Dr. Dale J. Veith


“Wahenna Falls” by Dale Veith.

“The work selected for your show OUTSIDE INTERESTS is especially important because that’s where I learned to use art in my healing process.” Dr. Dale Veith, Clinical Psychologist.

Why Walking On the Beach Feels So Good

Dale Veith

Those familiar with my photography are well aware that I love to photograph nature and that I am particularly fond of water, especially moving water. For as long as I can remember I find myself drawn to be near moving water and other natural settings. I always thought it was just because I like being outdoors. It wasn’t until much more recently that I learned about the role that negative ions play in making those places so enjoyable, and so healing. It has to do with the abundance of negative ions available in those settings.

An ion is an electrically charged atom or molecule. Negative ions I am referring to are oxygen atoms charged with an extra electron created in nature by the effects of water, air, sunlight and the Earth’s inherent radiation. Negatively charged ions are most prevalent in natural places and particularly around moving water or after a thunderstorm. Once they reach our bloodstream, negative ions are believed to produce biochemical reactions that increase levels of the mood chemical serotonin, helping to alleviate depression, relieve stress, and boost our energy levels. Some research has shown that they can be as effective in treating depression as an antidepressant medication.

If you can’t get to the beach, out on the ocean’s surface, or near rapidly moving stream or waterfall, perhaps try heading to the nearest forested area. The light and other forms of cosmic radiation bumping into our atmosphere and into the trees causes the formation of negative ions, as does natural radiation emanating from the ground.

Be it near or on the water or out in the woods, spending time there can do wonders for your mood and energy level and it can help prevent illness and facilitate recovery from injury.

OUTSIDE INTERESTS on exhibition through August 25.

Sharing images from the opening artist reception for OUTSIDE INTERESTS.

 

 

 

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http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

And, too,  upcoming September exhibition.

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St. located in the Historic Gilbert Block Building

September 7-25

Opening reception for CONTRASTS, an exhibition, showing art from selected regional artists using bright, abstract palettes – electric yellows, brilliant blues, wild reds and shining greens, as well as abstract monotones found only in the natural world.

Featuring abstract artists Bill Baily, Gregory Bell, Tanya Gardner, Agnes Field, Sharon Kathleen Johnson, Jan Rimerman, Renee Rowe, Russell J. Young and Zifen Qian.

In addition Renee Hafeman, mid-century jewelry designer, and Gayle H. Seely, mosaic-bead artist, reveal bright, new fall work.

Introducing Monet Rubin, glass artist.

Landscape oil by Ron Nicolaides, seascape oil by Lee Munsell and sunset/ sunrise oils by Nicholas Oberling.

“A simple walk along the beach, through a forest, or up a mountain can do wonders for your mental and emotional health. You do not have to have a specific destination in mind, either – your goal is not to hike X miles, but to immerse yourself in the natural, outside world around you.  Forest, mountain and sunset bathing can rejuvenate a weary mind.”

An interesting backstory or two or three…

On a Tuesday, during the peak season in August, visitors arrived in the gallery from Nevada, Montana, Missouri, New York, Ohio, FRANCE, Texas, Colorado, KENYA and a family of five from Utah who were seeing an ocean for the very first time!!!

 

And, on a Monday, the week before, visitors arrived from New York, Maine, Maryland, N. Carolina and from Missouri…this group started a road trip across the United States duplicating the Lewis and Clark journey.

Read more about Lewis and Clark start in Missouri and ending at  the Pacific Ocean in Oregon:

https://www.britannica.com/event/Lewis-and-Clark-Expedition

 

We are fortunate in that The City of Seaside has installed wide sidewalks to allow for six people to walk together. Indeed, there is a  town ordinance, Title 12,  that lists driveway, sidewalk standards and advertising within the public right-of-way.

During the recent beach volleyball tournament, an estimated 6,000 visitors arrived and walked along Broadway.  Here are a few tidbits heard as they did their walkabouts: “My, oh, my, it’s a beautiful sunny day at the beach.” “Man, I could live here.”  “Life is just better at the beach. Everything is better at the beach!”

 

Visitors enjoying Dale Veith’s “Serenity”, a  fine art photograph on display at Fairweather’s OUTSIDE INTERESTS exhibition.

In the background: art by Blue Bond, Diane Copenhaver and Emily Miller.

 

“Serenity”

“The work selected for your show OUTSIDE INTERESTS is especially important because that’s where I learned to use art in my healing process.”  Dr. Dale Veith, Clinical Psychologist.

OUTSIDE INTERESTS on exhibition through August 25.

http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Thank you Coast Weekend and reporter Katherine Lacaze for supporting the arts.

Art pictured:

On the ledge pair of abstracts by Diane Copenhaver, seascape by Lisa Sofia Robinson, oil by Blue Bond and fresco by Agnes Field.

On the wall photographs by Dale Veith and Russell J. Young, watercolors by Mary Burgess, oils by Phil Juttlestad, Judy Horning Shaw and Karen E. Lewis, abstract by Leah Kohlenberg, mixed media by Sandy Visse, glass art by Bob Heath, seed mosaics by Gayle H. Seely and acrylic by Nick Brakel.

 

 

Fairweather’s MAKING WAVES July 2019 exhibition explores the deep, multifaceted relationship with the ocean.

 

Oil paintings by Paul Brent, encaustic art, sea turtles, beach rope baskets and urchin bowls by Emily Miller, watercolor/ calligraphy by Diane Copenhaver,  handmade mouth blown glass and sea glass jewelry by Mary Bottita and Barbara Walker.

Three dimensional textile art by Bonnie Garlington and hand made one-of-a-kind glass accessories.

Landscape oil on canvas by Karen E. Lewis, seascapes by Carol Thompson, fresco art by Agnes Field, mouth blown art glass and Illume art  candles.

 

Look closely to note the mouth blown floating glass bubbles. Just perfect for the MAKING WAVES art display and, yes, they are  available for purchase.

Seascapes by Ron Nicolaides.

Oil seascapes by Victoria Brooks, calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson, hand made art glass vessels and vases.

Art for the MAKING WAVES exhibition, largely significant pieces, include new original work and new art glass selected specifically for the July month-long show.

 

 

Abstract wave art by Leah Kohlenberg, hand made glass by Bob Heath, hand made box by Christine Trexel, beaded box by Gayle H. Seely and art cards by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

 

 

Seascape oil paintings by Phil Juttelstad,  watercolor by Bill Baily, landscapes by Lee Munsell, fine art photography by Dr. Dale J. Veith and Russell J. Young,  fused glass by Mike Fox, wood boxes by Ray Noregaard, wood bowl by Tom Willing and seascape watercolors by Mary Burgess.

 

Art by Sharon Abbott-Furze, stemware by Rox Heath and art glass by Sandy and Bob Lercari.

 

 

Mixed media by Sandy Visse,  seascape by Karen E. Lewis,  art glass by Bob Heath and hand forged candle sticks.

Photos by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

Staging by D. Fairweather, gallerist/ allied member A.S.I. D., American Society of Interior Designers.

 

 

Read more about MAKING WAVES at:

Thank you Coast Weekend and reporter Katherine Lacaze for supporting the arts.

https://www.discoverourcoast.com/…/article_7a1c4f88-a704-11…

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside

Featuring changing month-long exhibitions  by selected and significant Northwest artists, craftsmen and artisans.The gallery specializes in original oils, watercolors, mixed media works of art, as well as contemporary bronze, mouth blown glass work, abstracts, and one-of-a-kind accessories.

MAKING WAVES on exhibit through July 30.

The range in the show reveals the extraordinary impact of the sea and waves.

Featuring  artists: Blue Bond, Victoria Brooks, Paul Brent, Nick Brakel, Karen Doyle, Leah Kohlenberg, Karen Lewis, Emily Miller, Lee Munsell, Richard Newman, Ron Nicolaides, Jan Rimerman, Lisa Sofia Robinson, Peg Wells, Russell J. Young and Dale Veith.

Introducing artists Sharon Abbott-Furze and Phil Juttelstad.

 For more info please visit  http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

Saturday August 3, 5-7:pm

Fairweather House and Gallery

Opening reception for OUTSIDE INTERESTS featuring local painters and artisans hugely impressed with the wide-open, majestic vistas of the Pacific Northwest  Selected art, new original work, conveys nature’s shifting moods, with no human presence visible.   Curated exhibition. Resident artists. Paul Brent, Renee Hafeman, Melissa Jander, Sharon Kathleen Johnson, Bev Drew Kindley, Martha Lee, Gretha Lindwood, Susan Romersa, Shelby Silver  and Dale J. Veith.

Welcoming new artists Christine Downs and Elina Zebergs.

Introducing new artist Vicky Combs.

Naturalist Neal Maine will speak on the local habitat at 6: pm.

Painting Seaside LIVE event by Paul Brent.

 LIVE music by Shirley 88.

 

 

“Heading out at Sunrise” by Dale Veith fine art photograph

 

“Fishermen at Sea” by Dale Veith fine art photograph

“Windswept” by Dale Veith fine art photograph

 

 

“I chose for Making Waves exhibit because they capture some of the different moods of the sea, and the way that the forces of Nature combine to create awe, exhilaration, and soothing. I love being out in weather. The heavy weather of 75+ mph winds that were howling when I shot, Windswept, and the calm, early morning sunrises that greeted us when I shot, Fishermen at Sea, and Heading Out At Sunrise.

Hopefully, these photos will connect their viewers with the same sort of deep sense of awe and appreciation of Nature and her many moods that they inspire in me.” Dr. Dale Veith Clinical Psychologist, Fine Art Photographer

 

 

Dale Veith offered a lecture on the healing nature of photography during the opening reception of MAKING WAVES, Fairweather’s July exhibition.

 

Photo: by Russell J Young

 

The Photography of Russell J Young

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

Seaside, Oregon

July 6 – July 30

 

MAKING WAVES

Fairweather’s July exhibition explores the deep, multifaceted relationship with the ocean.

Art for the exhibition, largely significant pieces, include new original work, created entirely by North coast artists.

Featuring selected artists: Blue Bond, Victoria Brooks, Paul Brent, Nick Brakel, Karen Doyle, Leah Kohlenberg, Karen Lewis, Emily Miller, Lee Munsell, Richard Newman, Ron Nicolaides, Jan Rimerman, Lisa Sofia Robinson, Peg Wells, Russell J. Young and Dale Veith.

Introducing artists Sharon Abbott-Furze and Phil Juttelstad.

The range in the show reveals the extraordinary impact of the sea and waves.

 

 

“THE LONG GREY LINE”  Dr. Dale J. Veith, fine art photographer

 

“When I think of, “March,” I cannot help but think of the many miles that my son and his fellow cadets spent marching during their tenure at West Point.

 

“The Cadet Chapel in March” by  Dr. Dale J. Veith, fine art photographer.

So, for my take on, “March,” I selected photos that were either taken at West Point during the month of March, or the photos are related to important marching events that occurred there.

 

For instance, the photo of the dark lines in the grass is titled, “THE LONG GREY LINE.” West Point Graduates are referred to as being part of “The Long Grey Line.” The lines in the lawn were worn into the lawn during an Acceptance Day parade when the cadets “accepted” into the Corps of Cadets.” Dr. Dale J. Veith

 

 

 

 

“Jumping in With Both Feet” USMC cadet in March by Dr. Dale J. Veith, fine art photographer.

 

Dr. Dale J. Veith offered an artist lecture at the Fairweather Gallery during the opening reception of ‘March’, an exhibition on display through March 28.

 

“He who has a why to live for can bear almost any how.”  Friedrich Nietzsche

 

“An Oregon native, I am a clinical psychologist. I work in medical settings and my work is with people who have chronic medical conditions. The management pain is one of my passions.

My love of treating patients grew out of my personal experiences as a chronic pain patient. My pain started around 40 years ago through a combination of sports injuries, heavy physical labor, and motor vehicle crashes. Wonderful physicians, psychologists, and physical therapists helped me. Their examples inspired me to return to school so that I might find meaning through transforming my pain into an asset by helping others cope.

One of the most valuable lessons my rehab team taught me was the truth of the Nietzsche quote that introduces my bio. Having a sense of purpose, an awareness of what gives life meaning helps us tolerate the many challenges that life sends our way.

 

Having my photos in my office also allows me to share them. I use them to model for my clients how they might go about finding symbols that can perform the same function for them, symbols that remind them what gives their life’s meaning and purpose no matter what challenges confront them on their journey through life.  I hope they do that for all who see them.”  Dr. Dale J. Veith

 

For more info about the gallery, please visit  www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com


WAVES, Fairweather’s front counter table scape.  Art featured: Beluga Whale, mixed media by Nick Brakel, Waves, oil on board by Melissa Jander and calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson.

 

Fairweather Gallery exhibition displays for WAVES.

A Fairweather Gallery  opening reception is all about meeting artists and seeing art.

 

WAVES introduced artist Karen E. Lewis.

 

Victoria Brooks.  Featured Faiweather resident artist for July.

For more info please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Victoria Brooks.

 

Regional artists greeted, spoke to and lectured about art to patrons at WAVES, an exhibition.

 

Fun with Fairweather hostesses. Surfboards by Cleanline Surf, Seaside. And, too, a blooper of sorts.

 

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