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Enjoy this behind-the-scenes look at how Fairwweather’s has captured NW artists’ artwork during past May art exhibitions.

May 2019

Artist lectures.

Artists Patricia Clark-Finley, Carolyn Wagler, Russell J. Young and Deirdra Doan

May 2018

Artist lectures.

May 2017

Special visitors, special art and artist visit.

May 2016

Featured artists.

May 2015

LIVE performance, painting LIVE and artist patron.

May 2014

Painting LIVE and performing LIVE,

Hope you enjoyed this behind-the-scenes look at how Fairwweather’s has captured NW artists’ artwork during five past May exhibitions.

 

Fairweather House and Gallery shut its doors mid-March following the Governor’s order that nonessential retailers and services must be closed.

 

“At a moment when our physical location is closed due to the health crisis, online viewing is offered as a primary means to present art and to connect with art enthusiasts,”  galleriest D. Fairweather.

Please read more about the gallery and its commitment to NW artists and products made by NW hands.

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

Soon, we hope to be on the other side of the pandemic crisis.

The arts play a vital role in supporting tourism efforts in our community, and while we are currently in a holding pattern,

there is no time like the present for a bit of looking back and, hopefully, for moving forward.

We will continue sharing and connecting in the arts with the artists and you.

 

Want more info contact gallery curator @fairweatherkd@gmail.com or message on FB @fairweatherhouseandgallery

 

 

 

 

Cover art is by Bev Drew Kindley, one of Fairweather House & Gallery’s featured artists this month.

 

This week’s edition includes information on the May Seaside Art Walk, classic movie recommendations and more. Read online at coastweekend.com.

All art is for sale, just contact the gallery  listed in the online story.

 

“Those that live for the arts, support the arts.”

Thank you for your appreciation for the arts, even in a time of a pandemic.

 

Though in-person events are still out of the question,  our Seaside Art Walk team put together a virtual version for you to enjoy!

Video by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

Click to view the virtual tour  May 2nd- May 25th.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CyYvHpqQI9g

No barriers to art this month – Seaside First Saturday Art Walk will be 100% online May 2-25!

May Art Walk is a concept of gallery-coordinated virtual exhibits.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CyYvHpqQI9g

As we continue following the State’s stay at home order,  Seaside galleries remain closed until further notice.

Galleries have gone on-line and are committed to assist you with during  COVID-19 via e-mail and through social media platforms.

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

On-line until further notice

A curatorial virtual NW exhibiton titled ‘In Full Bloom’

Fairweather House and Gallery brings together artists’ works in a variety of genres and interpretations, grouping them into an on-line spectrum of theme and color.

Featuring art by Jo Pomeroy Crockett, Christine Downs, Bev Drew Kindley, Dorota Haber-Leligh, Greta Lindwood, Melissa Jander, Carmela Newstead, and Zifen Qian.

“I love flowers. If I could, I would have flowers for dessert and live in a greenhouse surrounded by them. I actually crave flowers for their lovely colors, textures, fragrance, and beauty,   D. Fairweather, galleriest

Featured floral art work includes botanical, realism, abstraction, and surrealism.

Research has found that being around flowers increases the level of compassion that they feel for others and are more willing to extend a helping hand to those in need.

Art can be purchased and picked-up by curbside appointment or delivered free locally.

Contact gallery curator @fairweatherkd@gmail.com or message on FB @fairweatherhouseandgallery

We will see you, hopefully, on the other side of the pandemic crisis.

 

 

Just viewing floral art causes joy in the same way as walking in nature and losing oneself in music.

“For if you think art is not necessary try to spend time without music, books, poems, movies and… art.”

Sharing a video recently posted by North Coast Land Conservancy.

 

 

Thank you for reading about the arts in Seaside.

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 “First”  watercolor by Lieta Gratteri

Due to the  novel coronavirus the gallery shut its doors on March 15, 2020

Closed temporarily  until it is safe to reopen

Hopefully … late spring 2020

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway, Seaside Oregon

Nothing is more important to us than the health and safety of our community.
We are in this together.

In the meantime, we are offering a video about the arts and artists at Fairweather’s during the opening reception of Fresh Start, an exhibition.

Enjoy the virtual tour created today by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

Indeed, she is at home working and following the Oregon Stay Home/ Save Lives order.

Although,  we are dismayed over the worldwide pandemic crisis, about our gallery being shut, and about not being able to serve our community in person at this time, we hope that you will find comfort in the season of spring in this time of darkness.

We hope to see you on the other side of this…possibly in late spring 2020.

Hope quote by Penelope Culbertson

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway, Seaside Oregon

Closed until it is safe to reopen

Please stay in touch with the us.

We are still here for you, however, in a different way.

Contact us on messenger on FB, or email fairweatherhouseandgarden@gmail.com

 

visit us at:  http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway, Seaside Oregon

Closed until it is safe to reopen

Due to the  novel coronavirus the gallery shut its doors on March 15, 2020

We hope make to it possible to enjoy some of what we have to offer to while you are at home in during the order to Stay at Home, Save Lives. Publishing articles is a way that we can continue to feature our resident artists during the situation,” chief curator Denise Fairweather.

 

 

Close up of Lysichiton americanus/ AKA Skunk Cabbage or Swamp Lantern  watercolor by Jo Pomeroy Crockett

Adored by many and ridiculed by some, Lysichiton americanus, aka skunk cabbage or swamp lantern is one of the first plants to emerge in late winter. Pushing its way through snow and peeking out of bogs, this bright yellow curvaceous “leaf” (spathe) with its inner structure of numerous small flowers (spadix) provides a warm resting and mating place for beetles and other insects. the calla lily. It has a distinctive fragrance similar to garlic or apples that give rise to its popular name.

Lysichton has many uses. Some Native peoples used it as an emergency food and a medicine. Hanis Coos elder Lottie Evanoff reportedly said she liked skunk cabbage very much and found it curious that settlers did not eat it. “Bears eats skunk cabbage, is just crazy for it. So, it must be good eating; everything bear eats is good eating.”  Jo Pomeroy Crockett, PhD/ artist

Jo Pomeroy Crockett

GATHER notes:

Importance of Quality Watercolor Paper

Watercolor, while not fussy is particular about the kind of paper it prefers. A special rough paper, handmade in India, with a very deep tooth is especially suited to this medium. Pigment just skims over the top but if given enough water, likes to settle into the valleys. Gentle glazes provide depth and effects not possible with other papers. The watercolors were painted on this special paper.  JPC

 

 

Jo Pomeroy Crockett, Phd., has often lectured at Fairweather’s.

Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, a North coast resident, works primarily wet-into-wet and strives for dramatic patterns. Vivid colors, an emphasis on the play of light and a touch of whimsy mark her paintings. Although she enjoys painting a variety of subjects, she especially enjoys painting nature. She has exhibited in numerous juried art competitions in the Southwest and the Pacific Northwest. Her work is in private collections in various parts of the United States, England, Canada and Switzerland. In combination with her art, she works as a free-lance writer and educator

 

 

“First Leap” by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images. Proceeds in support of NCLC.

 “This mallard chick seems to be enjoying life to the fullest as it scurries across a lily pad in a pond near my home.”  Neal Maine

After a thirty-year career as an award winning biology teacher at Seaside High School, Neal Maine became the first executive director of North Coast Land Conservancy, which he co-founded in 1986. Since his retirement from the land trust in 2010, he has pursued his passion for nature photography through PacificLight Images, a partnership with Michael Wing, dedicated to raising awareness of coastal ecology and the wildlife with whom we share the region’s estuaries, freshwater wetlands and forests. Their photography centers around coastal and Columbia River landscape, ecology and the rich estuary habitat with the surrounding wetlands and forest systems.

 

Habitat lectures by Neal Maine at Fairweather’s will return when it is safe to re-open the gallery.

 

Artists and speakers were booked for the exhibition, GATHER,  several booked more than one year ago, with some of art delivered before the gallery closed mid-March.

The April exhibition, titled GATHER, which was meant to open in the gallery April 4 and run through April 25, was canceled  due to the novel coronavirus.

 

Elk in the dunes by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images.  Proceeds in support of NCLC.

North Coast Land Conservancy/ reprint
Elk have been on the Oregon Coast a long, long, long, long time. Scientists believe elk migrated from Asia to North America over Beringia—better known as the Bering Land Bridge—some 120,000 years ago. The animals would have been a familiar sight to the first human hunters who migrated here tens of thousands of years later. Elk survived, and continue to survive, by being able to eat almost any kind of plant they can find, while we humans are limited to eating “soft fruits, a few easily digestible seeds, and the milk and flesh of our more versatile animal cousins,” as David Haskell writes in The Forest Unseen, one of naturalist and photographer Neal Maine’s favorite books.

 

 

Chasing the Light by Neal Maine/PacificLight Images.  Proceeds in support of NCLC.

We are all are holed up at home to slow the spread of the virus, hopefully,  this “Fairweather fix” will give moods and psyches a lift with some online R&R.

 

Watch time lapse video showing efforts in creating space for last year’s April exhibition, LIFE ABUNDANT.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dhKYvSZM3bg

Soon, when it is safe to re-open, we will be back in the gallery.

Stay safe at home, save lives.

Fairweather House and Gallery will continue to reach out with on-line blog articles about the arts.

And, too, on a regular basis, during these uncertain times, we will continue to re-post previous LIVE  Fairweather arts events…until it is safe to re-open the gallery.

http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

End note:

Flowers heal broken hearts.
https://youtu.be/ryUxrFUk6MY

 

Jan and Jay Barber, Mayor of Seaside, introducing wildlife photographer Neal Maine.

 

Neal Maine presenting a signed ArcticLight photograph to Nancy Holmes, lucky raffle winner.

 

Karen Doyle, Fresh Start featured artist,  with Saundra, Art Walk hostess, lecturing about her art painted for the exhibition.

 

Dorota Haber-Lehigh, Fresh Start featured artist, with Joan, Art Walk hostess, lecturing about her art created for the exhibition.

 

Gayle H. Seely, Fresh Start featured artist, with Kathy, Art Walk hostess, lecturing about her art created for the exhibition.

Neal Maine,  Seaside/ Gearhart naturalist, lectured about the new and fresh frames for a series of juvenile eagle images captured in the local habitat.

 

A poised and composed Shirley 88  caught in a pause from playing LIVE during the evening affair.

 

Fresh tidbits: grapes, pineapples, jelly cookies, sugar wafers, sponge cake, kisses, chocolate mints and sugar cookies. Thanks to K. Bowman, Fairweather’s Director of Hospitality.

 

Revealing a fresh take on Neal Maine’s famous “Elk Run” photo.  Custom order in a 38×48 size finished through a lot of collaboration with a fellow gallery owner from Necanicum Gallery. Indeed, the project involved more than four people  working together to complete the goal of enlarging an iconic image from the local habitat.  This image by Neal Maine, nature photographer, was published in the May-June 2015 issue of Bugle magazine (published by the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation). It is pictured in the story printed on page 62 about Gearhart, OR; which is #6 on the list of top ten “elkiest” places in America. The article is titled: Greetings from Elk City USA, pages 56-68. Neal Maine, a former educator,  devotes his time to observing the local wildlife and raising habitat awareness.

 

Fresh Start Exhibition and Sale

Through March 25

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside, OR  97138

“This exhibit’s  expectation lies in its possibility to present fresh, new perspectives, inspiration, experiences, reflection and even the possibility for transcendence in some way. Indeed, the meaning of “fresh start” is: the beginning of a new period or step,”   D. Fairweather, gallerist.

http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

Photos by Kemy Kay Kjemhus.

Original watercolor by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, handmade spring column candles, mouthblown glass, hand turned wood candle sticks, pottery by Suzy Holland, mouth blown stemware by Rox Heath, vintage bird feeder and bird house, silk and chenille throw pillows.

Pastel by Gretha Lindwood, pair of whimsical artworks by Marga Stanley, mouth blown art glass, hand made potter vase, hand wired silk iris stem, hand beeded flowers, contemporary floral by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett and art cards by Leah Kohlenberg, glassware by Robin and Rox Heath.

Art by Toni Avery, handmade tea pot by Kate Carlye, hand-forged candle sticks, fused glass by Carolyn Lindberg and mouth blown art vase

Pottery by Suzy Holland and oil painting by Carmela Newstead.

Art by Leah Kohlenberg, textile art by Linda Olson..

Handmade birdie pillow by Cherry Jones Harris, feather motif handmade journal by Christine Trexel, mouth blown art glass, pottery and platters hand made by Maria Hudson.

Handmade glass by Bob Heath.

Handmade glass by Sandy and Bob Lercari.

 

 

Handmade glass by Christine Downs, fused glass by Sandy and Bob Lercari, urchin rocks by Kandy Schwartz, and ocean oil by Sandy and Bob Lercari.

Outdoor garden **folly filled with  cattail dyed green spheres and handmade moss decorative moss spheres.

 

**Q:  What is a garden folly, you ask?

A: A garden folly is usually considered a building or structure that is designed for decoration with no other purpose than to add a touch of whimsy or extravagance to the surrounding landscape. The term began as “a name for any costly structure considered to have shown folly in the builder” and was often named after the individual who commissioned or designed the project. The connotations of silliness or madness in this definition are in accord with the general meaning of the French word “folie”; however, another older meaning of this word is “delight.”

Photos by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

 

“This exhibit’s expectation lies in its possibility to present fresh, new perspectives, inspiration, experiences, reflection and even the possibility for transcendence in some way. Indeed, the meaning of “fresh start” is the beginning of a new period or step.  The North Coast land, truly, is in full springtime bloom for FRESH START, Fairweather’s March exhibition.”

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