Q&A


“Goldfinch and Sage” watercolor on wood panel by Mary Burgess

My paintings are about joyful experiences. As a long-time bird watcher, hiker, and nature enthusiast, I love the challenge of capturing the essence of each little creature and enjoy painting each as a portrait.”  MB

Mary Burgess is a watercolor artist living and working in Lake Oswego, Oregon. After teaching High School Art classes for 15 years, she began her second career as a professional watercolor artist and painting instructor

“Once a teacher, always an educator.  Mary Burgess enjoys the best of all worlds because she is using her skills to educate others about the arts and develops artwork to show what she is passionate about.”-– FH&G

“Redknot and Oceans” watercolor on panel by Mary Burgess

Red Knots nest above the Arctic Circle and winter near the tip of South America. So they migrate about 16,000 miles round trip each year. They can live more than 15 years, which means red knots travel to the moon and back several times on their cumulative migration flights.

When it’s winter here in the northern hemisphere, it’s summer in the southern — a fact that helps explain how the red knot’s vast migration evolved.

This is one of the most spectacular migrations available in bird life along the Pacific Ocean/ Western region migration and along the Atlantic Ocean/ Eastern region migration. 

Mary Burgess recommends reading the book “RISING”…

“RISING” by Elizabeth Rushing
Review: The short answer is: a writer’s sensibility. Rush, who teaches creative nonfiction at Brown University, has chosen to examine climate change through the lens of American places and people devastated by rising seas and higher temperatures. … An empathetic writer and observer, Rush hints that she is learning alongside you. Hailed as “deeply felt” (New York Times), “a revelation” (Pacific Standard), and “the book on climate change and sea levels that was missing” (Chicago Tribune), Rising is both a highly original work of lyric reportage

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

Art show and Sale

May 1-25

ON YOUR MARKS, an exhibition, featuring NW artists Gayle H. Seely, Diane Copenhaver, Mary Burgess, and Lee Munsell.

Welcoming NW pastel artist Susan Mitchell. 

“On your marks”  a command given to runners at the beginning of a race in order to get them into the correct position to start. In the words of the Fairweather exhibition, it “ means to begin something, indicating the arts season is opening for the summertime”. 


And, too, just perfect for the upcoming ice cream season, from Tom Willing.  Hand turned wood handles stainless steel ice cream scoops $40. each.

Tom Willing taught middle school in Newberg, Oregon.
Once a teacher, always an educator
President and Certified Member of the Pacific Northwest Woodturning Guild, he teaches woodturning techniques and is a Board Member of Northwest Woodturners and the American Association of Woodturners. 
Willing lives in the Willamette Valley with his wife, watercolor artist Mary Burgess.
 
 

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands.

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

 

 

Christine Trexel  makes special boxes. “It is intensive hand work. And, I like the piece to have a function.”  From her days helping those with neurological deficits back to health as a former occupational therapist, Christine puts her heart and soul into her work.

 

 

 

 

In addition, Christine makes papers from natural fibers. From her yard she uses plants like artichoke, lemon grass, and iris leaves. Christine’s lifetime of service to others has not stopped during the pandemic. She shares her art with others. Getting in touch with other people, with other artists is what she finds rewarding. Christine also repairs books that have been damaged or are worn from use.

 

 

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Lyn Cohn is a snowbird, a summertime resident on the Oregon coast who migrates to another state during the wintertime.  She creates lovely, functional, and unique  bowls on her potter’s wheel and carves a distinctive marker’s mark with a winking face. Wheel thrown pottery is her obsession.

 

 

 

 

Strike off showing artist trademark

 

“Fabric, needle, and thread became a part of my experience at an early age. Mother gave me a needle and thread of my own when I was about five and I embroidered my first tea towel. The desire to embellish is inherent in me. Art is everywhere. With a studio filled with machines and fabrics which had been gathered over the years is my creative haven now. I design quilts, utility items and, dare I say, art work, without restraint. Dreams keep me motivated.”

Textile artist Betty Huffman

 

 

 

 

 

Why is working with your hands good, you ask?
They actually produce endorphins, reducing your stress and anxiety levels. Working with your hands is a way of improving your mental health. They’re also a great way to relieve stress, improve neuroplasticity, and work on your skills, concentration, and calmness.

 

 

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands.

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

“Driftwood and Milky Way” nightscape photography by Bob Kroll

$550.

Artist’s statement:

“This beautiful piece of driftwood was found during a late-night exploration on the South end of Rockaway Beach.  The photos used to create this image were taken during the early morning of June 23, 2020, around 1:00 a.m.  This image is a blend of multiple frames taken without moving the camera; which combine different focus points, exposure settings, shutter speeds, and “light painting” the driftwood with a flashlight in order to create the final image.” 

For maximum longevity it is framed under UV filtering ArtGlass ™  and is printed at a size of 16″ x 24″ on archival paper with pigments inks using UltraChrome®   

“A Rare Visitor” nightscape photography by Bob Kroll

$750.

Artist’s statement:

“In July 2020, Comet Neowise put on a dazzling display and was visible in much of the Northern Hemisphere.  The comet was only discovered on Mar. 20, 2020 by NASA’s Near Earth Object Wide-field Survey Explorer (NEOWISE) mission and is not be seen again for another 6800 years. This signed photograph of the comet over Haystack Rock in Cannon Beach, Oregon, was taken on July 14th just after 11:00 p.m.”

For maximum longevity it is framed under UV filtering ArtGlass ™  and is printed at a size of 16″ x 24″ on archival paper with pigments inks using UltraChrome®   

“The Lion Sleeps” nightscape photography by Bob Kroll

$495.

Artist’s statement:

“The sea stack known as Lion Rock is located at the North end of Arcadia Beach State Recreation area, between Cannon Beach and Arch Cape.  This image had been in my mind for months and required the right combination of clear night skies, low tide, and alignment of The Milky Way.

The photos to create this image were taken on the early morning of July 14, 2020 between 1:00 and 1:30 a.m.  This image is a blend of multiple frames without moving the camera; with a combination of different focus points, exposure settings, shutter speeds, and painting the Lion Rock with a flashlight; in order to create the final image.”

For maximum longevity it is framed under UV filtering ArtGlass ™  and is printed at a size of 16″ x 24″ on archival paper with pigments inks using UltraChrome®   

Q: What is  astrophotography, you ask?
A:  Astrophotography is photography of astronomical bodies and celestial events including stars, the moon, the sun, planets, asteroids, and galaxies. Night photography containing large swaths of sky with stars is considered astrophotography.

Bob Kroll Photographer

“I have been passionate about photography for nearly 30 years, with much of my work focused on travel, landscape, and wildlife.  For me, photography is a means of self-expression and creativity, and it gives me joy in at least 4 different ways.  First, I find joy in being outdoors in nature, envisioning a unique composition, and working to create a photo that will display that vision.  Second, there is joy once the photo is “developed” in seeing that creative vision realized.  Third, it brings me joy to share my images with others and know that the work is appreciated.  And fourth, there is great joy in continuing to learn and improve as an artist. 

Since I retired from veterinary specialty practice (as a board-certified veterinary neurologist), my wife Nancy and I spend a majority of our time on the North Oregon coast in Cannon Beach. Recently, I have begun to explore nightscape imaging – combining landscape features with astrophotography.” 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

Through Sept. 25th 

OVER and UP September Art Exhibition featuring Northwest artists Paul Brent, Victoria Brooks, Patricia Clark-Finley, Pam Haunschild, Bob Kroll, Jan Rimerman, Emily McNeil, Neal Maine and Peg Wells.

OVER and UP focuses on contemporary art, showcasing a wide variety of art forms, mediums and expressions.

My nightscape images seem perfectly suited for this exhibit, “OVER and UP,” as the stars and other celestial bodies in our solar system rise Up in the night sky and are visible Over the landscape.  The long exposures needed to create these images allow the camera’s sensor to see very dim light that our eyes could not otherwise detect and allow us to appreciate the vastness and beauty of the universe.  Combining a view of the night sky with details of the foreground landscape seems to bring the images to life.  In order to see the details of the landscape element, I often use a technique called “light painting,” using a light source such as a flashlight to “brush” light onto the object during the exposure.  Some of these nightscape images have been blended from multiple frames to provide the desired exposure or focus through all parts of the photo.” Bob Kroll

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands.

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Fairweather Gallery has been the place for cultural art gatherings, art talks, music events, art education, artist socializing; indeed, it is a perfect event space to throw that perfect party. First and foremost,  however, it is an art gallery.

Throughout the years, many people have visited the gallery, locals and people from out of town, to enjoy the beautiful surroundings, art, music, wine tastings, listen to an inspiring artist talk, and, oftentimes, to offer a comforting ear about a good works event. 

And, so, it goes forward, while maintaining balance during a pandemic within the arts community. Fairweather continues to develop a list of best practices following approved guidelines.  Keeping everyone safe and healthy.

What remains is the art, artists, and our cultural sense of community.

“Devil’s Cauldron” oil impasto painting by Leah Kohlenberg. SOLD!

The Devil’s Cauldron is a cliff-backed cove just south of Short Sand Beach.

The ocean swells churn and froth around a handful of sea stacks,  making this a spectacular view on a fine day.

A viewpoint at the top of the cliffs can be reached from the nearby Oregon Coast Trail.

“I have been drawing and painting for 18 years, but the impasto work at Fairweather’s is entirely new for me.This oil painting was inspired by the Oregon coast, but the colors are wild and bright (sometimes wacky) and the land forms are intentionally abstract.” Leah Kohlenberg

Spot on!

Cauldron oil impasto by Leah Kohlenberg placed in a Fairweather lay-away plan!

 

 

Q: Did you know that people buy art on lay-away installment plans?  

A: It is a concept that has always been part of the art gallery world. 

 

 

 

“Following the Flowers” by Bev Drew Kindley SOLD!

 

“An Oregon artist, I paint impressionistic landscapes “en plein air” my paintings are based on site experience, memories, sketches and photos.

Searching for the brightness and joy in every season, inspired by the light and energy I find in nature, I experiment to transform the excitement I

feel into colors, shapes, movements and brushstrokes.”   Bev Drew Kindley

 

 

 

Q:  Who was the woman artist who did a painting demo in a Seaside hotel recently?  She was painting a landscape. I would like to purchase a work of art by the artist. She was very generous with her time visiting with me.

A: The River Inn at Seaside sponsored a painting LIVE event with Fairweather artist Bev Drew Kindley.  Painting demonstrations are a wonderful way to view an artist working.  Please make an appointment to visit the Fairweather Gallery in Seaside. This is the best way to see Bev’s newest work. In addition to being a Fairweather resident artist, Bev Drew Kindley participates in solo exhibitions, pop-up galleries, and studio shows.

 

 

“Following the Flowers” by Bev Drew Kindley placed in a Fairweather lay-away plan!

 

 

Fairweather’s lay-away plan for art:

We take the price of the art divide by however many months the patron wants to pay the art off and set up a payment plan with an automatic credit card payment each month. 

The art remains in the gallery, safely stored, in layaway until it is paid. There are no additional holding or finance charges, and the art may be viewed anytime a patron wishes to visit it until it is ready to go home.

Fairweather’s has always believed art should be available to all people and that is why we offer lay-away payment plans for art.

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands

ttps://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

“Art touches people in a way that words cannot.

Especially now in our time of Covid-19 crisis, art reaches out and holds a light of hope.

Through color and expression, art is healing for the artist and for humanity.

In our most dire hours, art keeps us sane, lights the dark and ensures we stay human.”

~ Benjamin Law, journalist/writer

 

Grace note received:

“Posts provide clear ideas in favor of  blogging. They really know how to run a blog.” HS

Copyright © 2020

“Mt. Hood”  handmade glass by Christine Downs

 

“Glass is mesmerizing. Did you know it is not a solid? Scientifically it is considered a supercool liquid due to its unique crystalline structure. There is no other art medium like it. The combination of color & light alone is magical. Its depth and visual allure pulls us in, seduces & invites the sense of touch. We want to swim in it, to feel its warmth or coolness, to look at the world through it. When such visceral responses as these are experienced, I feel I have created a work of art.”

“Happy Mountain Scene”  handmade glass by Christine Downs

“The beauty of Oregon, the western landscape, rivers, trees, ocean & my own backyard feed my aboriginal eye & fuel my creativity on a nearly daily basis.”

 

 

“After the Fire in the Columbia River Gorge” handmade glass by Christine Downs

 

“Rich pattern and simplicity of design is a dichotomy I strive to balance.”

 

“Misty Mountains” handmade glass plate by Christine Downs

 

“My work often entails cosmic, geometric, zoomorphic & vegetal symbols such as spirals, mandalas, leaves, and other universal symbols and elements of sacred geometry.”

 

“Using a variety of techniques, I add visual texture & richness to my works. Combining sheets of glass with glass powders and granules called frit, I often create patterns or images in the glass, removing glass granules as I draw. This “scraffito” technique’s results sometimes resemble monotype printmaking or wild gestural drawing.”

 

“Recently I have been using glass powder mixed in a gelatinous medium to actually draw lines or “paint” with a palette knife as one would with acrylic paint.

Another technique I employ is imbedding designs created by copper sheet or wire between two sheets of glass. The mass of the metal between the two sheets of glass introduces another element to the design: bubbles! Only partially controllable, bubbles add an airy lightness to many of my works.”

 

“After the Fire” diptych of Columbia Gorge Fire of 2017 handmade glass by Christine Downs

 

“My pieces are typically fired at least three times. I sometimes fire a piece, cut it up & re-fire the cut-up elements into a new design. I am always experimenting, in partnership with the glass for inspiration, and permission for what it will allow me to do. As they emerge still warm from the kiln, I sometimes embrace these beloved “artifacts” to my heart. My work is dear to me.”

 

 

Christine Downs, glass artist.

 

Christine taught at Portland State University, Graduate School of Education for many years, preparing candidates becoming special education teachers. She taught entry-level PSU Interpersonal Neurobiology courses, Learning & the Brain & co-taught Meditation & the Brain with Caverly Morgan, founder of Portland’s Peace in Schools.  Christine Downs, MEd, teacher, artist, yoga and mindfulness practitioner,  was a special education teacher for many years. Christine taught students identified as having social‐emotional, behavioral, and/or learning challenges.

 

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

located in the Historic Gilbert Block Building

August 3-25 Exhibition

OUTSIDE INTERESTS featuring local painters and artisans hugely impressed with the wide-open, majestic vistas of the Pacific Northwest. Selected art, new original work, conveys nature’s shifting moods, with no human presence visible. Artists include Paul Brent, Melissa Jander, Sharon Kathleen Johnson, Bev Drew Kindley, Martha Lee, Gretha Lindwood, Ron Nicolaides, Susan Romersa and Dale J. Veith.

Welcoming new artists:  oil painter Vicky Combs-Snider, glass artist Christine Downs and encaustic artist Elina Zebergs to the gallery.

 

“I’ve been having lots of fun in the studio, playing with some techniques I have not visited in a while.  The collection I have made for OUTSIDE INTERESTS is representative of things I like to do. The miniatures are quite time consuming and glass, as the ray material is quite expensive,”  writes glass artist Christine Downs.

 

“Atmospheric Changes” by glass artist Christine Downs

 

 

 

Moon over Mt. Jefferson

Original oil by Ron Nicolaides.

About the artist:

Ron Nicolaides, lives and works in Oregon and studied art at Washington University in St. Louis Missouri, but is primarily a self-taught artist. He painted his first oil seascape in his teens and credits visiting museums as a basis for his continuing knowledge of art and the style of the Hudson River School of Painting, a style he pursues.

Artist Eugene Garin has served as his mentor. However, his work is heavily inspired by the European Old Masters with his greatest stylistic influence being the Hudson River School of artists, such as Albert Bierstadt, Thomas Moran, Frederic Church and Herman Herzog.

The western landscape and Pacific coast are the predominant subjects of Nicolaides’ paintings.

 

 

Q: Where in the world in Mt. Jefferson, you ask?

A: Mt. Jefferson is a stratovolcano in the Cascade Volcanic Arc, part of the Cascade Range in the U.S. state of Oregon. The second highest mountain in Oregon, it is situated within Linn County, Jefferson County, and Marion County and forms part of the Mount Jefferson Wilderness.

 

 

 

 

Q: What is the Hudson River School of Painting style that describes the style of a Ron Nicolaides painting, you ask?

A: Hudson River School of Painting,  an American art Movement, was  originally a large group of American landscape painters of several generations who worked between about 1825 and 1870.

An outgrowth of the Romantic movement, the Hudson River school was the first native school of painting in the United States; it was a proud celebration of the natural beauty of the American landscape and in the desire of its artists to become independent of European schools of painting.

Hudson River School paintings reflect three themes of America: discovery, exploration, and settlement. The paintings are characterized by their realistic, detailed, and sometimes idealized portrayal of nature, often juxtaposing the remaining wilderness, which was fast disappearing from the Hudson Valley in the 19th century just as it was coming to be appreciated for its qualities of ruggedness and sublimity.

For more info go to: https://www.britannica.com/art/Hudson-River-schoolan

For more info about the artist, please go to https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/Artist/Ron/Nicolaides.html

 

 

August 3- 25 Exhibition 

 

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

located in the Historic Gilbert Block Building

OUTSIDE INTERESTS featuring local painters and artisans hugely impressed with the wide-open, majestic vistas of the Pacific Northwest.  Selected art, new original work, conveys nature’s shifting moods, with no human presence visible.   Artists include Paul Brent , Melissa Jander, Sharon Kathleen Johnson, Bev Drew Kindley, Martha Lee, Gretha Lindwood, Ron Nicolaides, Susan Romersa, and Dale J. Veith.

“Ron’s strength is his capacity to push the limits of oils and multiply glazes to create the masterful works that bring the viewer right into the scene. The stylistic influences he uses give his compositions a sense of wonderful depth,”  D. Fairweather, gallerist.

Welcoming new artists:  oil painter Vicky Combs-Snider, glass artist Christine Downs and encaustic artist Elina Zebergs to the gallery.

 

http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

 

 

Save the date and time.

NEXT Painting Seaside LIVE ™ episode is April 6, 5-7:pm at Fairweather’s. 

Celebrating 15 years in 2019, Seaside First Saturday Art Walk is free and open to the public.

Art Walk is  about seeing art in the galleries and businesses located between Holladay Drive and Broadway Street in the historic district of downtown Seaside.

Visitors meet artists, snag appetizers by favorite restaurants or personal chefs, view painting demonstrations, listen to artists talks and enjoy live performances in music.

Seaside First Saturday Art Walk

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside, Oregon

For more info about the Art Walk events, please visit www.facebook.com/SeasideFirstSaturdayArtWalk

 

Q: What is a Painting Seaside LIVE ™ episode, you ask?

A: Fariweather House and Gallery has had the privilege to offer painting demonstrations, titled Painting Seaside LIVE ™ during most of the Seaside First Saturday Art Walks. Resident artists have been very generous, as it is a compliment to be asked, and they always immediately respond with an enthusiastic, “yes” when asked to perform a painting episode.

 

“Painting is a passion. The Painting Seaside LIVE ™ process gives the artists the chance to share this passion with the onlookers. Artists enjoy the opportunity being authentic in what they are experiencing. Surely, the LIVE episodes, sponsored by Fairweather House and Gallery, are, truly, one of the ways that artists “live the process” and help patrons grow to appreciate art, as well.” D. Fairweather, gallerist.

 

To read more about the gallery and view the artist’s work , please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

 

 

 

“Whales at Play”  handmade box by Ray Noregaard.

Black walnut box with poplar wood pulls and feet.

Signed.

 

 

“Ribbons” box by Ray Noregaard, wood artist who uses no nails or screws.

Signed.

 

“Keepsake” triple tray box with three compartments by Ray Noregaard.

Signed.

 

 

“Treasure” two drawer raw edge cedar box by Ray  Noregaard.

Signed.

 

From the artist:

I cannot remember when I was not working with wood.  As a small child, I was making and repairing my toys. We were living in Vanport, the World War II housing project and our family lost everything in the 1948 Vanport flood.  After that event we lived in a tent for one year falling and cutting logs using a seven foot long cross cut saw.  I was thirteen years old and worked with my father twelve hours each day. 

After high school, I start working with houses, doing cabinets and finish work.  I make custom furniture, as well.  For more than fifty years I built houses all around the Northwest, moving to the North coast in 2004, where I built more than ten houses, having completed my last house in 2017.  I have retired from building and am turning wood and doing a lot of small wood craft work.

 

I realize with all the beauty of God’s creation that my calling is to help show what he has created.  I have always loved learning new methods and being challenged in making any of my art work.  IT has been a true blessing and one of my joys to receive cards and letters from my friends and family for my work.  I appreciate all the beautiful wood that God has supplied.  Ray Noregaard

 

To read more about the Vanport flood, go to…

How Oregon’s Second Largest City Vanished in a Day/  History … 

 A 1948 flood washed away the WWII housing project Vanport

 

Manzanita”  three drawer keepsake box by Ray Noregaard.

Spalted chestnut box, black walnut pulls with maple base.

Signed.

 

 

Q: What is spalted wood, you ask?

A: The partial decay, called spalting, gives the wood dark contrasting lines and streaks where fungus has begun to attack the wood. If the wood has been rescued from the spalting at the right time, the lumber should still be sound and usable, with little to no soft spots or rotten wood.

 

In the decorative wood market, spalted wood is in high demand. Spalting is caused by certain white-rot decay fungi growing in wood–primarily hardwoods. The fungi create zone lines in the wood where territories of competing fungi meet.

The partial decay, called spalting, gives the wood dark contrasting lines and streaks where fungus has begun to attack the wood.

Spalted wood has dark veins caused by fungi. This wood is very decorative and therefore very popular with woodworkers.

 

Fairweather House and Gallery features unique Northwest wood artists Fred Lukens, Mike Brown, Michael Gilbert, Daniel Harris, Mike Morris, Ray Noregaard, and Duane Bolster.

Fairweather House and Gallery believes that art, craft and service are best provided by local artisans.  We are proud to represent passionate local people.

 

 

To read more about selected wood artists, go to:

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/category/artists/daniel-harris/

 

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/category/artists/duane-bolster/

 

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/Artist/Mike/Brown.html

 

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/category/artists/michael-gilbert/

 

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/…/presenting-fred-lukens-and-his-h

 

The wood artists create one-of-kind wood objects from fallen timbers that include Douglas Fir, Red Cedar, Maple, Western Walnut, Oregon Mrytlewood, Oak and Cherry.

 

“Two Hearts” two drawer burl wood box by Ray Noregaard.

Signed.

 

And, too, vintage burl vase with glass liner.

 

Q: What is burl wood, you ask?

A: Burl wood is a tree growth in which the grain has grown in an unusual manner. It is commonly found in the form of a rounded outgrowth on a tree trunk or branch that is filled with small knots from dormant buds.

 

 

A burl results from a tree undergoing some form of stress. Most burls grow beneath the ground, attached to the roots as a type of growth that is generally not discovered until the blows over. Almost all burl wood is covered by bark, even if it is underground.

 

 

Burls yield a very peculiar and highly figured wood, prized for its beauty and rarity. It is sought after by wood sculptors. Burl wood is very hard to work with hand tools or on a lathe because its grain is twisted and interlocked, causing it to chip and shatter unpredictably. This “wild grain” makes burl wood valued for bowls and vases.

 

For more about the gallery, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

Note received:

“The wood crafter, Ray,  in your gallery has a steady hand.  He uses hard to find wood. Wow.  His work is a labor of love. I know, for I worked in the bi-fuels department of Weyerhauser for years and know wood.”

“High Seas”  original oil on linen by  Ron Nicolaides.

January 2019

 “Where the spirit does not work with the hand, there is no art.”  —Leonardo da Vinci

 

 

 

“Having worked on this painting for many years, more than twenty years, in September of 2018 I chose a different focus. The sun, too bright and the waves not powerful enough, in my opinion.”  Ron Nicolaides

 

 “The beginnings and ends of shadow lie between the light and darkness and may be infinitely diminished and infinitely increased.” Leonardo da Vinci

 

“It is always attempting to paint the light  that I remember most.  It is my inspiration. 

Light and its elusive quality can transform a landscape in just a matter of time.  

Originally, the sun was the focus, later, as the painting matured; the light on the sea and its fleeting magic was given more highlights.” —Ron Nicolaides 

 

 

Painted in the Hudson River School of Painting style.

Q: What is the Hudson River School of Painting style, you ask?

 

A: Hudson River School of Painting, an American art Movement, was originally a group of American landscape painters of several generations who worked between about 1825 and 1870. The name, applied retrospectively, refers to a similarity of intent rather than to a geographic location,  the  members of the group drew inspiration from the picturesque region north of New York City, through which the Hudson River flows.

An outgrowth of the Romantic Movement, the Hudson River school was the first school of painting in the United States; with its proud celebration of the natural beauty of the American landscape and in the desire of its artists to become independent of European schools of painting.

 

Hudson River School paintings reflect three themes of America: discovery, exploration, and settlement. The paintings also depict the American landscape as a pastoral setting, where human beings and nature coexist peacefully. Hudson River School landscapes are characterized by their realistic, detailed, and sometimes idealized portrayal of nature, often-juxtaposing peaceful agriculture and the remaining wilderness, which was fast disappearing from the Hudson Valley in the 19th century just as it was coming to be appreciated for its qualities of ruggedness and sublimity.

 

Hudson River School of Painting uses symbolism and allegory to convey  feelings about the natural world, often with connotations of the supernatural.

 

 

“Pacific City Haystack Rock” original oil on linen by Ron Nicolaides.  

“Ron Nicolaides paints in the Hudson River School of Painting style.  Note the use color, weather, light and shadow, and other dramatic elements in nature suggesting  creating strong juxtapositions and high seas in the same painting. This is the essence of any masterful work of art.” D. Fairweather, gallerist

 

 

 

And, too, on January 3, 2019 a tale of three Oregon coast Haystack Rocks:

 

There are three Haystack Rocks on the Oregon coast. Visitors from out-of-state who tend to latch onto the one in Pacific City, or the one in Cannon Beach or the one in Bandon. Indeed, there are three major landmarks, all regularly photographed, and all by the name of Haystack Rock.

One is the gargantuan Haystack Rock at Pacific City at 340.6 feet high and is almost a mile offshore from the landmark Cape Kiwanda.

The Haystack Rock in Cannon Beach is 235 feet high and sits right up on the tide line of the famed north coast town.

The Haystack Rock in Bandon is 105 feet high and is in Coos County. All sea stacks are federally protected and are closed to public access.

http://coastexplorermagazine.com/features/oregon-coast-sea-stack-rock-formations

Ron Nicolaides, lives in Oregon and studied art at Washington University in St. Louis Missouri, but is primarily a self-taught artist. He painted his first oil seascape in his teens and credits art museums as a basis for his continuing knowledge of art and the Hudson River School style he pursues. Artist Eugene Garin has served as his mentor. However, his work is heavily inspired by the European Old Masters with his greatest stylistic influence being the Hudson River School of artists, such as Albert Bierstadt, Thomas Moran, Frederic Church and Herman Herzog.

The western landscape and Pacific coast are the predominant subjects of Nicolaides’ paintings.

Nicolaides, with years of study and experience has become a powerful accomplished artist. He has captured majestic landscapes and has mastered the mesmerizing translucent waves in his depiction of the sea without freezing its energetic rhythms.

His strength is his capacity to push the limits of oils and multiply glazes to create the masterful works that bring the viewer right into the scene.

“I have developed a distinctive style that I truly own. I have a consistent body of work to show for it.” —Ron Nicolaides

Read more about the artist at http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists tab/ …Ron Nicolaides

“Snowbound”

Great Blue Heron by Neal Maine/PacificLight Images.

“After many years of trying to capture a heron in the snow, it finally happened along the Neawanna River in Seaside.” Neal Maine

 

For more images from Neal Maine, please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com /  …artists tab/  …Neal Maine and Michael Wing

 

Question:

“Would it be possible to share the link that has Katie’s thank you as an end of year story on the Fairweather blog?”

Answer:

“Of course! We would love that. We’re so glad you were touched by the letter and appreciate you wanting to share it with others.”

Lorraine Ortiz
Development Director

 

December 2018

Dear Friend of North Coast Land Conservancy,

When I look back on this wonderful year at North Coast Land Conservancy, there is one day that stands out as nothing less than magical. As someone who has joined an On the Land outing or pulled weeds with us, who regularly donates to us or who simply follows us through our newsletters or e-news, you know that among our many projects, the big one we’re working on is conservation of what we call the Rainforest Reserve—3,500 acres of forestland adjacent to Oswald West State Park. I’ve made more than two dozen trips up there this year alone, with old and new friends. But this one day was unique.

 

We heard that Oregon’s poet laureate, Kim Stafford, was visiting the coast to do a reading, and we invited him to visit the Rainforest Reserve with us. The morning we set out, the coast was socked in with dense fog—classic pea-soup conditions. Yet barely a couple hundred feet up into the forest, the clouds gave way to blue skies and sunshine. The higher we climbed, the warmer the day became. As we climbed the ridge, the summit of Onion Peak gradually came into view: Onion Peak, the highest point in the proposed Rainforest Reserve.

High on the ridge, at the headwaters of streams that plunge down steep chasms to meet the ocean, at the tree line where meadows flourish on rocky balds, I felt like I was perched on an island of wilderness, a secret floating mountain in the sky. We couldn’t see the towns or highway that we’d left behind just minutes earlier. It was strikingly quiet. Quiet, but not silent. I closed my eyes to better hear the sounds of the rainforest: the buzzing, the singing, the whispering, and the whooshing of wings. I felt transported.

 

I often feel that way when I get off the beaten path just a little bit; do you? When I notice that I don’t hear the road anymore. When I realize my breathing has slowed and I can feel my heart beat. When instead of reaching for my phone, I look to the trees, trying to locate with my eyes the bird that my ears can hear so clearly. Happy memories wash over me, and I feel a sense of kinship with all of creation, past and present. It’s at times like these that I tend to get some of my best ideas.

As Kim put it that day, “This place offers not only clarity of water but clarity of thought. Maybe that’s the business we’re really in: conserving places where all species can be their best selves. Your gifts are the only way we can make that happen. In our land conservation work, I often bump up against folks who say, “I’m not an environmentalist,” or say “I like open space, but I’m no tree-hugger.”  I’ll admit that I have been known to actually hug trees now and then, mostly to feel for myself the scale of some of the big trees we still have on the Oregon Coast. But to the extent that tree-hugger means by-any-means-necessary, I realize that’s not me. And that’s not the organization I work for. By working with willing landowners, by keeping in mind the people part of our people-plants-and-wildlife formula for coastal conservation, we keep open the lines of communication with everyone.

 

Because I don’t think I’ve ever met anyone who hasn’t experienced one way or another, a moment of magic in the natural world. Who hasn’t felt transported, or felt a deepening of connection with all of creation by being in a wild place, away from the houses, roads, and towns where we spend most of our lives.

The way Kim Stafford spoke about the land that day was so grounding, and so humble and human. It reminded me that we are all just people, doing the best we can to take care of our place, and for so very many reasons:

We save this land because it brings life, water and breath.

We save this land because we love the critters that live here, the wildflowers, and the forests.

We save this land because, in the end, we know it will save us.

Or as Kim said that day, on the shoulder of Onion Peak, one of the pieces of ground we are working so hard to conserve, “It occurs to me, while standing here, that this project will offer what we will long for more and more: clear water, quiet, and starlight.”

Thank you for sharing your time and your treasure and allowing us to do just that, here on our coast: offering clear water, quiet, and starlight, for all creatures, forever.

If simply being in nature is already such a powerful experience for me, what was it about being in one of my favorite wild places with a poet such as Kim Stafford that made the experience even more profound?

Part of it was the day itself: standing on a peak floating upon fog, in the gold and blue of a fall day that felt stolen from summer. But I think Kim was somehow able to read my heart and put words to what I was feeling better than I could myself. Each of us, every human being, has a need for nature, is part of nature. Each of us feels that connection, deep in our hearts and souls, even if we can’t put that awe and that sense of wonder into words the way he could.

The next day Kim emailed us to thank us for the day we shared. What a gift it is to work with such amazing people—people such as yourself—who care so deeply about our coast and for our coast.

 

Thank you for helping to conserve Oregon’s coastal lands, forever.

All my best,

Katie Voelke

Executive Director

North Coast Land Conservancy

Preserving the Oregon Coast Forever

PO Box 67, Seaside, OR 97138

503.738.9126

https://nclctrust.org/

 

 

Hosted by the Seaside Library Art Committee

“Maybe no other local wildlife creature represents the natural history of the North Coast land ocean interface better than the great blue heron.”  Neal Maine

19 images of the Great Blue Heron, a natural history art show, by Neal Maine at the Seaside Library, on public display combined with a printed image guide  detailing the natural history of the great blue heron.

 

 

“The goal of this photography display is to celebrate this unique bird and bring life to how the features of the great blue heron fir the abundance and freshwater systems of the North Coast.  Natural history photography places high value on the quality of the image but even more important, is the desire, skill and patience to capture and illuminate the beauty of the coast landscape and its unique wildlife.”   Neal Maine

“This is the perfect time to share NCLC’s gratitude for FAIRWEATHER’S support of our conservation work on the coast.  We are delighted to share about the new social media outreach program NCLC has launched for our business partners as a thank you for your support. Four times a year NCLC will be posting a thank you to FAIRWEATHER on our FB page, with a photo.”

Here is the schedule for FAIRWEATHER’S posts:

Last week of February 2019

Last week of May 2019

Last week of September 2019

Last week of November 2019

Thank you for valuing the beauty and magnificence of the Oregon Coast. Thank you from all of us at NCLC to all of you at FAIRWEATHER.

Lorraine Ortiz

Development Director

North Coast Land Conservancy

Preserving the Oregon Coast Forever

 

 

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