Neal Maine


#10. Seaside Painting LIVE ™ demonstrations.  At the easel is artist Carolyn Macpherson.

 

#9. Fourth annual harp petting zoo. Faiweather’s December Seaside First Saturday Art Walk.

 

#8.  Artist Emily Miller’s 100 Turtles project. Doing good works.

 

#7.  Shirley 88 performing LIVE on the Fairweather grand.

#6.  Celebrity artists Jorjett Strumme, Agnes Field and Barbara Rosbe Felisky lecturing.

 

#5.  Five rescued Fairweather greyhounds made an appearance in the gallery.

 

#4. Share and Share Alike exhibition.  Indeed, a  show with a personal backstory. Pictured with calligrapher Penelope Culbertson.

 

#3.  The Perfect Pair, Perfect Pare and Perfect Pear exhibition.  Jo-Pomeroy-Crockett, PhD., explains.

 

#2.  All the Neal Maine naturalist and habitat lectures at 6:pm during the Seaside First Saturday Art Walks.

 

#1.  Paul and Lana Jane Brent. Looking back and, surely, looking forward to 2019.

 

“Truly, it’s the people that offer the energy and talent that propels Fairweather House and Gallery.”

Please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com for more information.

 

“Snowbound”

Great Blue Heron by Neal Maine/PacificLight Images.

“After many years of trying to capture a heron in the snow, it finally happened along the Neawanna River in Seaside.” Neal Maine

 

For more images from Neal Maine, please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com /  …artists tab/  …Neal Maine and Michael Wing

 

Question:

“Would it be possible to share the link that has Katie’s thank you as an end of year story on the Fairweather blog?”

Answer:

“Of course! We would love that. We’re so glad you were touched by the letter and appreciate you wanting to share it with others.”

Lorraine Ortiz
Development Director

 

December 2018

Dear Friend of North Coast Land Conservancy,

When I look back on this wonderful year at North Coast Land Conservancy, there is one day that stands out as nothing less than magical. As someone who has joined an On the Land outing or pulled weeds with us, who regularly donates to us or who simply follows us through our newsletters or e-news, you know that among our many projects, the big one we’re working on is conservation of what we call the Rainforest Reserve—3,500 acres of forestland adjacent to Oswald West State Park. I’ve made more than two dozen trips up there this year alone, with old and new friends. But this one day was unique.

 

We heard that Oregon’s poet laureate, Kim Stafford, was visiting the coast to do a reading, and we invited him to visit the Rainforest Reserve with us. The morning we set out, the coast was socked in with dense fog—classic pea-soup conditions. Yet barely a couple hundred feet up into the forest, the clouds gave way to blue skies and sunshine. The higher we climbed, the warmer the day became. As we climbed the ridge, the summit of Onion Peak gradually came into view: Onion Peak, the highest point in the proposed Rainforest Reserve.

High on the ridge, at the headwaters of streams that plunge down steep chasms to meet the ocean, at the tree line where meadows flourish on rocky balds, I felt like I was perched on an island of wilderness, a secret floating mountain in the sky. We couldn’t see the towns or highway that we’d left behind just minutes earlier. It was strikingly quiet. Quiet, but not silent. I closed my eyes to better hear the sounds of the rainforest: the buzzing, the singing, the whispering, and the whooshing of wings. I felt transported.

 

I often feel that way when I get off the beaten path just a little bit; do you? When I notice that I don’t hear the road anymore. When I realize my breathing has slowed and I can feel my heart beat. When instead of reaching for my phone, I look to the trees, trying to locate with my eyes the bird that my ears can hear so clearly. Happy memories wash over me, and I feel a sense of kinship with all of creation, past and present. It’s at times like these that I tend to get some of my best ideas.

As Kim put it that day, “This place offers not only clarity of water but clarity of thought. Maybe that’s the business we’re really in: conserving places where all species can be their best selves. Your gifts are the only way we can make that happen. In our land conservation work, I often bump up against folks who say, “I’m not an environmentalist,” or say “I like open space, but I’m no tree-hugger.”  I’ll admit that I have been known to actually hug trees now and then, mostly to feel for myself the scale of some of the big trees we still have on the Oregon Coast. But to the extent that tree-hugger means by-any-means-necessary, I realize that’s not me. And that’s not the organization I work for. By working with willing landowners, by keeping in mind the people part of our people-plants-and-wildlife formula for coastal conservation, we keep open the lines of communication with everyone.

 

Because I don’t think I’ve ever met anyone who hasn’t experienced one way or another, a moment of magic in the natural world. Who hasn’t felt transported, or felt a deepening of connection with all of creation by being in a wild place, away from the houses, roads, and towns where we spend most of our lives.

The way Kim Stafford spoke about the land that day was so grounding, and so humble and human. It reminded me that we are all just people, doing the best we can to take care of our place, and for so very many reasons:

We save this land because it brings life, water and breath.

We save this land because we love the critters that live here, the wildflowers, and the forests.

We save this land because, in the end, we know it will save us.

Or as Kim said that day, on the shoulder of Onion Peak, one of the pieces of ground we are working so hard to conserve, “It occurs to me, while standing here, that this project will offer what we will long for more and more: clear water, quiet, and starlight.”

Thank you for sharing your time and your treasure and allowing us to do just that, here on our coast: offering clear water, quiet, and starlight, for all creatures, forever.

If simply being in nature is already such a powerful experience for me, what was it about being in one of my favorite wild places with a poet such as Kim Stafford that made the experience even more profound?

Part of it was the day itself: standing on a peak floating upon fog, in the gold and blue of a fall day that felt stolen from summer. But I think Kim was somehow able to read my heart and put words to what I was feeling better than I could myself. Each of us, every human being, has a need for nature, is part of nature. Each of us feels that connection, deep in our hearts and souls, even if we can’t put that awe and that sense of wonder into words the way he could.

The next day Kim emailed us to thank us for the day we shared. What a gift it is to work with such amazing people—people such as yourself—who care so deeply about our coast and for our coast.

 

Thank you for helping to conserve Oregon’s coastal lands, forever.

All my best,

Katie Voelke

Executive Director

North Coast Land Conservancy

Preserving the Oregon Coast Forever

PO Box 67, Seaside, OR 97138

503.738.9126

https://nclctrust.org/

 

 

Hosted by the Seaside Library Art Committee

“Maybe no other local wildlife creature represents the natural history of the North Coast land ocean interface better than the great blue heron.”  Neal Maine

19 images of the Great Blue Heron, a natural history art show, by Neal Maine at the Seaside Library, on public display combined with a printed image guide  detailing the natural history of the great blue heron.

 

 

“The goal of this photography display is to celebrate this unique bird and bring life to how the features of the great blue heron fir the abundance and freshwater systems of the North Coast.  Natural history photography places high value on the quality of the image but even more important, is the desire, skill and patience to capture and illuminate the beauty of the coast landscape and its unique wildlife.”   Neal Maine

“This is the perfect time to share NCLC’s gratitude for FAIRWEATHER’S support of our conservation work on the coast.  We are delighted to share about the new social media outreach program NCLC has launched for our business partners as a thank you for your support. Four times a year NCLC will be posting a thank you to FAIRWEATHER on our FB page, with a photo.”

Here is the schedule for FAIRWEATHER’S posts:

Last week of February 2019

Last week of May 2019

Last week of September 2019

Last week of November 2019

Thank you for valuing the beauty and magnificence of the Oregon Coast. Thank you from all of us at NCLC to all of you at FAIRWEATHER.

Lorraine Ortiz

Development Director

North Coast Land Conservancy

Preserving the Oregon Coast Forever

 

 

“White Wings.”

Common white egret by Neal Maine, PacificLight Images.

November, 2018

Sunset Beach, Oregon

 

Read more about Herons and Egrets | Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife

https://myodfw.com/wildlife-viewing/species/-herons-and-egrets

After a thirty-year career as an award-winning biology teacher at Seaside High School, Neal Maine became the first executive director of North Coast Land Conservancy, which he co-founded in 1986. Since his retirement from the land trust in 2010, he has pursued his passion for nature photography through PacificLight Images, which is dedicated to raising awareness of coastal ecology and the wildlife with whom we share the region’s estuaries, freshwater wetlands and forests. The photography centers around coastal and Columbia River landscape, ecology and the rich estuary habitat with the surrounding wetlands and forest systems. Neal Maine focuses his imagery on exploring wildlife in the context of its habitat.

 

To view more of Neal Maine’s photography, please go to the  artists tab/ Neal Maine http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

100% of profits from Neal Maine’s photography  are donated to NCLC,  North Coast Land Conservancy.

 

 

 

Q: “Would it be possible to share the poem that Kim Stafford dedicated to NCLC as a story for the “All is Calm” Art Walk at Fairweather’s?”

A:  “We’re so glad you were touched and appreciate you wanting to share it with others,”  NCLC/North Coast Land Conservancy.

For more about NCLC go to https://nclctrust.org/ North Coast Land Conservancy. Helping to conserve Oregon’s coastal lands, forever.

Mother Mountain
Heaven, the old proverb says, is at your mother’s feet—
and here we are at the forest hem watching fog climb
through trees toward the queen’s crown peak,
hidden harvester of rain, alpine realm of silence
and starlight, home to bear cave, elk wallow,
cougar range, rare flowers brimming from persistent
seeps, trees shaggy with centuries on their blue ridge
where sister peaks layer shadows far.
So close the gate, let the alders usher in young fir,
cedar, hemlock, spruce, let the road become a path
for pilgrims seeking myriad mysteries, magic
not yet known, the black petaltail dragonfly
born from fog-fed, moss-footed mud to soar
before our eyes from the time of legends.
Here we dwell at our mother’s feet, blessed
with bounty we protect, home to wild origin.
Kim Stafford

 

Kim Stafford named Oregon Poet Laureate | Oregon Cultural Trust
https://culturaltrust.org/blog/news/kim-stafford-named-oregon-poet-laureate/

 

Please note another Fairweather blog post next week will present the entire back story to the poem created by Kim Stafford for NCLC with a letter by Katie Voelke, executive director.

Naturalist and wildlife photographer Neal Maine lectured during the opening reception of “Expanding Horizons”   at Fairweather’s on Nov. 3rd.

 

Take away notes:

 

Q: What is Natural History?

A:  Natural history tells the story of our living earth. It comprises the systematic observation, classification, interpretation, and description of the biosphere and its inhabitants.

Natural history is a primary component of culture. Every society develops some system for classifying, interpreting, and valuing animals, plants, and other natural phenomena. These systems shape our understanding of the world and our place in it.

Natural history is field-based. It begins with direct observation and study of organisms in the conditions under which they actually live.

Natural history is interdisciplinary. While grounded in the natural sciences, it engages the humanities, social sciences, and the arts, and it informs technical fields such as medicine, agriculture, forestry, and environmental management.

 

 

 

Q: What is the difference being a scientist or a naturalist, you ask?

 

A: “Lots of scientists never leave the lab. You can just see them in white coats, crunching numbers on computers, pouring stuff in and out of test tubes, torturing animals, etc. Naturalists are people who actually go outside, learn about, and appreciate nature. And although there is some overlap, there is a huge difference, and it is very disappointing that there aren’t many naturalists out there any more. I guess there is no money and academic prestige associated with being a naturalist any more. That’s why Neal Maine is such a special person to have around.”  –Sara Vickerman-Gage

 

Through November

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway Street

Expanding Horizons, an exhibition, featuring artists turning to nature seeking to express its evocative power on personal level.

Painters and photographers included in this exhibit are Linda Fenton-Mendenhall,  Lee Munsell, Ron Nicolaides, Judy Horning Shaw,  Jim Young and Russell Young, as well as Neal Maine.

Introducing Michael Fox, Jeni Lee and Barbara Folawn.

 

 

Q; Why Does Natural History Matter?

A: Natural history helps to shape communities and individuals. It gives us deeper insights into our relationships with other beings and places we inhabit.

Natural history promotes sound environmental practice. It grounds policy in ecological reality, guides decision-making, and inspires conservation efforts at all levels.

Natural history informs and energizes environmental education. It connects students with natures, creates synergy across fields, and draws strength from all major divisions of a community. It prepares people to live honors and responsibly in a sustainable world.

http://www.naturalhistroynetwork.org/philosophy.

 

 

 “Best book to read ever on naturalist writing.” D. Fairweather

 

Save the date and time.

Next Neal Maine lecture at Fairweather’s.

December 1, 6:pm.

 

To view photographs  by naturalist  Neal Maine, go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Neal Maine

 

“Power of Flight”  by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images

Pacific Flyway

Snow Geese

 

 

Snow geese fly along the Pacific Flyway  in narrow corridors, more than 3,000 miles from traditional nesting areas in the Arctic tundra to wintering areas along the coast. They visit traditional stopover habitats in spectacular numbers.

 

Q: What is the Pacific Flyway, you ask?

A: The Pacific Flyway is a major north-south flyway for migratory birds in America, extending from Alaska to Patagonia. Naturalists can often predict to the day when a particular species will show up in their area.

 

https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/snow-goose

 

 

 

Neal Maine habitat lectures every First Saturday at 6:pm. Fairweather House and Gallery.

 

After a thirty-year career as an award-winning biology teacher at Seaside High School, Neal Maine became the first executive director of North Coast Land Conservancy, which he co-founded in 1986. Since his retirement from the land trust in 2010, he has pursued his passion for nature photography through PacificLight Images. His photographs center around coastal and Columbia River landscape, ecology and the rich estuary habitat with the surrounding wetlands and forest systems.

Neal focuses his imagery on exploring wildlife in the context of its habitat. PacificLight Images is dedicated to working with coastal communities to protect wildlife habitat and its connectivity. 100% profits are donated to NCLC, North Coast Land Conservancy, to help further this goal

To read more about the naturalist, please go to artists tab … Neal Maine at https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

Fun facts about Snow Geese:

SIZE: 27 to 33 in; wingspan, 4.5 ft

Snow Geese stay with the same mate for life.

The oldest Snow Goose on record was 27 and a half.

Snow Geese make epic journeys by air, but they are impressive on foot, too. Within the first three weeks of hatching, goslings may walk up to 50 miles with their parents.

The Snow Goose breeds north of the timberline in Greenland, Canada, Alaska, and the northeastern tip of Siberia. They fly high as far as 5,000 feet about the ground.

The Snow Goose has two color plumage morphs, white (snow) or gray/blue (blue), thus the common description as “snow goose” and “blue goose.”

 

Just in! “Hidden Surfaces” by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images.

Location:  Circle Creek wetlands blanketed in mist and spiderwebs. Seaside, Oregon.

100% profits in support of North Coast Land Conservancy, NCLC.

 

Exploring New Surfaces, an exhibition curated by Agnes Field, Astoria based artist with a Master’s Degree in Studio Fine Art from New York University.

Artist, curator Agnes Field

“The works included in this exhibit use either new materials or methods and techniques to amplify the meaning in the content of their art. Adding or embedding new materials to the surface creates surprise, and occasionally, deeper interpretation and understanding of the subject.” –Agnes Field

 

 

 

Neal Maine visits with art patrons at Fairweather’s during the October 6 Seaside First Saturday Art Walk.

 

For more about Neal Maine, go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ … artists tab/ …Neal Maine

 

 

 

“Cauldron” by Leah Kohlenberg

 

Leah Kohlenberg,  artist statement:

I have been drawing and painting for 18 years, but the work you see today is entirely new for me.

These pastels and oil paintings are inspired by the Oregon coast, but the colors are wild and bright (sometimes wacky) and the land forms are intentionally abstract. This is to allow some of the raw brushwork and initial power that comes from an artistic first impression. It’s also an attempt to share the more vibrantly colorful world that’s in my head onto the canvas.

I started painting in my 30s, so have always had a sense of being “behind” – there were people who’d been doing art much longer than me, who knew more about the craft than I, who were way better artists than I. As I practiced my skills, I also did a lot of painting over my first attempts until I made the work “correct.”

My lack of confidence resulted in a stuttering “over-painting” that could lose the initial rawness and beauty of the initial strokes. I sometimes missed what I had created in the first pass, and at the same time, I didn’t trust it.

Now 18 years later, this series is an attempt to trust and honor that first pass. You are the first people to see these works. They have all been made this year, with this venue in mind. Many thanks for being the number one audience.

 

October 2018

Exploring New Surfaces

Fairweather House and Gallery
612 Broadway Street
Seaside, Oregon

 

Exploring New Surfaces, an exhibition curated by Agnes Field, Astoria based artist with a Master’s Degree in Studio Fine Art from New York University through October 31st.

 

Artist, curator Agnes Field

 

“The works included in this exhibit use either new materials or methods and techniques to amplify the meaning in the content of their art. Adding or embedding new materials to the surface creates surprise, and occasionally, deeper interpretation and understanding of the subject.” –Agnes Field

 

The October 2018 exhibit includes Leah Kohlenberg and Kathy Moberg and Carmela Newstead.

“I have been drawing and painting for 18 years, but the work you will see for Exploring New Surfaces is entirely new for me. These pastels and oil paintings are inspired by the Oregon coast, but the colors are wild and bright (sometimes wacky) and the land forms are intentionally abstract. This is to allow some of the raw brushwork and initial power that comes from an artistic first impression. It’s also an attempt to share the more vibrantly colorful world that’s in my head onto the canvas. Art Walk visitors will be the first people to see these works. They have all been made this year, with this venue in mind. Many thanks for being the number one audience.” Leah Kohlenberg

For more about the curator, please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/  artists/  Agnes Field

 

The art of Leah Kohlenberg on display.

 

Close up of the art by Leah Kohlenberg

 

Reprinting ART ON article/ Oct 18  hipfishmonthly.com

Exploring New Surface

Leah Kohlenberg at Fairweather

Review

“The work inspired by the Oregon coast artist uses raw brush work and unexpected colors to focus on the initial power that comes from the first artistic impressions.  An experienced painter for over 18 years  Kohlenberg also teaches drawing to many local professionals.”

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