Q&A


Cat.

Encaustic (beeswax) on wood panel by Gregory Bell.

SHADOWS, the October Fairweather Gallery exhibition.

 

Q: What is encaustic, you ask?
A: Encaustic painting, also known as hot wax painting, involves using heated beeswax to which colored pigments are added. The liquid or paste is then applied to a surface—usually wood, though canvas and other materials are often used. Encaustic painting was practiced by Greek artists as far back as the 5th century B.C. Encaustic had a variety of applications: for the painting of portraits and scenes of mythology on wood panels. The Greeks applied coatings of wax and pigment to weatherproof and decorate their ships. Mention is even made by Homer of the painted ships of the Greek warriors who fought at Troy.

Q: How to care for an encaustic work of art, you ask?
A: Occasionally, gently wipe dust off of your piece with a clean and lint free rag.

 

 

Full size, CAT, by Gregory Bell. In addition, gallery exhibit features: pastel 4×4’s by Joanna Donaca, calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson, en plein air by Karen E. Lewis, lava vases by Emily Miller.

And, too, a timely article from the Daily Astorian.

Cougar country: Sightings of the predator have increased on the Oregon Coast
State biologists will attach GPS collars to cougars to study movement
Published on October 24, 2017

By Katie Frankowicz

The Daily Astorian

Yellow signs at trailheads in Ecola and Fort Stevens state parks feature a drawing of a cougar and a blank space to write the date whenever the animal is spotted.

Most years these spaces remain empty, but state wildlife managers say cougar populations appear to be increasing elsewhere along the Oregon Coast, raising questions about what is and what could become cougar country.

Original encaustic art by NW artist Gregory Bell (available$495 to $795).

Call now (503) 738-8899 for more details.

 

 

Q: What is encaustic, you ask?
A: Encaustic painting, also known as hot wax painting, involves using heated beeswax to which colored pigments are added. The liquid or paste is then applied to a surface—usually wood, though canvas and other materials are often used.

Encaustic painting was practiced by Greek artists as far back as the 5th century B.C. Encaustic had a variety of applications: for the painting of portraits and scenes of mythology on wood panels. The Greeks applied coatings of wax and pigment to weatherproof and decorate their ships. Mention is even made by Homer of the painted ships of the Greek warriors who fought at Troy.

 

Q: How to care for an encaustic work of art, you ask?
A: Occasionally, gently wipe dust off of your piece with a clean and lint free rag.

 

Foghorn Leghorn by Marga.

 

My art training comes from watching and experimenting and then doing it all over again, exposing a little more of me, Marga, with every attempt.

With each coat of paint, whether it’s watercolors, gouache, acrylics and oil comes depth and motion…it’s exciting and satisfying to see my work evolve from one layer to the next. I love using odd tools to paint with….for instance, the main images on my mini whimsy collection, were painted with a toothpick (I couldn’t find a small enough pallet knife).

I love the movement of things… whether it’s the hair or feather on a bird’s head or the drooping of a flower’s leaf…I want to make my painting live and breathe.

While living in the Caribbean I founded an annual fine arts fair, featuring over 20 very talented and diverse artists.

I draw on a regular basis with an exceptional group of local artists and am one of the founding members of Tempo Gallery, an arts collective, in Astoria.

My art has been shown in Canada, British West Indies, and the US, with collectors in OR, NY, NJ, MO, CA, FL, WA and Canada and Japan.– Hugs, Marga.

Comment received:

“Marga’s art blows me away. Dreamlike but not dreamy. More like a visionary kind of thing. Like the vestibule to an encounter with the inner workings of the being. Loved it. I really like the vision of this artist.” — David R.

 

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SHADOWS, an exhibition throughout October,  focuses on the interplay of light and dark through selected art that expresses time as the fall season progresses. New artwork by Northwest artists Diane Copenhaver, Gregory Bell,  Penelope Culbertson, Whelsey Whelp, Ashley Howarth, Lisa Wiser, Karen E. Lewis,  Tamara Johnson and Marga Stanley will be featured.

 

 

 

 

 

Title: Leaping for the Future I

Neal Maine/ PacificLight images

Male Coho salmon in the  Klaskanine River/ near Astoria, OR 

September, 2017

Proceeds in support of NCLC

 

 

 

Title: Leaping for the Future II

Neal Maine/ PacificLight images

Female Coho salmon in the  Klaskanine River/ near Astoria, OR 

September, 2017

Proceeds in support of NCLC

 

For more information about the photographer, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ Neal Maine

 

 

Q: Where in the world is the Klaskanine River, you ask?

A:  The Klaskanine River is a tributary of the Youngs River in northwest Oregon in the United States. It drains a section of the Coast Range in the extreme northwest corner of the state in the watershed of the nearby Columbia River. It rises in three short forks in the mountains in  Clatsop County, in the Clatsop State Forest north of Saddle Mountain State Natural Area.

A  Native American word, Tlats-kani, refers to a point in the Nehalem Valley but applied  to two rivers in the area, the Klaskanine and the Clatskanie.  

 

SAVE THE DATE AND TIME!

Celebrating 13 years in 2017, the next Seaside First Saturday Art Walk, will be held on October 7, 5-7: pm.

The event is free and is all about seeing and selling art in the sponsoring galleries and boutiques located between Holladay and Broadway in the historic Gilbert District of downtown Seaside. Complimentary parking  is on the corner of Holladay and Oceanway.

Fairweather House and Gallery, 612 Broadway

Opening reception for SHADOWS, an exhibition that focuses on the interplay of light and dark through selected art that expresses time as the fall season progresses. New artwork by Northwest artists Diane Copenhaver, Gregory Bell, Penelope Culbertson, Whelsey Whelp, Ashley Howarth, Lisa Wiser, Karen E. Lewis, Tamara Johnson and Marga Stanley will be featured.

Naturalist, biologist and scientist  Neal Maine will speak at 6: pm about the autumn ecology of the local habitat.

LIVE music by Shirley 88.

LIVE scribing by calligraphy artist Penelope Culbertson.

Special guest of honor will be Flynn,  “the handsomest Kestrel around and one of the  WCNC Ambassador Birds”  will be on hand celebrating the opening of Fairweather’s new exhibition SHADOWS!

And, too, during the opening reception of  SHADOWS on October 7th there will be a paddle auction  of selected Neal Maine images  to benefit the  WCNC.

 

Wildlife Center of the North Coast (WCNC) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit Oregon corporation, that specializes in wildlife rehabilitation of resident and migratory birds, mammals and other wild creatures naturally occurring in Oregon.

WCNC provides primary services to communities along 167 miles of coastline in Oregon and southwest Washington offering humane care and professional medical treatment to sick, injured, orphaned and displaced native wildlife with the goal of releasing healthy wild animals back into their appropriate habitat; offers quality conservation + environmental education programs concerning local wildlife, their ecosystems, and the human impact on these systems and individuals.

 On August 2nd FINDINGS, an opening art exhibition introduced past and present emerging artists at the Fairweather House and Gallery.

 

Top row/ left to right images:  resident jeweler Renee Hafeman, art patrons, Joan, Art Walk hostess with Paul Brent, resident artist.

Middle row/ left to right images: art by Britney Drumheller, celebrity artist Britney Drumheller offers an art lecture, artist Emily Miller, and introducing emerging artist Whelpsy Whelp.

Bottom row/ left to right images: marine debris artist Karynn Kozij, Joan, Art Walk hostess demonstrating Octopus art, Paul Brent with Gail and Ellen, Art Walk hostesses at the Paul Brent Pop-Up Art Studio and Gallery, sponsored by Fairweather House and Gallery and The Gilbert Block Building, Denise, Kemmy Kay, Joan and Saundra FINDING art at the FINDINGS opening reception.

Q: What is an emerging artist, you ask?

A:  An emerging artist is considered an artist without commercial representation who has a dedicated art practice but has had limited opportunities to show at a gallery or non-profit spaces.

 

For more info please  go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com.  Celebrating 11 years of sponsoring  NW regional acclaimed and emerging artists in 2017.

Lava vases by Emily Miller, Pelican and Buoy original art by Whelpsey Whelp, Sea Turtle original water-color by Rosemary Klein, hand-made journals and boxes by Christine Trexel, hammered copper and gold earrings by Steven Schankin and Natura shell series of original oil paintings by Paul Brent.

 

On the grass cloth wall: coral original oil by Paul Brent, coral wood cut series by Gregory Graham, Puffin on the Rock (facing left)original by Nick Brakel, Puffin fine art photograph (facing right) by Donna Geissler, and on the twig wall sculpture, Oregon myrtlewood earrings by Fred Lukens.

On the table scape: Puffin Portrait original pen and ink (facing right) by Britney Drumheller, Sea Star original pen and ink by Britney Drumheller, and  hand hemmed tie dyed silk scarves by Beth Collins.

 

Eel and pipe fish original pen and ink collage by emerging artist Whelpsey Welp (easel display), The Snorkler by Marga Stanley (on the circle table) rare CoCo Chanel vintage jewelry by Renee Hafeman,  spoons by Mike Morris,  Moulton Sky original oil seascape  by Michael Muldoon and Oregon lighthouse watercolor series by Emily Miller.

Sea Within original shell art by Jan Shield, original water colors by Carolyn Macpherson, tclam style  carry all bags by textile artist Linda Ballard  and…ta! da! …grand piano found by a friendly neighbor for the Fairweather Gallery!!!

Displays by Denise Fairweather,  Allied Member, A.S.I.D., American Society of Interior Designers.

 

For more about  the accredited interior design work at the gallery , please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …about/ Denise Faiweather page

And, too,  questions to the audience at FINDINGS, the opening reception for the August exhibition, at Fairweather House and Gallery.

What is new?

What is bigger than a bread box?

What took one and 1/2 hours to install?

What took 5 men to move?

What has the number 88 to do with this piece?

 

And, the art patron who answered the question…is it the grand  piano?  The lovely lady in black.  She graciously called for a round of applause, after listening to the piano stories  (past, current and future musical lives).

 

For more info please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Renee Hafeman, vintage jewelry artist

FINDINGS in my work is a collection of tools and other articles used by an artisan to make jewelry.

 

Q:  What is the difference Between “Art Nouveau” and “Art Deco”, you ask?

A: Art Nouveau: means “new art,” reigned from roughly 1880 until just before World War I. It features naturalistic but stylized forms, often combined with more geometric shapes, particularly arcs, parabolas, and semicircles (think of the Eiffel Tower). The movement brought in natural forms that had often been overlooked like insects, weeds, even mythical faeries, as evidenced by Lalique jewelry or Tiffany lamps.

Art Deco emerged after World War I. In fact, the deprivations of the Great War years gave way to a whole new opulence and extravagance that defined the Jazz Age and the Art Deco aesthetic. The movement, prevalent from the 1920s until roughly the start of World War II, took its name from the 1925 Exposition Internationales des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes, held in France and is characterized by streamlined and geometric shapes. It also utilized modern materials like chrome, stainless steel, and inlaid wood. If Art Deco dabbled with natural materials, they tended to be graphic or textural, like jagged fern leaves. As a result, Deco featured bold shapes like sunbursts and zigzags and broad curves.

Renee Hafeman offered an artist’s lecture during the opening reception of FINDINGS, an exhibition through August at Fairweather’s.

Note the difference?

Title: “Winged Wonder” by Neal Maine, PacificLight Images.

Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly. Location: Neacoxie Creek. Seaside/Gearhart.

Signed, matted and framed.

“Unless otherwise noted, images are presented as they were photographed. Slight adjustment by cropping, lightening or darkening may have been used, but the photo subject is presented as recorded in the Oregon coastal landscapes.”

A Certificate of Authenticity is provided with each copyrighted and signed image.

Available exclusively at Fairweather’s.

Proceeds to support North Coast Land Conservancy/NCLC.

 

 

THE NEXT FRONTIER, OUR OWN BACKYARD

Humans: We take pictures, walks, deep breaths, memories, rides on waves, water, timber, in habitat that used to belong to other trail makers. We thought we could never catch all the salmon, never cut all the big trees, and never pollute the ocean. In our hubris, we thought we could make our own trails. With renewed humility, we are learning how to share this place, to live together with our partner trail makers. PacificLight Images celebrates this partnership as we use our images to inspire others to honor nature’s trails in OUR OWN BACKYARD.Neal Maine

To read more about the photographer, please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Neal Maine

 

Save the date and time. 
Neal Maine, scientist and wildlife photographer to present a lecture on the ecology of the North Coast habitats.

August 5th, 6:pm
Fairweather House and Gallery
612 Broadway, Seaside, OR
Opening reception for FINDINGS

Seaside First Saturday Art Walk 

 

To read more about the Art Walk, please go to http://www.facebook.com/ Seaside First Saturday Art Walk.

Q: Where can the Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly be found, you ask?

A:  Habitat: Small ponds and slow streams. It perches on the tips of twigs, grasses and other vegetation.

Fun Creature Facts:

Distribution: Western U.S., West Indies and Central America south to Chile and Argentina.

Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly wings sit flat when perched and have a strong sustained flight; flitting about on gossamer wings and quiet as a whisper.

Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonflies are swift fliers, reminiscent of tiny airplanes.

Their eyes are huge, often meeting at the top of the head.

The Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly, will eat almost any soft-bodied flying insect including mosquitoes, flies, small moths, mayflies, and flying ants or termites.

The Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly are aptly named as they mimic hawks, relentlessly pursuing their prey.

The Latin name for this genus, Sympetrum, means “with rock” and refers to their habit of basking on rocks to absorb heat early in the day.

This species is one of the first dragonflies to emerge each year.

imnh.isu.edu/digitalatlas/bio/insects/drgnfly

 

In addition, read more about North Coast dragonflys:

Wild Side: Dragonfly – Coastal Life – Coast Weekend

Aug 31, 2017 – Read Wild SideDragonfly from Coast Weekend. … By Lynette Rae McAdams. For Coast … Even while eating, a dragonfly can remain in flight.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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