Jewelry Artists


“Create” folded book art by Mary Bottita

“Read” folded book art by Mary Bottita

 

Sketching and pondering from Karen Doyle

 

Turtle by Paul Brent. C/. 2020

 

Seahorse by Paul Brent. C./ 2020 By

 

Ghost net basket turning inward by Emily Miller C./ 2020

Ghost net basket series. Spring 2020 by Emily Miller

“I’m also working on a wall piece with about 1,000 tiny chips of plastic. The title of the piece is Anthropocene and it’s inspired by the idea that our human impact on the earth has become so significant that it will be written in the fossil record.”  Emily Miller

Reposting  Fairweather Gallery March 15, 2020:

In order to protect the health and safety our guests, our community, and our staff the Gallery is closing its doors to visitors through April.

 

“Artists and those that support the arts have a unique sensitivity in the ability to pivot and meet needs that enlighten and inform, in my opinion.”  D. Fairweather, galleriest

Artist Mike Mason in his studio.

In order to protect the health and safety our guests, our community, and our staff (who are over the age of 65 and are deemed to be a high health risk), the Gallery is closing its doors to visitors through April.

“This decision comes after careful review of guidance from public health authorities and projections for the spread of COVID-19, and reflects our desire to ensure it is not contributing to transmission of the disease which could overwhelm our health care system. This is a difficult decision, but we are confident is the right choice.”

Please re-visit our previously published blog post articles throughout this time.

Questions or concerns, please email fairweatherkd@gmail.com.

Thank you for your understanding.

 

March 14, 2019 Question to the Fairweather artists.

Q: “Here is an idea. Please send images of the art being created in your studio during this crisis. We will publish  a blog post and keep it updated as you share with us what you are creating. Are you interested? Let me know your thoughts.”

 

 

“Wonderful idea! Here is a couple of teaser photos of what I have been working,”  woodworker Mike Brown

 

“I am painting in my art studio.” Toni Avery

 

“Social distancing doesn’t require you to become a shut-in. I go outside to paint,”  en plein arist Emily Miller.

 

“In addition, I’m finishing up a few smaller baskets for a large collaborative display of reclaimed fishing rope ( ghost net collected by Cape Lookeout rangers).basket sculptures called Undersea Garden.”  Emily Miller

 

“I like this idea! You can use this one and will try to send a few more. Thanks for the up date about the gallery,” artist/ Professor Emeritus of Art Pacific University Jan Shield.

 

 

“It is my plan to create tomorrow, I would love to send some pictures while I am creating! I have been wondering how things will go with all of this virus worry.  If there is anything I can do to be of help, please don’t hesitate to ask.”  Rene’e Hafeman, jewelry designer.

 

“Here is an image of a book I just published in early 2020 on a series Weekend Projects  I tried to provide day-by-day instructions different projects which use one common element: stringers. Thanks for the proposal. I think it’s very useful to have a venue that helps especially during the crisis. I’m working now on a couple of new big works and will share photos as soon as I have them completed,”  fused glass artist Fyodor Zubanov.

 

“I have scheduled kids art on-line classes (ages 8-18) all week in three different time zones: Central Europe / US East Coast / and US West Coast time. We are learning how to draw puffins!”   Leah Kohlenberg www.leahkohlenberg.com/book-online

 

 

“Hope everyone is staying healthy! I’m staying home painting.” Pam Haunschild

“This strange virus has affected everyone.  We are 3 weeks behind the Italians infections so things are going to get way more interesting.  I appreciate the information and understand if other schedules need to be altered.  Thank you for keeping me updated. Stay safe!” Jan Rimerman, Artist/Art Administrator.

 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has  issued guidelines for “community mitigation strategies” to limit the spread of COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, which include recommendations for “social distancing”—a term that epidemiologists are using to refer to a conscious effort to reduce close contact between people and hopefully stymie community transmission of the virus.

 

 

  • Be in nature. Breathe fresh air. Notice things about the world around you that you didn’t see before.
  • Start birdwatching. Coronavirus hasn’t bothered the birds. Find out what species nest near you, dust off your binoculars if you’ve got ’em and download a birdwatching map.
  • Make art. Whether it’s a page out of a coloring book or paint-by-numbers masterpiece, a knitted scarf or a piece of pottery, creating will ease your mind and keep your fingers nimble.

 

 

“Thank you with the list of things to do.  It’s one of the most uplifting ones I’ve received,” artist Sandy Visse

 

Please visit us on line at www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.co

Eve Marx Just in from CA: Gov. Gavin Newsom on Sunday called for home isolation of all seniors and those who are health compromised in the state of California and the immediate shutdown of bars, nightclubs, brew pubs and wineries to help stop the spread of coronavirus, now considered a global pandemic.

In addition, Newsom said all restaurants should reduce capacity by half and provide “deep social distancing.”

 

Modernist, mid-century precious pendant with sterling silver necklace by jewelry designer Reneé Hafeman.

 

 

 

Authentic designer pendant, hallmarked “CC Chanel”  with vintage French crystal, ornate toggle closure and decorative oval and circular chain.

One-of-a-kind necklace by jewelry designer Reneé Hafeman.

 

  “Growing up, my grandmother would pull out her jewelry box, take each piece out one-by-one and explain in detail what it was, where it came from and why it was so special to her.  This developed my love of  jewelry.  I started to think of how many treasured pieces are sitting in drawers and jewelry boxes, many handed down, some outdated, some broken and others, just put away because they didn’t match anything you wore.  I decided enough of that,”   —Reneé Hafeman.

 

 

Q: Who was Coco Chanel, you ask?

A: Fashion designer Coco Chanel, born in 1883, in France, is famous for her timeless designs, trademark suits and little black dresses. Chanel was raised in an orphanage and taught to sew. She had a brief career as a singer before opening her first clothes shop in 1910.

Coco Chanel is actually named Gabrielle Chanel, though the rest of the world knows her by her childhood nickname Coco. However when she was born, her birth certificate actually had a massive spelling mistake and it read Gabrielle Bonheur Chasnel.

Spring Awakening by Jackie Leloff.

Fun Fact:  Jackie, a new artist in the gallery, was referred by fellow Fairweather artist,  Jo Pomeroy-Crockett.

 

Handmade ceramic beads, mouth blown glass and semi-precious gemstone necklaces and earrings by jewelry artist Mary Truhler.

 

 

Spring Day  Approaching encaustic art by Peg Wells.

 

Q: What do the three Fairweather artists have in common, you ask?

A: The artists Jackie Leloff,  Mary Truhler and Mary Truhler have a nursing background.  Some of the fundamental values that drive art — compassion, humanity, empathy, creativity and expression — are the very same values that influence nursing. The creation of art is a wonderful vehicle for nurses, whether the goal is to unwind, replenish the soul or share the nursing experience with the world. Proof that nursing and creative mindsets can live harmoniously.

 

Case studies of the scientific  mind engaging in art and vice versa are often presented as being unusual. However, psychologists recently conducted a comprehensive review of the extent to which Nobel Prize winners in the sciences, members of the Royal Society and US National Academy of Sciences, and members of the US public reported engaging in arts and crafts-based pursuits. They found that members of the Royal Society and National Academy of Sciences were almost twice as likely to report engaging in arts and crafts pursuits as the general public. Eminent Nobel laureate scientists were almost three times more likely to report such activities.  http://www.discovermagazine.com › mind › does-evidence-support-the-artis..

 

As Einstein, himself noted: “The greatest scientists are artists as well”.

 

And, too, artist Jackie Leloff was introduced during a reception at the Bloom Gallery located at 289 North Nehalem in Clatskanie recently.

 

 

 

http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

A fresh palette. A revitalized spirit. A soft, rosy hue blooming with potential.  Color of the Year 2020.

“First Light” 2102-70 by Benjamin Moore is the backdrop for a new decade.

 

 

 

One-of-a-kind designer pillows. Antique rosy/ pink velvet brocade.

Down filled pillows with hand stitched flowers in soft pinks and greys.

Questions and Answers:

Q: How to you create a signature style for each season, you ask?

A: I thoughtfully edit the collections and forecast an upcoming season after reading interior designer trade magazines and re-visit favorite design books. I take a lot of time in the winter to consider and select a trending idea and a designer look. My approach has one important quality: to provide an artful vision.

The products selected are to be made by hand and made in America.  Indeed, the gallery has a sign in the front window that says this.  My signature style, oftentimes tweaked and refined, is created to offer the unique and beautiful  Fairweather House & Gallery “look”.

In truth, a few are not just, let’s say…favorites, but rather have become signature pieces…as in the sublimely beautiful hand made glass design pieces that are the “Fairweather” calling cards. My signature style is a set mind, applying a vision of what ifs, must-sees and to-dos.

 

Visitors have often said: “This place is amazing.”

And, then, too, I often share. I’m a minimalist in my mind, constantly editing the displays, walls and tables to insure that the gallery isn’t too-perfect…but, rather, a showcase of sophisticated one-of-a-kind art pieces that highlight each individual season.  D. Fairweather, gallerist and Allied Member A.S.I.D.

FAV winter read re-visited  for 2020:

The Finer Things: Timeless Furniture, Textiles, and Details by Christiane Lemieux

 

Read more at http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

P.S.S.T. Four weeks to Valentine’s Day.

Exclusive to Seaside.  Fran’s fine chocolates.

 

P.S.S.T. Six weeks to spring.

“Neighborhood Party” oil  by Melissa Jander.

 

Copyright © 2020 D. Fairweather

Handmade paper box by Christine Trexel, chenille down filled decorative pillow, handmade sequined ornament, silk ribbon by the yard, hand dipped magenta dripless candles, hand decorated ornaments, mercury glass hurricane and for the December HUE exhibition art titled “Divine” by emerging artist Vanessa K. Stokes.

 

Magenta velvet and down filled decorative pillows, silk and linen shawls and oven proof pottery by Suzy Holland.

Selected silk, linen and wool shawls reduced 30% through Dec. 23.

Oregon Sunstone and Oregon myrtlewood earrings by Fred Lukens, wood bowl and tray by Tom Willing and  purple heart stave vase by Mike Brown.

 

“Snowberry” watercolor with pen and ink by Dorota Haber-Lehigh, birdhouse by Marcia Hudson, fused glass by Christine Downs, fused glass tree and star ornament by Monet Rubin.

 

Close up detail of a unique, whimsical bird house, lovingly built and painted by hand by potter Marcia Hudson.

“Charming bird feeder for your feathered friends. Fit to adorn your garden throughout the year.  Special pricing: originally $295/ reduced to $195  through Dec. 23.”

 

At the beach, the winter garden is usually a peaceful sanctuary in hustle and bustle of the holiday season. However, this year the front yard has hosted a three week, up to 7 trucks a day repair crew with all sorts of ladders, multiple levels of scaffolding, and surely, miles of electrical cords. Discovering, at first, a simple indoor water feature/ or rather, a small leak…the issue eventually developed into an extensive time and materials on-going repair project. I had offered to park the car outside in order to allow the garage space for material and equipment storage, every plug hosted multiple portable tool charging devices. Seeing daylight on the western front of the house today (windows and doors were previously boarded up) and seeing cedar shingles on the exterior curved walls… the end is in sight. Thankful for the insurance company who has covered: Mt. St. Helens volcano eruption repair (we lived 14 miles away); boating death; 1996 Portland flooding issue; gallery destruction in a 2007 windstorm and this current matter. Thankful for the contractor who was referred, who pulled together a crew from his home building company (has built ten homes in the Reserve). “Basically, we have used all the tools and equipment to build a complete house other than the plumbing on this repair.”

I would highly recommend the contractor and his crew, as they have proven themselves knowledgeable and efficient in the task associated with this water search and destroy repair project. PM for contractor and insurance references.

“Pinecone” pen and ink art by Dorota Haber-Lehigh. Handmade shell tree and hand sewn silk and seed pearl pillow. New hammered copper, gold and silver earrings by Cher Flick for Joanie and ME.

From $24- $48.

Complementary gift wrapping.

 

“This collection of jewelry is inspired by Joanie’s fun yet classy style. The earrings and bracelets are simple in design, light weight and are made of mixed metal, including sterling silver, pewter, brass, gold filled, copper, gemstones and pearls. I live and handcraft all of the jewelry in Oregon. I received my Graduate Gemology degree from the Gemological Institute of America  and have many years of experience working with diamonds, gemstones and other boutique jewelry.  In memory of Joanie, my mother, I will be donating 10% of sales to OHSU Knight Cancer Institute.”  

Staging by Kathy Bowman.

Fun Facts:

Jewelry designer Cher FLick Kathy’s younger sister.

Kathy is the oldest of three sisters.

Kathy is Fairweather’s Director of Hospitality.

 

http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 


“Moonlight and Waves” original oil by Ron Nicolaides.

“Light and Waves” original oil by Victoria Brooks.

 

“Complete Me” original pen and ink by Vanessa K. Stokes.

 

Amber and turquoise fused glass platter by Christine Downs.

 

Turquoise and Amber Sue Sparkgo design  ™ quilted pillow by Cherry Jones Harris.

 

Fused glass Mezuzah by Rosalyn Andronescu with room for a biblical passage, a love note or a personal thought.

Earrings in Amber and Gold by Mary Hurst.

Sterling and turquoise bracelet by Mary Bottita.

 

“Whale Within” signed photograph by Neal Maine.  Three polar bears  with whale bones. Alaska trip.

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

Through December 23

 HUE, an exhibition, featuring art by Leah Kohlenberg, JoAnn Pari-Mueller  and Vanessa K. Stokes.

“Hues or colors are so pure – no white or blacks added – just rich, delightful, lose yourself in the color.”

In addition, HUE features a lavish array of handmade jewelry of mixed-metal, leather, gold-filled and semi-precious stones from many of the Northwest’s most reputable jewelry artists. It is a once a year exclusive private jewelry shopping experience to select the latest edgy fashion forward works.

In addition, new, never-before-seen photographs  and selected “encore” polar bear photographs from Neal Maine’s Arctic Light Images.

Raffle opportunity – only 14 chances to win a signed and framed Arctic Light  by Neal Maine (valued at $295).

The Last Polar Bear, a book published by Braided River. In addition to  Steven Kazlowski’s photos, the book features essays by Alaska-based writers Charles Wohlforth, Richard Nelson and Nick Jans, as well as Newsweek correspondent Dan Glick, Frances Beinecke, president of the National Resources Defense Council, and Theodore Roosevelt IV, conservationist and great-grandson of the president.

The photographs that make up the book show the polar bears and other Arctic species in their threatened natural habitat — swimming, playing, caring for their young and dozing on late-summer ice floes. One image is beautiful but the caption reminds the reader of the reality: “If we do nothing as a society, and the ice continues to melt, zoos could be the only place on Earth where polar bears can be found.”

Read more about Arctic Light:

https://www.discoverourcoast.com › coast-weekend › arts › article_1d18109…

Feb 16, 2015 – ‘Arctic Light’ draws attention to global warming Presentation, photographic … The presentation is co-sponsored by Denise Fairweather of …

“Patrons who purchase The Last Polar Bear book,  retail value of $39.99, will have the entire proceeds in support of Alaska Wilderness League and will have a raffle opportunity (1-14 chance)  to win a  signed and framed  Arctic Light Neal Maine image!   

Read more about doing good works at: http://www.alaskawild.org.  Book proceeds in support of Alaska Wilderness League.

Alaska Wilderness League protects Alaska’s public lands by fighting for wilderness, wildlife, indigenous rights and a cleaner energy future.

Each book purchase will receive a numbered ticket.  At a set time, Neal Maine will draw the winning ticket at random.

 

Read more at:

Arctic Light, the event, in support of the Alaska Wilderness …

 

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com › 2015/02/22 › arctic-li…

 

Feb 22, 2015 – Three West coast naturalists who traveled to the high Arctic last year, a trip sponsored by the … Arctic Light, the event, in support of the Alaska Wilderness League

 

Through December 23

On Hue Art Exhibit and Sale

Fairweather House and Gallery

http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

Next Page »