Mary Hurst


Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Opening reception of the exhibit titled FIRST LOOK, a highly anticipated jewelry truck show, featuring a dozen of local and regional designers– including a select group who have been represented by the gallery more than 11 years!

 

Cindy Bricca, designer, incorporates Kumihimo, the ancient Japanese seed braiding, in must-have creations.

 

Elaine Sawyer uses natural stone Cabochons, cut and polished by in lapidary by her husband, Mike, to create one-of-a-kind cuff bracelets.

 

 

 

Barbara Walker works in precious metal wire turning earrings into a wearable work of art.

 

 

 

Mary Hurst, born in raised in County Tipperary, Ireland, studied fashion design at the Grafton Academy in Dublin, integrates past and present Celtic designs in each piece.

 

Billie Johnstone, a former clinical practitioner, sparked her retirement into a means to support to the youth programs in Soweta, South Africa with the proceeds from the sales of her custom handcrafted jewelry doing good works that changes lives.

 

 

 

Alan Stockam  and Heather Rieder create one-of-a-kind silver rings, cuffs and necklaces; each signed and numbered, with stones from the Pacific Northwest and beyond.

 

 

Cher Flick, with a graduate degree from the Gemological Institute of America, creates jewelry doing good works, by giving back to a charitable foundation in honor of her mother, Joanie.

 

 

Karen Johnson, a natural-born artist, boldly  designs meticulously handcrafted multi-pearl statement necklaces that could – and should- be featured in magazines.

 

 

 

Mary Boitta experiments in druzy rock crystal designs, semi-precious stones,  that retain femininity and fineness.

 

 

Robyn Hall, with no art degree or formal training, creates stunning mouth blown lamp work bracelets and earrings.

 

Debra Beard, often featured as cruise ship event designer, offers pieces that are  a mini-exploration from travels around the world.

 

Fred Lukens crafts architecturally inspired jewelry featuring responsibly collected rare wood and Oregon myrtle wood.

 

Reneé Hafeman embraces a love of vintage jewelry and gives a them new life, redesigning  the antique pieces , she prays “whoever wears, please  be blessed in some way.”

 

Save the date and time.

Opening reception. FIRST LOOK. Nov. 4th, 5-7pm

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside

Seaside/ Gearhart naturalist, biologist and wildlife photographer Neal Maine will speak at 6: pm about the ecology of the local habitat.

Seaside Painting LIVE(tm)  episode by artist Carolyn Macpherson.

LIVE music by Shirley 88.

And, too, enter a raffle for a baker’s dozen of door prizes  of  jewelry by  fabulous Fairweather designers!

 

For more info go to http://www.facebook.com/ Seaside First Saturday Art Walk

Front display table at Fairweather’s  featuring calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson and ‘Irish Vista’, oil on linen,  by Michael Muldoon.

Please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com  …artists tab/  Penelope Culbertson/  Michael Muldoon for more information about the artists.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Grace Note:

To Fairweather  artists, guests and cultural art patrons:

“Thank you for the sharing of your time at the opening reception of Irish Lands on March 4th, 2017.  The exhibition, which continues through March 28th,  all about the telling of Irish people who dance to the tune of their own muse and in doing so offer prose and art that reaches back to the beginning of time.” –Denise Fairweather

And, too, just in from Celtic jewelry designer Mary Hurst.

Braided Welsh pewter and amethyst quartz necklace.

 

For more info about the Mary Hurst please go to https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/…/tis-celtic-jewelry-by-mary-hurst-…

’tis Celtic jewelry by Mary Ryan Hurst for IRISH LANDS, an exhibition …Feb. 26, 2017

Pearls, sterling and crystal by Mary Hurst Ryan, Celtic jewelry designer. “I enjoy the blog and see how busy and involved you are in the art …

For more images  from the March 4th events in the historic Gilbert District of downtown Seaside please visit http://www.facebook.com/ Seaside First Saturday Art Walk.

ancient-christains

Triskel, or Triquetra, symbolizing the ancient concept of eternal renewal, adopted by Christianity as a way to explain the Trinity. Pearls, sterling and crystal by Mary Hurst Ryan, Celtic jewelry designer.

“I enjoy the blog and see how busy and involved you are in the art world. I know your Irish event will be a great success. Thank you for all the years you’ve carried my work, I appreciate you so much.” Cheers, Mary

 

 

gold-plated-celtic-swilrl-and-emerald-s

Gold plated Celtic swirl with emerald crystals by Mary Hurst Ryan, jewelry designer.

The spiral is one of the most common symbols of the Celtic culture. This symbol stood for the radiation of ethereal energy. There are however many different meanings of the single spiral. Some of the most prominent ones are growth, or expansion of the consciousness, its perseverance and knowledge.

 

museum-of-ireland

opal-toris

“I’ve sent you Celtic Torcs, an original design inspired by Celtic jewelry I saw in The National Museum in Ireland.” –Mary

Mary Hurst

Mary Hurst

Q: What is a Torc design, in Celtic art, you ask?

A: As ancient Celtic jewelry goes, the Torc is the most unusual. It’s completely different to anything worn today, and it has a long and varied history. It’s not just limited to Ireland either – torcs have been found from Celtic societies but also from the Bronze Age of the Vikings, too.
The word, torc, comes from the Latin ‘torquis’, meaning ‘to twist’, is large ring made out of precious metal, most often made of gold or bronze, but torcs of silver, copper and other metals have been found too

For the ancient Celts, jewelry was a highly important symbol of a person’s status in society. It was the clearest possible sign of wealth and high rank. The torc was reserved for the nobility of Celtic societies during various rituals.
Torcs highlight several ancient Irish stories. Morann the Arbiter allegedly had a magical torc that tightened around his neck any time he made a false judgement. One King of Tara, Dermot MacCerrbheoil, dreamt that angels took his torc from his neck and gave it to a stranger, who turned out to be St. Brendan of Clonfert. When they bumped into each other sometime later and the King recognized him as the man who was gifted the torc, he relinquished his kingdom to him.

Real ancient torcs can be found in almost every historical museum in Ireland and the UK, and throughout mainland Europe. The best examples are right here in Ireland – and we’re not just saying that. The National Museum of Ireland in Dublin has a sparkling collection along with various other magnificent Celtic jewelry pieces. It includes the Broighter Hoard and other famous artefacts such as the Ardagh Chalice, Tara Brooch and Derrynaflan Hoard.

For more info about the artifacts in the National Museum of Ireland please visit www. http://www.museum.ie

 

Q:  Want to learn more about the Celtic artist, Mary Ryan Hurst, you ask?

A:  Mary Ryan Hurst was born and raised in County Tipperary, Ireland. Although she has lived in the United States for years, Mary returns to Ireland every year to visit her family and to get inspiration for her jewelry designs.

Mary studied dress design and incorporates her love of fashion into each piece of jewelry she creates. Her collection consists of one-of-a-kind and limited editions.

Mary’s Celtic Jewelry harks back to ancient traditions but is designed for today. Since each necklace is original, each one takes on a distinct personality and the naming process is almost mystical. According to the artist, “The names I choose for my jewelry becomes an integral part of each piece and the spirit of the name becomes a part of the wearing experience. I send a piece of my culture, my heart and my soul out with each piece of jewelry.”

Fun facts:

Mary lives in Portland, Oregon with her husband and a bossy cat!

Mary was born and raise in County Tipperary, Ireland.

Necklaces, bracelets and earrings created from antique components, each one-of-a-kind and often engraved with the initials.

Ancient Celtic designs are combined with gemstones and pearls with contemporary flair.

Celtic and Couture jewelry in limited editions or one-of-a-kind designs.

The designer is available for trunk shows and special events.

 

 

Please visit https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/…May 16, 2014  under Mary Hurst tags: … the creative creations within the walls of…

 

Grace note received:

“Thank you for your lovely note, it meant a great deal to me.  I love your spirit and am honored to be in your lovely gallery.  Of all the owners I deal with, you are the best!” Sincerely Mary Hurst

 

 

Raven Gift Orange

From artist Kathryn Delany ‘HEART SAVER’

“One of my strengths is the ability to match my style of art to the requests and dreams of clients. I developed a style in decorative finishes that was unique and reflects a love of layered finishes. I love to use a lot of metallics in my work too. The metallics reflect light and creates a sense of luxury.”–Kathryn Delany

To read more about Kathyrn Delany, the artist, at Fairweather’s please visit:
 From Mary Hurst, Celtic couture jewelry designer.

 

 

To read more about Mary Hurst,  Celtic jewelry designer,  at Fairweather’s please go to:

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/…/mary-hurst-jewelry-arti…

 

 

 

Irish inspiration

 What inspires the contemporary artisan Celtic jewelry designer, Mary Hurst.

 

For Fall a “sea” change  from the polished sterling seen in the summer designs to the trend of the timeless appeal of pewter, copper and vermeil (gold plate over copper) and hammered gold.

 

Born and raised in County Tipperary, Ireland, the artist returns every year to visit family. Her jewelry is designed as a homage to the myth and lore of her Celtic past.  Each piece is thoughtfully created to honor the unique gemstone materials and she takes great care in the finishing details.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

mary1-300x228

Mary Hurst has been creating and selling her original jewelry to stores and galleries for over nine years. She was born and raised in County Tipperary, Ireland. Although she has lived in the United States for years, Mary returns to Ireland every year to visit her family and to get inspiration for her jewelry designs. She now lives in Portland, Oregon with her husband and a bossy cat!

Mary’s Celtic Jewelry harks back to ancient traditions but is designed for today. Since each necklace is original, each one takes on a distinct personality and the naming process is almost mystical.

According to the artist, “The names I choose for my jewelry becomes an integral part of each piece and the spirit of the name becomes a part of the wearing experience. I send a piece of my culture, my heart and my soul out with each piece of jewelry.”