured, orphaned and displaced native wildlife with the goal of releasing healthy wild animals back into their appropriate habitat; offers quality conservation + environmental education programs concerning local wildlife, their ecosystems, and the human impact on these systems and individuals.

 

 

 

For SHADOWS original calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson.

 

Imagine quote by John Lennon created in calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson.

 

 

Shadows quote by Penelope Culbertson.

 

Penelope Culbertson began her art studies at the Portland Art Museum as a child, in the art department at Cleveland High School, at Reed College with calligraphy master Lloyd Reynolds, at Willamette University in Salem, at the San Francisco Art Institute, and the Institute de Bellas Artes in San Miguel, Mexico.

Penelope was the co-founder of the Art Academy of Kona and the West Hawaii Arts Guild where she served on the Executive Board. Penelope worked in the Hawaii State Artist-in-School program and showed as the Artist-in-Residence at the Hyatt Regency. Her work is in the permanent collection at the Royal Waikoloan Hotel.

Since her return to Portland, Penelope has had seventeen solo exhibits of her watercolors. She showed year round at the Hawthorne Arts Gallery and annually at the Buckman Art Show where she was the founding chairman of the Children’s Art Sale. She taught children’s art classes at the Buckman Arts Magnet Elementary and for the Portland Parks Dept. in their after-school program. In 1999 she helped produce a book of children’s watercolors about the Portland Water System. She was co-founder of The Hawthorne Arts Guild and showed in all their monthly group shows.

 

 

Penelope teaches weekly classes in calligraphy and watercolors for the disabled. She experiments in watercolors, oil pastels, collage, tapestry weaving and calligraphy. She is a member of the Portland Society of Calligraphy. She exhibits her art at Fairweather  Gallery in Seaside, Oregon.

 

Fun facts: 

In Penelope Culberston’s calligraphy class at Reed College there was a fellow student, Steve Jobs (Apple computer founder).

There is a theory that the computers today would not have the font choices without the learning seed  planted by Reed College calligraphy professor Lloyd Reynolds. 

 

Penelope Culbertson, at the opening reception of SHADOWS on October 7th, in addition to offering a scribing LIVE episode, will offer an artist’s talk  about  significant quotes that have made a difference in tilting the world to a better place!!!

 

Save the date and time!

 

Celebrating 13 years in 2017, the next Seaside First Saturday Art Walk, will be held on October 7, 5-7: pm.

Visitors meet artists, see original art, sip wine or snag appetizers by favorite restaurants or personal chefs, view artist demonstrations and, oftentimes, enjoy live performances in music.

The event is free and is all about seeing and selling art in the sponsoring galleries and boutiques located between Holladay and Broadway in the historic Gilbert District of downtown Seaside. Complimentary parking for the historic Gilbert District is on the corner of Holladay and Oceanway.

Fairweather House and Gallery, 612 Broadway

Opening reception for SHADOWS, an exhibition that focuses on the interplay of light and dark through selected art that expresses time as the fall season progresses.

New artwork by Northwest artists Diane Copenhaver, Penelope Culbertson, Gregory Bell, Janet Hickox,  Lisa Wiser , Ashley Howarth,  Whelsey Whelp, Karen E. Lewis, Tamara Johnson and Marga Stanley will be featured.

Artists will be in attendance to meet patrons and to speak about their art.

Take a note!

Calligrapher Penelope Culbertson will offer her annual Fairweather scribing LIVE episode!

 

Seaside/ Gearhart naturalist Neal Maine will speak at 6: pm about the autumn ecology of the local habitat.

LIVE music by Shirley 88.

 

Special guest of honor will be Flynn,  “the handsomest Kestrel around and one of the  WCNC Ambassador Birds”  will be on hand celebrating the opening of Fairweather’s new exhibition SHADOWS!

 

SHADOWS, the opening reception for Fairweather’s October exhibition, will be a benefit for Wildife Center of the North Coast!

 

 

 

Lisa Wiser is a visual artist living and working in Oregon. She draws inspiration from the scenic northwest, travel adventures and reading novels to create watercolor, acrylic, and mixed media paintings. Also an avid photographer, she chronicles her visual inspirations as she records obscure landscapes, architectural details, and other intriguing painting subjects.

 

Pursuits in life drawing and plein air painting confirms that she prefers a direct association with her subjects while working from life both outdoors or in the studio.

 

 

“The foundation of my work is a keen interest in the concept of structure in both the natural and built environment. My primary interest is capturing landscape scenes that visually articulate my emotional response upon approaching the scene.”–Lisa Wiser

 

Shadows of Butte by Lisa Wiser

 

Her representational work is characterized by vivid color, great depth of space and attention to detail.

Lisa earned a BS Degree in Art Education from the University of Oregon and has completed graduate coursework in graphic design, art education and painting. Lisa has been invited to serve in both curatorial and juror positions for various arts organizations in the area. She has taught art from pre-school through college and adult level courses and has recently retired as a substitute art teacher for her local school district to devote more time to her painting.

Aside from painting Lisa enjoys hiking, reading, gardening, skiing, and family time with her three adult children and husband, travel and fixing things. Her favorite getaways are the forests and deserts of Central Oregon and her family’s rustic retreat on Payette Lake in McCall, Idaho.

Save the date and time.

October 7th, 5-7pm

Opening reception for SHADOWS, an exhibition, Fairweather House and Gallery.

Welcoming artist Lisa Wiser.

Introducing glitter house artist Tamara Johnson and Janet Hickox.

 “SHADOWS,  expressed through a variety of works; bold and expressive, muted and gentle, solid and soft edges, and layers of dark and light.” –Diane Copenhaver

SHADOWS will feature new artwork by Fairweather resident artists Diane Copenhaver, Gregory Bell, Whelpsy Whelp, Marga Stanley and  Neal Maine.

Featured artists will be in attendance and will offer an artist talk about their works of art.

 

Special guest, FLYNN, an American Kestrel, from the Wildlife Center of the North Coast. 

Take a note!

SHADOWS,  the opening reception, will be a benefit for the WCNC.

Wildlife Center of the North Coast (WCNC) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit Oregon corporation, that specializes in wildlife rehabilitation of resident and migratory birds, mammals and other wild creatures.

 WCNC relys on the generosity of individuals and community groups for annual funding through donations, as well as grants from foundations, both local and from around the country.

 

 

More information to follow.

 

Anny Sears, fellow floral artist, spoke about the understanding of florography and how it magnified the energy of Mike Mason’s art.

 

“The aster is the flower of the month for September. In the language of  asters represent afterthought and sentimental remembrance. COLOR IT FALL has ne thinking of  the light of summer…. and starting of the light moving towards the glow of autumn.” –Anny Sears

 

“I really enjoyed speaking to all the artists and, especially to you. Thank you for all that you do for the arts. CHEERS!” –Anny

 

Anny Sears visits with artist Carolyn Macpherson, who offered a Seaside Painting LIVE ™ episode during the opening reception of COLOR IT FALL at Fairweather’s on Sept. 2nd.

 

 

Star of Bahai by Mike Mason

This image is of a 9 point star. It is a symbol of faith. The back ground is composed of hydrangea representing: devotion, and remembrance.
Queen Anne’s lace, historically representing: haven, protection, and “I will return”.
Cosmos line the star. They represent: modesty and love of a virgin.
Rhododendron signifies romance, first love and moderation.
Tulips accent the stat points with perfect love and “happy years”.
The center of the star is a Gerbera daisy. Historically the flower represents sadness. This part is special, because the emotional heart is one that we all share. Examining ones center and letting it bloom is truly the origin of Love.

 

 

 

 

For more about the artist, please read more at:

Fairweather House And Gallery — Blogs, Pictures, and more on …
nv.wordpress.com/tag/fairweather-house-and-gallery/
For COLOR IT FALL, an exhibition, at Fairweather’s. Artist Mike Mason. Prize winning Northwest artist Mike Mason. Carefully dried, pressed and placed …

COLOR IT FALL, an exhibition, through September 2017.

Dancing With The Stars by Marga Stanley.

 

The Snorkler by Marga Stanley.
For more info about the artist, go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ ..Marga Stanley

 

 

Eagle Sunrise by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images.

For more images please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Neal Maine

Proceeds in support of NCLC, North Coast Land Conservancy/ NCLCtrust.org

Moon and Mermaid by Ashley Howarth.

To read info go to …https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/…/a-decade-of-emerging-artist-bac… Jan 7, 2017 – Posted by Fairweather House and Gallery under Ashley Howarth, … kristin–qian/ shows a new emerging artist for the entire month of August.

 

Seaside clam tide by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.
For more info about Linda Fenton-Mendenhall, who also performs as the official Seaside First Saturday Art Walk photographer, go to http://www.facebook.com/ Linda Fenton-Mendenhall Photography

 

Sunburst  by Gayle H. Seely

For more info  go to: http://www.coastweekend.com/cw/visual/20150324/artist-reception-held-for-gayle-h-seely

Take note!!!

SAVE THE DATE AND TIME!
September 2nd, 5-7pm
  Fall opening reception at Fairweather House and Gallery

Seaside First Saturday Art Walk

 

The summer art season ends with a most perfect exhibition titled COLOR IT FALL. New original art compositions revolve around the complementary clash of the deliberately heightened blues, bright oranges and warm yellows.  Color is the dominant element in new art by resident artists Jo Pomeroy Crockett Ph.D., writer and artist,  bead artist Gayle H. Seely, abstract painter Renee Rowe, Michael Muldoon, Dr. Dale Veith, Paul Brent and Lisa Wiser!

 Introducing prize-winning artist Mike Mason, who uses carefully dried, pressed and placed botanicals to create art to support natural habitats conservation.   In addition, welcoming  new NW Cathy Mahardy to the  Gallery.  

Naturalist, scientist and biologist Neal Maine will speak at 6: pm about the ecology of the local habitat. 

LIVE music by Shirley 88.

 

 

Cape Arago Lighthouse by Emily Miller

Late summer sun illuminates the turquoise waters and rocky, forested shoreline of the southern Oregon coast near Coos Bay. Cape Arago Lighthouse is visible in the distance.

Cape Arago Lighthouse was built on Chief’s Island in 1866 to guide merchant ships into Coos Bay, just 13 years after white settlers first arrived in the area. Chief’s Island is just offshore, but proved dangerous to access with multiple washed-out bridges and boat disasters over the years. The current lighthouse is the third to be built at Cape Arago. It was deactivated in 2006 after 140 years of service.

In 2013, the last bridge to the island was removed and the land transferred to the Confederated Tribes of the Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians. The Confederate Tribes hope to establish an interpretive center on the mainland near the lighthouse.

Cleft of the Rock Lighthouse by Emily Miller

Late summer fog hangs over the horizon at Cape Perpetua, near Yachats on the central Oregon coast. The beacon from Cleft of the Rock Light can be seen 16 miles offshore, and might be welcomed at sea on these frequent foggy days.

The lighthouse and attached dwelling were built as a labor of love in 1976 by James Gibbs, a former Tillamook Rock Light attendant and lighthouse historian. He lived here until his death in 2010.

 


Yaquina Head Lighthouse from Cobble Beach by Emily Miller

Yaquina Head Lighthouse is the tallest lighthouse in Oregon, with a 93 ft. tower and a light that can be seen 19 miles out to sea. It was built in 1873 and continues to operate today. It is located on a high, exposed cliff near Newport, on Oregon’s central coast.

The lighthouse is part of the Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area, a federal reserve that is home to an incredible array of wildlife and beautiful coastline. The site has been popular with visitors since the 1930s, when nearly 12,000 visitors made it the 4th most visited lighthouse in the United States. Today it receives over 400,000 visitors per year.

A vein of magnetized iron runs through the bedrock of Yaquina Head, causing ships’ compasses to malfunction if they venture too near.

 

Tillamook Rock Lighthouse from Haystack Rock

Haystack Rock reflects in the shallow waters of an outgoing tide at Cannon Beach, on Oregon’s northern coast. A mile offshore, the Tillamook Rock lighthouse is visible in the distance. The lighthouse is located on a barren, exposed rock, situated to guide merchant ships to the mouth of the Columbia River.

Construction on the Tillamook Rock lighthouse began in 1879 and was not finished until 1881 due to powerful storms that made construction and transport of materials nearly impossible. The lighthouse became known as “Terrible Tilly”. Waves broke over the rock strong enough to drench the entire lighthouse, collapsing roofs, flooding the interior, clogging the mechanisms with debris, breaking loose boulders and sending them flying through the air. The lighthouse keepers were totally isolated and tasked with constant repairs.

In 1957 the lighthouse was deactivated after 77 years of service. After changing hands several times, it was most recently used as a columbarium where the ashes of around 30 people are stored.

“Lighthouses have a mythical quality. A lighthouse stands for untold stories of stormy nights, beautiful sunrises, and the hardship and magic of life at the edge of the sea. A lighthouse symbolizes the journey between wild ocean and safe harbor. This transition zone is one of my favorite places to explore.” –Emily Miller, artist


Emily Miller, artist

Last fall I took a road trip to visit and paint at all eleven lighthouses on the Oregon coast. Lighthouses have a mythical quality to me. They symbolize the journey between wild ocean and safe harbor. I love the ocean and have always lived near it. To me, the coast is a border between the known and unknown. This transition zone is one of my favorite places to explore.

I choose to paint the landscape view rather than close-ups or lighthouse interiors because my artwork is centered on the way we interact with our environments. I am most interested in how we alter the landscape to suit our needs, and how the landscape, in return, alters our structures over time.

The paintings were completed on location (en plein air) or in the studio from my many reference photos. The series is about half-finished.

I enjoy series projects like this because they provide a framework for exploring and understanding an area. I spend more time at beautiful places while I’m painting and photographing. The project gives me a reason to dig deeper into the history of a place, and discover new spots that I might have missed otherwise.
Each lighthouse has its own story. Tillamook Rock Lighthouse is just south of Seaside on a barren rock one mile offshore. It was pounded by incredible storms where waves broke boulders off the cliff side and crashed them into the lighthouse. You can see its silhouette from Ecola State Park and Cannon Beach. Cape Meares Lighthouse in Tillamook and Yaquina Head Light in Newport are both still active and you can go inside the tower and climb up the spiral stairs.

 

 

Emily Miller with her art:  anemone and sea urchin bowls and the Oregon light house series.

 

 

Grace Note received:

“Thanks again for a great Art Walk event FINDINGS, Fairweather opening reception. It was wonderful to see the new gallery layout and chat with the other artists. Someone asked me if I was making a book from the lighthouse painting series. I may do that once it has finished, and then you will not have to hunt down maps in the magazines anymore!–Emily Miller

 

 

 

“Quick update if you want to share with your clients. Now thru the end of 2017, I am donating 10% of my proceeds to local ocean conservancy and art organizations. Thank you for your part in making my art ventures a success!!”

 

And, too,  an encore request for the image of the Sea Urchin bowl with spines by Emily Miller.

 

Making a Difference:  Emily Miller donates 10% of all proceeds to local ocean conservancy and art organizations.

Renee Hafeman, vintage jewelry artist

FINDINGS in my work is a collection of tools and other articles used by an artisan to make jewelry.

 

Q:  What is the difference Between “Art Nouveau” and “Art Deco”, you ask?

A: Art Nouveau: means “new art,” reigned from roughly 1880 until just before World War I. It features naturalistic but stylized forms, often combined with more geometric shapes, particularly arcs, parabolas, and semicircles (think of the Eiffel Tower). The movement brought in natural forms that had often been overlooked like insects, weeds, even mythical faeries, as evidenced by Lalique jewelry or Tiffany lamps.

Art Deco emerged after World War I. In fact, the deprivations of the Great War years gave way to a whole new opulence and extravagance that defined the Jazz Age and the Art Deco aesthetic. The movement, prevalent from the 1920s until roughly the start of World War II, took its name from the 1925 Exposition Internationales des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes, held in France and is characterized by streamlined and geometric shapes. It also utilized modern materials like chrome, stainless steel, and inlaid wood. If Art Deco dabbled with natural materials, they tended to be graphic or textural, like jagged fern leaves. As a result, Deco featured bold shapes like sunbursts and zigzags and broad curves.

Renee Hafeman offered an artist’s lecture during the opening reception of FINDINGS, an exhibition through August at Fairweather’s.

Note the difference?

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