Robyn Hall


best tear drop

First Look November window display  at Fairweather’s. 

bracelet tree

First Look bracelet tree.

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First Look jewelry tray featuring Cindy Bricca, designer, who incorporates Kumihimo seed braiding in must-have creations.

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First Look jewelry tray featuring Mary Boitta, who experiments in druzy semi-precious stones in designs that retain femininity and fineness.

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First Look jewelry tray featuring Karen Johnson, a natural-born artist, boldly designs meticulously handcrafted statement jewelry that could – and should – be featured in magazines.

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First Look jewelry tray featuring Robyn Hall, who has no art degree or formal training, yet creates stunning mouth-blown glass lamp work bracelets and earrings.

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First Look jewelry tray featuring Cher Flick, a graduate from the Gemological Institute of America, who creates jewelry “doing good works ™”, giving back to a charitable foundation in honor of her mother, Joanie.

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First Look jewelry tray featuring Christine Johnson, designer, who creates necklaces from Oregon beach stones.

 

First Look featuring the silver work

 by Alan Stockam, each design is signed and numbered.

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Strike off enlargement of a jewelry tray featuring Billie Johnstone, a former clinical practitioner, who sparked her retirement into a means to support to the youth programs in Soweta, South Africa. Proceeds are “doing good works ™” that changes lives.

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Highlighting jewelry designer Renée Hafeman, who embraces a love of vintage Chanel ™  jewelry and gives them new life. Redesigning the pieces, she prays “whoever wears, please be blessed in some way.”

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Silver tray featuring jewelry designer Elaine Sawyer, who uses natural stone Cabochons, cut and polished by in lapidary by her husband, Mike, to create one-of-a-kind cuff bracelets.

With appreciation and gratitude to StephBuffington photos.

 

 

Alan

Fairweather House and Gallery

Through November, an exhibition titled FIRST LOOK, a highly anticipated jewelry trunk show, will feature a dozen of local and regional designers– including one very special artist who has been represented by the gallery more than 11 years!

Cindy Bricca, designer incorporates Kumihimo seed braiding in must-have creations.

Elaine Sawyer uses natural stone Cabochons, cut and polished by in lapidary by her husband, Mike, to create one-of-a-kind cuff bracelets.

Barbara Walker works in precious metal turning  bling into a wearable works of art.

Mary Hurst, born in raised in County Tipperary, Ireland, studied fashion design at the Grafton Academy in Dublin, integrates past and present Celtic designs.

Billie Johnstone, a former clinical practitioner, sparked retirement into a means to support to the youth programs in Soweta, South Africa. The proceeds from her handcrafted jewelry are “doing good works ™”  that changes lives.

Alan Stockam and Heather Reider create one-of-a-kind silver jewelry, signed and numbered, with stones from the Pacific Northwest and beyond.

Cher Flick,  a graduate  from the Gemological Institute of America, creates jewelry “doing good works ™ “,  giving back to a charitable foundation in honor of her mother, Joanie.

Karen Johnson, a natural-born artist, boldly designs meticulously handcrafted statement jewelry that could – and should – be featured in magazines.

Mary Boitta experiments in druzy semi-precious stones  in designs that retain femininity and fineness.

Robyn Hall, with no art degree or formal training, creates stunning mouth-blown  glass lamp work bracelets and earrings.

Debra Beard, often featured as cruise ship event designer, offers pieces that are a mini-exploration from travels around the world.

Fred Lukens crafts architecturally inspired jewelry featuring responsibly collected rare wood and Oregon myrtle wood.

Renée Hafeman embraces a love of vintage jewelry and gives them new life. Redesigning the antique pieces, she prays “whoever wears, please be blessed in some way.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

 

An exhibition titled FIRST LOOK, a highly anticipated jewelry trunk show, features a dozen of local and regional designers– including a select group who have been represented by the gallery more than 11 years!

 

Cindy Bricca, designer, incorporates Kumihimo, the ancient Japanese seed braiding, in must-have creations.

Elaine Sawyer uses natural stone Cabochons, cut and polished by in lapidary by her husband, Mike Sawyer, to create one-of-a-kind cuff bracelets.

Barbara Walker works in precious metal wire turning  bling into a wearable work of art.

Mary Hurst, born in raised in County Tipperary, Ireland, studied fashion design at the Grafton Academy in Dublin, integrates past and present Celtic designs in each piece.

Billie Johnstone, a former clinical practitioner, sparked her retirement into a means to support to the youth programs in Soweta, South Africa. The proceeds from the sales of her custom handcrafted jewelry are doing good works that changes lives.

Alan Stockam and Heather Reider create one-of-a-kind silver rings, cuffs and necklaces; each signed and numbered, with stones from the Pacific Northwest and beyond.

Cher Flick,  a graduate  from the Gemological Institute of America, creates jewelry doing good works, by giving back to a charitable foundation in honor of her mother, Joanie.

Karen Johnson, a natural-born artist, boldly designs meticulously handcrafted statement jewelry that could – and should – be featured in magazines.

Mary Boitta experiments in druzy rock semi-precious stones  with in designs that retain femininity and fineness.

Robyn Hall, with no art degree or formal training, creates stunning mouth blown  glass lamp work bracelets and earrings.

Debra Beard, often featured as cruise ship event designer, offers pieces that are a mini-exploration from her travels around the world.

Fred Lukens crafts architecturally inspired jewelry featuring responsibly collected rare wood and Oregon myrtle wood.

Renée Hafeman embraces a love of vintage jewelry and gives them new life. Redesigning the antique pieces, she prays “whoever wears, please be blessed in some way.”

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

An exhibit titled FIRST LOOK, a highly anticipated jewelry trunk show, features a dozen of local and regional designers– including a select group who have been represented by the gallery more than 11 years!

 

Cindy Bricca, designer, incorporates Kumihimo, the ancient Japanese seed braiding, in must-have signature creations.

 

Elaine Sawyer uses natural stone Cabochons, cut and polished by in lapidary by her husband, Mike, to create one-of-a-kind cuff bracelets, lined with ultra-suede.

 

 

 

Barbara Walker works in precious metal wire turning earrings into a wearable work of art including sea glass, pearls and crystals.

 

 

 

Mary Hurst, born in raised in County Tipperary, Ireland, studied fashion design at the Grafton Academy in Dublin, integrates past and present Celtic designs in each piece.

 

 

Billie Johnstone, a former clinical practitioner, sparked her retirement into a means to support to the youth programs in Soweta, South Africa with the proceeds from the sales of her custom handcrafted jewelry doing good works that changes lives.

 

 

 

Alan Stockam  and Heather Rieder create one-of-a-kind silver rings, cuffs and necklaces; each signed and numbered, with stones from the Pacific Northwest and beyond.

 

 

Cher Flick, with a graduate degree from the Gemological Institute of America, creates jewelry doing good works, by giving back to a charitable foundation in honor of her mother, Joanie.

 

 

Karen Johnson, a natural-born artist, boldly  designs meticulously handcrafted multi-pearl statement necklaces that could – and should- be featured in magazines.

 

 

 

Mary Boitta experiments in druzy rock crystal designs using  semi-precious stones that retain femininity and fineness.

 

 

Robyn Hall, with no art degree or formal training, creates stunning Viking braids, mouth blown lamp work glass in bracelets and earrings.

 

Debra Beard, often featured as cruise ship event designer, offers pieces that are  a mini-exploration from travels around the world.

 

 

Fred Lukens crafts architecturally inspired jewelry featuring responsibly collected rare wood and Oregon myrtle wood.

 

Reneé Hafeman embraces a love of vintage jewelry and gives a them new life, redesigning  the antique pieces , she prays “whoever wears, please  be blessed in some way.”

 

 

 

FIRST LOOK

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside

  FIRST LOOK, a highly anticipated jewelry trunk show, features a dozen of local and regional designers– including a select group who have been represented by the gallery more than 11 years!

 

 

Color it Winter

“Color it Winter” by Neal Maine, PacificLight Images.

The common house finch has a cheerful rosy red head and a long, twittering song, which can now be heard in most of the areas North America.

Proceeds to support NCLC.

Please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/artists/ Neal Maine for more information.

 

Please plan to  visit Fairweather House and Gallery at 612 Broadway, Seaside Oregon soon. You’ll be tickled pink!

spring window

Pink abstract art by artist Carmela Newstead in the front window.

What is seen right now: pink sunrises, pink spring accessories, pink jewelry and, too, a new book arriving all about pink!

Pink...trending now.

Just in! House Beautiful PINK

 

Editorial Review
Library Journal
House Beautiful provides a look at a wealth of interiors showing how pink can be used to advantage in the hands of professional interior designers. Accompanying the more than 150 color photographs are captions in which designers describe their use of color in every room of the house, including entryways, family rooms, home offices, and patios. Included are two-page spreads depicting a room with a more in-depth explanation of the design and mood boards in which a designer puts together the furniture, fabrics, and colors for a project. The paint splotches with the name and manufacturer present a vivid display of the assortment of hues. A revealing look at the ways this color can be harmoniously incorporated into any décor.

Sterling silver viking knit bracelet

Q: What is Viking knit jewelry, you ask?

A: Lovely handmade chains have been found in Viking treasure troves. Made from melted down coins turned into fine wire, these chains were made using a loop in loop technique. These same techniques can be used today, though we don’t tend to use coin silver anymore. Sterling silver and copper in a fine gauge is often used today.

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Q: What are lamp work beads?

A: Lamp work Beads are handmade glass beads. Glass beads are crafted using a centuries-old process called lampworking. Rods of colorful glass are melted in a special torch and the molten glass is embellished using a variety of techniques and materials, creating unique and one-of-a-kind beads.

Robyn

“I use Sterling Silver, hand crafted lamp work glass beads, semi-precious gems and gemstones, Swarovski crystals and much more, combined with a little love and passion to create Viking knit jewelry that is truly unique. “ –Robyn Hall, jewelry artist

Lamp work hand crafted glass

Lamp work hand crafted glass

Lampworking is a where a lamp torch is used to melt glass. Once in a molten state, glass is formed by blowing using tools and hand movements. The earliest verifiable lamp worked glass is probably a collection of beads thought to date to the fifth century BC.

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ROBYN HALL, Fairweather lamp work jewelry artist.

An Oregon native, born and raised in the heart of Oregon’s Willamette Valley, Robyn Hall is a bit of a country girl with a rock and roll heart. Robyn has recently relocated to the beautiful Oregon coast, a perfect inspiration for her happy go lucky, and fun loving attitude. Robyn has a passion for life that is directly applied to her work.

“I first got involved in sterling silver jewelry due to skin reactions from store bought jewelry. I took a few classes on soldering silver, then after that it just seemed to click, soon I was forging and creating my own jewelry, it just took off from there. I use sterling silver, hand crafted lamp work glass beads, semi-precious gemstones, Swarovski crystals, a few surprises, combined with a lot of love and passion to create jewelry that is chic, hip and truly unique.”