Billie Johnstone


best tear drop

First Look November window display  at Fairweather’s. 

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First Look bracelet tree.

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First Look jewelry tray featuring Cindy Bricca, designer, who incorporates Kumihimo seed braiding in must-have creations.

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First Look jewelry tray featuring Mary Boitta, who experiments in druzy semi-precious stones in designs that retain femininity and fineness.

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First Look jewelry tray featuring Karen Johnson, a natural-born artist, boldly designs meticulously handcrafted statement jewelry that could – and should – be featured in magazines.

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First Look jewelry tray featuring Robyn Hall, who has no art degree or formal training, yet creates stunning mouth-blown glass lamp work bracelets and earrings.

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First Look jewelry tray featuring Cher Flick, a graduate from the Gemological Institute of America, who creates jewelry “doing good works ™”, giving back to a charitable foundation in honor of her mother, Joanie.

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First Look jewelry tray featuring Christine Johnson, designer, who creates necklaces from Oregon beach stones.

 

First Look featuring the silver work

 by Alan Stockam, each design is signed and numbered.

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Strike off enlargement of a jewelry tray featuring Billie Johnstone, a former clinical practitioner, who sparked her retirement into a means to support to the youth programs in Soweta, South Africa. Proceeds are “doing good works ™” that changes lives.

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Highlighting jewelry designer Renée Hafeman, who embraces a love of vintage Chanel ™  jewelry and gives them new life. Redesigning the pieces, she prays “whoever wears, please be blessed in some way.”

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Silver tray featuring jewelry designer Elaine Sawyer, who uses natural stone Cabochons, cut and polished by in lapidary by her husband, Mike, to create one-of-a-kind cuff bracelets.

With appreciation and gratitude to StephBuffington photos.

 

 

Alan

Fairweather House and Gallery

Through November, an exhibition titled FIRST LOOK, a highly anticipated jewelry trunk show, will feature a dozen of local and regional designers– including one very special artist who has been represented by the gallery more than 11 years!

Cindy Bricca, designer incorporates Kumihimo seed braiding in must-have creations.

Elaine Sawyer uses natural stone Cabochons, cut and polished by in lapidary by her husband, Mike, to create one-of-a-kind cuff bracelets.

Barbara Walker works in precious metal turning  bling into a wearable works of art.

Mary Hurst, born in raised in County Tipperary, Ireland, studied fashion design at the Grafton Academy in Dublin, integrates past and present Celtic designs.

Billie Johnstone, a former clinical practitioner, sparked retirement into a means to support to the youth programs in Soweta, South Africa. The proceeds from her handcrafted jewelry are “doing good works ™”  that changes lives.

Alan Stockam and Heather Reider create one-of-a-kind silver jewelry, signed and numbered, with stones from the Pacific Northwest and beyond.

Cher Flick,  a graduate  from the Gemological Institute of America, creates jewelry “doing good works ™ “,  giving back to a charitable foundation in honor of her mother, Joanie.

Karen Johnson, a natural-born artist, boldly designs meticulously handcrafted statement jewelry that could – and should – be featured in magazines.

Mary Boitta experiments in druzy semi-precious stones  in designs that retain femininity and fineness.

Robyn Hall, with no art degree or formal training, creates stunning mouth-blown  glass lamp work bracelets and earrings.

Debra Beard, often featured as cruise ship event designer, offers pieces that are a mini-exploration from travels around the world.

Fred Lukens crafts architecturally inspired jewelry featuring responsibly collected rare wood and Oregon myrtle wood.

Renée Hafeman embraces a love of vintage jewelry and gives them new life. Redesigning the antique pieces, she prays “whoever wears, please be blessed in some way.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

 

An exhibition titled FIRST LOOK, a highly anticipated jewelry trunk show, features a dozen of local and regional designers– including a select group who have been represented by the gallery more than 11 years!

 

Cindy Bricca, designer, incorporates Kumihimo, the ancient Japanese seed braiding, in must-have creations.

Elaine Sawyer uses natural stone Cabochons, cut and polished by in lapidary by her husband, Mike Sawyer, to create one-of-a-kind cuff bracelets.

Barbara Walker works in precious metal wire turning  bling into a wearable work of art.

Mary Hurst, born in raised in County Tipperary, Ireland, studied fashion design at the Grafton Academy in Dublin, integrates past and present Celtic designs in each piece.

Billie Johnstone, a former clinical practitioner, sparked her retirement into a means to support to the youth programs in Soweta, South Africa. The proceeds from the sales of her custom handcrafted jewelry are doing good works that changes lives.

Alan Stockam and Heather Reider create one-of-a-kind silver rings, cuffs and necklaces; each signed and numbered, with stones from the Pacific Northwest and beyond.

Cher Flick,  a graduate  from the Gemological Institute of America, creates jewelry doing good works, by giving back to a charitable foundation in honor of her mother, Joanie.

Karen Johnson, a natural-born artist, boldly designs meticulously handcrafted statement jewelry that could – and should – be featured in magazines.

Mary Boitta experiments in druzy rock semi-precious stones  with in designs that retain femininity and fineness.

Robyn Hall, with no art degree or formal training, creates stunning mouth blown  glass lamp work bracelets and earrings.

Debra Beard, often featured as cruise ship event designer, offers pieces that are a mini-exploration from her travels around the world.

Fred Lukens crafts architecturally inspired jewelry featuring responsibly collected rare wood and Oregon myrtle wood.

Renée Hafeman embraces a love of vintage jewelry and gives them new life. Redesigning the antique pieces, she prays “whoever wears, please be blessed in some way.”

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

An exhibit titled FIRST LOOK, a highly anticipated jewelry trunk show, features a dozen of local and regional designers– including a select group who have been represented by the gallery more than 11 years!

 

Cindy Bricca, designer, incorporates Kumihimo, the ancient Japanese seed braiding, in must-have signature creations.

 

Elaine Sawyer uses natural stone Cabochons, cut and polished by in lapidary by her husband, Mike, to create one-of-a-kind cuff bracelets, lined with ultra-suede.

 

 

 

Barbara Walker works in precious metal wire turning earrings into a wearable work of art including sea glass, pearls and crystals.

 

 

 

Mary Hurst, born in raised in County Tipperary, Ireland, studied fashion design at the Grafton Academy in Dublin, integrates past and present Celtic designs in each piece.

 

 

Billie Johnstone, a former clinical practitioner, sparked her retirement into a means to support to the youth programs in Soweta, South Africa with the proceeds from the sales of her custom handcrafted jewelry doing good works that changes lives.

 

 

 

Alan Stockam  and Heather Rieder create one-of-a-kind silver rings, cuffs and necklaces; each signed and numbered, with stones from the Pacific Northwest and beyond.

 

 

Cher Flick, with a graduate degree from the Gemological Institute of America, creates jewelry doing good works, by giving back to a charitable foundation in honor of her mother, Joanie.

 

 

Karen Johnson, a natural-born artist, boldly  designs meticulously handcrafted multi-pearl statement necklaces that could – and should- be featured in magazines.

 

 

 

Mary Boitta experiments in druzy rock crystal designs using  semi-precious stones that retain femininity and fineness.

 

 

Robyn Hall, with no art degree or formal training, creates stunning Viking braids, mouth blown lamp work glass in bracelets and earrings.

 

Debra Beard, often featured as cruise ship event designer, offers pieces that are  a mini-exploration from travels around the world.

 

 

Fred Lukens crafts architecturally inspired jewelry featuring responsibly collected rare wood and Oregon myrtle wood.

 

Reneé Hafeman embraces a love of vintage jewelry and gives a them new life, redesigning  the antique pieces , she prays “whoever wears, please  be blessed in some way.”

 

 

 

FIRST LOOK

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside

  FIRST LOOK, a highly anticipated jewelry trunk show, features a dozen of local and regional designers– including a select group who have been represented by the gallery more than 11 years!

 

 

COLLECTIVE ENERGY, an exhibition that brought artists of all mediums together.

Artists who appeared at Fairweather’s: Paul Brent, Richard Newman, Billie Johnstone, Bobby McWhirter, Kimberly Reed, Rosemary Klein and Seaside/Gearhart naturalist Neal Maine.

Collective Energy.

Stay tuned for the art, the patrons and the memories of a very special evening, well-played.

With appreciation to Linda Fenton-Mendenhall Photography.

Please visit http://www.facebook.com/Seaside First Saturday Art Walk for more information.

Billie Johnstone

Billie Johnstone, jeweler  arrived for COLLECTIVE ENERGY.

Billie Johnstone has a history of working with children and their families as a school social worker and clinical practitioner.  After retirement from the Tacoma School District, she returned to South Africa, finding the lives of children overwhelmingly horrific.  She pledged financial support to an orphanage and the youth programs in Soweta to benefit these children.

Billie Johnstone with Art walk patron.

Billie Johnstone with Art walk patron, sharing her back story.

Sparked by a passion for gemstones, crystals and rare trade beads, Billie embraced an inspiration to create a business of handcrafted jewelry as a means to support the orphanage.  Billielepahnt  Designs changes lives.  Each one is custom designed made up of semi-precious gem stones, Swarovski crystals, hand blown glass, vintage African trade beads and other natural materials with gold and silver components.

Original necklaces by Billieielepahnt Design featuring African trade beads.

Q: What are African trade beads?

A: Africans often used beads for currency, (often referred to as African money). Wealth and social status could be easily determined by the quality, quantity and style of jewelry worn. The success of this form of currency can largely be attributed to the high intrinsic value African people put upon decorative items.

Artist’s statement:

I am a philanthropist giving away 100%  of my artistic endeavors to an African orphanage and other charities. “Ubunthu”, an African word, meaning “humanity to others.”  Proceeds are donated to Soweta youth programs and non-profit organizations in  Kliptown, South Africa. 

This is unbunthu.—Billie Johnstone

About Soweta:

kliptown wall

Soweta Kliptown Youth (SKY) provides hopes and serves to some of the most neglected children in South Africa.

Conditions in Kliptown:

There is a health crisis that leaves many children orphans, with high mortality rates, as well as no access to health care. There is a lack of infrastructure.  Many homes lack electricity and plumbing.  There are no schools, clinics or libraries.

There is a lack of opportunity as unemployment is extremely high.  Most adults lack education or sources of income.  Youth have few productive outlets.

Yet, there is a wealth of spirit.  Kliptown is blessed with home and a caring community.

www.kliptownyouthprogram.org.za

For more information please visit http://www.kliptownyouth program.org.za

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“If I could, I would purchase all of Billie’s jewelry!  What a stunning story! What a remarkable cause! My first visit to Fairweather’s! What an enjoyable evening! Thank you for having Billie here!” –Seattle  Art Walk patron wearing a Billie Johnstone original necklace with the artist Billie Johnstone.