Reneé Hafeman


 On August 2nd FINDINGS, an opening art exhibition introduced past and present emerging artists at the Fairweather House and Gallery.

 

Top row/ left to right images:  resident jeweler Renee Hafeman, art patrons, Joan, Art Walk hostess with Paul Brent, resident artist.

Middle row/ left to right images: art by Britney Drumheller, celebrity artist Britney Drumheller offers an art lecture, artist Emily Miller, and introducing emerging artist Whelpsy Whelp.

Bottom row/ left to right images: marine debris artist Karynn Kozij, Joan, Art Walk hostess demonstrating Octopus art, Paul Brent with Gail and Ellen, Art Walk hostesses at the Paul Brent Pop-Up Art Studio and Gallery, sponsored by Fairweather House and Gallery and The Gilbert Block Building, Denise, Kemmy Kay, Joan and Saundra FINDING art at the FINDINGS opening reception.

Q: What is an emerging artist, you ask?

A:  An emerging artist is considered an artist without commercial representation who has a dedicated art practice but has had limited opportunities to show at a gallery or non-profit spaces.

 

For more info please  go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com.  Celebrating 11 years of sponsoring  NW regional acclaimed and emerging artists in 2017.

Lava vases by Emily Miller, Pelican and Buoy original art by Whelpsey Whelp, Sea Turtle original water-color by Rosemary Klein, hand-made journals and boxes by Christine Trexel, hammered copper and gold earrings by Steven Schankin and Natura shell series of original oil paintings by Paul Brent.

 

On the grass cloth wall: coral original oil by Paul Brent, coral wood cut series by Gregory Graham, Puffin on the Rock (facing left)original by Nick Brakel, Puffin fine art photograph (facing right) by Donna Geissler, and on the twig wall sculpture, Oregon myrtlewood earrings by Fred Lukens.

On the table scape: Puffin Portrait original pen and ink (facing right) by Britney Drumheller, Sea Star original pen and ink by Britney Drumheller, and  hand hemmed tie dyed silk scarves by Beth Collins.

 

Eel and pipe fish original pen and ink collage by emerging artist Whelpsey Welp (easel display), The Snorkler by Marga Stanley (on the circle table) rare CoCo Chanel vintage jewelry by Renee Hafeman,  spoons by Mike Morris,  Moulton Sky original oil seascape  by Michael Muldoon and Oregon lighthouse watercolor series by Emily Miller.

Sea Within original shell art by Jan Shield, original water colors by Carolyn Macpherson, tclam style  carry all bags by textile artist Linda Ballard  and…ta! da! …grand piano found by a friendly neighbor for the Fairweather Gallery!!!

Displays by Denise Fairweather,  Allied Member, A.S.I.D., American Society of Interior Designers.

 

For more about  the accredited interior design work at the gallery , please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …about/ Denise Faiweather page

And, too,  questions to the audience at FINDINGS, the opening reception for the August exhibition, at Fairweather House and Gallery.

What is new?

What is bigger than a bread box?

What took one and 1/2 hours to install?

What took 5 men to move?

What has the number 88 to do with this piece?

 

And, the art patron who answered the question…is it the grand  piano?  The lovely lady in black.  She graciously called for a round of applause, after listening to the piano stories  (past, current and future musical lives).

 

For more info please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Renee Hafeman, vintage jewelry artist

FINDINGS in my work is a collection of tools and other articles used by an artisan to make jewelry.

 

Q:  What is the difference Between “Art Nouveau” and “Art Deco”, you ask?

A: Art Nouveau: means “new art,” reigned from roughly 1880 until just before World War I. It features naturalistic but stylized forms, often combined with more geometric shapes, particularly arcs, parabolas, and semicircles (think of the Eiffel Tower). The movement brought in natural forms that had often been overlooked like insects, weeds, even mythical faeries, as evidenced by Lalique jewelry or Tiffany lamps.

Art Deco emerged after World War I. In fact, the deprivations of the Great War years gave way to a whole new opulence and extravagance that defined the Jazz Age and the Art Deco aesthetic. The movement, prevalent from the 1920s until roughly the start of World War II, took its name from the 1925 Exposition Internationales des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes, held in France and is characterized by streamlined and geometric shapes. It also utilized modern materials like chrome, stainless steel, and inlaid wood. If Art Deco dabbled with natural materials, they tended to be graphic or textural, like jagged fern leaves. As a result, Deco featured bold shapes like sunbursts and zigzags and broad curves.

Renee Hafeman offered an artist’s lecture during the opening reception of FINDINGS, an exhibition through August at Fairweather’s.

Note the difference?

By Renee’s Vintage Designs.

Signed Louis Vuitton.

Q: Who is Louis Vuitton, you ask?

A: Louis Vuitton is a fashion house and luxury retail company founded in 1854. The label’s LV monogram appears on most of its products, ranging from luxury trunks and leather goods, shoes, jewelry and accessories. Louis Vuitton is one of the world’s leading international fashion houses. For six consecutive years (2006–2012), Louis Vuitton was named the world’s most valuable luxury brand.

 

“Growing up, my grandmother would pull out her jewelry box, take each piece out one-by-one and explain in detail what it was, where it came from and why it was so special to her. This developed my love of antique and vintage jewelry. I started to think of how many treasured pieces are sitting in drawers and jewelry boxes, many handed down, some outdated, some broken and others, just put away because they didn’t match anything you wore. I decided enough of that! Let’s dig out those pieces and give them new life. As I design, I pray over my work that whoever wears this piece, may be blessed in some way. I thank God for blessing me with this creativity and passion.”–Renee Hafeman

 

 

 AUGUST 5th, 5-7:pm

FINDINGS opening reception 

Seaside First Saturday Art Walk

Fairweather House and Gallery

Renee Hafeman, jewelry designer, truly has found fabulous objects of desire, master pieces! Renee will be in attendance to discuss the development of her work and the ideas that drive her creativity. 

 

 

Exclusive signature jewelry available at Fairweather’s by Renee Vintage Designs.

 

Q: Who is Dolce & Gabbana, you ask?

A:  Dolce & Gabbana is an Italian luxury fashion house founded in 1985 by designers Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana. They won Perfume’s Academy “Most Feminine Flavor of the Year” in 1993 for their fragrance Dolce & Gabbana Parfum.

 

In addition FINDINGS will be the 11th (!) annual emerging artist exhibition! Fairweather’s will introduce current emerging artist Whelpsy Whelp.  

Fun fact: Fairweather has launched NW emerging artists Britney Drumheller, Nick Brakel, Linda Trexler, Ashley Howarth, Diane Copenhaver, Ashley Howarth, Gayle H. Seely, Kristin Qian and Rebecca Gore through the years. And, too, several of the talented artists will have new work for FINDINGS.  This is an event you do not want to miss!

FINDINGS will feature the juxtaposing an array of art from artists found at the recent BEAVER TALES ART SHOW and EXHIBITION in Seaside, as well.  New art by Emily Miller, Mariana Mace,  JoAnn Pari-Mueller and  Chris Boyer will be revealed, work created to depicting the pleasure of beach combing.

Seaside nature photographer, ecologist and biologist Neal Maine will speak at 6:pm. Summer time beverages and light bites.

Celebrating 13 years in 2017, Seaside First Saturday Art Walk is all about the arts.  Visitors meet artists, enjoy light bites, view artist demonstrations, see new work or enjoy live performances in music. The event is a free and held in the historic Gilbert District of downtown Seaside. Complimentary parking is on the corner of Holladay and Oceanway.

 

To read more about the Art Walk, please go to http://www.facebook.com/ Seaside First Saturday Art Walk.


Mid-Century Geometric Modernist Runway Design. Purple Hand Hand-Made Stained Glass Squares. Oval and Circular Non-Tarnish Chain. Sterling Silver Ornate Hook and Eye Closure. One-on-a-kind.

Vintage Design by Reneé No. 267. Available exclusively at Fairweather’s.

 

Mid-Century Modern. Sterling Silver Red Agate Cabochon. Hallmark “925”. Over and Circular Non-Tarnish Chain. Sterling Silver Ornate Hook and Eye Closure. One-of-a-kind.

Vintage Design by Reneé. No. 266. Available exclusively at Fairweather’s.

 

Vintage French Silver Filigree Perfume Bottle. Hallmark “France.” Vintage Czechoslovakian Crystal. Ornate Sterling Silver Hook and Eye Closure. Vintage-Inspired Chain.

Vintage Design by Reneé. No 273. Available exclusively at Fairweather’s.

 

 

Reneé Hafeman, vintage fine jewelry designer.

 

Q: How would you describe a vintage fine jewelry designer, you ask?

A:  A vintage fine jewelry designer incorporates silver or gold-filled metal and use other elements such as gemstones or hand-crafted jewelry components. The styles of jewelry are one-of-a-kind or small production work that is found in a gallery or a specialty boutique. Fine jewelry is made with valuable metal such as gold and platinum and is set with natural, precious gemstones. Cultured pearls are considered a gemstone.

 

Vintage jewelry is usually identified with a particular era including Art Nouveau, Art Deco, Retro, and Mid-Century Modern. The beauty of vintage jewelry is that unlike contemporary styles, it is not available in vast multiples or quantities. It possesses distinctive qualities of workmanship, individuality and rarity that are appreciated by collectors and stylish clients alike.

close-up-coco-i

Coco Chanel signed vintage charms designed into pendant necklaces by jeweler Renee Hafeman.

better-coco


About Renee Hafeman jewelry designer:

“Growing up, my grandmother would pull out her jewelry box, take each piece out one-by-one and explain in detail what it was, where it came from and why it was so special to her. This developed my love of antique and vintage jewelry. I started to think of how many treasured pieces are sitting in drawers and jewelry boxes, many handed down, some outdated, some broken and others, just put away because they didn’t match anything you wore. I decided enough of that! Let’s dig out those pieces and give them new life. As I design, I pray over my work that whoever wears this piece, may be blessed in some way. I thank God for blessing me with this creativity and passion.”–Renee Hafeman

 

Just in! CoCo Chanel purse charm designed as a pendant necklace by Renee Hafeman.

Renee Haveman

Q: What’s trending in jewelry, you ask?

A: “One reads a lot about the returning of a sense of vintage glamour. Those that are hyper active and vogue seem to be embracing the resurgence of elegant jewelry. The millennial new age nomads are returning to family oriented keepsakes. Full of vibrance, in effect, this trend is as much treasured vintage as it is contemporary.”– Denise Fairweather, Allied member A.S.I.D., American Society of Interior Designers/ Fairweather House and Gallery

Please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com for more information about the regional artists and artisans featured in the gallery.

 

Q: Who was CoCo Chanel, you ask?

A: Fashion designer Coco Chanel, born August 19, 1883, in Saumur, France, is famous for her timeless designs.

In 1969, Chanel’s fascinating life story became the basis for the Broadway musical Coco, starring Katharine Hepburn as the legendary designer. Alan Jay Lerner wrote the book and lyrics for the show’s song while Andre Prévin composed the music. Cecil Beaton handled the set and costume design for the production. The show received seven Tony Award nominations, and Beaton won for Best Costume Design and René Auberjonois for Best Featured Actor.

Coco Chanel died on January 10, 1971, at her apartment in the Hotel Ritz. She never married, having once said “I never wanted to weigh more heavily on a man than a bird.” Hundreds crowded together at the Church of the Madeleine to bid farewell to the fashion icon. In tribute, many of the mourners wore Chanel suits.

A little more than a decade after her death, designer Karl Lagerfeld took the reins at her company to continue the Chanel legacy. Today her namesake company is held privately by the Wertheimer family and continues to thrive, believed to generate hundreds of millions in sales each year.

In addition to the longevity of her designs, Chanel’s life story continues to captivate people’s attention. There have been several biographies of the fashion revolutionary, including Chanel and Her World (2005), written by her friend Edmonde Charles-Roux.

In the recent television biopic, Coco Chanel (2008), Shirley MacLaine starred as the famous designer around the time of her 1954 career resurrection. The actress told WWD that she had long been interested in playing Chanel. “What’s wonderful about her is she’s not a straightforward, easy woman to understand.”

 

Renee Haveman

About Renee Hafeman jewelry designer:

“Growing up, my grandmother would pull out her jewelry box, take each piece out one-by-one and explain in detail what it was, where it came from and why it was so special to her. This developed my love of antique and vintage jewelry. I started to think of how many treasured pieces are sitting in drawers and jewelry boxes, many handed down, some outdated, some broken and others, just put away because they didn’t match anything you wore. I decided enough of that! Let’s dig out those pieces and give them new life. As I design, I pray over my work that whoever wears this piece, may be blessed in some way. I thank God for blessing me with this creativity and passion.”–Renee Hafeman

Q: What’s trending in jewelry, you ask?

A: ” One reads a lot about the returning of a sense of vintage glamour. Those that are hyper active and vogue seem to be embracing the resurgence of elegant jewelry. Let’s call it bohemia-style,  or perhaps, too, a bit of 70’s flashback designs. The millennial new age nomads are returning to family oriented keepsakes. Full of vibrance, in effect, this trend is as much treasured vintage as it is contemporary.” Denise  Fariweather,  Allied member A.S.I.D., American Society of Interior Designers