Neal Maine


 

Just in! “Hidden Surfaces” by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images.

Location:  Circle Creek wetlands blanketed in mist and spiderwebs. Seaside, Oregon.

100% profits in support of North Coast Land Conservancy, NCLC.

 

Exploring New Surfaces, an exhibition curated by Agnes Field, Astoria based artist with a Master’s Degree in Studio Fine Art from New York University.

Artist, curator Agnes Field

“The works included in this exhibit use either new materials or methods and techniques to amplify the meaning in the content of their art. Adding or embedding new materials to the surface creates surprise, and occasionally, deeper interpretation and understanding of the subject.” –Agnes Field

 

 

 

Neal Maine visits with art patrons at Fairweather’s during the October 6 Seaside First Saturday Art Walk.

 

For more about Neal Maine, go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ … artists tab/ …Neal Maine

 

 

 

“Cauldron” by Leah Kohlenberg

 

Leah Kohlenberg,  artist statement:

I have been drawing and painting for 18 years, but the work you see today is entirely new for me.

These pastels and oil paintings are inspired by the Oregon coast, but the colors are wild and bright (sometimes wacky) and the land forms are intentionally abstract. This is to allow some of the raw brushwork and initial power that comes from an artistic first impression. It’s also an attempt to share the more vibrantly colorful world that’s in my head onto the canvas.

I started painting in my 30s, so have always had a sense of being “behind” – there were people who’d been doing art much longer than me, who knew more about the craft than I, who were way better artists than I. As I practiced my skills, I also did a lot of painting over my first attempts until I made the work “correct.”

My lack of confidence resulted in a stuttering “over-painting” that could lose the initial rawness and beauty of the initial strokes. I sometimes missed what I had created in the first pass, and at the same time, I didn’t trust it.

Now 18 years later, this series is an attempt to trust and honor that first pass. You are the first people to see these works. They have all been made this year, with this venue in mind. Many thanks for being the number one audience.

 

 

October 2018

Exploring New Surfaces

Fairweather House and Gallery
612 Broadway Street
Seaside, Oregon

 

Exploring New Surfaces, an exhibition curated by Agnes Field, Astoria based artist with a Master’s Degree in Studio Fine Art from New York University through October 31st.

 

Artist, curator Agnes Field

 

“The works included in this exhibit use either new materials or methods and techniques to amplify the meaning in the content of their art. Adding or embedding new materials to the surface creates surprise, and occasionally, deeper interpretation and understanding of the subject.” –Agnes Field

 

The October 2018 exhibit includes Leah Kohlenberg and Kathy Moberg and Carmela Newstead.

“I have been drawing and painting for 18 years, but the work you will see for Exploring New Surfaces is entirely new for me. These pastels and oil paintings are inspired by the Oregon coast, but the colors are wild and bright (sometimes wacky) and the land forms are intentionally abstract. This is to allow some of the raw brushwork and initial power that comes from an artistic first impression. It’s also an attempt to share the more vibrantly colorful world that’s in my head onto the canvas. Art Walk visitors will be the first people to see these works. They have all been made this year, with this venue in mind. Many thanks for being the number one audience.” Leah Kohlenberg

For more about the curator, please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/  artists/  Agnes Field

 

The art of Leah Kohlenberg on display.


 Abstract watercolors by Donna Sanson, Oregon  myrtlewood cribbage board, segmented vase and nautilus sculptures by Mike Brown.

Crafted by NW hands.

Folded book art by Mary Boitta, en caustic art (aptly titled “Remembering Autumn”) by Peg Wells, origami by Peggy Evans, leather work by Luans Leathers, en caustic crows by Kathryn Delany and hand painted tiles by Sandy Applegate.

Abstracts by Diane Copenhaver and glass art by Bob Heath.

 


Handmade curly willow, mouth blown glass,  hand-made book and box by Christine Trexel.

Coral glass by Rinee Merritt, glass platters by Sandy and Bob Lecari and plein air oil by Lisa Wiser.

 

En caustic  art, ocean debris baskets, sea urchin bowls, moon platter by Emily Miller, mixed media stone art by Peggy Stein, abstract drip by Kimberly Reed and oil paintings by Sharon Kathleen Johnson.

 


Abstract miniatures by Tanya Gardner.

 

Calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson, watercolor by Bill Baily and pottery by Suzy Holland.

 

Abstract oil by Carmela Newstead.

 

 

Abstracts by Zifen Qian, maple bowls by Daniel Harris, watercolor by Paul Brent, landscape by Bill Baily and seascape  by Victoria Brooks.

 

 

For Shape and Color.

Art masks by Jorjett Strumme.

Paintings with pressed flowers on metal by Mike Mason. Anny Sears, model, with pressed foliages by Mike Mason.

 

 

Pastel landscape by Carmela Newstead, vintage jewelry necklace by Reneé Hafeman and en caustic blue abstract by Kimberly Kent.

Sunset oil paintings  by Nicholas Oberling, photograph by Neal Maine, pastels by Lynda Campbell and seascapes by Ron Nicolaides.

 

Mixed media diptych by Gary Pearlman, raw edged walnut bowl by Mike Brown and paper box sculpture by Christine Trexel.

Miniature oils by Barbara Rosbe Felisky.

 

Photos by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

“Color and Shape” exhibition through September 30th.

The show covers every aspect of art, textures, materials and finishes, highlighting the quintessentially colorful fall season.

Grace note to the artists…

 

“Shape and Color, Fairweather’s September exhibition, would not be such a success without the beautiful work created by NW hands.  The selected artists provided new work to highlight the annual fall show.  We thank them all for the extraordinary opportunity to tell a seasonal story with their art.  Truly, the artists offered new exceptional work, and by doing so, they encourage those of us in the arts, to do more.”  Fairweather Gallery

Abstract series of three by Jan Rimmerman, seascape oil by Karen E. Lewis and pottery by Suzy Holland.  Shape and Color gallery hostesses Katie, Kemy Kay, Joan, Bonnie and Denise.

 

And, too, a grace note received from a gallery hostess to share.

“Thank you for the beautiful crystal I picked out for a gift.  Most, of all, thanks for bringing the utmost beauty to many, many people.  Most of all, thanks for inviting me to work in your stunning establishment.  It delights my eyes every time I come in.  Your artists are beyond comparison.” Kemy Kay

A grace note received from an artist.

 

“Don’t ask yourself what the world needs.  Ask yourself  what makes you come alive and then do that.  Because what the world needs is people who have come alive.” –Howard Thurman, educator and theologian.
“Thank you for your encouragement and support in showing and growing my art.  You have created such a wonderful group of artists, and display our work in beautiful ways.  I am extremely grateful for your friendship and aliveness in out shared vision.”  Gayle H. Seely

For more about the gallery, please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com.

“Solitude” by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images.

 

 

After a thirty-year career as an award-winning biology teacher at Seaside High School, Neal Maine became the first executive director of North Coast Land Conservancy, which he co-founded in 1986. Since his retirement from the land trust in 2010, he has pursued his passion for nature photography through PacificLight Images, a partnership with Michael Wing, dedicated to raising awareness of coastal ecology and the wildlife with whom we share the region’s estuaries, freshwater wetlands and forests. Their photography centers around coastal and Columbia River landscape, ecology and the rich estuary habitat with the surrounding wetlands and forest systems.

Neal focuses his imagery on exploring wildlife in the context of its habitat, while Michael’s specialty is capturing action images that illustrates the dynamic nature of coastal wildlife. PacificLight Images is dedicated to working with coastal communities to protect wildlife habitat and its connectivity.

Copyright © Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images

And, too, as always and forever, 100% profits from the Fairweather Gallery sales are donated to North Coast Land Conservancy to help further this goal.  For more info, go to NCLCtrust.org

Neal Maine lectures at Fairweather’s about the shape and color study in the art titled “Solitude”.

 

SAVE the date and time!

October 6, 5-7:PM

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway Street

Opening reception for Exploring New Surfaces, an exhibition curated by Agnes Field, Astoria based artist with a Master’s Degree in Studio Fine Art from New York University. The work included in this exhibit use either new materials or methods and techniques to amplify the meaning in the content of their art.  Adding or embedding new materials to the surface creates surprise, and occasionally, deeper interpretation and understanding of the subject. The exhibit will include Leah Kohlenberg and Kathy Moberg and Carmela Newstead.

Habitat lecture by naturalist and wildlife photographer Neal Maine at 6: pm. 

Live music by Shirley 88.

Light bites and beverages.

 

Pacific Force III by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images

 

Tillamook Rock Lighthouse, Seaside Oregon. Jan. 2018.

Q: Why the large wave, you ask?

A: A high surf advisory was issued for the northern Oregon coast according to the National Weather Service. The coast will see breaking waves on the beaches much higher than normal. Forecasters said ocean swells will be above 60 feet for most of the day January 19, 2018. The high surf advisory has caused officials to keep some North Coast Oregon and South Coast Washington beaches closed.

 

 

 

January 19, 2018

Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images.

Pacific Force I, Pacific Force II and Pacific  Force III

Tillamook Rock Lighthouse.  Seaside Oregon.

Pacific Force I  (wave hgt. 176′)

Pacific Force II (wave hgt. 183′)

Pacific Force III (wave hgt. 211′)

Q: Where in the world is Tillamook Rock Lighthouse, you ask?

 

A: Tillamook Rock Lighthouse stands 133 feet above sea level and sits on a rock a mile off the beach of Seaside and is west of Tillamook Head in Clatsop County, Oregon. Operating from 1881 to 1957, the lighthouse was nicknamed Terrible Tilly for its ferocious storms and the difficulties facing lighthouse keepers stationed there. It was the most expensive lighthouse built in the United States up to that time.  An isolated, storm-battered basaltic island less than an acre in size, Tillamook Rock Lighthouse is 20 miles south of the mouth of the Columbia River. Violently churning seas crash against the steep sides of the Rock and surge high up its sloping eastern face. Tillamook Rock is part of Oregon Islands National Wildlife Refuge, and the lighthouse is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

 

 

100% profits in support of  NCLC, North Coast Land Conservancy

  For more about the photographer, please go to  artists/ Neal Maine  www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com 

 

 

https://traveloregon.com › … › Culture & History › Historic Sites & Oregon Trail

 

 Resting atop a sea stack of basalt, more than a mile off the banks of Oregon’s  Seaside North Coast, the notorious Tillamook Rock Lighthouse, (nicknamed “Terrible Tilly”), is the stuff of aged lore. Although long closed to the public, she still stands today, though battered and …

 

Tillamook Rock Lighthouse – The Oregon Encyclopedia
https://oregonencyclopedia.org/articles/tillamook_rock_lighthouse/
Tillamook Rock Lighthouse sits on a rock a mile offshore of Tillamook Head in Clatsop County, Oregon. Operating from 1881 to 1957, the lighthouse was …

 

“Pacific Force IV”  by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images

 

100% Profits to NCLC, North Coast Land Conservancy

“Birds of a Feather” by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images.

 

Osprey, sometimes known as the sea hawk, fish eagle, river hawk or fish hawk, is a large raptor, reaching more than 2 feet in length and 6 feet in wing span. As its other common name suggests, the osprey’s diet consists almost exclusively of fish. It possesses specialized physical characteristics and exhibits unique behavior to assist in hunting and fishing. The Broadway Park osprey nest has a live camera placed by the Necancium Watershed Council and the City of Seaside.

 

 

After a thirty-year career as an award winning biology teacher at Seaside High School, Neal Maine became the first executive director of North Coast Land Conservancy, which he co-founded in 1986. Since his retirement from the land trust in 2010, he has pursued his passion for nature photography through PacificLight Images, a partnership with Michael Wing, dedicated to raising awareness of coastal ecology and the wildlife with whom we share the region’s estuaries, freshwater wetlands and forests. Their photography centers around coastal and Columbia River landscape, ecology and the rich estuary habitat with the surrounding wetlands and forest systems.

Neal focuses his imagery on exploring wildlife in the context of its habitat, while Michael’s specialty is capturing action images that illustrates the dynamic nature of coastal wildlife. PacificLight Images is dedicated to working with coastal communities to protect wildlife habitat and its connectivity. A percentage of all photography sales are donated to North Coast Land Conservancy to help further this goal.

 

 

Seaside ospreys by Neal Maine.

The Broadway Park osprey nest has a live camera placed by the Necancium Watershed Council and the City of Seaside.

In Clatsop County, Oregon there are about 14 osprey nests.

Watch the osprey at Seasideosprey.org.

 

Fairweather House and Gallery EMERGING artist Hall of Fame

2006-2018

 Kristin Qian

Britney Drumheller

Nick Brakel

Robert McWhirter

Michael Wing

Michele Bettger

Rebecca Gore

Gayle H. Seely

Linda Trexler

Diane Copenhaver

Ashley Howarth

Whelpsy Whelp

Veronica Russell

For more info about the gallery, go to www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Photo by Neal Maine / PacificLight Images
Bald eagles on Clatsop Beach.

Image title:  Eagle Speak

 

After a thirty-year career as an award-winning biology teacher at Seaside High School, Neal Maine became the first executive director of North Coast Land Conservancy, which he co-founded in 1986. Since his retirement from the land trust in 2010, he has pursued his passion for nature photography through PacificLight Images dedicated to raising awareness of coastal ecology and the wildlife with whom we share the region’s estuaries, freshwater wetlands and forests. His photography centers around coastal and Columbia River landscape, ecology and the rich estuary habitat with the surrounding wetlands and forest systems.

PacificLight Images is dedicated to working with coastal communities to protect wildlife habitat and its connectivity. A percentage of all photography sales are donated to North Coast Land Conservancy to help further this goal.

Eagle Sunrise by Neal Maine

 

On June 20th, 1782 the American Bald eagle was chosen as the symbol of the United States of American because of its long life, strength, majestic look and its representation of the freedoms enshrined in out constitution.

 

 

Image title:  Shaped by Wind.  Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images

 

Eagle conservation lecture  notes by naturalist Neal Maine:

Neal Maine graduated from Seaside High, returned as an educator in the Seaside School District.

It was not until 20 years after collage that he viewed an eagle on the North coast for the first time!

In 1961, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) counted  only 471 pairs of Amercian Bald Eagles.

 

 

Neal Maine lectures during a Fairweather Gallery event.

 

 

July 7- July 31

Fairweather House and Gallery

100 Turtles project by Emily Miller

 

“I have spent my life on the coast, and all my artwork has its roots in my love of the sea. I see the coast as a border between the known and the unknown, and a place where our connection to larger natural systems becomes clear. My artwork focuses on the delight of exploring this mysterious and beautiful environment. I found a positive voice in SeaLegacy, a conservation group creating a movement towards healthy oceans through visual storytelling. 25% of July sale proceeds in support of SeaLegacy,”  Emily Miller.

Launching of the 100 Turtles project by artist Emily Miller, who has spent the early summer sculpting tiny ceramic sea turtles: curling and shaping two hundred front flippers and carving details into two hundred eyes.

 

 

 

 I found a positive voice in SeaLegacy, a conservation group creating a movement towards healthy oceans through visual storytelling. 25% of July sale proceeds in support of SeaLegacy,”  Emily Miller.

 

 

For more info go to

 

http://ejmillerfineart.com/news/2018/06/14/100-turtles-project/

 

 

Read more:

The Story of Silent Spring. How a courageous woman took on the chemical industry and raised important questions about humankind’s impact …

http://www.rachelcarson.org/

Perhaps the finest nature writer of the Twentieth Century, Rachel Carson (1907-1964) is remembered more today as the woman who challenged the notion that …

 

To view more Neal Maine images, please visit  www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

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