Jewelry Artists



 Abstract watercolors by Donna Sanson, Oregon  myrtlewood cribbage board, segmented vase and nautilus sculptures by Mike Brown.

Crafted by NW hands.

Folded book art by Mary Boitta, en caustic art (aptly titled “Remembering Autumn”) by Peg Wells, origami by Peggy Evans, leather work by Luans Leathers, en caustic crows by Kathryn Delany and hand painted tiles by Sandy Applegate.

Abstracts by Diane Copenhaver and glass art by Bob Heath.

 


Handmade curly willow, mouth blown glass,  hand-made book and box by Christine Trexel.

Coral glass by Rinee Merritt, glass platters by Sandy and Bob Lecari and plein air oil by Lisa Wiser.

 

En caustic  art, ocean debris baskets, sea urchin bowls, moon platter by Emily Miller, mixed media stone art by Peggy Stein, abstract drip by Kimberly Reed and oil paintings by Sharon Kathleen Johnson.

 


Abstract miniatures by Tanya Gardner.

 

Calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson, watercolor by Bill Baily and pottery by Suzy Holland.

 

Abstract oil by Carmela Newstead.

 

 

Abstracts by Zifen Qian, maple bowls by Daniel Harris, watercolor by Paul Brent, landscape by Bill Baily and seascape  by Victoria Brooks.

 

 

For Shape and Color.

Art masks by Jorjett Strumme.

Paintings with pressed flowers on metal by Mike Mason. Anny Sears, model, with pressed foliages by Mike Mason.

 

 

Pastel landscape by Carmela Newstead, vintage jewelry necklace by Reneé Hafeman and en caustic blue abstract by Kimberly Kent.

Sunset oil paintings  by Nicholas Oberling, photograph by Neal Maine, pastels by Lynda Campbell and seascapes by Ron Nicolaides.

 

Mixed media diptych by Gary Pearlman, raw edged walnut bowl by Mike Brown and paper box sculpture by Christine Trexel.

Miniature oils by Barbara Rosbe Felisky.

 

Photos by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

“Color and Shape” exhibition through September 30th.

The show covers every aspect of art, textures, materials and finishes, highlighting the quintessentially colorful fall season.

Grace note to the artists…

 

“Shape and Color, Fairweather’s September exhibition, would not be such a success without the beautiful work created by NW hands.  The selected artists provided new work to highlight the annual fall show.  We thank them all for the extraordinary opportunity to tell a seasonal story with their art.  Truly, the artists offered new exceptional work, and by doing so, they encourage those of us in the arts, to do more.”  Fairweather Gallery

Abstract series of three by Jan Rimmerman, seascape oil by Karen E. Lewis and pottery by Suzy Holland.  Shape and Color gallery hostesses Katie, Kemy Kay, Joan, Bonnie and Denise.

 

And, too, a grace note received from a gallery hostess to share.

“Thank you for the beautiful crystal I picked out for a gift.  Most, of all, thanks for bringing the utmost beauty to many, many people.  Most of all, thanks for inviting me to work in your stunning establishment.  It delights my eyes every time I come in.  Your artists are beyond comparison.” Kemy Kay

A grace note received from an artist.

 

“Don’t ask yourself what the world needs.  Ask yourself  what makes you come alive and then do that.  Because what the world needs is people who have come alive.” –Howard Thurman, educator and theologian.
“Thank you for your encouragement and support in showing and growing my art.  You have created such a wonderful group of artists, and display our work in beautiful ways.  I am extremely grateful for your friendship and aliveness in out shared vision.”  Gayle H. Seely

For more about the gallery, please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com.

“I have always loved different shapes and colors of objects since I was a child. I remember drawing them in mid-air with my fingers, I remember pointing them out to my mom and dad, and they always drew my attention. When I am searching for a piece to design into a necklace, my eyes draw to geometric and abstract modern shapes. You will find many of my designs are Modernist and Mid-Century. These eras began in the 1940’s. During that time, some of the most famous and innovative jewelry designs and designers were created. It was a time of streamline design, curves, futuristic impression, creative artistry and modernism. The jewelry supplies at that time began the start of innovative materials never yet used, such as silver, brass, copper and precious stones that fit the raw simplistic design. As you can see from many of my creations, you will find beautiful shapes that draw the human eye because they are not commonly seen. You will notice biomorphic shapes and colors in my newest jewelry.” 

 

 

“I truly love the hunt, the find and the creative design of this profession.” 

 

“I have found pendants in different countries; they drew my attention because of their unusually beautiful form and color.”

 

End note

 

“I do believe that each necklace would create a wonderful family heirloom for generations to treasure, thank you.”  Rene’e Hafeman

 

Rene’e Hafeman

One-of-a-kind jewelry designed exclusively for Shape and Color Rene’e Hafeman. Must see! Must have!

 

Painted glass pendant

Tanya Gardner jewelry designer

 

Tanya Gardner

Painted glass jewelry.   Zinc Alloy, Lead & Nickel Free.  One-of-a-kind.

 Reneé Hafeman jewelry designer

Modernist design. Sterling silver dragonfly, vintage French crystal, white gold plated chain. 28″. One-of-a-kind.

 

One-of-a-kind Mid-Century Modern pendant necklaces by Reneé Hafeman

 

 

 

 

 

“Sea Star” by Paul Brent. Original oil on linen.

Table top display features one-of-a-kind accessories: mouth blown glass, driftwood garland, vintage glass and handmade glass spheres.

 

Table displays feature the art  and artists that, truly, offer endless inspirations for idyllic times at the beach.

More than 200 artists from across the Pacific Northwest are featured in the Faiweather House and Gallery, a business that has been an anchor for Seaside’s growing arts scene for more than 12 years. A variety of mediums include original paintings, sculptures, ceramics and jewelry.

New pieces and artists are added each month, making the Fairweather House and Gallery a must-visit destination in Seaside, Oregon for art connoisseurs.

 

Art by Jan Shield,  glass by Sandy and Bob Lercari,  coral platter by Rinee Merritt, handmade box by Christine Trexel and origami garland by Peggy Evans.
Fairweather House and Gallery is a place to see finished creations of bowls, platters and sculpture, as well as contemporary paintings.

Jewelry by Cher Flick, Mary Hurst and Alan Stockam.  Myrtle wood by Fred and Janice Lukens.  Ocean scape painting by Ron Nicolaides. Gull portrait by Leah Brown.  Nantucket basket by Carol Bolster.  Sea anemone study by Jon Anni. Sail boat water colors by Paul Brent.

 

With appreciation to Linda Fenton-Mendenhall,  photographer.

 

To learn more about the gallery, please go to www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Full Moon Bowl by Emily Miller

 

 

“I have a brand new full moon bowl (first one out of the kiln!) Creating a different perspective on my passion for exploring unknown environments in art. Although most of my artwork has focused on the ocean, I find the beauty, mystery, and science of outer space as compelling as the deep-sea.”  —Emily Miller, artist

 

Q: When is the full moon in June, you ask?

A: The full moon will be on June 27 and June 28. To the casual observer, however, the moon will appear full the day before and after its peak brightness. https://www.moongiant.com/moonphases/June/2018

 

 

Concept drawings by Emily Miller.

“I love the fanciful scientific names for the lunar “seas” (which are actually flat regions of dark basalt where lava oozed to the surface, pulled by Earth’s gravity up towards the near side of the moon). The Sea of Nectar and the Sea of Clouds are two of my favorites. I also love that the Seas of Tranquility and Crises are right next to each other.”  Emily Miller

 

 

“I am captivated by the beautiful contrast between light and darkness in our natural world, and the necessity of both for life to thrive. .”  Emily Miller

 

 

Deep blue spiny sea urchin bowl

 

 

White moonlight spiny sea urchin bowl

 Hand made and artist signed porcelain bowls by Emily Miller

 

 

Sea anemone porcelain vases by Emily Miller.

Heavily textured raw porcelain exteriors are  reminiscent of sunlight patterns in a shallow lagoon.

Hand made and signed by the artist.

Watertight.

 

Read more about Emily Miller at https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/tag/fairweather-house…gallery/…/1…

 

Save the date and time

Opening artist reception for the exhibition  “Ocean Folk”

July 7, 5-7:pm

Emily Miller launches her 100 Turtles project at the Fairweather Gallery

 

“Here is the post I just wrote about my 100 Turtles project.” Emily Miller

  http://ejmillerfineart.com/news/2018/06/14/100-turtles-project/

 

 

End note: Two Fairweather Gallery artists featuring a North Oregon coast night scene with a full moon over the Pacific Ocean, which is the largest ocean in the world.   At full moon, the Moon and Sun are in a straight line on opposite sides of the Earth. Their gravitational forces combine to create larger waves.

“Night Sea” by Ron Nicolaides.  Original oil on Linen.

 

For more info about the artist, please go to  https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/Artist/Ron/Nicolaides.html

 

  “North Coast Sea” by Nicholas Oberling.  Original oil on linen.

For more info about the artist, please go to  https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/…/welcoming-nicholas-oberling-art.

 

Precious moonstone, a translucent, opalescent, pearly blue gemstone cuff bracelet by Alan Stockam. Signed and numbered by the silversmith.

 

 

 

For more about the gallery, please go to www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

Bumble bee jasper pendant #568 by Alan Stockam.

 

Q:  What is bumble bee jasper and where is it found, you ask?

A: Highly polished bumble bee jasper  portrays intricate patterns and marvelous yellow/orange hues. The colors within this stone have the same characteristics of a bumble bee, which is how it got its name. These stones contain natural cracks and fractures. It is a notoriously difficult mineral to score because the volcanic mine where bumble bee jasper is located has activated from its previously dormant state. It comes to us exclusively from West Java, Indonesia near Mount Papandayan.

 

Alan Stockam creates handmade silver jewelry with gemstones from the Northwest and beyond.

 

A cool blue gold Labradorite ring  #785 by Alan Stockam

Alan Stockam set this sideways to give it a softer, more classic look. This piece of Labradorite has a lot to see in the stone, a couple of flashes and it almost looks faceted by the way the lines are in the stone but it is not. It is a flat high shine stone.

 

Each silver piece is signed, marked by the artist, Alan Stockam, and numbered.

 

 

Lapis ring #783 by Alan Stockam

Jewelry staging by Heather Rieder.

Available exclusively at Fairweather House and Gallery.

 

Fun facts about the semi-precious gemstones selected by Alan Stockam and Heather Rieder.

 

  • Amethyst is best known for its rich, violet-purple hue. Historically it has been highly valued as a precious stone for the uniqueness of its color, as there are few purple gemstones. The Greek name for the stone, “amethustos” became known as amethyst.
  • Agates are a form of quartz that are banded or lined in a variety of patterns of colored layers. Agate is derived from the Greek word “achates”, which is a river in Sicily where agate was mined in abundance as early as 3000 BC.
  • Jasper is an opaque variety of chalcedony. Jasper is derived from the Greek word “iaspis”. One of the characteristics of jasper is that it is able to take a high polish.
  • Lapis is a beautiful, rich ultramarine-blue stone consisting largely of lazurite and speckled with golden pyrite. It was one of the most prized stones of ancient times. Egyptian blue paint was made from finely ground lapis.
  • Turquoise was one of the first gemstones to be mined by the native people of Egypt. It is easily shaped and polished.

 

Please call 503-738-8899 for more details.

 

www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

“High Seas” 8 x 10 Original oil on linen by Ron Nicolaides.

 

The  Pacific coast is the predominant subject of Nicolaides’ paintings. With years of study and experience, Ron Nicolaides  has become a powerful accomplished artist. He has captured majestic landscapes and has mastered the mesmerizing translucent waves in his depiction of the sea without freezing its energetic rhythms. His strength is his capacity to push the limits of oils and multiply glazes to create the masterful works that bring the viewer right into the scene.

 

http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com   …artists/  …Ron Nicolaides.

 

About the illuminating art wood display:

Hand made and hand-finished lighted display stands for art glass and other translucent objects.  Each display is solid natural wood, textures and colors are unique.  Finishes include cherry, maple and walnut. High-intensity LED lights (without the need of batteries)  emphasize the intricate details of art and objects – much like a fine p[picture frame.  LED bulbs last up to ten years.  “Investing in art is spiritually and emotionally rewarding,” Andrew Nelson.

 

About the painted glass jewelry:

Pouring paint into glass is the artist’s favorite medium because of the bright color mixing.  The Northwest artist creates colorful  drippings, reminiscence of ocean waves and skies, to make one-of-a-kind  personal jewelry.   “I hope you enjoy my art, as much as I enjoyed creating it,” Tanya Gardner

 

 

It’s beginning to look like high season at the beach. Yes, indeed,  it is the nearly that time of year when Seaside has most tourists or visitors.

Kemy Kay, gallery hostess.

“Welcome to the Seaside.”

 

The lists are “Best Summer Vacations” and “Best Summer Vacations in the U.S.”

U.S. News Travel considered 700 cities, parks, beaches and small towns around the world and in this country, measuring “affordability, weather and variety of things to do plus traveler and expert sentiment.”

According to the rankings, Paris, France is the world’s No. 1 summer vacation list, followed by Florence, Italy; Boston, Massachusetts; and Dublin, Ireland. Seaside, Oregon is fifth. I mean, we’re talking about Paris, the City of Lights, and Seaside, the city of surreys and fried clams.

Read to full article:

Southern Exposure: Seaside under the radar no more
Can you say ‘Seaside’ and ‘Boston’ in the same sentence?
Date: 2018-05-14/ RJ Marx
story

Editor Gwendolyn Shearman of U.S. News Travel said her team initiates the process by selecting destinations from throughout the world. They score each destination in 11 different categories.

For rankings such as the Best Summer Vacations and the Best Summer Vacations in the USA, editors also factor in the seasonality of a destination and when the best time to visit is for the everyday traveler. Rankings are based on user ratings and editors’ scores, from 0 to 5 — “phenomenal.”

Editors apply these ratings to categories including sights, culture, people, food, shopping, family, nightlife, adventure, romance and accessibility. Destinations’ overall scores are a weighted average of the individual editors’ averages, based on which factors users said were most important to them.

This is the first year Seaside has been included in the scoring, Shearman said, receiving high marks in the sights, family, food and accessibility categories.

“Seaside stood out this year because of its appeal to both beach-going families and outdoor enthusiasts. Plus, its location in the Pacific Northwest is a great alternative to more well-known (and more crowded) beach destinations further south.”

 

In 2018, editors have found readers are particularly interested in visiting more under-the-radar vacation spots and smaller towns in the United States, she said. “More of those types of vacations appearing on many of our ranking lists.”

In Seaside, all you have to do is take a leisurely stroll along the Prom on a clear  morning  to place the city high on your own list. We’re proud to have our home named among the finest in the world.

 

For more info, go to  www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

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