Photographers


R.J. Marx performed LIVE on May 4.  Art by Lisa Sofia Robinson and Barbara Rosbe Felisky; calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson and Brenda Gordon.

 

Carolyn Macpherson painted LIVE during a gallery event. Segmented wood vases and shells by Mike Brown; pottery by Suzy Holland; painting by James Waterman and wood boxes by Ray Noregaard.

 

Blue Bond painted en plein air  outside on Broadway at Fairweather’s.

 

Neal Maine lectured during Fairweather’s ‘Portraiture’ opening reception.  Photographs by Neal Maine and Michael Wing; glass are by Bob and Rox Heath.

 

 

Photographer Scott Saulsbury stepped up to the plate to fill-in for Linda Fenton-Mendenhall, Faiweather’s after hours event photographer.

Fun Fact: Linda selected Scott and they both had Neal Maine as a teacher at Seaside High.

 

Guy and Karen Rainsberger poured for Parrett Mountain Cellars at Fairweather’s Wine Walk.  Art by Britney Drumheller, Diane Copenhaver and Emily Miller.

 

Shirley 88 played  LIVE during the SDDA Spring Wine Walk at Fairweather’s.  Fused glass by Mike Fox.

 

More than 800 tid-bits were consumed during four hours of the SDDA Spring Wine Walk at Fairweather’s.  In addition, back up “In the Mist” books by Russell J. Young and stored Odes to the Tides flyers, Fairweather’s JUNE exhibition.

 

Seaside First Saturday Art Walk hostesses served as SDDA Spring Wine Walk hostesses on May 18 at Fairweather’s.   And, yes, the ladies  dressed to complement each other.

Hundreds of  guests came to the SDDA Spring Wine Walk at Fairweather’s. Art by Paul Brent;  Chanel jewelry by Reneé Hafeman and photographs on bamboo by Don Frank.

 

Late in the month of May, Blue Bond made the announcement that he sold his painting  of “Willie Nelson” to the country legend Willie Nelson!!!

 

For more about the gallery, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

“Lady in Orange” original oil on canvas by Blue Bond.

‘Portraiture’ exhibition on view at Fairweather’s through May 29.

 

 

 

“The secret of mastering the portrait, look no further than the eyes.”  Blue Bond

 

“Portraiture” exhibition now on view through May 29 at Fairweather’s.

 

Blue Bond self-portrait. On the ledge above:  “Sunbather” original oil on wood panel by Blue Bond;  “Lady” by Susan Romersa, “Jay and Mr. D.” watercolor by Carolynn Wagler  and “Wine Bottle Still Life” by Barbara Rosbe Felisky.

Blue Bond, artist, with self-portrait.

 

Blue Bond painting en plein air at Faiweather’s.

Would you like to discover your hidden artistic talents or simply improve your current abilities in oil painting? Blue Bond offers private classes in his studio located on 417 South Holladay Drive in Seaside.  He can be reached by phone at (503) 739-0660.

Blue Bond has learned that his painting of “Willie Nelson”, previously introduced at Fairweather’s is being considered by (drum roll…) by Willie Nelson!!!

Saturday, May 18

 Blue Bond offered a Seaside Painting LIVE ™ event during the Wine Walk at Fairweather’s!!!

The Spring Downtown Wine Walk is when Seaside opens its doors – and its bottles – to welcome wine enthusiasts during this wine tasting event. Over twenty participating wineries will sell unopened bottles, allowing visitors to take home their favorite new find. The event will also include live music in several venues, complimentary appetizers, and a prize drawing. Wineries will charge nominal tasting fees.

Spring Downtown Wine Walk – Seaside Oregon

The Spring Downtown Wine Walk is when Seaside opens its doors – and its bottles – to welcome wine enthusiasts during this wine tasting event. Over twenty …

Fairweather House and Gallery hosts Parrett Mountain Cellars (#16) during the Spring Wine Walk!  

 

 

 

LIVE music by Shirley 88.

 

 

Seaside Downtown Wine Walk review:

“Fairweather House & Gallery is where the beautiful pieces of art and live music always add joy to this stop on the Wine Walk.”

“Polar Snow Shoe” by Neal Maine

“Whale Within” by Neal Maine 

 

 

Wildlife photographers Daniel Dietrich and Neal Maine in 2015.

 

An event hosted in Seaside for the Alaska Wilderness League in 2015 has earned  recent  kudos and a connection to Art Wolfe, internationally known photographer. Neal Maine shared the news at the opening reception of ‘Portraiture’ on May 4, 2019.

 

Daniel Dietrich traveled to the Arctic with Neal Maine in 2014. Daniel recently entered his polar bear image, a photo one/tenth of a second from Neal Maine, in a competition.

“Thanks to BigPicture: Natural World Photography Competition for selecting my polar bear image as a finalist in this year’s competition. The photo will be on display at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco July-October.”  Daniel Dietrich

 

And, too, Daniel Dietrich is with Art Wolfe on location in 2019.

 

 

To recall the 2015 event, go to…

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/tag/arctic-light

 

‘Arctic Light’ draws attention to global warming Presentation …

https://www.discoverourcoast.com/…/arctic-light…/article_1d181096-2d41-5d56-a37…

Feb 16, 2015 – ‘Arctic Light’ draws attention to global warming Presentation, … Neal Maine and Daniel Dietrich will speak about Alaska Wilderness League at …

 

 

Osprey portrait by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images.  Proceeds in support of NCLC.

 

‘Portraiture’ habitat lecture by local naturalist, wildlife photographer Neal Maine was given at Fairweather’s on May 4.

 

Ospreys return to Seaside

May 17, 2019/  Seaside Signal newspaper article

Oregon coast naturalist Neal Maine still gets a thrill after many years of watching the osprey return to their nests in Seaside. Maine has found nine nests so far and estimates that there are about 20 osprey locally, but he admits that there are likely some he is missing.

“When nature keeps on marching, you get excited. When the osprey return, somethings still right, they flew all the way from South America,” said Maine.

The annual return of the osprey not only marks the coming of summer, it is a sign of the progress being made in conservation. Osprey, along with other raptors, suffered a population decimation from the use of DDT, which caused eggshell thinning. Once the pesticide was banned, the bird of prey made a sharp recovery.

However, they are not out of the woods yet. There is a growing trend of osprey nesting on man-made objects. Osprey typically nest near rivers on the top of dead trees, but as forest composition changed and old growth snags disappeared, they started relying on utility poles and other tall objects to rear their young.

In addition, their choice location is not always convenient. When osprey in Seaside decided to nest on a pole near the Broadway baseball field the raptors did not consider that the power line may one day need replacement. The nest was relocated on a 60-foot high pole installed off Neawanna Creek. Fortunately, the birds were fine with the move and have continued to nest at the new location since 2012. Maine, who oversaw the project, has watched the same birds come back to the same nests since 2009.

Osprey that summer in Oregon typically winter off the islands and coast of Mexico, Central and South America, segregating into male and female territories. Osprey typically live to 25 in the wild and will continue to use the same nest with their monogamous partner, unless something tragic happens. The juveniles also come back to the area where they were reared so the birds on the coast have been here for many, many generations.

While their numbers rebounded significantly in most of the world after the banning of DDT, osprey are still threatened or endangered globally, including in many states nationally. In Oregon, they are not considered legally endangered, although are not as abundant as they once were. Currently, the biggest threat to osprey is aquaculture, which causes habitat loss because of damming. The raptors are often shot while hunting fish at aquaculture facilities in their southern territory.

However, here in Oregon the birds are increasingly overwintering locally rather than migrating and it is not clear as to why. The birds rely on an abundant source of fish, which may be harder for the birds to find as more rivers are dammed for agriculture, flood control, aquaculture and hydropower. It’s also possible that they are finding the Willamette Valley’s maritime climate more amenable than in year’s past and have moved north, like many birds, as a result of climate change. Moreover, it could be a slough of other variables not yet identified. There are not many resources on the coast dedicated to the study of osprey.

We didn’t even know where the nests were, it wasn’t on anyone’s agenda. ODFW was budgeted back to survival level, there’s not even an ODFW office in Clatsop County,” said Maine. Since the ospreys are not a priority species, answering these questions might fall on the shoulders of people like Maine, who engages regularly in citizen science. “More and more are staying every winter in the valley, and last year I found one here in January,” he said.

Nature certainly does find a way and osprey are a testament to that. They are resilient birds and can make themselves at home in the busiest of human environments. “It seems like they watch the baseball games,” Maine said about the birds at the Broadway field.

 

Check out the osprey cam at seasideosprey.org or better yet, go find them in person in Seaside.

 

 

“Man with a Mask” fine art portraiture by Russell J. Young

“I go to great lengths, to create stories and or fairy tale style portraits tailored to a subject’s personality, life or alter ego.” RJY

 

 

Fine art portrait with bird cage by Russell J. Young

“I often include a heightened sense of realism. This is often done by building a scene that includes a costumed character, props, hand painted background, lighting the scene for a mood, time of day and season.” RJY

 

 

Monolith by Russell J. Young

“I am particularly interested in stories that express the nuances or human emotions, personal relations, secrets, and alter egos.  This work is inspired by past and present relationships, life experience, stories I have been entrusted with, the work of other artist, literature, and the performing arts.” RJY  

 

Russell J. Young, fine art photographer spoke about his work at Faiwweather’s during the Seaside First Saturday Art Walk on May 4.

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

May 2019

 “Portraiture” featuring regional artists Leah Kohlenberg, Susan Romersa, Patricia Clark-Finley, Rebecca Gore, Carolynn Wagler, Carolyn Macpherson, Mike Mason and Russell J. Young.

Russell J. Young is a commercial and fine art photographer based in Portland, Oregon. His photographic genres include commercial, fine art, portraiture, fitness, sports, performing arts, landscape, outdoor adventure, travel, and culture. He believes each genre complements the end result of the others.

Welcoming artists Karen Doyle, Lisa Sofia Robinson and Shelby Silver.

Introducing emerging artists Tamara Watanabe and Vanessa Stokes.

The art selected is a debut exhibition contemplating character in portrait drawings and oil sketches displaying the relationship between artist and sitter as its central subject,” D. Fairweather, gallerist.

 

To read more about Russell J. Young’s exhibitions at Fairweather’s, go to

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/…/fairweathers-end-note-for-life-ab…

“Borage Botanical”” by Russell J. Young “Rhododendron Botanical” by Russell J. Young “Carnas

 

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/category/…/russell-j-young/

 

 

 

 

“We Thought We Were Babes” original watercolor by Carolynn Wagler

Painting back story:

“We were in Southern California visiting on vacation. It was very hot, so we wore ball caps to shade our faces and both of us had pony tails that came out of the back of the hat.   My husband took a snap shot with his camera. Later, I thought “we were babes” and I painted it. The art seemed to resonate with viewers because it received three ‘judges’ awards and even spent a couple of weeks for viewing at the Capitol in Salem.”  Carolynn Wagler

 

2015 “Barack” watercolor by Carolynn Wagler.

 

Carolynn Wagler specializes in portraits.

 

 

 

Carolynn Wagler has taught in Portland for many years and has won many awards. She is an art instructor for Portland Parks and Recreation and a member of the Portland Fine Arts Guild.

 

To learn more about the artist, teacher and instructor Carolynn Wagler, go to:

https://www.discoverourcoast.com/…/article_d2863386-5174-11e9-80c1-77445bcfa6

 

https://www.seasideor.com/event/first-saturday-art-walk-12/

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/…/welcoming-carolynn-wagler-wat..

 

The artist’s sketchbook is a place to plan, to start an idea and to place value on a future painting.

 

 

Seaside Art Walk hostess Saundra, “We Thought We Were Babes” mother-daughter art, with Carolynn Wagler, artist and daughter at Fairweather’s.
Photo by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

 

On view through May 29.

 

 

Spring pink crane with feathers, crystals and pearls by Peggy.

 

“I received a huge order of Yuzen Washi Paper from Japan  (30 different designs) which inspired me.”

 

And, now, tickled pink to share a display table. So very timely for spring and so perfect for ‘Life Abundant’ on view through April 29.

 

 

Hand painted wine glasses in cherry blossom motif, pink platter by Emily Miller, sand-blasted hummingbird beverage glasses by Bob and Rox Heath, mouth blown art glass,  pink pearl necklace by Mary Boitta, hand-made silk blossom down filled  pillow, gold and pink speckled eggs decorated by hand,  rare pink sea glass and faux chocolate bunny.  “Tulips” oil painting by Melissa Jander with vintage bistro table and chairs.  In the background one-of-a-kind iron and twig garden folly and vase with Oregon myrtle wood eggs by Mike Brown. Hand wrapped silk cherry blossoms with mouth blown amethyst vase.

 

Silk cherry blossoms

And, now, a  finale.

 

 

Original calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson

 

“I was fortunate enough to study with the Master Professor of Calligraphy, Lloyd Reynolds, at Reed College. He really encouraged his students to “Pass it on” and I have been doing that for 50 years.” Penelope Culbertson

 

Q: What was Pablo Neruda, you ask?

A: Pablo Neruda, a Chilean poet, diplomat, and politician who was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1971. He was perhaps the most important Latin American poet of the 20th century.

 

 

To read more about the gallery, please visit  www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

Watch LIVE.

March exhibition disassemble and April exhibition installation.

Video represents one section of the Fairweather Gallery showing four days of after hours installation work including spackling, painting, displaying, accessorizing and lighting the selected artworks for the exhibition.  ‘Life Abundant’ now on view through April 29.

 

 

 

In its thirteen year, Fairweather House and Gallery, located at 612 Broadway in downtown Seaside, Oregon, has established itself as the nexus of the north coast’s art climate with a new exhibition each month.  For the exhibition ‘Life Abundant’ eventually more than 145 new works of art  were displayed throughout the gallery.

 

 

 

Next Page »