Neal Maine


R.J. Marx performed LIVE on May 4.  Art by Lisa Sofia Robinson and Barbara Rosbe Felisky; calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson and Brenda Gordon.

 

Carolyn Macpherson painted LIVE during a gallery event. Segmented wood vases and shells by Mike Brown; pottery by Suzy Holland; painting by James Waterman and wood boxes by Ray Noregaard.

 

Blue Bond painted en plein air  outside on Broadway at Fairweather’s.

 

Neal Maine lectured during Fairweather’s ‘Portraiture’ opening reception.  Photographs by Neal Maine and Michael Wing; glass are by Bob and Rox Heath.

 

 

Photographer Scott Saulsbury stepped up to the plate to fill-in for Linda Fenton-Mendenhall, Faiweather’s after hours event photographer.

Fun Fact: Linda selected Scott and they both had Neal Maine as a teacher at Seaside High.

 

Guy and Karen Rainsberger poured for Parrett Mountain Cellars at Fairweather’s Wine Walk.  Art by Britney Drumheller, Diane Copenhaver and Emily Miller.

 

Shirley 88 played  LIVE during the SDDA Spring Wine Walk at Fairweather’s.  Fused glass by Mike Fox.

 

More than 800 tid-bits were consumed during four hours of the SDDA Spring Wine Walk at Fairweather’s.  In addition, back up “In the Mist” books by Russell J. Young and stored Odes to the Tides flyers, Fairweather’s JUNE exhibition.

 

Seaside First Saturday Art Walk hostesses served as SDDA Spring Wine Walk hostesses on May 18 at Fairweather’s.   And, yes, the ladies  dressed to complement each other.

Hundreds of  guests came to the SDDA Spring Wine Walk at Fairweather’s. Art by Paul Brent;  Chanel jewelry by Reneé Hafeman and photographs on bamboo by Don Frank.

 

Late in the month of May, Blue Bond made the announcement that he sold his painting  of “Willie Nelson” to the country legend Willie Nelson!!!

 

For more about the gallery, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

“Polar Snow Shoe” by Neal Maine

“Whale Within” by Neal Maine 

 

 

Wildlife photographers Daniel Dietrich and Neal Maine in 2015.

 

An event hosted in Seaside for the Alaska Wilderness League in 2015 has earned  recent  kudos and a connection to Art Wolfe, internationally known photographer. Neal Maine shared the news at the opening reception of ‘Portraiture’ on May 4, 2019.

 

Daniel Dietrich traveled to the Arctic with Neal Maine in 2014. Daniel recently entered his polar bear image, a photo one/tenth of a second from Neal Maine, in a competition.

“Thanks to BigPicture: Natural World Photography Competition for selecting my polar bear image as a finalist in this year’s competition. The photo will be on display at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco July-October.”  Daniel Dietrich

 

And, too, Daniel Dietrich is with Art Wolfe on location in 2019.

 

 

To recall the 2015 event, go to…

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/tag/arctic-light

 

‘Arctic Light’ draws attention to global warming Presentation …

https://www.discoverourcoast.com/…/arctic-light…/article_1d181096-2d41-5d56-a37…

Feb 16, 2015 – ‘Arctic Light’ draws attention to global warming Presentation, … Neal Maine and Daniel Dietrich will speak about Alaska Wilderness League at …

 

 

Osprey portrait by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images.  Proceeds in support of NCLC.

 

‘Portraiture’ habitat lecture by local naturalist, wildlife photographer Neal Maine was given at Fairweather’s on May 4.

 

Ospreys return to Seaside

May 17, 2019/  Seaside Signal newspaper article

Oregon coast naturalist Neal Maine still gets a thrill after many years of watching the osprey return to their nests in Seaside. Maine has found nine nests so far and estimates that there are about 20 osprey locally, but he admits that there are likely some he is missing.

“When nature keeps on marching, you get excited. When the osprey return, somethings still right, they flew all the way from South America,” said Maine.

The annual return of the osprey not only marks the coming of summer, it is a sign of the progress being made in conservation. Osprey, along with other raptors, suffered a population decimation from the use of DDT, which caused eggshell thinning. Once the pesticide was banned, the bird of prey made a sharp recovery.

However, they are not out of the woods yet. There is a growing trend of osprey nesting on man-made objects. Osprey typically nest near rivers on the top of dead trees, but as forest composition changed and old growth snags disappeared, they started relying on utility poles and other tall objects to rear their young.

In addition, their choice location is not always convenient. When osprey in Seaside decided to nest on a pole near the Broadway baseball field the raptors did not consider that the power line may one day need replacement. The nest was relocated on a 60-foot high pole installed off Neawanna Creek. Fortunately, the birds were fine with the move and have continued to nest at the new location since 2012. Maine, who oversaw the project, has watched the same birds come back to the same nests since 2009.

Osprey that summer in Oregon typically winter off the islands and coast of Mexico, Central and South America, segregating into male and female territories. Osprey typically live to 25 in the wild and will continue to use the same nest with their monogamous partner, unless something tragic happens. The juveniles also come back to the area where they were reared so the birds on the coast have been here for many, many generations.

While their numbers rebounded significantly in most of the world after the banning of DDT, osprey are still threatened or endangered globally, including in many states nationally. In Oregon, they are not considered legally endangered, although are not as abundant as they once were. Currently, the biggest threat to osprey is aquaculture, which causes habitat loss because of damming. The raptors are often shot while hunting fish at aquaculture facilities in their southern territory.

However, here in Oregon the birds are increasingly overwintering locally rather than migrating and it is not clear as to why. The birds rely on an abundant source of fish, which may be harder for the birds to find as more rivers are dammed for agriculture, flood control, aquaculture and hydropower. It’s also possible that they are finding the Willamette Valley’s maritime climate more amenable than in year’s past and have moved north, like many birds, as a result of climate change. Moreover, it could be a slough of other variables not yet identified. There are not many resources on the coast dedicated to the study of osprey.

We didn’t even know where the nests were, it wasn’t on anyone’s agenda. ODFW was budgeted back to survival level, there’s not even an ODFW office in Clatsop County,” said Maine. Since the ospreys are not a priority species, answering these questions might fall on the shoulders of people like Maine, who engages regularly in citizen science. “More and more are staying every winter in the valley, and last year I found one here in January,” he said.

Nature certainly does find a way and osprey are a testament to that. They are resilient birds and can make themselves at home in the busiest of human environments. “It seems like they watch the baseball games,” Maine said about the birds at the Broadway field.

 

Check out the osprey cam at seasideosprey.org or better yet, go find them in person in Seaside.


 ‘Shannon’ crystal candle sticks.

Ireland is home to some of the world’s most impressive crystal designs, among them ‘Shannon’  crystal. The craft of Irish crystal making is an art form that has been developed and modified over hundreds of years, going back as far as the Celts, who brought the first glass to Ireland in for jewelry making.

Table design featuring ‘Shannon’ crystal, mixed-media beach stone and lichen art by Peggy Stein, ‘Great Blue Heron’ oil painting by Paul Brent, miniature abstract by  Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, semi-precious gemstone necklaces by Mary Bottita.  Tables by D. Fairweather, gallerist and  allied member A.S.I.D., American Society of Interior Designers. Photo collage by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

 

 

Green art glass: no other medium captures the dance of light and color so perfectly, mouth blown gracefully into a free-form shape. Approximately 20’ diameter at rim.

Kemy Kay, art hostess in dressed in the wearing of green, Carol Johansen, frequent gallery visitor. She is a cousin to Fairweather resident artist Linda Fenton-Mendenhall, did you know?

Pastels on table by Leah Kohlenberg,  raw edged coffee table by Ray Noregaard, birch wood framed acrylics on grass cloth  by Barbara Bacon Folawn, abstract 12×12 by Diane Copenhaver, pen and ink framed and matted art by emerging artist Brenda Gordon, paper cloth beaded origami by Peggy Evans and table display featuring the liquid beauty of a hand blown fluted glass bowl. Photo collage by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall

 

One-of-a-kind hand-crafted art jewelry at the Fairweather Gallery. Distinctive  NW artist-made necklaces and earrings.

 

Concert grand piano display for ‘March’ featuring watch necklaces by Brigitte Willse, sea glass jewelry by Barbara Walker, calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson and earrings by Mary Boitta, Mary Hurst, Karen Johnson and Tanya Gardner.

 

 

 

Leather key ring cross by Luan and silver cuff by Alan Stockam and Heather Rieder.

 

 

 

To read about the history of the Celtic cross, please visit https://www.gaelicmatters.com/celtic-cross-meaning.html

 

To read more about past Irish and March articles about  Fairweather’s go to:

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/…/a-round-of-applause-for-after-pa…

Mar 12, 2017 – A round of applause for after party images from IRISH LANDS, an exhibition opening at Fairweather’s.

Feb 14, 2017 – Posted by Fairweather House and Gallery under Q&A | Tags: Art Galleries, … Kate Hegarty came to America from Ireland with a spinning wheel …
Mar 2, 2016 – The Wildlife Center of the North Coast will bring a live American kestrel to FairweatherHouse and Gallery during …

 

Making the Dollar: Fairweather House & Gallery. Published: March 26, 2009. During 25 years of interior design experience she …

Top left: Rain painting by Jeni Lee, mixed media 12 x 12 painting by Jan Rimerman, mini words in wisdom by Diane Copenhaver, ceramics, lava vases and pottery by Emily Miller, mouth blown glass platters by Sandy and Bob Lercari, pastel “Pond Reflection” by Dan Mackerman, as well as calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson.

Top center: “Great Blue Heron” oil painting by Paul Brent.

Top right:  pair of whimsical art by Marga Stanley.

Bottom left: Seaside Visitors Bureau/ Tourism booklet 2019 open to a page about the Fairweather Gallery.  Nature photography by Neal Maine.

Bottom center:  Watercolors on yupo by Carolyn Macpherson and wood boxes by Ray Noregaard.

Bottom right: IIumne  candle collection on piano,  Fine Art lamps,  mirror by Currey and Co., indoor/outdoor garden stool by Art Interiors and limited edition rabbit lithographs.

2019 March postcard by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

 


“Virginia Rail” by Neal Maine, PacificLight Images.

The Virginia rail is a small waterbird, fairly common despite continuing loss of habitat, but are secretive by nature and more often heard than seen.

Read more at https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/virginia-rail

 

 

 

Seaside First Saturday Art Walk

Fairweather House and Gallery

Through the years, local habitat lecture every First Saturday by Neal Maine at 6:pm.

 

 

Neal Maine,  naturalist,  spoke about the nurse logs that establish marching orders for future forests during the Fairweather Gallery opening reception of ‘March’ on the March 2nd Seaside First Saturday Art Walk.

 

Even though they’re dead, they are not gone — trees find a way to help each other out postmortem. Introducing the nurse log. Defined as fallen trees that provide “ecological facilitation” as they decay, nurse logs offer seedlings shade, nutrients, water and protection from disease and pathogens, thus nurturing and making way for the new generation.

How does it work, you ask? Well, the process begins with a fallen tree’s gradual breakdown of lignin following its death. Lignin is a group of polymers that help form the trees’ structural tissues, especially in wood and bark. Biodegradation of lignin is facilitated by microorganisms such as fungi and bacteria — white rot fungi, more specifically, is responsible for breaking down wood on the forest floor. As the lignin deteriorates, holes and niches in the bark begin to grow in size and, over time, become filled with soil, moss, mushrooms and small plants. This dark soil is called humus, the nitrogen-rich organic matter that forms when plant and animal matter decay. When moss covers the exterior of the log itself, the decaying process is expedited, and new plant species are more easily supported.

Plants aren’t the only ones that benefit, however. Many small animal species such as squirrels are also known to roost on or in nurse logs, enriching the humus and providing additional fertilization for germinating seeds and sprouts with their food debris.  –Allie Wisniewski, American Forests

 

 

“This tree I saw at Skipanon Forest, an NCLC Reserve. This Sitka spruce fell over some time ago, but instead of dying, it decided to become at least seven new “trees” from its branches. The largest new tree (just left of center) looked to be nearly a foot in diameter and perhaps 30’ tall. Amazing what a tree will do to keep on keeping on.”   Jeffrey Roehm, NCLC steward

 

Take a note!

Next Seaside First Saturday Art Walk

April 6

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Next local habitat lecture by Neal Maine at 6:pm on April 6.

For more info about the Art Walk events, please visit www.facebook.com/SeasideFirstSaturdayArtWalk

 

Neal Maine introduced a catalog of PacificLight Images recently at Fairweather House and Gallery; an exclusive catalog featuring his entire collection with images that can be special ordered as framed prints or as matted prints, representing more than a decade of habitat photography.

 

 

100% profits from the sale proceeds in support of North Coast Land Conservancy, NCLC.

To read more about North Coast Land Conservancy, please go to https://nclctrust.org/rare-

For more about the naturalist/ photographer Neal Maine, please visit his artist’s page at

www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

#10. Seaside Painting LIVE ™ demonstrations.  At the easel is artist Carolyn Macpherson.

 

#9. Fourth annual harp petting zoo. Faiweather’s December Seaside First Saturday Art Walk.

 

#8.  Artist Emily Miller’s 100 Turtles project. Doing good works.

 

#7.  Shirley 88 performing LIVE on the Fairweather grand.

#6.  Celebrity artists Jorjett Strumme, Agnes Field and Barbara Rosbe Felisky lecturing.

 

#5.  Five rescued Fairweather greyhounds made an appearance in the gallery.

 

#4. Share and Share Alike exhibition.  Indeed, a  show with a personal backstory. Pictured with calligrapher Penelope Culbertson.

 

#3.  The Perfect Pair, Perfect Pare and Perfect Pear exhibition.  Jo-Pomeroy-Crockett, PhD., explains.

 

#2.  All the Neal Maine naturalist and habitat lectures at 6:pm during the Seaside First Saturday Art Walks.

 

#1.  Paul and Lana Jane Brent. Looking back and, surely, looking forward to 2019.

 

“Truly, it’s the people that offer the energy and talent that propels Fairweather House and Gallery.”

Please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com for more information.

 

“Snowbound”

Great Blue Heron by Neal Maine/PacificLight Images.

“After many years of trying to capture a heron in the snow, it finally happened along the Neawanna River in Seaside.” Neal Maine

 

For more images from Neal Maine, please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com /  …artists tab/  …Neal Maine and Michael Wing

 

Question:

“Would it be possible to share the link that has Katie’s thank you as an end of year story on the Fairweather blog?”

Answer:

“Of course! We would love that. We’re so glad you were touched by the letter and appreciate you wanting to share it with others.”

Lorraine Ortiz
Development Director

 

December 2018

Dear Friend of North Coast Land Conservancy,

When I look back on this wonderful year at North Coast Land Conservancy, there is one day that stands out as nothing less than magical. As someone who has joined an On the Land outing or pulled weeds with us, who regularly donates to us or who simply follows us through our newsletters or e-news, you know that among our many projects, the big one we’re working on is conservation of what we call the Rainforest Reserve—3,500 acres of forestland adjacent to Oswald West State Park. I’ve made more than two dozen trips up there this year alone, with old and new friends. But this one day was unique.

 

We heard that Oregon’s poet laureate, Kim Stafford, was visiting the coast to do a reading, and we invited him to visit the Rainforest Reserve with us. The morning we set out, the coast was socked in with dense fog—classic pea-soup conditions. Yet barely a couple hundred feet up into the forest, the clouds gave way to blue skies and sunshine. The higher we climbed, the warmer the day became. As we climbed the ridge, the summit of Onion Peak gradually came into view: Onion Peak, the highest point in the proposed Rainforest Reserve.

High on the ridge, at the headwaters of streams that plunge down steep chasms to meet the ocean, at the tree line where meadows flourish on rocky balds, I felt like I was perched on an island of wilderness, a secret floating mountain in the sky. We couldn’t see the towns or highway that we’d left behind just minutes earlier. It was strikingly quiet. Quiet, but not silent. I closed my eyes to better hear the sounds of the rainforest: the buzzing, the singing, the whispering, and the whooshing of wings. I felt transported.

 

I often feel that way when I get off the beaten path just a little bit; do you? When I notice that I don’t hear the road anymore. When I realize my breathing has slowed and I can feel my heart beat. When instead of reaching for my phone, I look to the trees, trying to locate with my eyes the bird that my ears can hear so clearly. Happy memories wash over me, and I feel a sense of kinship with all of creation, past and present. It’s at times like these that I tend to get some of my best ideas.

As Kim put it that day, “This place offers not only clarity of water but clarity of thought. Maybe that’s the business we’re really in: conserving places where all species can be their best selves. Your gifts are the only way we can make that happen. In our land conservation work, I often bump up against folks who say, “I’m not an environmentalist,” or say “I like open space, but I’m no tree-hugger.”  I’ll admit that I have been known to actually hug trees now and then, mostly to feel for myself the scale of some of the big trees we still have on the Oregon Coast. But to the extent that tree-hugger means by-any-means-necessary, I realize that’s not me. And that’s not the organization I work for. By working with willing landowners, by keeping in mind the people part of our people-plants-and-wildlife formula for coastal conservation, we keep open the lines of communication with everyone.

 

Because I don’t think I’ve ever met anyone who hasn’t experienced one way or another, a moment of magic in the natural world. Who hasn’t felt transported, or felt a deepening of connection with all of creation by being in a wild place, away from the houses, roads, and towns where we spend most of our lives.

The way Kim Stafford spoke about the land that day was so grounding, and so humble and human. It reminded me that we are all just people, doing the best we can to take care of our place, and for so very many reasons:

We save this land because it brings life, water and breath.

We save this land because we love the critters that live here, the wildflowers, and the forests.

We save this land because, in the end, we know it will save us.

Or as Kim said that day, on the shoulder of Onion Peak, one of the pieces of ground we are working so hard to conserve, “It occurs to me, while standing here, that this project will offer what we will long for more and more: clear water, quiet, and starlight.”

Thank you for sharing your time and your treasure and allowing us to do just that, here on our coast: offering clear water, quiet, and starlight, for all creatures, forever.

If simply being in nature is already such a powerful experience for me, what was it about being in one of my favorite wild places with a poet such as Kim Stafford that made the experience even more profound?

Part of it was the day itself: standing on a peak floating upon fog, in the gold and blue of a fall day that felt stolen from summer. But I think Kim was somehow able to read my heart and put words to what I was feeling better than I could myself. Each of us, every human being, has a need for nature, is part of nature. Each of us feels that connection, deep in our hearts and souls, even if we can’t put that awe and that sense of wonder into words the way he could.

The next day Kim emailed us to thank us for the day we shared. What a gift it is to work with such amazing people—people such as yourself—who care so deeply about our coast and for our coast.

 

Thank you for helping to conserve Oregon’s coastal lands, forever.

All my best,

Katie Voelke

Executive Director

North Coast Land Conservancy

Preserving the Oregon Coast Forever

PO Box 67, Seaside, OR 97138

503.738.9126

https://nclctrust.org/

 

 

Hosted by the Seaside Library Art Committee

“Maybe no other local wildlife creature represents the natural history of the North Coast land ocean interface better than the great blue heron.”  Neal Maine

19 images of the Great Blue Heron, a natural history art show, by Neal Maine at the Seaside Library, on public display combined with a printed image guide  detailing the natural history of the great blue heron.

 

 

“The goal of this photography display is to celebrate this unique bird and bring life to how the features of the great blue heron fir the abundance and freshwater systems of the North Coast.  Natural history photography places high value on the quality of the image but even more important, is the desire, skill and patience to capture and illuminate the beauty of the coast landscape and its unique wildlife.”   Neal Maine

“This is the perfect time to share NCLC’s gratitude for FAIRWEATHER’S support of our conservation work on the coast.  We are delighted to share about the new social media outreach program NCLC has launched for our business partners as a thank you for your support. Four times a year NCLC will be posting a thank you to FAIRWEATHER on our FB page, with a photo.”

Here is the schedule for FAIRWEATHER’S posts:

Last week of February 2019

Last week of May 2019

Last week of September 2019

Last week of November 2019

Thank you for valuing the beauty and magnificence of the Oregon Coast. Thank you from all of us at NCLC to all of you at FAIRWEATHER.

Lorraine Ortiz

Development Director

North Coast Land Conservancy

Preserving the Oregon Coast Forever

 

 

“White Wings.”

Common white egret by Neal Maine, PacificLight Images.

November, 2018

Sunset Beach, Oregon

 

Read more about Herons and Egrets | Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife

https://myodfw.com/wildlife-viewing/species/-herons-and-egrets

After a thirty-year career as an award-winning biology teacher at Seaside High School, Neal Maine became the first executive director of North Coast Land Conservancy, which he co-founded in 1986. Since his retirement from the land trust in 2010, he has pursued his passion for nature photography through PacificLight Images, which is dedicated to raising awareness of coastal ecology and the wildlife with whom we share the region’s estuaries, freshwater wetlands and forests. The photography centers around coastal and Columbia River landscape, ecology and the rich estuary habitat with the surrounding wetlands and forest systems. Neal Maine focuses his imagery on exploring wildlife in the context of its habitat.

 

To view more of Neal Maine’s photography, please go to the  artists tab/ Neal Maine http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

100% of profits from Neal Maine’s photography  are donated to NCLC,  North Coast Land Conservancy.

 

 

 

Q: “Would it be possible to share the poem that Kim Stafford dedicated to NCLC as a story for the “All is Calm” Art Walk at Fairweather’s?”

A:  “We’re so glad you were touched and appreciate you wanting to share it with others,”  NCLC/North Coast Land Conservancy.

For more about NCLC go to https://nclctrust.org/ North Coast Land Conservancy. Helping to conserve Oregon’s coastal lands, forever.

Mother Mountain
Heaven, the old proverb says, is at your mother’s feet—
and here we are at the forest hem watching fog climb
through trees toward the queen’s crown peak,
hidden harvester of rain, alpine realm of silence
and starlight, home to bear cave, elk wallow,
cougar range, rare flowers brimming from persistent
seeps, trees shaggy with centuries on their blue ridge
where sister peaks layer shadows far.
So close the gate, let the alders usher in young fir,
cedar, hemlock, spruce, let the road become a path
for pilgrims seeking myriad mysteries, magic
not yet known, the black petaltail dragonfly
born from fog-fed, moss-footed mud to soar
before our eyes from the time of legends.
Here we dwell at our mother’s feet, blessed
with bounty we protect, home to wild origin.
Kim Stafford

 

Kim Stafford named Oregon Poet Laureate | Oregon Cultural Trust
https://culturaltrust.org/blog/news/kim-stafford-named-oregon-poet-laureate/

 

Please note another Fairweather blog post next week will present the entire back story to the poem created by Kim Stafford for NCLC with a letter by Katie Voelke, executive director.

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