Neal Maine


 

Image titled:  Woody on Parade by Gearhart/ Seaside naturalist, biologist and scientist Neal Maine of PacificLight Images.

 Gallery proceeds to support NCLC, North Coast Land Conservancy.

Fun fact about the Wood Duck: The Wood Duck is the only North American duck that regularly produces two broods in one year. 

Male Wood Duck  photographed on West Lake  in April 2017.

Q: Where in the world is West Lake, you ask?

A: West Lake  is located is Gearhart, Oregon on Highway 101, just north of Hertig Fire Station near the cross road of Del Moore Loop Road.

 

For more about the artist, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseangallery.com/ artists/ … Neal Maine

 

 

North Coast Beaver by Neal Maine

NEAL MAINE, SCIENTIST AND WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHER TO PRESENT A LECTURE ON BEAVER ECOLOGY MAY 25TH 7-8PM

Necanicum Watershed Council and North Coast Land Conservancy and The Wetlands Conservancy, present Beaver Tales –Neal Maine, scientist and wildlife photographer to present a lecture on Beaver Ecology

 

Date: May 25
Time: 7 –8 PM
Location: Beaver Tales Exhibition Gallery, 608 Broadway, located in the historic Gilbert District of downtown Seaside
Next to Fairweather Gallery (612 Broadway)

To celebrate beavers and their contribution to the ecology of the North Coast, the nonprofit organizations have teamed up with local businesses to host the Beaver Tales Art Exhibit and Sale in Seaside. The purpose of the exhibit is to highlight the importance of beavers in creating wetlands and other aquatic habitat.

Neal Maine will explain how beavers engineer wetlands on the North Coast, and how people can learn to take advantage of their environmental benefits while protecting property from flooding and other damage. Maine’s vast experience in studying and photographing wildlife enables him to tell fascinating stories about these industrious little rodents that most people never see.

For more info please visit NCLC.org
http://www.necanicumwatershedcouncil

The Wetlands Conservancy has posted information on the Beaver Tales art project. The link is below. Feel free to share it with your friends and contacts.
http://wetlandsconservancy.org/stewardship/beaver-tales

http://wetlandsconservancy.org/stewardship/beaver-tales/beaver-inspiration

https://northernwoodlands.org/discoveries/pathways-to-ponds

Here’s a link to an excellent short video, with great aerial depiction of the changes that beaver dams bring to meadows . . .
http://www.animalplanet.com/tv-shows/other/videos/fooled-by-nature-beaver-dams

And for more inspiration, a video of beaver swimming on U-Tube. .https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9cwu_Wu5ONI


Image title: Hidden Gold.

Long-Billed Curlew.

On migration.

Location: Del Rey Beach, Oregon State Park.

Framed, matted and signed by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images

Proceeds in support of NCLC, North Coast Land Conservancy

For more info please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ … artists/ Neal Maine

This incredibly long-billed curlew is the largest of our shorebirds. It spends the summer on the grasslands of the arid west, appearing on coastal mudflats only in migration. It often occurs alongside the Marbled Godwit, which is very similar in size and color pattern; but the godwit’s bill curves up, not down.

Forages by walking rather quickly over coastal mudflats, using its long bill to probe just below the surface searching for crabs, ghost shrimps, and other creatures.

http://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/long-billed-curlew
http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Long-billed_Curlew

Tracking long-billed curlew | The Nature Conservancy
http://www.nature.org/ourinitiatives/regions/…/tracking-long-billed-curlew-1.xml

•North American Bird Conservation Initiative. 2016. The State of North America’s Birds 2016. Environment and Climate Change

 

Q: Where in the world is Del Rey Beach, you ask?

 

A: The largest ocean in the world, the Pacific Ocean  is a just a steps away walk from Del Rey Oregon State Park, just north of Gearhart on the Pacific Coast Highway 101.  There is a quiet, secluded parking area.  Each of the Oregon State Parks is an individual place where people play, picnic, rest, hike, renew, and everything in between.  They are an everyday reminder of the things that make Oregon great, and their very existence is a testament to what we collectively value.

 

Park History: The land was acquired in 1970 by gift from Clatsop County. Free annual day-use attendance: 98,318

 

 

For more info go to: http://www.traveloregon.com   See & Do …Del Rey Beach State Recreation Site | Travel Oregon

 

ICONIC!  Oregon Coast Sunsets port hole view from Brownie’s Workshop.

Mike Brown. Master Wood Artist.

“Apparently glass is infused in Mike’s soul. He has introduced it back in his woodworking.”

 

Mike Brown’s  newest ICONIC creation is a vase called “Oregon Coast Sunsets” which incorporates four glass portholes and photographs taken on while on vacations!

Each porthole shows a beautiful sunset along the northern, central, and southern Oregon Coast and includes sand and shells to highlight the view through the porthole!

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Mike Brown is a native of the Pacific Northwest. He has had a creative mind and an intense work ethic and likes to express himself building works of art with different mediums using glass and exotic hard woods.

During his school days he took all different types of shop classes including various crafts, leatherwork, and metal but didn’t start working with wood until he started working at a glass shop at the age of 15 ½.  His first boss, Doyle Clapper, was his mentor and shared with Mike his love of woodworking along with giving Mike a broad knowledge of all aspects of construction.  After 35 years, Mike retired from the glass business and finally could pursue his passion for woodworking fulltime.
Mike started creating exotic wood intarsia pictures, learning the art of Intarsia by Judy Gale Robert. He won multiple Best of Awards at the Annual Artistry in Wood Juried show. He also enjoys turning bowls and vases on his lathe and has given many of them away as gifts to family and friends.
He started experimenting creating filigree pictures and ornaments using the scroll saw along with striped-ring exotic wood bowls. The internet is a wonderful thing and he happened upon Steve Garrison’s Ebook on creating wooden sea shells. This became his new passion and once again he won Best of Class and Best of Division awards at the Juried Woodworking show for his wood nautilus shells. These shells range from 35 to 170 wedges of wood and each one takes up to 40 hours to cut, glue, sand, and finish.

He uses exotic woods such as Padauk, Purple Heart, Myrtlewood, and Birdseye Maple, and completes them with a hand-rubbed lacquer finish. Each one is an exquisite piece of art and just like a seashell, no two are alike.

 


Mike has now expanded into turning segmented bowls and vases on his lathe along with creating his own patterns. He is also experimenting with liquid inlay and has created a stunning piece he calls “Purple Heart of Gold” using Purpleheart, Yellowheart,  and Maple woods with gold liquid inlay.

 

 

 

First Shout Out for What’s up Next!

SAVE THE DATE AND TIME!
June 3rd 5-7:pm

Opening reception for ICONIC!!!

Definition of iconic:

1: of, relating to, or having the characteristics of an icon

2: widely recognized and well-established •an iconic brand name

3: widely known and acknowledged especially for distinctive excellence •an iconic image  •an iconic vacation

Fairweather House and Gallery

Seaside First Saturday Art Walk

Featuring Fairweather artists: Mike Brown, Penelope Culbertson, Melissa Jander, Carmela Newstead  and introducing fine art photographer Dale Veith!

Artist Carolyn McPherson will offer a Painting Seaside LIVE ™ episode!

Shirley 88 will perform LIVE!

Naturalist, ecologist Neal Maine will speak at 6:pm (sharp) about the local habitat!

 

For more information about the artists, please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/  artists tab

 

For more information about the Art Walk, please visit http://www.facebook.com/ Seaside First Saturday Art Walk

Just in. Image titled: We Have Lift Off by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images. Location: Sunset Beach, Oregon. Date: April 2017. Proceeds in support of NCLC.
Please visit NCLCtrust.org to read more about North Coast Land Conservancy.

See more info about Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images and other exhibits at http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com /…artists /…Neal Maine …/blog.

Q: Where is Sunset Beach, you ask?

A: Sunset Beach is a state park in Clatsop County, Oregon. The park comprises 120 acres along the Pacific Ocean on the Clatsop Plains and is located between Gearhart and Warrenton, Oregon.

For more info please go to:
Sunset Beach State Recreation Site – Oregon State Parks and …
oregonstateparks.org/index.cfm?do=parkPage.dsp_parkPage&parkId=182
Sunset Beach State Recreation Site comes with a very famous past. The park marks the west trailhead of the historic Fort-to-Sea Trail

The osprey is a very unique raptor, standing out not only for its beauty but also for its choice of prey.
Seven fun facts about ospreys:

1. The osprey is the only hawk species in North America that eats almost exclusively live fish.

2. The raptor can dive as deep as three feet into the water for fish, but prefers to hunt in shallower areas.

3. This species is also known as the river hawk, fish hawk or sea hawk. But don’t confuse it with the Seahawk, the mascot of the Seattle-based football team. First, there is no such thing as a “seahawk” (one word). Second, the team actually uses an augur hawk as its mascot, a species native to Africa. The osprey may be known as a sea hawk, but it has no connection to football.

4. The osprey is the second most widely distributed raptor species, after the peregrine falcon, and can be found on every continent except Antarctica.

5. All of the ospreys around the world are part of a single species, with the exception of the eastern osprey which is native to Australia.

6. The osprey species is at least 11 million years old and is so well adapted to fishing that it has evolved unique characteristics that set it apart from other raptor species. These include nostrils that can be closed during dives, and an outer toe that can be angled backwards to better grasp fish. The species is so unique, it is listed in its own genus (Pandion) and family (Pandionidae).

7. Ospreys can live to be 15-20 years old. The oldest known osprey was just over 25 years old. During that long lifetime, the migratory birds can rack up over 160,000 miles of travel. In fact, in 2008 an osprey being tracked by researchers flew an amazing 2,700 miles in just 13 days, traveling from Massachusetts to French Guiana, South America!

For more info about ospreys go to:
Osprey, Life History, All About Birds – Cornell Lab of Ornithology
https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Osprey/lifehistory


THE OSPREY IS BEING CONSIDERED TO BECOME THE STATE BIRD OF OREGON.

To learn more go to: Oregon Senate chooses osprey over western … – Statesman Journal
http://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/…/oregon…osprey…state-bird…/100124452/ Apr 7, 2017

 

 

 

“The Seaside Osprey nest cam is up and running, in exceptional HD quality! HUGE thanks to Sunset Empire Park and Recreation District for hosting the camera, and installing fiber optic cable so the cam can be so clear!”

Thank you Necanicum Watershed Council!

Seaside Osprey Nest located in Broadway Park in Seaside, Oregon 

 

 https://youtu.be/POrdO5y0XxY

 

 

 

Melyssa Graeper
Coordinator
Necanicum Watershed Council
1115 Broadway | PO Box 474
Seaside, OR 97138
503-717-1458 office

CLICK HERE to support our osprey nest cam goals
http://www.necanicumwatershed.org

For more info go to: http://www.facebook.com/necanicumwatershedcouncil

Named the “state animal” in 1969, the American beaver builds the dams and wetlands that serve as habitat for Oregon salmon, steelhead, birds, amphibians and insects. Beavers are nature’s hydrologists, “Beaver Tales: A Celebration of Beaver Art” curator Sara Vickerman … click of the following link to read the entire front page article by Eve Marz, reporter for the Seaside Signal …

Source: From near extinction to a place in art

For more info the participating Fairweather  artists, please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com …artists … Paul Brent, Mike Brown, Susan Curington, Agnes Field, Jo Pomeroy Crockett and  Neal Maine.

Save the date and time.

BEAVER TALES, a celebration of art.

May 6th, 5-7:pm in the historic Gilbert District Block of downtown Seaside

For more info about the Art Walk, please go to http://www.facebook.com/SeasideFirstSaturdayArtWalk

SAVE THE DATE AND TIME!

http://www.NCLCtrust.org
Listening to the Land: Dam, Beaver! Dam!
Wednesday, April 19
6 to 8 pm
Seaside Public Library

And, too, a lot more info about Beavers and all the good things they do for us:

Dr. Stephen Ramsey, from the OSU Center for Genome Research & Biocomputing (the Center has recently announced the completion of its sequencing of the beaver genome, so this is very well timed – http://registerguard.com/rg/news/local/35185225-75/oregon-state-university-researchers-find-benny-the-beaver-fills-big-genes.html.csp)

Frances Backhouse will offer a talk based on her research and writing that appeared in her award-winning book, Once They Were Hats: In Search of the Mighty Beaver. At Beach Books on May 6th at 1:pm. http://www.backhouse.ca/books/once-they-were-hats-in-search-of-the-mighty-beaver/.

The Wetlands Conservancy has posted information on the Beaver Tales art project. The link is below. Feel free to share it with your friends and contacts.
http://wetlandsconservancy.org/stewardship/beaver-tales

http://wetlandsconservancy.org/stewardship/beaver-tales/beaver-inspiration

https://northernwoodlands.org/discoveries/pathways-to-ponds

Here’s a link to an excellent short video, with great aerial depiction of the changes that beaver dams bring to meadows . . .
http://www.animalplanet.com/tv-shows/other/videos/fooled-by-nature-beaver-dams

And for more inspiration, a video of beaver swimming on U-Tube. .https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9cwu_Wu5ONI

CBC News Posted: Apr 02, 2017Great parenting: animals that care for their young in ‘amazing’ ways BEAVERS…

Some parents are a little more dedicated than others, according to wildlife expert Frank Ritcey. Ritcey says beavers take a more paws-on approach to raising their young. They give birth inside their lodges, where kits will stay until they’re old enough to start eating solid food.

“Once they’re old enough to venture forth, they travel about with the parent to learn how to become a beaver. [Kits] follow the adult around and mimic the adults actions,” said Ritcey.

“It’s so cute to watch — but it’s also very important as the young have to learn a whole set of skills like using the right trees to fall and how to build dams and lodges, and in general — how to be as busy as a beaver should be.”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_23vuRU2Ews

 

While nothing can compare to the real beaver it is great to see more comprehensive research about the positive impacts of beaver dams.

http://www.ktvz.com/…/osu-cascades-students-scien…/394113930

 

 

 

And, too, from @MightyBeaver
This page features updates on what’s happening in the beaver world and news about the book.

http://www.cbc.ca/…/canada/hamilton/trapped-beaver-1.4086804

A new addition to the beaver’s resumé — cattle wrangler!
http://www.cbc.ca/…/…/sask-ranchers-stunned-beaver-1.4073018

Beavers get a shout-out for their great parenting skills (especially their “paws-on approach to raising their young”) in this CBC News story. http://www.cbc.ca/…/great-parenting-4-animals-that-care-for…
A successful rescue of a wandering young beaver in London, Ontario.
http://www.thelondoner.ca/…/salthavens-patient-of-the-week-…
What does it mean to coexist with beavers and how do we do that? This short video offers good answers to both questions. https://vimeo.com/96040603

Baltimore Oriole

Image titled: Stranger in Town.

April 2017

Photographer Neal Maine, PacificLight  Images.

Just in time for BLOOM, an exhibition, at Fairweather’s.

A Baltimore Oriole visiting a backyard in Seaside, Oregon! 

Image backstory:

Once again, one Baltimore Oriole, a stranger to the North coast area, usually not a visitor to the West, has appeared, again in the spring of 2017, to the same flowering tree in the Seaside area, first visited in the spring of 2016.

Fun facts:

One of the most brilliantly colored songbirds in the east, flaming orange and black, sharing the heraldic colors of the coat of arms of 17th-century Lord Baltimore.

Widespread east of the Great Plains.

Baltimore Orioles are often very common in open woods.

Visits flowers for nectar.

http://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/baltimore-oriole

Baltimore Oriole migration map.

Open woods, riverside groves, elms, shade trees. Breeds in deciduous or mixed woodland, generally in open woods or edges rather than interior of dense forest. May be common in trees in towns. Often favors elms. Winters mostly in the tropics around forest edge and semi-open country.

Rarely west of the Rocky Mountains!!!

 

Neal Maine/ PacificLight  Images

NATURE’S TRAILS

A limpet creeps up a wave-washed rock, following the rise of the tide. A salmon follows ancient watershed trails to its natal stream. An otter travels along its living trap line for crabs in the estuary to crayfish up side creeks. A vole tunnels into the soft sponge on the forest floor. In the treetops, in the forest, across the land, in the water, and in the air, all become a living slate for NATURE’S TRAILS. This tracery of interwoven trails are unsigned but indelible to generations of travelers.

THE NEXT FRONTIER, OUR OWN BACKYARD

Humans: We take pictures, walks, deep breaths, memories, ride on waves, water, timber, in habitat that used to belong to other trail makers. We thought we could never catch all the salmon, never cut all the big trees, and never pollute the ocean. In our hubris, we thought we could make our own trails. With renewed humility, we are learning how to share this place, to live together with our partner trail makers. PacificLight Images celebrates this partnership as we use our images to inspire others to honor nature’s trails in OUR OWN BACKYARD. –Neal Maine

 Proceeds to support North Coast Land Conservancy, NCLC. 

Please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com …artists …Neal Maine for more images and info

 

And, too, the 2016 famous Baltimore Oriole photo by Neal Maine.

Baltimore Oriole

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