The historic Gilbert District


Photo: Rick Mickelson

 

 

March 1, 2019 | by Seaside Visitors Bureau/ City of Seaside

As one of the best known beach destinations in the Pacific Northwest, Seaside has a reputation for stunning sunsets, inviting sand, and proximity to incredible hiking trails that wander along both the sandy shores and rugged bluffs. In addition to its scenic beauty, though, Seaside is also full of rich history and embraces artists from all walks of life. From art walks to museums to festivals, this Oregon Coast gem has an ocean’s worth of art and culture to explore during your next visit.

 

Seaside First Saturday Art Walk
For a decade and a half, Seaside has organized an Art Walk to celebrating the work of residents and visiting artists. On the first Saturday of every month, the art galleries and boutiques located between Holladay and Broadway in the downtown Historic Gilbert District host the Art Walk from 5 to 7 pm. The Art Walk is free and open to the public and gives everyone a chance to see the incredible art of the region. You’ll also have the opportunity to meet artists, watch demonstrations, and even listen to live musical performances.

 

Visiting Seaside when there is not an Art Walk?

 

Don’t fret. Seaside’s art community is well represented all year-long. Must-stop art galleries include the Oregon Gallery, the SunRose Gallery, the Fairweather House and Gallery, and the numerous murals spread all throughout town.

 

One-of-a-Kind

Along Broadway Street just east of the Necanicum  River, Seaside’s Historic Gilbert District is home to several distinctive galleries and shops known for both locally and regionally produced artwork and gifts.  Fairweather House and Gallery (612 Broadway) is one of the preeminent fine-art destinations on the North Coast, with works in a variety of media by both local and regional talents, from larger-than-life abstract paintings to woodwork, bronzes, pottery and even handmade furniture.

 

Map featuring four major historic building blocks in the Historic Gilbert District of downtown Seaside.

The Seaside murals are an attraction in themselves and capture the spirit and culture of this idyllic coastal town. Colorful, iconic, and full of the coastal spirit you’d expect to see, the murals, which are perfect for selfies in the salty air, adorn buildings all around town.

 

Mural located in the Menzel Buidling block of the Historic Gilbert District of downtown Seaside.

 

To view the latest and greatest murals, pay a visit to the Seaside Visitors Bureau, where you can get directions and personalized recommendations for other things to explore in the area.

Seaside, Oregon, is known for its downtown murals and active arts scene.

 

Promoting Seaside
by Jon Rahl/ City of Seaside
How do you describe Seaside to your friends, neighbors and relatives? Better yet, how would you, if asked? You may have an answer on the tip of your tongue. Perhaps you have a different description depending on who you are talking to? There’s no right or wrong answer. However, in the world of destination marketing, the task is to make sure that description resonates with prospective visitors. We want to inspire them to visit and we want to be authentic in our portrayal of this great place.

For the past two months we’ve been working side-by-side with Portland-based Lookout Consulting, and a team of three branding experts, to reimagine Seaside’s identity and determine how it is that we should and will talk about Seaside.

This decision to rebrand our communications did not come overnight. As I look back on it, it was an evolving decision that gained steam in mid-April during my attendance at the 2015 Oregon Governor’s Conference on Tourism. I was asked if Seaside would serve as a case study during a session on developing an integrated marketing plan. Never one to shy away from constructive feedback – and free I might add – I had no hesitation in agreeing to the exercise.

While the session offered a holistic look at our content development, the team of panelists also recommended a simple yet impactful new approach to Seaside’s advertising creative; this new thinking really encouraged me to take the next step towards rebranding. After consulting with my Tourism Advisory Committee, the decision was made to hatch this project.

Beginning in early January, the descriptions, colors and identity of Seaside marketing will change dramatically and I could not be more excited about the new direction and opportunity it will give us. A new primary logo (pictured) features various icons that celebrate the unique identity of our town, echoing the love and nostalgia visitors have felt for Seaside for generations, while introducing a visual abundance of what to see and do here in vibrant coastal colors. With this new logo, we will also roll out a new tagline.

It’s easy to Seaside will become our new consumer facing tagline. It speaks to our audiences leading hectic lives in nearby urban areas about how easy it is to have a fantastic time in Seaside. The tagline will anchor our new brand campaign, which tells visitors how to experience all the amazing things to do and see in and around town through fun, informative “how to” instructions.

It will not entirely replace More Than Just a Day at the Beach – which has been our tagline since the late 1990s. We look at it instead as an evolution. There are times where the More Than… can and will be used. But as we develop new advertising creative, we will want to use It’s easy to Seaside to play off of the new “how to” executions we’ll be introducing.

This “how to” campaign will not only give us a way to have fun (by telling people how to eat taffy), but also allow us a way to describe to new visitors how to do something that maybe didn’t seem so obvious (like finding the perfect hike or learning how to dig for razor clams).

It’s difficult to summarize a 48-page style guide down to a 600-word column, but whether you are a life-long resident, a casual part-timer with a second home or a prospective new visitor, the ceiling is truly high in the number of ways we can tell everyone that It’s easy to Seaside!

 

For more information,  go to http://www.seasideor.com

 

Take a note.

Q: Who visited Fairweather House and Gallery recently (on a Thursday in March), you  ask?

A:  A group of ladies from Taiwan,  a group of college students who were working on an assignment of visiting galleries and writing about the pottery artists  (on mid-winter break from Seattle) and a couple from Vermont… all on a day when there was snow just six miles out of Seaside on Highway 26 (indeed, it is the bridge season between winter  and spring).

 

Spring Break 2019

Oregon Schools

Portland, Beaverton and Seaside area high schools     March 25-29

Willamette University, Lewis and Clark College, Oregon State University, Pacific University and University of Oregon    March 25-29

 

Washington Schools

Seattle    April 8-12

Tacoma,   Olympia/ Thurston County, Mt. Vernon and Clark County/ Vancouver   April 1-5

University of Washington    March 23-31

 

Idaho Schools

Boise schools March 18-22

Coeur D’ Alene March 25-29

Fairweather House and Gallery

 

An exhibition titled FIRST LOOK, a highly anticipated jewelry trunk show, features a dozen of local and regional designers– including a select group who have been represented by the gallery more than 11 years!

 

Barbara Walker works in precious metal wire turning  bling into a wearable work of art.

Mary Hurst, born in raised in County Tipperary, Ireland, studied fashion design at the Grafton Academy in Dublin, integrates past and present Celtic designs in each piece.

Billie Johnstone, a former clinical practitioner, sparked her retirement into a means to support to the youth programs in Soweta, South Africa. The proceeds from the sales of her custom handcrafted jewelry are doing good works that changes lives.

Alan Stockam and Heather Reider create one-of-a-kind silver rings, cuffs and necklaces; each signed and numbered, with stones from the Pacific Northwest and beyond.

Cher Flick,  a graduate  from the Gemological Institute of America, creates jewelry doing good works, by giving back to a charitable foundation in honor of her mother, Joanie.

Karen Johnson, a natural-born artist, boldly designs meticulously handcrafted statement jewelry that could – and should – be featured in magazines.

Mary Boitta experiments in druzy rock semi-precious stones  with in designs that retain femininity and fineness.

Robyn Hall, with no art degree or formal training, creates stunning mouth blown  glass lamp work bracelets and earrings.

Fred Lukens crafts architecturally inspired jewelry featuring responsibly collected rare wood and Oregon myrtle wood.

Renée Hafeman embraces a love of vintage jewelry and gives them new life. Redesigning the antique pieces, she prays “whoever wears, please be blessed in some way.”

 

 

 

Prize winning Northwest artist Mike Mason

Carefully dried, pressed and placed botanicals.  Floral impressionism is created with nature’s color and form as brushstrokes. Mike Mason has been using the flora and organic palette for over 9 years. His body of work which contains over 150 pieces consist of: landscape studies animal images and abstracts. Art is created using all botanical material and made into various fine art collectables.  Mike is using his art to support natural habitat conservation.

 

 

Above: Blue Sun by Mike Mason.

Inspired by the graphic design of the Zia symbol which is a sacred cross, sacred sun symbol. Image consists of rhododendron, rose, carnation, Protea, love in the mist, hydrangea and dill.

 

 

 

Above: Star of Bahai by Mike Mason

Symbol of faith. Nine point star. Peaceful Religion. Image consists of  hydrangea, queen anne’s lace, tulips, rose, rhododendron, peony and foliage.

 

Above: Red Shift  by Mike Mason

Reference to the “Big Bang Theory,” Suggesting a point of origin, a catalyst for the expansion of the known of the universe, and beyond. Image consists of, but not limited to: Iris, squash blossom, fuchsia, rose, gerbera daisy and peony.

 

 

 

 

Artist Hope:  Natural color and form used as brushstrokes is the next step in the journey of understanding. Timeless tales of truth resound in each petal, leaf and root. The impressions of ideas expressed in botanical source material magnify when shared with each other.”–Mike Mason

 

About Mike Mason
Evergreen State College Olympia, WA 1973-1974
Portland State University Portland, OR 1975
San Francisco Art Institute BA Fine Arts San Francisco, CA 1978
BA Arts Administration 1983

2017 Juried Shows:
Beaver Tales Oregon Wetlands Conservancy Art Sale and Exhibit:
OSU LaSells Stewart Center Giustina Gallery, Corvallis, OR 1/2017
Lake Oswego Arts Association, Lake Oswego, OR 2/2017
Fairweather Gallery, Seaside, OR 5/2017
North County Recreation Facility, Nehalem, OR 8/2017
Oregon Zoo Portland, OR 10/2017
Beaverton City Hall, Beaverton, OR 11/2017Portland Open Studios 2015 & 2017
Washington County Open Studios 2016 & 2017
Fairweather Gallery Color Exhibit Seaside, OR 9/2017
The OSU 150 Space Grant Art Exhibit Corvallis, OR 8/2017
Art Splash Tualatin, OR 7 2015-2017*Award
Art Over Macleay Park, Portland, OR 2014-2017

2017 Community Display
Garibaldi Maritime Museum Garibaldi, OR 2013-2017
OSU LaSells Stewart Center Giustina Gallery Fish and Fish Habitat Exhibit Corvallis, OR 2017
The Gaufre Gourmet (Gigi’s Cafe) Portland, OR 2017
Insomnia Coffee House Hillsboro, OR 2017
503 Salon Portland, OR 2011-2017

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Through September

 

The summer art season ends with a most perfect exhibition titled COLOR IT FALL.

New original art compositions revolve around the complementary clash of the deliberately heightened blues, bright oranges and warm yellows.

Color is the dominant element in art.

 

Featuring prize-winning artist Mike Mason, who uses carefully dried, pressed and placed botanicals to create art to support natural habitats conservation. 

 

 

 

 

 

Timely quote by master calligrapher Penelope Culbertson.

For ICONIC, an art exhibition, through June, 2017.

 Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway, Seaside

Definition of iconic:

1: of, relating to, or having the characteristics of an icon

2: widely recognized and well-established •an iconic brand name

3: widely known and acknowledged especially for distinctive excellence •an iconic image •an iconic vacation

 

Penelope Culbertson offered a scribing LIVE episode during the opening reception of Iconic on June 3rd.

 

 

 

For Iconic, an exhibition, Penelope Culbertson created new water-color works combined with calligraphy.  In addition, in the photo are seascapes  by Lee Munsell.  Throughout the years, water-color artist and master calligrapher Penelope Culbertson  has appeared during events at Fairweather’s to offer art lectures, calligraphy history lessons, and scribing LIVE events.

For more about the artists, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseangallery.com/ artists/ … Penelope Culbertson. …Lee Munsell

Original work by Penelope Culbertson.

Penelope Culbertson began her art studies at the Portland Art Museum as a child, in the art department at Cleveland High School, at Reed College with calligraphy master Lloyd Reynolds, at Willamette University in Salem, at the San Francisco Art Institute, and the Institute de Bellas Artes in San Miguel, Mexico.

Penelope was the co-founder of the Art Academy of Kona and the West Hawaii Arts Guild where she served on the Executive Board. Penelope worked in the Hawaii State Artist-in-School program and showed as the Artist-in-Residence at the Hyatt Regency. Her work is in the permanent collection at the Royal Waikoloan Hotel.

Since her return to Portland, Penelope has had seventeen solo exhibits of her watercolors. She showed year round at the Hawthorne Arts Gallery and annually at the Buckman Art Show where she was the founding chairman of the Children’s Art Sale. She taught children’s art classes at the Buckman Arts Magnet Elementary and for the Portland Parks Dept. in their after-school program. In 1999 she helped produce a book of children’s watercolors about the Portland Water System. She was co-founder of The Hawthorne Arts Guild and showed in all their monthly group shows.

Penelope teaches weekly classes in calligraphy and watercolors for the disabled. She experiments in watercolors, oil pastels, collage, tapestry weaving and calligraphy. She is a member of the Portland Society of Calligraphy.

 

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Q: What is calligraphy, you ask?

A: Calligraphy is the art of forming beautiful symbols by hand and arranging them well. It’s a set of skills and techniques for positioning and inscribing words so they show integrity, harmony, some sort of ancestry and rhythm.

Symbol is a mark which has a specific agreed-upon meaning in a language, like a letter of the alphabet, a numeral or a word. Integrity of a letter means admirable proportions and form. Harmony describes a pleasing relationship between different visual elements in a piece of calligraphy: parts of a letter, letters, words, the whole text and surrounding space. Ancestry refers to the heritage of letter-shapes, materials and techniques which calligraphers use. Rhythm means the calligrapher’s deliberate repetition and variation of marks and spaces to create feelings of pattern and emphasis.

But wait, there’s more about calligraphy…

The Oxford English Dictionary defines calligraphy as:

1. Beautiful handwriting; elegant penmanship. (Early seventeenth century.)
2. Style of handwriting, penmanship generally. (Mid-seventeenth century.)
3. In painting etc.: beauty of line; (elegant) brushwork. (Early twentieth century.)

(The word comes from kallos, Greek, meaning ‘beauty’ and -graphy, ‘a style of method or writing, drawing, etc’ which in turn comes from graphe, Greek, meaning ‘drawing, writing’.)

… calligraphy is a script that exhibits exceptional and often self-conscious artistry and aesthetic quality in design and execution. (M. P. Brown, Understanding Illuminated Manuscripts: A Guide to Technical Terms (London: The British Library, 1994)

Calligraphy is a skill. This skill involves touch, pressure, hand movement, unity, and that elusive quality we term “beauty.” (V. Studley, Calligraphy (NY: Dover, 1991)

http://www.calligraphy-skills.com/what-is-calligraphy.html


“As we struggle to adapt to the vagaries of climate change, water stewardship may prove to be the beaver’s greatest gift to us.”
Once They Were Hats, author Frances Backhouse

Fairweather House and Gallery front counter display highlighting BEAVER TALES, May 2017

May marks American Wetlands Month, a time to recognize and celebrate the multitude of ways wetlands contribute to our quality of life.–The Wetlands Conservancy.

 

 

Fairweather Gallery displayed original  art work by Paul Brent, art depicting wetlands for the Beaver Tales exhibit.

Please visit www. fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/  artists/ Paul Brent for more info

Fairweather Gallery artist Agnes Field created fresco paintings depicting beavers for the exhibit.

The Beaver Tales exhibit that continues throughout the month of May in the Fairweather Gallery located at 612 Broadway and in the adjacent pop-up Beaver Tales gallery located at 608 Broadway.

Please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com. artists/ Agnes Field for more info

 

During the opening reception for Beaver Tales special guest speakers spoke about the work wetlands and the good work that beavers do.  Neal Maine, Esther Lev, Katie Voelke, Meylssa Graeber and Sara Vickerman shared stories and suggestions of how to learn more about wetlands and get involved conserving our state treasures.

 

And, too, nearly 100 artists were selected to participate in the BEAVER TALES EXHIBIT, a celebration of beaver art!!! Proceeds in support of The Wetlands Conservancy, Necanium Watershed Council and North Coast Land Conservancy.

Please go to http://www.coast weekend.com to read more about Beaver Tales!

Article titled: Beaver Tales: From near extinction to a place in art
Celebrating nature’s builder
Date: 2017-05-05
story

Grace note to the artists:

“The Seaside exhibit is going very well. Denise Fairweather did an incredible job of securing the pop-up space, furniture and accessories (even beaver sticks) for the display, which resulted in a lovely presentation. Her careful attention to detail and perfectionism are mind-boggling. Even before it officially opened, visitors poured in to view the art. The exhibit is divided between the Fairweather Gallery at 612 Broadway and adjacent pop-up space Beaver Tales at 608 Broadway. Seaside First Saturday Art Walk was a great success, attracting quite a crowd of beaver art enthusiasts. We’ve sold 5 pieces so far at Seaside. Thanks so much for those of you who attended the opening and to Mike Mason, who did a demo of his lovely botanical art on Sunday.

Best wishes, and thanks again for participating in this exciting event.” Sara Vickerman

For more info contact svickerman@comcast.net

503-936-4284

Named the “state animal” in 1969, the American beaver builds the dams and wetlands that serve as habitat for Oregon salmon, steelhead, birds, amphibians and insects. Beavers are nature’s hydrologists, “Beaver Tales: A Celebration of Beaver Art” curator Sara Vickerman … click of the following link to read the entire front page article by Eve Marz, reporter for the Seaside Signal …

Source: From near extinction to a place in art

For more info the participating Fairweather  artists, please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com …artists … Paul Brent, Mike Brown, Agnes Field, Jo Pomeroy Crockett and  Neal Maine.

Save the date and time.

BEAVER TALES, a celebration of art.

May 6th, 5-7:pm in the historic Gilbert District Block of downtown Seaside

For more info about the Art Walk, please go to http://www.facebook.com/SeasideFirstSaturdayArtWalk

SAVE THE DATE AND TIME!

http://www.NCLCtrust.org
Listening to the Land: Dam, Beaver! Dam!
Wednesday, April 19
6 to 8 pm
Seaside Public Library

And, too, a lot more info about Beavers and all the good things they do for us:

Dr. Stephen Ramsey, from the OSU Center for Genome Research & Biocomputing (the Center has recently announced the completion of its sequencing of the beaver genome, so this is very well timed – http://registerguard.com/rg/news/local/35185225-75/oregon-state-university-researchers-find-benny-the-beaver-fills-big-genes.html.csp)

Frances Backhouse will offer a talk based on her research and writing that appeared in her award-winning book, Once They Were Hats: In Search of the Mighty Beaver. At Beach Books on May 6th at 1:pm. http://www.backhouse.ca/books/once-they-were-hats-in-search-of-the-mighty-beaver/.

The Wetlands Conservancy has posted information on the Beaver Tales art project. The link is below. Feel free to share it with your friends and contacts.
http://wetlandsconservancy.org/stewardship/beaver-tales

http://wetlandsconservancy.org/stewardship/beaver-tales/beaver-inspiration

https://northernwoodlands.org/discoveries/pathways-to-ponds

Here’s a link to an excellent short video, with great aerial depiction of the changes that beaver dams bring to meadows . . .
http://www.animalplanet.com/tv-shows/other/videos/fooled-by-nature-beaver-dams

And for more inspiration, a video of beaver swimming on U-Tube. .https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9cwu_Wu5ONI

CBC News Posted: Apr 02, 2017Great parenting: animals that care for their young in ‘amazing’ ways BEAVERS…

Some parents are a little more dedicated than others, according to wildlife expert Frank Ritcey. Ritcey says beavers take a more paws-on approach to raising their young. They give birth inside their lodges, where kits will stay until they’re old enough to start eating solid food.

“Once they’re old enough to venture forth, they travel about with the parent to learn how to become a beaver. [Kits] follow the adult around and mimic the adults actions,” said Ritcey.

“It’s so cute to watch — but it’s also very important as the young have to learn a whole set of skills like using the right trees to fall and how to build dams and lodges, and in general — how to be as busy as a beaver should be.”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_23vuRU2Ews

 

While nothing can compare to the real beaver it is great to see more comprehensive research about the positive impacts of beaver dams.

http://www.ktvz.com/…/osu-cascades-students-scien…/394113930

 

 

 

And, too, from @MightyBeaver
This page features updates on what’s happening in the beaver world and news about the book.

http://www.cbc.ca/…/canada/hamilton/trapped-beaver-1.4086804

A new addition to the beaver’s resumé — cattle wrangler!
http://www.cbc.ca/…/…/sask-ranchers-stunned-beaver-1.4073018

Beavers get a shout-out for their great parenting skills (especially their “paws-on approach to raising their young”) in this CBC News story. http://www.cbc.ca/…/great-parenting-4-animals-that-care-for…
A successful rescue of a wandering young beaver in London, Ontario.
http://www.thelondoner.ca/…/salthavens-patient-of-the-week-…
What does it mean to coexist with beavers and how do we do that? This short video offers good answers to both questions. https://vimeo.com/96040603

Life Drink

“Life Drink” by nature photographer Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images.
Proceeds in support of NCLC.

Fairweather Gallery
612 Broadway
Seaside

MOMENTS LIKE THIS opening reception

Seaside First Saturday Art Walk
August 6th

5-7pm

Plan on high and low notes, moments that are quiet and rousing. “MOMENTS LIKE THIS”, an exhibition through August 30th, is about selected art by regional artists mesmerized by the sparkling ocean and fiery sunsets, “in light so soft and tender, despite its brilliance” as artist Henri Matisse said.

On the agenda:
• Bev Drew Kindley
• Lori Wallace-Lloyd
• Lana Jane Brent for Paul Brent
• Seaside/ Gearhart nature photographer Neal Maine lectures*
• Shirley Smith-Yates
• Aliza Allen
• Special guests
• Visiting artists
And, too, Bev Drew Kindley, en plein air artist, and Lori Wallace-Lloyd, pastel artist, will be offering a Seaside Painting LIVE ™ event, two fine art demonstrations, throughout the evening! See and be seen.
Free and open to the public.

Need to know: Dedicated parking for the historic Gilbert Block is on the corner of Ocean way and Holladay.

*At 6:pm Neal Maine will speak about the ecology found in the coastal habitats.

 

A habitat is an ecological area that is inhabited by a particular species. The term typically refers to the zone in which the species lives and where it can find food, shelter, protection and mates for reproduction. The local vegetation ecological area type may be a coastal rain forest, grass land plains, or dunes. Fresh water habitats include marshes, streams, rivers, lakes, ponds and estuaries, and marine habitats include salt marshes, the coast and the intertidal zone. (From Wikipedia)

For more information please visit:
http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/artists…/blog…
http://www.facebook.com/SeasideFirstSaturdayArtWalk

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