Q&A


 On August 2nd FINDINGS, an opening art exhibition introduced past and present emerging artists at the Fairweather House and Gallery.

 

Top row/ left to right images:  resident jeweler Renee Hafeman, art patrons, Joan, Art Walk hostess with Paul Brent, resident artist.

Middle row/ left to right images: art by Britney Drumheller, celebrity artist Britney Drumheller offers an art lecture, artist Emily Miller, and introducing emerging artist Whelpsy Whelp.

Bottom row/ left to right images: marine debris artist Karynn Kozij, Joan, Art Walk hostess demonstrating Octopus art, Paul Brent with Gail and Ellen, Art Walk hostesses at the Paul Brent Pop-Up Art Studio and Gallery, sponsored by Fairweather House and Gallery and The Gilbert Block Building, Denise, Kemmy Kay, Joan and Saundra FINDING art at the FINDINGS opening reception.

Q: What is an emerging artist, you ask?

A:  An emerging artist is considered an artist without commercial representation who has a dedicated art practice but has had limited opportunities to show at a gallery or non-profit spaces.

 

For more info please  go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com.  Celebrating 11 years of sponsoring  NW regional acclaimed and emerging artists in 2017.

Lava vases by Emily Miller, Pelican and Buoy original art by Whelpsey Whelp, Sea Turtle original water-color by Rosemary Klein, hand-made journals and boxes by Christine Trexel, hammered copper and gold earrings by Steven Schankin and Natura shell series of original oil paintings by Paul Brent.

 

On the grass cloth wall: coral original oil by Paul Brent, coral wood cut series by Gregory Graham, Puffin on the Rock (facing left)original by Nick Brakel, Puffin fine art photograph (facing right) by Donna Geissler, and on the twig wall sculpture, Oregon myrtlewood earrings by Fred Lukens.

On the table scape: Puffin Portrait original pen and ink (facing right) by Britney Drumheller, Sea Star original pen and ink by Britney Drumheller, and  hand hemmed tie dyed silk scarves by Beth Collins.

 

Eel and pipe fish original pen and ink collage by emerging artist Whelpsey Welp (easel display), The Snorkler by Marga Stanley (on the circle table) rare CoCo Chanel vintage jewelry by Renee Hafeman,  spoons by Mike Morris,  Moulton Sky original oil seascape  by Michael Muldoon and Oregon lighthouse watercolor series by Emily Miller.

Sea Within original shell art by Jan Shield, original water colors by Carolyn Macpherson, tclam style  carry all bags by textile artist Linda Ballard  and…ta! da! …grand piano found by a friendly neighbor for the Fairweather Gallery!!!

Displays by Denise Fairweather,  Allied Member, A.S.I.D., American Society of Interior Designers.

 

For more about  the accredited interior design work at the gallery , please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …about/ Denise Faiweather page

And, too,  questions to the audience at FINDINGS, the opening reception for the August exhibition, at Fairweather House and Gallery.

What is new?

What is bigger than a bread box?

What took one and 1/2 hours to install?

What took 5 men to move?

What has the number 88 to do with this piece?

 

And, the art patron who answered the question…is it the grand  piano?  The lovely lady in black.  She graciously called for a round of applause, after listening to the piano stories  (past, current and future musical lives).

 

For more info please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Renee Hafeman, vintage jewelry artist

FINDINGS in my work is a collection of tools and other articles used by an artisan to make jewelry.

 

Q:  What is the difference Between “Art Nouveau” and “Art Deco”, you ask?

A: Art Nouveau: means “new art,” reigned from roughly 1880 until just before World War I. It features naturalistic but stylized forms, often combined with more geometric shapes, particularly arcs, parabolas, and semicircles (think of the Eiffel Tower). The movement brought in natural forms that had often been overlooked like insects, weeds, even mythical faeries, as evidenced by Lalique jewelry or Tiffany lamps.

Art Deco emerged after World War I. In fact, the deprivations of the Great War years gave way to a whole new opulence and extravagance that defined the Jazz Age and the Art Deco aesthetic. The movement, prevalent from the 1920s until roughly the start of World War II, took its name from the 1925 Exposition Internationales des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes, held in France and is characterized by streamlined and geometric shapes. It also utilized modern materials like chrome, stainless steel, and inlaid wood. If Art Deco dabbled with natural materials, they tended to be graphic or textural, like jagged fern leaves. As a result, Deco featured bold shapes like sunbursts and zigzags and broad curves.

Renee Hafeman offered an artist’s lecture during the opening reception of FINDINGS, an exhibition through August at Fairweather’s.

Note the difference?

Title: “Winged Wonder” by Neal Maine, PacificLight Images.

Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly. Location: Neacoxie Creek. Seaside/Gearhart.

Signed, matted and framed.

“Unless otherwise noted, images are presented as they were photographed. Slight adjustment by cropping, lightening or darkening may have been used, but the photo subject is presented as recorded in the Oregon coastal landscapes.”

A Certificate of Authenticity is provided with each copyrighted and signed image.

Available exclusively at Fairweather’s.

Proceeds to support North Coast Land Conservancy/NCLC.

 

 

THE NEXT FRONTIER, OUR OWN BACKYARD

Humans: We take pictures, walks, deep breaths, memories, rides on waves, water, timber, in habitat that used to belong to other trail makers. We thought we could never catch all the salmon, never cut all the big trees, and never pollute the ocean. In our hubris, we thought we could make our own trails. With renewed humility, we are learning how to share this place, to live together with our partner trail makers. PacificLight Images celebrates this partnership as we use our images to inspire others to honor nature’s trails in OUR OWN BACKYARD.Neal Maine

To read more about the photographer, please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Neal Maine

 

Save the date and time. 
Neal Maine, scientist and wildlife photographer to present a lecture on the ecology of the North Coast habitats.

August 5th, 6:pm
Fairweather House and Gallery
612 Broadway, Seaside, OR
Opening reception for FINDINGS

Seaside First Saturday Art Walk 

 

To read more about the Art Walk, please go to http://www.facebook.com/ Seaside First Saturday Art Walk.

Q: Where can the Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly be found, you ask?

A:  Habitat: Small ponds and slow streams. It perches on the tips of twigs, grasses and other vegetation.

Fun Creature Facts:

Distribution: Western U.S., West Indies and Central America south to Chile and Argentina.

Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly wings sit flat when perched and have a strong sustained flight; flitting about on gossamer wings and quiet as a whisper.

Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonflies are swift fliers, reminiscent of tiny airplanes.

Their eyes are huge, often meeting at the top of the head.

The Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly, will eat almost any soft-bodied flying insect including mosquitoes, flies, small moths, mayflies, and flying ants or termites.

The Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly are aptly named as they mimic hawks, relentlessly pursuing their prey.

The Latin name for this genus, Sympetrum, means “with rock” and refers to their habit of basking on rocks to absorb heat early in the day.

This species is one of the first dragonflies to emerge each year.

imnh.isu.edu/digitalatlas/bio/insects/drgnfly

 

 

 

 

 

Emily Miller.  Hand made porcelain. Urchin bowls. Food-safe, microwave sale, top rack dishwasher safe.

 

I have spent my life on the coast, and all my artwork has its roots in my love of the sea. I see the coast as a border between the known and the unknown, and a place where our connection to larger natural systems becomes clear. My artwork focuses on the delight of exploring this mysterious and beautiful environment.

 

 

 

I am a lifelong artist with a passion for materials. My work ranges from realistic watercolor painting to abstract encaustic wax and collage, as well as glass and metal sculpture, functional porcelain ware, digital and darkroom photo processes, and interactive installation work. So far I haven’t met a medium I didn’t like.

My background is in California, Kauai, and Down East Maine. I am currently based in Portland, Oregon. My work is constantly inspired by the links between life on these very different coasts.

 

 

Recent Work

“A vase can hold weeds or flowers, but can’t it just be a spot of beauty?”
– Rose Cabat, studio ceramicist

 

 

Lagoon pots and anemone-pots

My recent ceramics are functional and sculptural objects with tactile, touchable surfaces, based on ocean life forms and colony growth patterns. Sea urchins, anemones, and succulents inspire my ceramics, as well as landscape features from turquoise lagoons to cooling lava.

Emily Miller

 

My recent paintings explore the beauty and diversity of Oregon’s coastal landscapes and how water shapes these environments, from rain, rivers and wetlands to the sea. Plein air (outdoor) painting and multiple reference photos are essential to my work. Being out in the landscape, studying the details of each moment’s shifting light, color, and weather, creates a strong bond with the location and a freshness and immediacy in the finished artwork.

 

 

Encaustic Art. Squall by Peg Wells

 

Seaside summer time artist Peg Wells, who exhibits in the off-season at the Saddle Brooke Resort/ Primary Studio in Arizona, recently delivered a new encaustic painting.  Perfect for the WAVES July exhibit at Fariweather’s.

 

 “Peg Wells provocative style proves that a quiet approach can have a very powerful effect.” –Amy Kiefer, freelance Historic Gilbert District reporter.

“I have been fortunate enough to live in a variety of states and several countries and have enjoyed my exposure to a wide scope of artistic expressions. I have worked in various media including pottery, title and water-color.” –Peg Wells

 

Q: What is encaustic painting, you ask?

 

A: Pronunciation: en-caws-tick, is a paint consisting of pigment mixed with beeswax and fixed with heat after its application. –n. The Greek word is enkaustikos –to burn in.

 

Encaustic dates back to the ancient Greeks, as far back as the 5th century BC. Ancient ship builders used beeswax, resin to seal, and waterproof their vessels. Ultimately, they began adding pigment to the wax-giving rise to the decoration of spectacular ships. To paint with encaustic, a combination of beeswax, resin and pigment is combined and then melted to a liquid state. Encaustic paintings have many layers of wax and depending on the piece, it is not uncommon to have anywhere from 25-50 layers.

Grace Note:

“I am grateful that my art found a gallery presence for my sixth summer season with you! I so appreciate your support of my art and me as an artist. I hope that my art will find a new home and that it will bring as much pleasure to people as it has given me create. Thank you.” –Peg Wells

 

 

 

“My  paintings explore the beauty and diversity of Oregon’s coastal landscapes and how water shapes these environments, from rain, rivers and wetlands to the sea. Plein air (outdoor) painting and multiple reference photos are essential to my work. Being out in the landscape, studying the details of each moment’s shifting light, color, and weather, creates a strong bond with the location and a freshness and immediacy in the finished artwork. ”  —Emily Miller

Here’s a link to my Oregon lighthouses watercolor series so far: http://www.ejmillerfineart.com/painting/oregon-lighthouses
I’ll plan to have 4 new paintings in the series for the August 5th  Art Walk at Fairweather’s.  –-Emily Miller

 

 


Mid-Century Geometric Modernist Runway Design. Purple Hand Hand-Made Stained Glass Squares. Oval and Circular Non-Tarnish Chain. Sterling Silver Ornate Hook and Eye Closure. One-on-a-kind.

Vintage Design by Reneé No. 267. Available exclusively at Fairweather’s.

 

Mid-Century Modern. Sterling Silver Red Agate Cabochon. Hallmark “925”. Over and Circular Non-Tarnish Chain. Sterling Silver Ornate Hook and Eye Closure. One-of-a-kind.

Vintage Design by Reneé. No. 266. Available exclusively at Fairweather’s.

 

Vintage French Silver Filigree Perfume Bottle. Hallmark “France.” Vintage Czechoslovakian Crystal. Ornate Sterling Silver Hook and Eye Closure. Vintage-Inspired Chain.

Vintage Design by Reneé. No 273. Available exclusively at Fairweather’s.

 

 

Reneé Hafeman, vintage fine jewelry designer.

 

Q: How would you describe a vintage fine jewelry designer, you ask?

A:  A vintage fine jewelry designer incorporates silver or gold-filled metal and use other elements such as gemstones or hand-crafted jewelry components. The styles of jewelry are one-of-a-kind or small production work that is found in a gallery or a specialty boutique. Fine jewelry is made with valuable metal such as gold and platinum and is set with natural, precious gemstones. Cultured pearls are considered a gemstone.

 

Vintage jewelry is usually identified with a particular era including Art Nouveau, Art Deco, Retro, and Mid-Century Modern. The beauty of vintage jewelry is that unlike contemporary styles, it is not available in vast multiples or quantities. It possesses distinctive qualities of workmanship, individuality and rarity that are appreciated by collectors and stylish clients alike.

Note the time! Fred Luken’s myrtle wood clock…arrived just in time for the June 3rd, 5:pm opening reception of Iconic at Fairweather’s.

About Fred Lukens:

I was born in 1942 during the height of World War Two and my parents raised myself and my two brothers in Portland. We had a very happy childhood with many family members close at hand.

When I was 6 years old we moved out to east county and lived on an acre of property raising a lot of our own food both vegetables and meat.
I attended school at Gilbert Grade School and David Douglas High School. When I turned 16, I joined the U.S Naval Reserves and upon graduation from high school, I immediately went into active service which happened during the Berlin Wall crisis, this placed me active duty prior to my 18th birthday. I spent 2 years of active service both in the Asian theater and then stateside based out of San Francisco, Ca. At 21 years old I moved back to Oregon and worked in the retail market for a number of years and then into product management for a couple of manufactures in the local area.

In 1972 I had another career change by going into sales as a manufactures agent covering Oregon, Washington & Alaska.

In 1985 along with a business partner we created a business that started at zero and by the time I retired in 2005 sales had reached unexpected results. We specialized with any product that involved water, this included water handling, purification, and irrigation. I am proud to say that we were recognized as one of the “go to” authorities in our field. I had the great pleasure to work with some very gracious and wonderful people in my business career of whom I still communicate with.

In 2006 my wife and I decided to sell our home and purchase a travel trailer and set out to see the greater Pacific North West. We traveled thru Oregon, Washington Idaho and parts of Canada before settling back down in Oregon and purchased an acre of land in Sandy, Oregon. I took an old garage that was already on the property and completely refurbished the exterior and had the interior rewired to allow the necessary wood tools that I needed to start working on the projects I am currently able to present for sale and at the same time enjoy producing.

“Much of the raw wood products come from all over the world, South America, Africa, and also our beautiful southern Oregon coast which grows Myrtle wood which many say will soon disappear from the United States.”-– Fred Lukens

 

 

“A finished myrtle wood piece is gorgeous and it is easy to see why people fall in love with them. After all, each provides the new owner a little piece of Oregon created by a local artisan who take tremendous pride in creating unique works in rare wood. “ — Grant McCombie

For more about Grant’s recommendations, please visit  http://traveloregon.com/trip-ideas/grants-getaways/

 

Q:  Where in Oregon is myrtle wood is found, you ask?

A: Oregon has a “banana belt,” a warm landscape along the southern coast, but you will not find pineapple, mango, or papaya growing there. Instead, you will find plenty of cedar, fir and even giant redwoods – plus, one particular hardwood variety that grows from south of Reedsport through Northern California and east from the Coast Range Mountains to the I-5 corridor in the Alfred A. Loeb State Park.  

Q: Where is the Alfred A. Loeb State Park, you ask?

A: The park is located near Brookings, Oregon.  Your first impression of Loeb may well be the scent of the myrtle wood forest … a crisp, bay leaf aroma. The park is nestled in a grove of lovely myrtle wood trees through Alfred  A. Loeb State Park. It is the largest public-owned old growth myrtle stand in the state! The park land was acquired by gift from the State Board of Forestry.  It was a tract purchased by Save the Myrtle Woods, Inc. from Alfred A. Loeb of Portland for protecting the outstanding native myrtle trees and other vegetation along the Chetco River.

For more info please visit http://www.stateparks.com/alfred_a_loeb_state_park_in_oregon.html

 

Fun Fact: Myrtle wood, a rare hard wood,  is a distinctly Oregon wood, found nowhere else in the United States; indeed some  may say,  found nowhere else other than in the Holy Land.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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