Elaine Sawyer


Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Opening reception of the exhibit titled FIRST LOOK, a highly anticipated jewelry truck show, featuring a dozen of local and regional designers– including a select group who have been represented by the gallery more than 11 years!

 

Cindy Bricca, designer, incorporates Kumihimo, the ancient Japanese seed braiding, in must-have creations.

 

Elaine Sawyer uses natural stone Cabochons, cut and polished by in lapidary by her husband, Mike, to create one-of-a-kind cuff bracelets.

 

 

 

Barbara Walker works in precious metal wire turning earrings into a wearable work of art.

 

 

 

Mary Hurst, born in raised in County Tipperary, Ireland, studied fashion design at the Grafton Academy in Dublin, integrates past and present Celtic designs in each piece.

 

Billie Johnstone, a former clinical practitioner, sparked her retirement into a means to support to the youth programs in Soweta, South Africa with the proceeds from the sales of her custom handcrafted jewelry doing good works that changes lives.

 

 

 

Alan Stockam  and Heather Rieder create one-of-a-kind silver rings, cuffs and necklaces; each signed and numbered, with stones from the Pacific Northwest and beyond.

 

 

Cher Flick, with a graduate degree from the Gemological Institute of America, creates jewelry doing good works, by giving back to a charitable foundation in honor of her mother, Joanie.

 

 

Karen Johnson, a natural-born artist, boldly  designs meticulously handcrafted multi-pearl statement necklaces that could – and should- be featured in magazines.

 

 

 

Mary Boitta experiments in druzy rock crystal designs, semi-precious stones,  that retain femininity and fineness.

 

 

Robyn Hall, with no art degree or formal training, creates stunning mouth blown lamp work bracelets and earrings.

 

Debra Beard, often featured as cruise ship event designer, offers pieces that are  a mini-exploration from travels around the world.

 

Fred Lukens crafts architecturally inspired jewelry featuring responsibly collected rare wood and Oregon myrtle wood.

 

Reneé Hafeman embraces a love of vintage jewelry and gives a them new life, redesigning  the antique pieces , she prays “whoever wears, please  be blessed in some way.”

 

Save the date and time.

Opening reception. FIRST LOOK. Nov. 4th, 5-7pm

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside

Seaside/ Gearhart naturalist, biologist and wildlife photographer Neal Maine will speak at 6: pm about the ecology of the local habitat.

Seaside Painting LIVE(tm)  episode by artist Carolyn Macpherson.

LIVE music by Shirley 88.

And, too, enter a raffle for a baker’s dozen of door prizes  of  jewelry by  fabulous Fairweather designers!

 

For more info go to http://www.facebook.com/ Seaside First Saturday Art Walk

 

Here is the quote I shared in my artist talk. It is from Concerning the Spiritual in Art by Wassily Kandinsky. –Gayle H. Seely

“Colour is a power which directly influences the soul. Colour is the keyboard, the eyes are the hammers, the soul is the piano with many strings. The artist is the hand which plays, touching one key or another, to cause vibrations in the soul.”

 

 

Gayle H. Seely offers a personal one-to-one time with an art patron during the opening of COLOR IT FALL, an exhibition at Fairweather’s through Sept. 30th.

Featured in the display cabinet, found for Fairweather’s by artist Paul Brent, seed pearl mosaics by Gayle H. Seely,  vintage jewelry by Renee Hafeman, beaded  cuffs by Elaine Sawyer and leather purses by Luans Leathers.

 

Close up of Gayle H. Seely’s beaded mosaics displayed in Fairweather’s newest fixture.

 

Paul Brent  recently said “you must have this cabinet! We put your name on it for you.”

Thank you, Paul and Lana Jane Brent.  Thank you, Tina Cook/ John Cook Glass Studio

 

 

“Thank you for all your hard work presenting such a wonderful group of artists. I thoroughly enjoyed the Art Walk on Saturday and met some great folks; shoppers and fellow artists.”  Gayle H. Seely

 

Top ten 2016 smile times.
 Laughter has a magnetic quality.
Laughter is contagious and uncontrollable.
Laughter can create unique bonds between people.

Indeed.

The ability to have a good laugh — especially at our own expense — may be essential for survival.

TIME magazine reported: Ursula Beermann of the University of California, Berkeley, and Willibald Ruch of the University of Zurich studied 70 psychology students to gauge their ability to laugh at themselves. The findings support what has long been believed: that being able to laugh at oneself is not only a distinct trait, but is also linked with having an upbeat personality and good mood and may be the foundation for a good sense of humor.

And, so, we move forward to 2017!!!

A blank canvas.

Please visit us at http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com to read more about our work.

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Black Hole Sun/ Monotype 11″x15″/ Sarah Lippold

Sarah Lippold is intrigued and challenged with replicating imagery without the use of technology. She prints and stencils with just about any material that can be found and used. She considers the images colorful snapshots of memory from the world around her. She began studying printmaking at Clatsop Community College in 2004 and has taken many printmaking workshops with many local and regional printmakers. She currently teaches art at the Fire Mountain School and The Tamata School.

 

“Regionalism is, at best, a rooted jumping off place that can bring a fresh eye and a sense of special observation to that which we see every day. The work in this exhibit uses material and images outside usual ways to urge viewers to areas beyond expected vision. The use of collage, found materials, fabric and light, add to the pattern and texture of the surface, as well as to the meaning. The work pushes against the usual process, not for novelty, but for heightened meaning”.–Agnes Field.

 

Trepassers by Don Frank

Trepassers by Don Frank


Don Frank a professional photographer living on the Oregon Coast, creates varied colorful imagery. His work is found in many galleries and collections across the country, including the Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago and the Center for Fine Art Photography in Colorado. Many photographers simply observe. Don likes to participate.

Don Frank engaging friends and patrons at the opening reception for Against the Current.

How to Paint a Sunset

How to Paint a Sunset/Agnes Field/ Mixed Media: Paint, plaster, wood and collage/ 36″x48″

 

Agnes Field, a native Oregonian, worked in Italy, Finland, was awarded several residencies and completed her graduate work at New York University. She produces mixed media paintings assembled from her surroundings commonly accessible materials, such as cardboard, wood and fabric. The artwork attempts to create intrinsic objects that minimize the boundary between everyday experience and the commercialization of products.

 

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Sarah Lippold lectures about her print making art at the opening reception for Against the Current in Sept. 2016.

 “I am intrigued and challenged with replicating imagery without the use of technology.  The printing press is my copy machine, rollers add the color and stencils are made with just about any material you can imagine.  For these stencils an image is formed.  I present recognizable images (here in wood grain) always with a dreamy landscape (against the current).  This represents what I see every day around me.  Colors change throughout the day, shadows come and go.  My prints offer you a snapshot of my memory.” —Sarah Lippold

 

Against the Current opening reception.

Agnes Field, curator, opens the exhibit Against the Current, with an art lecture.

Agnes Field, artist/curator, lectures during the opening reception of “Against the Current”, an exhibition,  at Fairweather’s.

“Design and representation anchor art in the known world.  Draw a line horizontally across a blank canvas and we see a horizon and the beginning of a landscape. We complete the images because of our perceptual conditioning and try to make images into something we recognize–part of our known universe.  Abstract art seeks the unknown and stretches the perception of the known world.” —Agnes Field

Against the Grain through September   2016.

For more information about the gallery please visit http://www.faiweatherhouseandgallery.com.

For more info please visit www.facebook.com/SeasideFirstSaturdayArtWalk

An oil painting of leaves tied with string and hung on a door nail

“Caught” by Savvy Dani. An oil painting of leaves tied with string and hung on a door nail

From Savvy Dani.  “Caught” original oil on linen. 

Savvy Dani is a visual artist based in Seattle, WA. She uses traditional drawing and painting materials to unearth beauty in the world around her.

From Elaine Sawyer, jeweler.
“Each seed pearl is hand sewed onto a firm backing, anchored to a stable form and covered by ultra-suede. I have made pendants and cuff bracelets. I never duplicate a design and each piece takes many, many hours. My husband, Mike, does the lapidary work to cut and polish the stones into cabochons.” Elaine

Mike and Elaine Sawyer

Mike and Elaine Sawyer.

And, too, on Sept. 3rd during the opening reception for AGAINST THE CURRENT beaded cuff jeweler Elaine Sawyer spoke about her passion in creating fabulous beaded cuffs!

“I was educated in the Art of Nursing, working as a registered nurse for 38 years. The fine arts were critical to me to decompress and express my creative side. I found I have a good sense of composition, design, color and texture that gives me energy as I create.

Making jewelry from stringing paled as I learned weaving patterns: peyote, Russian weave, right-angled, and spiral using seed pearls. Then I discovered my true passion, pearl embroidery. I fell in love with the freedom to create totally original designs. I start with a natural stone cabochon, hand blown glass, or even a vintage button to serve as the focal point. That inspires me to choose the seed pearls in various colors, shapes, and textures to complement the piece.” —Elaine Sawyer

 

Boo

 

New! Book folding art from Mary Boitta, artist.

Michael Muldoon’s latest!

 

 

Christine Trexel Summer I

From Christine Trexel.  From plants grown in her garden: hand made paper, hand painted,  hand made box and hand made journals.

Eagle Sunrise

From Neal Maine.  Eagle Sunrise.  Del Rey Beach, Gearhart.

For more info go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/artists/ blog

Fall 2015, mother of pearl cuff

Fall 2015, mother of pearl cuff

Beaded cuff by Elaine Sawyer.

As fall approaches and days of bliss by the sea are shorter, artists are introducing new works.  From jewelry designer Elaine Sawyer unique one-of-a-kind cuffs that offer a tribute to the incoming season.

Fall 2015, mother of pearl cuff

Fall 2015, mother of pearl cuff

Discreet and chic beaded cuff by Elaine Sawyer.

About jeweler Elaine Sawyer.

“I was educated in the Art of Nursing, working as a registered nurse for 38 years. The fine arts were critical to me to decompress and express my creative side. I found I have a good sense of composition, design, color and texture that gives me energy as I create.

Making jewelry from stringing paled as I learned weaving patterns: peyote, Russian weave, right angled, and spiral using seed pearls. Then I discovered my true passion, pearl embroidery from a book by Sherry Serafini who does amazing work. I fell in love with the freedom to create totally original designs. I start with a natural stone Cabochon, hand blown glass, or even a vintage button to serve as the focal point. That inspires me to choose the seed pearls in various colors, shapes, and textures to complement the piece.

Each seed pearl is hand sewed onto a firm backing, anchored to a stable form and covered by ultra-suede. I have made pendants and cuff bracelets. I never duplicate a design and each piece takes many, many hours. My husband, Mike, does the lapidary work to cut and polish the stones into cabochons.” –Elaine

The jeweler’s mastery of pure design, harmonious colors, and timeless sophistication, Elaine Sawyer offers elegantly understated nature-inspired cuffs for the autumn season.

Comment received: “I am so happy you are featuring some of Elaine’s jewelry. She has an artistic eye for design and creativity. I love the jewelry I have from her.” — Connie Erickson