Q&A



Mid-Century Geometric Modernist Runway Design. Purple Hand Hand-Made Stained Glass Squares. Oval and Circular Non-Tarnish Chain. Sterling Silver Ornate Hook and Eye Closure. One-on-a-kind.

Vintage Design by Reneé No. 267. Available exclusively at Fairweather’s.

 

Mid-Century Modern. Sterling Silver Red Agate Cabochon. Hallmark “925”. Over and Circular Non-Tarnish Chain. Sterling Silver Ornate Hook and Eye Closure. One-of-a-kind.

Vintage Design by Reneé. No. 266. Available exclusively at Fairweather’s.

 

Vintage French Silver Filigree Perfume Bottle. Hallmark “France.” Vintage Czechoslovakian Crystal. Ornate Sterling Silver Hook and Eye Closure. Vintage-Inspired Chain.

Vintage Design by Reneé. No 273. Available exclusively at Fairweather’s.

 

 

Reneé Hafeman, vintage fine jewelry designer.

 

Q: How would you describe a vintage fine jewelry designer, you ask?

A:  A vintage fine jewelry designer incorporates silver or gold-filled metal and use other elements such as gemstones or hand-crafted jewelry components. The styles of jewelry are one-of-a-kind or small production work that is found in a gallery or a specialty boutique. Fine jewelry is made with valuable metal such as gold and platinum and is set with natural, precious gemstones. Cultured pearls are considered a gemstone.

 

Vintage jewelry is usually identified with a particular era including Art Nouveau, Art Deco, Retro, and Mid-Century Modern. The beauty of vintage jewelry is that unlike contemporary styles, it is not available in vast multiples or quantities. It possesses distinctive qualities of workmanship, individuality and rarity that are appreciated by collectors and stylish clients alike.

Note the time! Fred Luken’s myrtle wood clock…arrived just in time for the June 3rd, 5:pm opening reception of Iconic at Fairweather’s.

About Fred Lukens:

I was born in 1942 during the height of World War Two and my parents raised myself and my two brothers in Portland. We had a very happy childhood with many family members close at hand.

When I was 6 years old we moved out to east county and lived on an acre of property raising a lot of our own food both vegetables and meat.
I attended school at Gilbert Grade School and David Douglas High School. When I turned 16, I joined the U.S Naval Reserves and upon graduation from high school, I immediately went into active service which happened during the Berlin Wall crisis, this placed me active duty prior to my 18th birthday. I spent 2 years of active service both in the Asian theater and then stateside based out of San Francisco, Ca. At 21 years old I moved back to Oregon and worked in the retail market for a number of years and then into product management for a couple of manufactures in the local area.

In 1972 I had another career change by going into sales as a manufactures agent covering Oregon, Washington & Alaska.

In 1985 along with a business partner we created a business that started at zero and by the time I retired in 2005 sales had reached unexpected results. We specialized with any product that involved water, this included water handling, purification, and irrigation. I am proud to say that we were recognized as one of the “go to” authorities in our field. I had the great pleasure to work with some very gracious and wonderful people in my business career of whom I still communicate with.

In 2006 my wife and I decided to sell our home and purchase a travel trailer and set out to see the greater Pacific North West. We traveled thru Oregon, Washington Idaho and parts of Canada before settling back down in Oregon and purchased an acre of land in Sandy, Oregon. I took an old garage that was already on the property and completely refurbished the exterior and had the interior rewired to allow the necessary wood tools that I needed to start working on the projects I am currently able to present for sale and at the same time enjoy producing.

“Much of the raw wood products come from all over the world, South America, Africa, and also our beautiful southern Oregon coast which grows Myrtle wood which many say will soon disappear from the United States.”-– Fred Lukens

 

 

“A finished myrtle wood piece is gorgeous and it is easy to see why people fall in love with them. After all, each provides the new owner a little piece of Oregon created by a local artisan who take tremendous pride in creating unique works in rare wood. “ — Grant McCombie

For more about Grant’s recommendations, please visit  http://traveloregon.com/trip-ideas/grants-getaways/

 

Q:  Where in Oregon is myrtle wood is found, you ask?

A: Oregon has a “banana belt,” a warm landscape along the southern coast, but you will not find pineapple, mango, or papaya growing there. Instead, you will find plenty of cedar, fir and even giant redwoods – plus, one particular hardwood variety that grows from south of Reedsport through Northern California and east from the Coast Range Mountains to the I-5 corridor in the Alfred A. Loeb State Park.  

Q: Where is the Alfred A. Loeb State Park, you ask?

A: The park is located near Brookings, Oregon.  Your first impression of Loeb may well be the scent of the myrtle wood forest … a crisp, bay leaf aroma. The park is nestled in a grove of lovely myrtle wood trees through Alfred  A. Loeb State Park. It is the largest public-owned old growth myrtle stand in the state! The park land was acquired by gift from the State Board of Forestry.  It was a tract purchased by Save the Myrtle Woods, Inc. from Alfred A. Loeb of Portland for protecting the outstanding native myrtle trees and other vegetation along the Chetco River.

For more info please visit http://www.stateparks.com/alfred_a_loeb_state_park_in_oregon.html

 

Fun Fact: Myrtle wood, a rare hard wood,  is a distinctly Oregon wood, found nowhere else in the United States; indeed some  may say,  found nowhere else other than in the Holy Land.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Image title: Hidden Gold.

Long-Billed Curlew.

On migration.

Location: Del Rey Beach, Oregon State Park.

Framed, matted and signed by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images

Proceeds in support of NCLC, North Coast Land Conservancy

For more info please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ … artists/ Neal Maine

This incredibly long-billed curlew is the largest of our shorebirds. It spends the summer on the grasslands of the arid west, appearing on coastal mudflats only in migration. It often occurs alongside the Marbled Godwit, which is very similar in size and color pattern; but the godwit’s bill curves up, not down.

Forages by walking rather quickly over coastal mudflats, using its long bill to probe just below the surface searching for crabs, ghost shrimps, and other creatures.

http://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/long-billed-curlew
http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Long-billed_Curlew

Tracking long-billed curlew | The Nature Conservancy
http://www.nature.org/ourinitiatives/regions/…/tracking-long-billed-curlew-1.xml

•North American Bird Conservation Initiative. 2016. The State of North America’s Birds 2016. Environment and Climate Change

 

Q: Where in the world is Del Rey Beach, you ask?

 

A: The largest ocean in the world, the Pacific Ocean  is a just a steps away walk from Del Rey Oregon State Park, just north of Gearhart on the Pacific Coast Highway 101.  There is a quiet, secluded parking area.  Each of the Oregon State Parks is an individual place where people play, picnic, rest, hike, renew, and everything in between.  They are an everyday reminder of the things that make Oregon great, and their very existence is a testament to what we collectively value.

 

Park History: The land was acquired in 1970 by gift from Clatsop County. Free annual day-use attendance: 98,318

 

 

For more info go to: http://www.traveloregon.com   See & Do …Del Rey Beach State Recreation Site | Travel Oregon

 

 Rectangle Concaved Bottle Shape Sea Glass & Sterling

Rectangle Concave & Rare Bottle Sea Glass & Sterling

Minty, pink, amber and marine blue rare sea glass earrings accented by hammered sterling silver designed by Debra Beard.

*NOTE All earring are on Sterling or gold with copper core *NO NICKEL

Artist statement:
“Born and raised in Vancouver, B. C. Canada. I have had the opportunity of living in many places which have included Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario, Germany, California, and Washington.

I have always been a lover of art, travel, interior design, jewelry, antiques and beautiful things in general. It just kind of happened in grade school when I was introduced to some beads off of my grandmother’s old lamp shade, then seed beads, wooden beads and wire work.
I found myself beading and creating unique pieces from nature & the environment that had inspired me during my travels. I found that I was attracted to semi-precious stones and creating original designs.
I work in my studio designing original handmade pieces using turquoise, lapis, agate, jasper, coral, pearls, and various other semi-precious stones. My jewelry may even include a re-purposed jewelry piece from the past. Some of my designs have traveled as far away from home as Europe.
You can find me at various artisan bazaars and events. You will also find my work on display at a Fairweather House & Gallery in Seaside Oregon and in Sparrows Gallery in Denison Texas!”

 


Debra Beard, Fairweather jewelry designer.

Grace Note received from Debra:
“Most importantly thank you to all the customers, wonderful people and new friendships I have been blessed with from attending so many great events.”


Questions and Answers:

Q: What events has Debra’s jewelry  been at, you may ask?
A: The designer placed her jewelry in the gift shop of a cruise ship!

 

 

Q: What is sea glass, you ask?
A: Sea glass is physically and chemically weathered glass found on beaches along bodies of salt water.  Sea glass takes 20 to 30 years, and sometimes as much as 50 years, to acquire its characteristic texture and shape.  Genuine sea glass, originates as pieces of glass from broken bottles, or even shipwrecks, have tumbled in the ocean for years.

Spring forecast:

Sea glass colors are trending in hues of new goodies in minty, calming green and ocean blues, in addition in jewelry!!!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Sea glass is often called “Mermaid Tears.”

The legend of the mermaid tears:
One storm-ravaged night, a schooner fought to find safety in the San Juans. The ship was familiar to the mermaid who swam along its side. As the ship heeled in the violent wind, the captain lost his hold on the wheel, tumbling perilously close to the raging sea. In an instant, the mermaid calmed the wind and tamed the waves, changing the course of nature and saving the life of a man she had grown to love from afar.
For her impetuous act, Neptune banished the sobbing mermaid to the oceans depths, condemning her for eternity never to surface or swim with the ships again. To this day, her gleaming tears wash up on the beaches as sea glass, an eternal reminder of true love.

 

And, too,  showing a few of Fairweather’s favs of designs by Debra, using hand made glass, inlaid with gold, wrapped in sterling silver.

 

Ron Nicolaides.

High Sea. Original oil.

About the artist:

Ron Nicolaides, lives and works in Oregon and studied art at Washington University in St. Louis Missouri, but is primarily a self-taught artist. He painted his first oil seascape in his teens and credits visiting museums as a basis for his continuing knowledge of art and the style of the Hudson River School of Painting, a style he pursues.

Artist Eugene Garin has served as his mentor. However, his work is heavily inspired by the European Old Masters with his greatest stylistic influence being the Hudson River School of artists, such as Albert Bierstadt, Thomas Moran, Frederic Church and Herman Herzog.

The western landscape and Pacific coast are the predominant subjects of Nicolaides’ paintings.

Evening Surf

 Ron Nicolaides, with years of study and experience has become a powerful accomplished artist. He has captured majestic landscapes and has mastered the mesmerizing translucent waves in his depiction of the sea without freezing its energetic rhythms.

“His strength is his capacity to push the limits of oils and multiply glazes to create the masterful works that bring the viewer right into the scene.”

 

“His accomplishment as an artist can be clearly seen in his use of fine detail, vibrant color and the multiple glazes. The stylistic influences he uses give his compositions a sense of wonderful depth.” 

 

Water and Light

“His accomplishment as an artist can be clearly seen in his use of fine detail, vibrant color and the multiple glazes. The stylistic influences he uses give his compositions a sense of wonderful depth.”

His paintings can be found in many private collections and selected  fine art galleries.  His work is in a permanent exhibition in the North Lincoln County Historical Museum in Lincoln City, Oregon.

Represented by:
FAIRWEATHER GALLERY

Seaside, OR

See more info about our gallery and other exhibits at http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …blog.

In addition, Ron Nicolaides is represented by:

HORIZON FINE ART GALLERY
Jackson Hole, WY

and

EISELE GALLERY OF FINE ART
Cincinnati, OH

Q: What is the Hudson River School of Painting style, you ask?

A: Hudson River School of Painting,  an American art Movement, was  originally a large group of American landscape painters of several generations who worked between about 1825 and 1870. The name, applied retrospectively, refers to a similarity of intent rather than to a geographic location, though many of the older members of the group drew inspiration from the picturesque Catskill region north of New York City, through which the Hudson River flows.
An outgrowth of the Romantic movement, the Hudson River school was the first native school of painting in the United States; it was strongly nationalistic both in its proud celebration of the natural beauty of the American landscape and in the desire of its artists to become independent of European schools of painting.

Hudson River School paintings reflect three themes of America: discovery, exploration, and settlement. The paintings also depict the American landscape as a pastoral setting, where human beings and nature coexist peacefully. Hudson River School landscapes are characterized by their realistic, detailed, and sometimes idealized portrayal of nature, often juxtaposing peaceful agriculture and the remaining wilderness, which was fast disappearing from the Hudson Valley in the 19th century just as it was coming to be appreciated for its qualities of ruggedness and sublimity.

For more info go to: https://www.britannica.com/art/Hudson-River-schoolan

SHOUT OUT FOR FAIRWETHER ARTIST RON NICOLAIDES! His paintings are on display during the National Oil Painters Society Convention.

May 12 – June 24, 2017

Artists, collectors and art enthusiasts will find an unparalleled collection of traditional oil paintings representative of the high quality of work being produced by the nationally and internationally acclaimed group of oil painters in this exhibition. An opening reception and award ceremony will be held for artists, collectors, the public and press on Friday, May 12th from 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. at Eisele Gallery. Renowned artist William Whitaker OPAM will serve as Juror of Awards.

Over the years, OPA’s National Exhibition has garnered a reputation for being one of the premier art shows in the country receiving over 2,000 submissions each year for consideration. Of those entries, only two hundred twenty artists are selected to be part of this exhibition.

To read more about OPA’s National Exhibition go to:
http://www.oilpaintersofamerica.com/events/exhibitions/2017/national/index.cfm

And, again, worth repeating, we are humbled and grateful to have been selected to represent Ron Nicolaides!

Varied Thrush by Neal Maine.
Fun Fact: Discovered in Doug Ray’s back yard in March, 2017.

About Neal Maine:

After a thirty-year career as an award-winning biology teacher at Seaside High School, Neal Maine became the first executive director of North Coast Land Conservancy, which he co-founded in 1986. Since his retirement from the land trust in 2010, he has pursued his passion for nature photography through PacificLight Images, dedicated to raising awareness of coastal ecology and the wildlife with whom we share the region’s estuaries, freshwater wetlands and forests. Their photography centers around coastal and Columbia River landscape, ecology and the rich estuary habitat with the surrounding wetlands and forest systems. PacificLight Images is dedicated to working with coastal communities to protect wildlife habitat and its connectivity. A percentage of all photography sales are donated to North Coast Land Conservancy to help further this goal.
——————————————————————————————————————————————
THE COASTAL EDGE
In cycles older than time, forces deep within the earth push apart tectonic plates, creating and expanding the oceans whose waters are pushed and pulled by the sun and moon, cooled and heated and calmed and stirred to fury by the skies. Ocean collides with continent, shattering the shore into a thousand facets: bare rock monoliths, vast expanses of sand, saltwater pools that drown, then drain, then drown, then drain. And in that shattering, life asserts itself, creeping and burrowing and swimming and perching in particular niches, particular flora and fauna whose collective presence defines THE COASTAL EDGE.
——————————————————————————————————————————————
NATURE’S TRAILS
A limpet creeps up a wave-washed rock, following the rise of the tide. A salmon follows ancient watershed trails to its natal stream. An otter travels along its living trap line for crabs in the estuary to crayfish up side creeks. A vole tunnels into the soft sponge on the forest floor. In the treetops, in the forest, across the land, in the water, and in the air, all become a living slate for NATURE’S TRAILS. This tracery of interwoven trails are unsigned but indelible to generations of travelers.
——————————————————————————————————————————————
THE NEXT FRONTIER, OUR OWN BACKYARD
Humans: We take pictures, walks, deep breaths, memories, rides on waves, water, timber, in habitat that used to belong to other trail makers. We thought we could never catch all the salmon, never cut all the big trees, and never pollute the ocean. In our hubris, we thought we could make our own trails. With renewed humility, we are learning how to share this place, to live together with our partner trail makers. PacificLight Images celebrates this partnership as we use our images to inspire others to honor nature’s trails in OUR OWN BACKYARD.
——————————————————————————————————————————————

To view a catalog of images by Neal Maine, please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com …artists/ Neal Maine.

Q: What make the Varied Thrush unique, you ask?

A: Does much foraging on the ground, usually under dense cover but sometimes in the open, it can surprise birders in winter; may use its bill to toss leaf-litter aside as it searches for insects.
The haunting songs of the Varied Thrush echo through the lands of the Pacific Northwest. Long minor-key whistles repeated after deliberate pauses, they seem like sounds without a source; only a careful searcher will find the bird itself.

Although it looks superficially like a robin, often nicknamed the Alaskan Robin, the Varied Thrush is very elusive. Could be vulnerable to loss of habitat through cutting of northwestern forests. Currently still common.

For more info go to http://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/varied-thrush

celtic-high-cross-gallery-wrap

Celtic High Cross by Michael Muldoon. Original oil.

Legend says that the first Celtic cross was formed by St Patrick while bringing Christianity to the Druids. The Druids used to worship a large circular stone. St Patrick, on seeing the significance of this stone, drew a large cross through the middle of it in order to bless it. From this act, the two cultures combined to form the Celtic cross. The cross represents Christianity and the circle is the Celtic representation of eternity, no beginning and no end.

Micheal Muldoon paints LIVE.

Michael Muldoon, artist,  offered a Painting Seaside LIVE ™ episode during the opening of IRISH LANDS, an exhibition, on March 6th.

dublin-trinity-college

Trinity Cathedral, location of the Books of Kells, Dublin, Ireland by Richard Newman, photographer.

Q: What is the significance of the Books of Kells, you ask?

A: One of the experts on the manuscript Bernard Meehan writes “In Ireland it symbolizes the power of learning and the spirit of artistic imagination.” The scale and ambition of The Book of Kells is incredible. Written on vellum, practically all of the 680 pages are decorated in some way or another. On some pages every corner is filled with the most detailed and beautiful Celtic designs. The Book is the most famous manuscript in the Library of Trinity College Dublin where it is permanently on display. The Book of Kells is kept in a gallery with only two pages displayed at a time, although they are turned after some period.

https://www.tcd.ie/visitors/book-of-kells/
http://www.special-ireland.com/the-book-of-kells/

 

And, too, for IRISH LANDS, an Irish  family heirloom from the 1800’s will be displayed throughout the month of March  at Fairweather’s



Irish Lands hostesses: Kathy B., Kay K., Denise F., Joan S., and Shirley Y. posing with the spinning wheel display at Fairweather’s.

Kate Hegarty came to America  from Ireland with a spinning wheel crafted in the 1800’s  during the Great Irish Potato Famine.

 

After flourishing for more than 600 years, the Weaver’s  (Spinning) Guild collapsed during the famine years (1846-1853). The Great Potato Famine of the mid-19th century is the most defining event in modern Irish history. The Famine or the Great Hunger was a period of mass starvation and emigration in Ireland between 1846 and 1853.  More than more than 5 million adults and children left Ireland to seek refuge, more than 60% did not survive the journey to America and beyond.  

 

Q: Who was Kate Hegarty, you ask?

 

A: Kate Hegarty, traveled a 16-year-old from County Limerick, Ireland to America in the mid 1800’s. She was the only member selected from a family lottery to safely leave during the Great Potato Famine in Ireland. She brought with her a family heirloom, a spinning wheel, crafted in the 1800’s and had hopes to earn a living in the textile trade. Instead, the young immigrant found work as a maid in Boston, saved her money to travel to the Washington Territory.  She worked as a mother’s helper and brought her treasured spinning wheel. She married a pioneer, Michael Curtin in 1854.  He had come to America from County Cork, Ireland traveling in a ship “around the Horn”.  He earned  money in the gold mines of San Francisco, and later Curtin settled in the Washington Territory. 

 

Curtin is the first pioneer family listed in the Clark County Historical Register, Washington Territory. The Curtin land claim is signed by Ulysses S. Grant, who served as quartermaster at Fort Vancouver from 1852 to 1853. 

Tradition gifts the spinning wheel to the eldest daughter of each generation. Denise Fairweather, founder of Fairweather House and Gallery, has  received the treasured family heirloom.

More info go to: http://www.globalgenealogy.com/countries/ireland/resources/

 

More info: The Famine Ships: Irish Exodus to America, 1846-51 – Edward Laxton, author.

 

To learn more about the gallery, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseangallery.com and view the about, blog and artists tabs.r

Next Page »