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INTO THE BLUE vignette #1

INTO THE BLUE vignette #1: Abstract art by Diane Copenhaver, encaustic art by Peg Wells, oil painting on linen by Victoria Brooks and masks by Don Nisbett. In addition, hand made vessel, vintage brass chapel candelabra, pair of verdigris candlesticks, THYMES azur home fragrance collection, Oregon myrtle wood bowl, cast planter tabletop shell, one-of-a-kind driftwood loveseat, accented with down filled silk and velvet pillows.

INTO THE BLUE vignette # 2

INTO THE BLUE vignette #2: Watercolors by Lieta Gratteri, oil paintings by Lisa Wiser, oceanscape by Karen E. Lewis, abstract by Patricia Clark-Finley, encaustic by Emily Miller, painted and seed bead mosaic boxes by Gayle H. Seely, calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson, jewelry by Mary Truhler, hand made paper triangle box by Christine Trexel, reversible one-of-a-kind hand made masks by Peggy Evans, and chevron glass platter by Fedor Zubanov.  Accessories include THYMES gold leaf home fragrance, vintage braided ceramic basket, Oregon myrtle wood platter, mouth blown vase, hand painted silk stems, linen towel hostess gift, bronze candle sticks, and ILLUME candles with gold gilt chevron caddy, lemon scented hostess soaps, and hand fringed linen table square.

Displays by KD Fairweather, allied member, A.S.I.D./ American Society of Interior Designers.

Photos by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside, Oregon

INTO THE BLUE

Art sale and show

Through June 24

 

Discover just how fond are artists of a particular color is demonstrated at the exhibition of INTO THE BLUE, with fifteen selected NW artists, 100 new original artworks, art glass, and semi-precious aquamarine gemstones in jewelry.

Acrylic artist Toni Avery

Printmaker Nick Brakel

Abstract painter Diane Copenhaver

En plein air painter Karen Doyle

Watermedia artist Pam Haunschild

Glass artist Bob Heath

Fine art photographer Bob Kroll

Water colorist Lieta Gratteri

Pastel artist Gretha Lindwood

Calligraphy artist JoAnn Pari-Mueller

Mixed media artist Jan Rimerman

Oil painter Lisa Wiser

Semi precious gemstone jeweler Mary Truhler

Introducing poured alcohol painter Gail Pennebaker

And, too…

July 3, 5-7 pm opening reception for the Fairweather exhibition PLACE BASED!!!

 

May Day artist talk 2021

ON YOUR MARKS

by Gayle H. Seely

  Every December Fairweather House and Gallery sends out the next year’s Art Walk themes. There is always one that jumps in front of the rest. This past year I switched from working with beads and stones to drawing on boxes with oil markers.

So “On your marks” was the perfect theme to create around.

 

I am exploring this new medium, having fun “marking” with color, wrapping layers around the sides to create full, vividly colorful pieces. My square boxes include tiny vases, a way to customize each piece and “make your mark” by adding your choice of feather.

Some of the feathers here are from birds I have harvested with my “marksmanship“. 

My larger companion piece is a way to share a story or awaken a memory in the viewer. Like a poem or a song in a visual, colorful language.”Gayle H. Seely

 

“Don’t ask yourself what the world needs.

Ask yourself what makes you come alive and then do that.

Because what the world needs is people who have come alive.”

Howard Thurman, Educator and Theologian

 

“If your dreams don’t scare you, they aren’t big enough.”

Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Africa’s First Woman President

Collage images by Linde Fenton-Mendenhall for Seaside First Saturday Art Walk

Upper left:  Gayle H. Seely smiling joyfully about her new work for 2021 while following COVID social distancing and Oregon mask mandates. 

Upper middle: Gallery display featuring the new work for 2021 at the Fairweather Gallery for Gayle H. Seely and  in the background is new pastel work by Susan Mitchell.

Upper right:  Gleeful artist Gayle H. Seely with a fine feathered family friend.  Pictured in the background is art by Beverly Drew Kindley, NW impressionistic artist and Fairweather resident artist.

Lower left: Gayle H. Seely lecturing about her new boxes during the opening reception of the ON YOUR MARKS exhibition at the Fairweather House and Gallery.

Lower right:  Gayle H. Seely wearing a personally designed feather fascinator.  And, too, pictured with the artist is another art patron wearing a fascinator hat. 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

Art Show and Sale

May 1-25

ON YOUR MARKS, an exhibition, featuring NW artists Gayle H. Seely, Diane Copenhaver, Mary Burges, and Lee Munsell. Debuting the pastel art of Susan Mitchell. 

“On your marks”  a command given to runners at the beginning of a race in order to get them into the correct position to start. In the words of the Fairweather exhibition, it “ means to begin something, indicating the arts season is opening for the summertime”. 

“For by the coastal summer season, is that nothing is enjoyed without community, without creative collaboration, without pure joy, and resolute faith in living safely and sharing generously with friends, family, and visitors.”  FH&G

The show offers a fresh and dynamic experience with new art specially created for the upcoming summer season. 

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands.

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

   I hail from California and my two loves are buying bulbs and shoes with flowers on them.”  Mary Lyn Gough

About the artist:

Like any artist, as a child, I started by painting on the walls. 

I sold my first painting in 7th grade. Won 1st prize in the County Fair 5 times in a row. Creating a balance of right & left-brain hemispheres, I collected a few college degrees. I received income in my college years by selling art.  MLG

Art is a luxury we all can afford. I have the experience of witnessing people find the right artwork. Being both a maker and seller of art- I worked at LaHina Gallery in San Francisco. You can tell when someone falls in love with a piece by their expression, body language. Somehow helping them and sharing in that experience of discovery – that Ahaa moment- was compelling. MLG

“Spring Pageant” watercolor 23 x 30 framed by Mary Lyn Gough

“Watercolors have the transparency of oils and a vibrancy of acrylics with the beguiling nature of water. Painting with watercolors is an attempt to control the uncontrollable.” MLG

“Spring Awakening” 23 x 30 watercolor by Mary Lyn Gough
 
 
Mary Lyn is a Principal Program Delivery Partner at Providence. She strives to spend at least a couple of weekends a month on the North coast and has served on the Board of the Cannon Beach Arts Association.  In addition, the artist arrived to lecture about her new watercolors, a floral series of original framed art priced at $650 each, during the April Seaside First Saturday Art Walk at the Fairweather Gallery.
 
Art Walk 421 Col 1

Mary Lyn Gough, water color artist, with Bon Knoll, another Cannon Beach Arts Association Board member.  Fun fact:  Nancy Knoll, spouse of Bob Knoll, is also another Cannon Beach Arts Association Board member.  Photo collage by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall, Seaside First Saturday Art Walk photographer.

Arching Glory” 23 x 30 watercolor by Mary Lyn Gough

You can teach the basics of structure, the technique of any art process, however, to access the 7th element within cannot be taught. It comes from your soul or intestines, depending on the day.

It is like Picasso, who during his Blue Period, mastered techniques which allowed him to break all the rules and create Cubism.”  MLG

sign

MARY LYN GOUGH watercolors on display and for sale through April 25.

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside

“Truly, artists lose themselves in their work revealing the world that exists in the  imagination, transcending grace  through the muse of nature.” FH&G

 

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands.

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

Close-up strike-off showing quilting details in a one-of-a-kind purse by textile artist Jeanne Walker.

 

Close-up featuring handwork, seed pearls, and vintage button details of an over-the-shoulder purse by Jeanne Walker.

 

“I’m a textile artist that creates one-of-a-kind designs using fiber. The products that I make are largely for personal use or to use as a gift. I fabricate designs using vintage, fabric, thread, and other objects. . My works have previously shown in California, Washington, and Arizona.”  Jeanne Walker

  

 

Each textile purse is signed, numbered, and includes an inside hidden pocket by the artist.

 

“My designs include advanced sewing, quilting, embroidery, and fabric painting.  Since moving to Oregon in 2021 I also incorporate objects such as shells, stones, and pieces of driftwood found from my walks on the beach.”  —Jeanne Walker

 

 

 

And, too, a timely springtime shoutout from paper and bead artist Peggy Evans.

Crane bunnies!

 

New, for the spring season of 2021!

Handpainted fabric with reversible quilt fabric lining…fashionable ready to wear…

Artful masks by Peggy Evans.

Trending now!

Making do.

Hands-on art like sewing, paper folding, and painting has gained traction as relaxing alternatives to screen-heavy activities going forward into the 2nd COVID year.

Indeed, art enhances the overall quality of life, generates a better environment for sheltering in place, allows more accommodations for those joyful moments at home, and inspires more make-it-work creativity..”  FH&G

 

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands.

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

“A premier source for stylish, chic, one-of-a-kind livable furnishings, fine art, and the most extraordinary accessories.”

 

 

Anny Sears delivering a delightful fresh-cut bouquet of daffodils to the gallery, dressed, as always, in a coordinating and fashionable outfit.  In the background, is a spring watercolor by Bill Baily, fresco art by Agnes Field, oil landscapes by Sharon Kathleen Johnson, mixed media by Jan Rimerman, GREEN ROOM art and cards by Diana Nadal,  watercolors by Dorota Haber-Lehigh, and abstract oil by Carmela Newstead.

 

Spring tablescape #1:  Watercolors by Lieta Gratteri, impressionistic art by Bev Drew Kindley, Majolica braided basket filled with hand-gilded golden eggs,  ribbons by the yard, hand-dipped candles by Illumne,  and an Oregon myrtlewood bowl.

 

Spring tablescape #2:  Abstract by Carmela Newstead, encaustics by Elina Zebergs, pottery by Marilyn Cohn, hand-painted wooden eggs,, hand-painted foil bunnies, hand-cut crystal candlestands, Illlumne candles,  silk ribbon by the yard, mouth-blown champagne flutes, collection of beveled mirrored frames, and silk table runner.

 

Spring tablescape #3:  Quilted decorative pouf pillows by Cherry Harris, maple serving bowl by Ted Willing, botanical cards by Dorota Haber-Leigh, birdbath by Emily Miller, oak wine barrel lazy susan by Mike Morris with hand-forged iron table, vintage verdigris candlesticks, and patterned alder wood bowl by Daniel Harris.

Photos by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

Displays by D. Fairweather, allied member, A.S.I.D., American Society of Interior Designers.

 

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

“A premier source for stylish, chic, one-of-a-kind livable furnishings, fine art, and the most extraordinary accessories.”

 

 

Enjoy past Anny Sears photos at Fairweather’s.

 

“Fairweather House and Gallery has become one of the historic Gilbert District’s sought after destinations offering an ever-changing amazing visual experience.” –Seaside Signal/ 2008

“Stroll across the arched Broadway Bridge and you’ll see the historic Gilbert Block Building, est. 1914. The upscale Fairweather House and Gallery, at 612 Broadway Street, is a must-visit for anyone who is serious about Northwest artists.” –Seaside Visitor’s Bureau/ 2021

‘Metolius Creek Convergence” abstract mixed media by Bill Shumway

 

Convergence: a location where air flows or ocean currents meet, characteristically marked by upwelling (of air) or downwelling (of water).

Meticulous: showing great attention to detail; very careful and precise.

 

“Creek Reflections” abstract acrylic by Bill Shumway

 

“Row + River” abstract acrylic by Bill Shumway

 

During his time earning an MA in painting at the University of Massachusetts,  Bill Shumway operated galleries in Amherst, Northampton and Martha’s Vineyard, MA. before moving to Oregon. He founded and operated Pegasus Gallery in Corvallis for more than 35 years before his retirement. 

The gallery, which is now owned by his daughter Paige, served regional and international artists over the years and generated collaborative events with other galleries. 

 

 

 

 

The Green Room

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

Seaside, Oregon

Fittingly, the first Fairweather presentation of the year, for the month-long exhibit, the GREEN ROOM, spotlights art by regional fellow gallerists.

In the entertainment business, the green room is the space in a theatre or similar venue that functions as a waiting room and lounge for artists before, during, and after a performance or show when they are not engaged on stage. The origin of the term is often ascribed to such rooms historically being painted green.

Featuring:

Watercolors by Bill Baily, exhibiting artist from the Portland Art Museum

Fresco art by Agnes Field, founder and past president of the non-profit Astoria Visual Arts

Watermedia by Diana Nadal, fellow designer and frequently showing at Gusitina Gallery

Mixed media work by Jan Rimerman, curator for Lakewood Center Gallery and Rain Spark Gallery Director

Abstracts by Bill Shumway, founder of Pegasus Gallery and creator of the Vistas and Vineyards en plein art program

Other historical green room fun facts:

Richard Southern, in his studies of Medieval theatre in the round, states that in this period the performing area was referred to as the green. This central space, often grass-covered, was used by the actors, while the surrounding space and circular banks were occupied by the spectators. From this source then The Green has been a traditional actors’ term for the stage. The green room could thus be considered the transition room on the way to the green/stage. Technical staff at some theatres (such as the London Coliseum) still refer to the stage as the green.

Another explanation is that in the 18th-century theater makeup was a greenish-clay in color.  It took a long time to dry without cracking, so actors waited in the “green room” until it had fully cured.

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And, too,  GREEN ROOM will feature spring vignettes by D. Fairweather, gallerist/ allied member, A.S.I.D., American Society of Interior Designers and GREEN ROOM  display images by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall, special events photographer.

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

“Forager of Seeds” mixed media on panel by Jan Rimerman

24″ x 24″ x 1.75″

 

 

“Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge”  mixed media on birch panel by Jan Rimerman

36″ x 36″ x 1.75″

 

“King of the Forest” mixed media on birch panel by Jan Rimerman

36″ x 36″ x 1.75″

“My paintings are powered charcoal, gelled onto watercolor paper with as many as twenty-two layers of transparent paint, and, yes, it takes time  for a layer to dry before another layer is applied.  The resulting art has a three-dimensional aspect.  Truly, working with charcoal gives the  painting visual textural mystery. The technique allows the viewer to have their own adventure.  In different light or from different angles, various images come forward or recede, offering a new perspective each time it is viewed.”    Jan Rimerman

 

 

 

The Green Room

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

Seaside, Oregon

Fittingly, the first Fairweather presentation of the year, for the month-long exhibit, the GREEN ROOM, spotlights art by regional fellow gallerists.

In the entertainment business, the green room is the space in a theatre or similar venue that functions as a waiting room and lounge for artists before, during, and after a performance or show when they are not engaged on stage. The origin of the term is often ascribed to such rooms historically being painted green.

Featuring:

Watercolors by Bill Baily, exhibiting artist from the Portland Art Museum

Fresco art by Agnes Field, founder and past president of the non-profit Astoria Visual Arts

Watermedia by Diana Nadal, fellow designer and frequently showing at Gusitina Gallery

Mixed media work by Jan Rimerman, curator for Lakewood Center Gallery and Rain Spark Gallery Director

Abstracts by Bill Shumway, founder of Pegasus Gallery and creator of the Vistas and Vineyards en plein art program

Other historical green room fun facts:

Richard Southern, in his studies of Medieval theatre in the round, states that in this period the performing area was referred to as the green. This central space, often grass-covered, was used by the actors, while the surrounding space and circular banks were occupied by the spectators. From this source then The Green has been a traditional actors’ term for the stage. The green room could thus be considered the transition room on the way to the green/stage. Technical staff at some theatres (such as the London Coliseum) still refer to the stage as the green.

 

Another explanation is that in the 18th-century theater makeup was a greenish-clay in color.  However, it took a long time to dry without cracking, so actors waited in the “green room” until it had fully cured.

———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

 

 

And, too,  GREEN ROOM will feature spring vignettes by D. Fairweather, gallerist/ allied member, A.S.I.D., American Society of Interior Designers and GREEN ROOM  display images by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall, special events photographer.

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

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Jan Rimerman is the Visual Arts Coordinator of Lakewood Center, Art Director of LO Reads, and Director of Rock…Paper…Turtle…Art for in partnership with The Wetlands Conservancy, and Director of Rain Spark Gallery. Jan uses her art for presentations promoting the arts & culture while raising awareness for the World Wildlife Fund, an orphanage in Tibet, & for clean water in Tanzania. Jan is the turtle mother of six rescue turtles which follow her around the studio like puppies.

 

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“Cave Drawing Memories” watercolor/mixed media by Diana Nadal

15 x 11 double matted and framed 21 x 17 with UV museum glass

“Visiting one of the oldest caves in the Dordogne  had a lasting impression of that experience. This represents a door to the darkened entrance with so much mystery, greenish-blue dampness, and darkness, a confined atmosphere that serves to save the cave for future generations.”  DN

 

“Stone Town Street 1” watercolor on gesso by Diana Nadal

15 x 11 double matted with frame 21 x 17

“First in a series of paintings of the streets and doors found in 15th century “Old Town” section of Zanzibar. There is Arab, Persian, Indian and European elements seen in part of the city.”  DN

 

“St. Emilion Green Door” watercolor and gesso by Diana Nadal

14 x 10 framed and matted 23 x19

“This design on the window part of this French door in a villa in the picturesque Saint Emilion located in the vineyard countryside was very interesting and caught my eye. The green was difficult to achieve so many layers and colors were used to bring out its aged glory.” DN

 

  “Green Door St. Jean de Cole” watercolor and gouache by Diana Nadal

14.25 x 10.5 framed and matted 21 x 17

“Painted from memories of a visit to the Maison Blanche in the center of a French countryside. The buildings and cathedral were quite unique from other villages and several door paintings came from this visit.” DN

 

 

 

Diana’s art is in mixed media gesso, gouache, and watercolor to highlight varied transparent qualities.The center of Diana’s artwork comes from an emotional connection to nature. She finds painting in a series gives her a body of work using similar techniques.  Painting representational and abstract art, with an interior decorating background, and formal studies of color Diana Nadal creates themed works of art.

 

 

 

The Green Room

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

Seaside, Oregon

Fittingly, the first Fairweather presentation of the year, a month-long exhibit, the GREEN ROOM, spotlights art by regional fellow gallerists.

In the entertainment business, the green room is the space in a theatre or similar venue that functions as a waiting room and lounge for artists before, during, and after a performance or show when they are not engaged on stage. The origin of the term is often ascribed to such rooms historically being painted green.

Featuring:

Watercolors by Bill Baily, exhibiting artist from the Portland Art Museum

Fresco art by Agnes Field, founder and past president of the non-profit Astoria Visual Arts

Watermedia by Diana Nadal, fellow designer and frequently showing at Gusitina Gallery

Mixed media work by Jan Rimerman, curator for Lakewood Center Gallery and Rain Spark Gallery Director

Abstracts by Bill Shumway, founder of Pegasus Gallery and creator of the Vistas and Vineyards en plein art program

 

Other historical green room fun facts:

Richard Southern, in his studies of Medieval theatre in the round, states that in this period the performing area was referred to as the green. This central space, often grass-covered, was used by the actors, while the surrounding space and circular banks were occupied by the spectators. From this source then The Green has been a traditional actors’ term for the stage. The green room could thus be considered the transition room on the way to the green/stage. Technical staff at some theatres (such as the London Coliseum) still refer to the stage as the green.

 

Another explanation is that in the 18th-century theater makeup was a greenish-clay in color.  However, it took a long time to dry without cracking, so actors waited in the “green room” until it had fully cured.

——————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————

 

 

And, too,  GREEN ROOM will feature spring vignettes by D. Fairweather, gallerist/ allied member, A.S.I.D., American Society of Interior Designers and GREEN ROOM  display images by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall, special events photographer.

 

 


 

 

 

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

Hand painted silk wall hanging by Cicely Gorman, watercolor by Pam Haunschild, pen and ink abstract by Vanessa K. Stokes, hand painted tile earrings by Kris Zorko, and knitted wool cloche by Linda Olson.

In addition, locking wine storage island with glass doors and pull out food safe serving drawer, made in America.

Landscape oil by Colette Fallon, watercolor by Lieta Gratteri, glass platters by Monet Rubin, double faced masks by Sai,  botanical floral cards by Dorota Haber-Lehigh, and natural edge console table by Ray Noregaard.

In addition, selected accessories made by hand:  mouth blown art glass, vintage Murano glass on consignment by Paul Brent, inlaid wood frames, sequined silk fame, leather frame, and sterling silver heart frame. Also featuring silver leaf wood display table with beveled glass, vintage wire garden folly, and faux fur with imprinted suede liner throw.

 

Chanel vintage necklaces by Rene`e Hafeman, calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson, bracelets by Karen Johnson, earrings by Mary Truhler, notebooks  and woven card by Kris Zorko.

Selected accessories made by hand:  chiseled champagne flutes, seeded bubbles mouth blown heart, gift package of caramel hearts, copper wire heart, and vintage Valentine’s cards.

In addition, frosted glass and nickel tiered etagere, wooden trug, and ruby mouth blown glass compote.

 

Fresco painting by Agnes Field, encaustic by Peg Wells, clocks by Stuart Dittbrenner, goose by Sandy Visse, pedestals by Marcia Hudson, hand painted wine glasses by Gretha Lindwood, and seascapes by Carol Thompson.

In addition, selected accessories made by hand:  signed ceramic vase, natural dried sheared juniper trees, hand forged candlesticks,  exclusive Illume ™ candles, treated natural boxwood candle rings.

Also featuring hand poured luster glass candle stands, beveled mirror, quilted silk/down pillows, fine textile scarves, woven reed runner, dyed cattail spheres, bamboo platter, and carved wood fretwork lamp.

 

 

Quilted felt pillow by Cherry Harris

“Hope is the thing with feathers
That perches in the soul
And sings the tune without the words
And never stops at all.”
~ Emily Dickinson

 

And, too, just in! 
New hardcover cookbooks with chef-inspired recipes combined with inspiring plated photographs and Seattle chocolatier Fran’s famous caramels. In addition, Fairweather’s offers a fine selection of hardcover design, travel, and garden books.

“Now, my hunger to cook for those I love has translated into self care. Without friends over the past year, I have cooked for myself; and I realize now that my life has been much the richer for it. When at times it has felt like the world is crumbling around me, a proper meal is something I look forward to, taking the time to lay the table prettily, and eating by soft candlelight. My best distraction lately has been ending the day with a sweet morsel of fine chocolate.

As this global pandemic lifts and, little by little, the world opens up, without doubt what I look forward to most is sitting once again round a table in the company of those I love and eating together. But for now I’m plotting tonight’s dinner, leafing through cookbooks looking for food I long to eat; and then taking the time to cook it just for me. There is comfort— a lot of love—in that, too.” — S. McAlpine

 

Photos by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.
Staging by D. Fairweather/ gallerist, interior designer, and allied member, A.S.I.D.

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

The pandemic year, although stressful, has given us a lot of  time to think—about our NW artists, and specifically, the role that the gallery can have on our patrons. Indeed, many artists have produced more new work than ever before.  We are grateful for their inspirations and have been fortunate to have had the time to create new vibrant displays to complement the artwork and to highlight the month of February, always and forever, known as the season of Love.

 

 

 

Strike off close up detail

Hand quilted, dyed, and painted silk wall hanging by NW textile artist Cicely Gilman

20″w x 90″l with hand painted wood pole $1000

Cicely Gilman is a silk artist that has been working in the medium for more than 20 years. She received her B.A. in Fashion and Textiles from St. Martins College of Art in London, England in 1979. She was born the US and has lived in Vienna, Austria, London, England, NYC, and LA before moving to Seaside, Oregon in 2020. She was represented by Sue Lapin Museums, where she created silk scarves for many museum shops. She has developed an extensive collection of textile designs.

Textile arts have been developing new creative forms and language involving many during the pandemic. Influenced by postmodernist ideas, Cicely Gilman’s  fiber work has become more conceptual. Indeed, with techniques, materials and concepts, the NW artist is completely pushing the limits of the medium. The re-born practices such as embroidery art, quilting,  sewing, hand painting,empl and many others, have placed a new focus on the work that  feature textiles and threads as a painting and sculpting material.”   FH&G

 

And, too, just in for 2021!

Cherry Jones Harris has created a quilted wall treasure that, truly, will be loved for a lifetime as textile art.

“Bird Dance ” 30 block  quilt by textile artist Cherry Harris $950

44″x39″

“Quality fabrics should feel wonderful to work like a dream.” CH

 

Reverse of Bird Song quilt by Cherry Harris with a hidden wood hanging dowel

 

Selecting quality fabrics that have a higher thread count, Cherry Harris takes pride in working with high quality goods. In addition, she searches  constantly to find looks and designs in the beautiful color values.  –FH&G

 

Close up detail of the multi-medium layering  hand work of textile artist Cherry Harris

 

 

Folk art designer Sue Spargo offers patterns to quilting enthusiasts through signature designs.

 

Cherry Harris applied a trademark private label for her Sue Spargo design, generously giving the creator credit with embroidery.

 

 

 

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

 

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