Q&A


Inspired by the beach and nature, Peg Wells has prepared a gallery exhibit composed of  hot wax encaustic  and cold wax collage. The work is decorative, but with a purpose that is secure in the strength of using natural elements. Her provocative style proves that a quiet approach can have a very powerful effect.  Summer time resident and artist Peg Wells, who exhibits in the winter-season at the Saddle Brooke Resort/ Primary Studio in Arizona, presents new work in an ocean theme for Fairweather’s.  WELCOME BACK TO SEASIDE!

 

 

“Wonder of the Sea” by Peg Wells.  Cold Wax Painting.

“From the Depths” by Peg Wells.  Cold Wax Painting.

 

Q: What is Cold Wax Painting, you ask?

 

A: Cold Wax Painting is not defined by subject matter nor the degree of realism or abstraction, Cold Wax Painting is unified by artists’ shared interest in experimentation, texture and the physicality of paint layers. In its own way, Cold Wax Painting blurs the line between oil painting and encaustic painting.

 

Cold Wax is a mixture of natural beeswax, solvent and a small amount of  resin. The term “cold” in beeswax painting refers to the fact that heat is not required for working with this wax medium – as it dries by solvent evaporation, rather than the cooling of the wax, as in encaustic painting. As the solvent evaporates out of the medium, the soft wax hardens to the density of a beeswax candle.

Cold Wax is creating a variety of textures within a painting. It gives a clean break off the brush or knife, retaining the sharp peaks of impasto. These working properties allow for expressive brush marks and the ability to carve into paint layers with palette knives. Cold Wax also gives oil colors a beautiful translucent quality, similar to the seductive surfaces of encaustic paintings.

 

Q: What is encaustic painting, you ask?

A: Pronunciation: en-caws-tick, is a paint consisting of pigment mixed with beeswax and fixed with heat after its application. –n. The Greek word is enkaustikos –to burn in.

 

Encaustic dates back to the ancient Greeks, as far back as the 5th century BC. Ancient ship builders used beeswax, resin to seal, and waterproof their vessels. Ultimately, they began adding pigment to the wax-giving rise to the decoration of spectacular ships. To paint with encaustic, a combination of beeswax, resin and pigment is combined and then melted to a liquid state. Encaustic paintings have many layers of wax. Depending on the piece, it is not uncommon to have anywhere from 25-50 layers.

 

 

“Surf” Encaustic by Peg Wells

 

It’s not always obvious whether an abstract work of art should be hung vertically or horizontally.  Oftentimes on a contemporary piece, the artist signs that work on the back, which  allows the  gallerist and interested clients to determine how the art could be oriented for display.

 

 

 

Artist grace note

 

“I am grateful that my art found a gallery presence for my seventh summer season with you! I do appreciate your support of my art and me as an artist. I hope that my art will find new homes and that it will bring as much pleasure to people as it has given me create. Thank you.”Peg Wells

 

WELCOME BACK TO SEASIDE!

 

For more information about the gallery, please go to  www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Lynda Campbell, artist, spoke at the opening reception of “Perfect Pear, Perfect Pair, Perfect Pare” on May 5 at Fairweather’s.

 

 

And, too, a grace note:

“Thank you for your interest and support of my work. Your gallery is highly regarded among artists so it is special to be included in one of your showings. The “pear, pair, pare” theme was fun and it was interesting to see everyone’s interpretations. I appreciate all your did (and all you do) to share artists accomplishments. It is a lot of work for you each month. My best.”  —Lynda Campbell

 

 

Read more about the artist lecture at:

Fairweather House and Gallery | https://www

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/tag/fairweather-house-and-gallery/

A “pear”antly by Lynda Campbell for Perfect Pear…

 

“Those that live for the arts, support the arts.” Art patrons capture the artist lecture presented by Lynda Campbell.

 

Read more about the opening reception at:

https://www.seasideor.com/event/first-saturday-art-walk-3/ …Blue Bond, Marga Stanley, Bill Baily, and Lynda Campbell

 

Pastel Pears by Lynda Campbell

Read more about the artist at:

https://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com | extraordinary home …

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/

Lynda Campbell, pastel artist, has worked in the medium for about 14 years. She has a BS degree in Art Education from the University of Oregon. She has lived …

 

 

 

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside, Oregon

Through May 31

Perfect Pear, Pair, Pare Exhibition

Regional artists were selected due to their art related to scale and perspective, and the way things correlate and interact.

Featuring artists Lisa Wiser, Patti Isaacs, Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, Blue Bond, Marga Stanley, Bill Baily, and Lynda Campbell.

 

Take a note

Upcoming Fairweather Exhibition

June 2, 5-7pm

Seaside First Saturday Art Walk

Artist Reception

“Sense of Place”

 

“Negotiation” original art by Lisa Wiser.

“I do have a pair of pears on canvas as well as a few other perfect pairs of other items. Ha! Confusing eh? I will focus on pairs of pears. Heading down into the studio now! ”  — 😍🍐🍐Lisa Wiser

 

About  Lisa Wiser, pear artist:

Lisa Wiser is a visual artist living and working in Lake Oswego, Oregon. Her representational work is characterized by vivid color, great depth of space and attention to detail. She credits her father for instilling a love of drawing and painting while teaching her to draw at a young age.

“Leafy Pears” original oil on canvas by Lisa Wiser.

 

More about Lisa Wiser, pear artist:

Lisa earned a BS Degree in Art Education from the University of Oregon in 1978 and has completed graduate coursework in graphic design, art education and painting. Lisa has been invited to serve in both curatorial and juror positions for various arts organizations in the area. She has taught art from pre-school through college and adult level courses and has recently retired as a substitute art teacher for her local school district to devote more time to her painting.

 

 

“Bartlett Pears” original art by Lisa Wiser.

The Bartlett pear  carries a true pyriform “pear shape:” a rounded bell on the bottom half of the fruit, then a definitive shoulder with a smaller top.

 

 

 

Q: Why do artists often study painting pears, you ask?

A:  Cézanne once proclaimed, “With a pear I want to astonish Paris,” and he succeeded, even in his most deceptively simple still lifes, to dazzle and delight.  Turning to the pears grown in the vicinity of the family’s estate, he dispensed with traditional one-point perspective and examined the fruit, plates, and table from various viewpoints—straight on, above, and sideways.

 

 

Still Life Pears, Paul Cezanne, 1885

 

Indeed, every artist has spent hours staring at pears, later to paint pears to learn the study of light, shading and perspective.


 

 

 

And, too, a grace note received about the blog article:

“I love the post. Fun and informative. I really like the information about why artists chose pears as a subject.”  —Lisa Wiser

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside, Oregon

Through May 31

Perfect Pear, Pair,  Pare Exhibition

Regional artists were selected due to their art related to scale and perspective, and the way things correlate and interact.

Featuring artists Lisa Wiser, Patti Isaacs, Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, Blue Bond, Marga Stanley, Bill Baily, and Lynda Campbell.

 

 

“Ostrea” by Emily Miller.

A  large-scale sculpture inspired by the gnarled shells of oysters, the fluted ruffles of nudibranchs, and other beautiful and mysterious sea creatures. Sculpted with outdoor architectural stoneware ceramics. Weather-safe and water-tight. Recommended to protect from freezing. Signed by the artist.

 

 

But wait, there’s more.  See, there’s three! 

Ostrea I, Ostrea II and Ostrea III.

20″ to 30″ wide, each

 

 

Lookie here,  Emily Miller’s “Ostreas” have ocean inspired bottoms, as well.

 

Q: What is the meaning of the word “Ostrea”, you ask?

A: “Ostrea” is the Latin name / classification for oysters and the title of a set of large-scale sculptures I created, inspired by the gnarled shells of oysters, the fluted ruffles of nudibranchs, and other beautiful and mysterious sea creatures. The tactile contrast of smooth and rough surfaces is an ongoing theme in my artwork. I use these contrasts to explore ideas of inner and outer spaces, playful discovery, and delight in the unknown. Fun fact about the Ostrea: I like the rough, hidden underside as much as the top glazed surface! -Emily  Miller

 

 

Order from Chaos by Emily Miller

In addition, the 2018 rope basket project with a new palette of Pacific Ocean rope collected from Oregon, wilder and more eroded, weathered by months or years at sea. Cleaned, unraveled, and restitched, the colorful rope became a collection of unique baskets accented with local stones and other beach treasures.

Reclaimed fishing rope, 2018/ Mint Green basket

4.5″ high x 6″ diameter

Green and white fishing rope gathered from the Oregon coast and accented with a local beach stone.

“It begins with days spent hauling rope from the tide line in all weathers, connecting and collecting from other beach clean-up crews. A quick soak in water to loosen the sand, mud, and surface grime, then the long, meditative process of untangling knotted nests into their separate lengths. Each length slowly unwound by hand into its three segments, a second longer soak and scrub in hot soapy water, and a final rinse where the water runs clean. “Emily Miller

 

Fun fact:  Karynn Kozij, introduced as the 2017 Fairweather emerging artist with her Octopus ocean debris art, gifted Emily her recent beach debris.

 

Read what Eve Marx wrote about Karynn’s art: View from the Porch: Art from the ‘Octopus’s Garden’

Artist transforms marine debris/Date: 2017-08-18 Seaside Signal

Story The Daily Astorian | Signal News
http://www.dailyastorian.com/SS/news

The Daily Astorian | Signal News

http://www.dailyastorian.com/SS/news

 

 

Photo credit: Katie Frankowicz/ The Daily Astorian

Unlike plastic bottles or larger items, microplastics can be difficult to recycle and plague Clatsop County beachesAnd, so,  too, Neal Maine, Seaside naturalist, “re-gifted”  ocean debris to Emily Miller, artist. 

 

 

 

 

Your journey has uncovered the trouble the oceans are in, and drawn something beautiful from that trouble. It is a model for all of us, who each face our own perplexing tangle of strands and nets that we call “life.”   –M. Miller

 

 

“I have spent my life on the coast, and all my artwork has its roots in my love of the sea. I see the coast as a border between the known and unknown, amid constant cycles of change. My work explores these transition environments as a marker of our place within the larger network of natural systems. I believe that joyful exploration of the unknown creates a positive, active environment that enriches our relationships with ourselves, each other, and our world.  I am a lifelong artist with a passion for materials.”  —Emily Miller

c. Emily Miller

Cat.

Encaustic (beeswax) on wood panel by Gregory Bell.

SHADOWS, the October Fairweather Gallery exhibition.

 

Q: What is encaustic, you ask?
A: Encaustic painting, also known as hot wax painting, involves using heated beeswax to which colored pigments are added. The liquid or paste is then applied to a surface—usually wood, though canvas and other materials are often used. Encaustic painting was practiced by Greek artists as far back as the 5th century B.C. Encaustic had a variety of applications: for the painting of portraits and scenes of mythology on wood panels. The Greeks applied coatings of wax and pigment to weatherproof and decorate their ships. Mention is even made by Homer of the painted ships of the Greek warriors who fought at Troy.

Q: How to care for an encaustic work of art, you ask?
A: Occasionally, gently wipe dust off of your piece with a clean and lint free rag.

 

 

Full size, CAT, by Gregory Bell. In addition, gallery exhibit features: pastel 4×4’s by Joanna Donaca, calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson, en plein air by Karen E. Lewis, lava vases by Emily Miller.

And, too, a timely article from the Daily Astorian.

Cougar country: Sightings of the predator have increased on the Oregon Coast
State biologists will attach GPS collars to cougars to study movement
Published on October 24, 2017

By Katie Frankowicz

The Daily Astorian

Yellow signs at trailheads in Ecola and Fort Stevens state parks feature a drawing of a cougar and a blank space to write the date whenever the animal is spotted.

Most years these spaces remain empty, but state wildlife managers say cougar populations appear to be increasing elsewhere along the Oregon Coast, raising questions about what is and what could become cougar country.

Original encaustic art by NW artist Gregory Bell (available$495 to $795).

Call now (503) 738-8899 for more details.

 

 

Q: What is encaustic, you ask?
A: Encaustic painting, also known as hot wax painting, involves using heated beeswax to which colored pigments are added. The liquid or paste is then applied to a surface—usually wood, though canvas and other materials are often used.

Encaustic painting was practiced by Greek artists as far back as the 5th century B.C. Encaustic had a variety of applications: for the painting of portraits and scenes of mythology on wood panels. The Greeks applied coatings of wax and pigment to weatherproof and decorate their ships. Mention is even made by Homer of the painted ships of the Greek warriors who fought at Troy.

 

Q: How to care for an encaustic work of art, you ask?
A: Occasionally, gently wipe dust off of your piece with a clean and lint free rag.

 

Foghorn Leghorn by Marga.

 

My art training comes from watching and experimenting and then doing it all over again, exposing a little more of me, Marga, with every attempt.

With each coat of paint, whether it’s watercolors, gouache, acrylics and oil comes depth and motion…it’s exciting and satisfying to see my work evolve from one layer to the next. I love using odd tools to paint with….for instance, the main images on my mini whimsy collection, were painted with a toothpick (I couldn’t find a small enough pallet knife).

I love the movement of things… whether it’s the hair or feather on a bird’s head or the drooping of a flower’s leaf…I want to make my painting live and breathe.

While living in the Caribbean I founded an annual fine arts fair, featuring over 20 very talented and diverse artists.

I draw on a regular basis with an exceptional group of local artists and am one of the founding members of Tempo Gallery, an arts collective, in Astoria.

My art has been shown in Canada, British West Indies, and the US, with collectors in OR, NY, NJ, MO, CA, FL, WA and Canada and Japan.– Hugs, Marga.

Comment received:

“Marga’s art blows me away. Dreamlike but not dreamy. More like a visionary kind of thing. Like the vestibule to an encounter with the inner workings of the being. Loved it. I really like the vision of this artist.” — David R.

 

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SHADOWS, an exhibition throughout October,  focuses on the interplay of light and dark through selected art that expresses time as the fall season progresses. New artwork by Northwest artists Diane Copenhaver, Gregory Bell,  Penelope Culbertson, Whelsey Whelp, Ashley Howarth, Lisa Wiser, Karen E. Lewis,  Tamara Johnson and Marga Stanley will be featured.

 

 

 

 

 

Title: Leaping for the Future I

Neal Maine/ PacificLight images

Male Coho salmon in the  Klaskanine River/ near Astoria, OR 

September, 2017

Proceeds in support of NCLC

 

 

 

Title: Leaping for the Future II

Neal Maine/ PacificLight images

Female Coho salmon in the  Klaskanine River/ near Astoria, OR 

September, 2017

Proceeds in support of NCLC

 

For more information about the photographer, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ Neal Maine

 

 

Q: Where in the world is the Klaskanine River, you ask?

A:  The Klaskanine River is a tributary of the Youngs River in northwest Oregon in the United States. It drains a section of the Coast Range in the extreme northwest corner of the state in the watershed of the nearby Columbia River. It rises in three short forks in the mountains in  Clatsop County, in the Clatsop State Forest north of Saddle Mountain State Natural Area.

A  Native American word, Tlats-kani, refers to a point in the Nehalem Valley but applied  to two rivers in the area, the Klaskanine and the Clatskanie.  

 

SAVE THE DATE AND TIME!

Celebrating 13 years in 2017, the next Seaside First Saturday Art Walk, will be held on October 7, 5-7: pm.

The event is free and is all about seeing and selling art in the sponsoring galleries and boutiques located between Holladay and Broadway in the historic Gilbert District of downtown Seaside. Complimentary parking  is on the corner of Holladay and Oceanway.

Fairweather House and Gallery, 612 Broadway

Opening reception for SHADOWS, an exhibition that focuses on the interplay of light and dark through selected art that expresses time as the fall season progresses. New artwork by Northwest artists Diane Copenhaver, Gregory Bell, Penelope Culbertson, Whelsey Whelp, Ashley Howarth, Lisa Wiser, Karen E. Lewis, Tamara Johnson and Marga Stanley will be featured.

Naturalist, biologist and scientist  Neal Maine will speak at 6: pm about the autumn ecology of the local habitat.

LIVE music by Shirley 88.

LIVE scribing by calligraphy artist Penelope Culbertson.

Special guest of honor will be Flynn,  “the handsomest Kestrel around and one of the  WCNC Ambassador Birds”  will be on hand celebrating the opening of Fairweather’s new exhibition SHADOWS!

And, too, during the opening reception of  SHADOWS on October 7th there will be a paddle auction  of selected Neal Maine images  to benefit the  WCNC.

 

Wildlife Center of the North Coast (WCNC) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit Oregon corporation, that specializes in wildlife rehabilitation of resident and migratory birds, mammals and other wild creatures naturally occurring in Oregon.

WCNC provides primary services to communities along 167 miles of coastline in Oregon and southwest Washington offering humane care and professional medical treatment to sick, injured, orphaned and displaced native wildlife with the goal of releasing healthy wild animals back into their appropriate habitat; offers quality conservation + environmental education programs concerning local wildlife, their ecosystems, and the human impact on these systems and individuals.

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