What’s New


Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Opening reception of the exhibit titled FIRST LOOK, a highly anticipated jewelry truck show, featuring a dozen of local and regional designers– including a select group who have been represented by the gallery more than 11 years!

 

Cindy Bricca, designer, incorporates Kumihimo, the ancient Japanese seed braiding, in must-have creations.

 

Elaine Sawyer uses natural stone Cabochons, cut and polished by in lapidary by her husband, Mike, to create one-of-a-kind cuff bracelets.

 

 

 

Barbara Walker works in precious metal wire turning earrings into a wearable work of art.

 

 

 

Mary Hurst, born in raised in County Tipperary, Ireland, studied fashion design at the Grafton Academy in Dublin, integrates past and present Celtic designs in each piece.

 

Billie Johnstone, a former clinical practitioner, sparked her retirement into a means to support to the youth programs in Soweta, South Africa with the proceeds from the sales of her custom handcrafted jewelry doing good works that changes lives.

 

 

 

Alan Stockam  and Heather Rieder create one-of-a-kind silver rings, cuffs and necklaces; each signed and numbered, with stones from the Pacific Northwest and beyond.

 

 

Cher Flick, with a graduate degree from the Gemological Institute of America, creates jewelry doing good works, by giving back to a charitable foundation in honor of her mother, Joanie.

 

 

Karen Johnson, a natural-born artist, boldly  designs meticulously handcrafted multi-pearl statement necklaces that could – and should- be featured in magazines.

 

 

 

Mary Boitta experiments in druzy rock crystal designs, semi-precious stones,  that retain femininity and fineness.

 

 

Robyn Hall, with no art degree or formal training, creates stunning mouth blown lamp work bracelets and earrings.

 

Debra Beard, often featured as cruise ship event designer, offers pieces that are  a mini-exploration from travels around the world.

 

Fred Lukens crafts architecturally inspired jewelry featuring responsibly collected rare wood and Oregon myrtle wood.

 

Reneé Hafeman embraces a love of vintage jewelry and gives a them new life, redesigning  the antique pieces , she prays “whoever wears, please  be blessed in some way.”

 

Save the date and time.

Opening reception. FIRST LOOK. Nov. 4th, 5-7pm

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside

Seaside/ Gearhart naturalist, biologist and wildlife photographer Neal Maine will speak at 6: pm about the ecology of the local habitat.

Seaside Painting LIVE(tm)  episode by artist Carolyn Macpherson.

LIVE music by Shirley 88.

And, too, enter a raffle for a baker’s dozen of door prizes  of  jewelry by  fabulous Fairweather designers!

 

For more info go to http://www.facebook.com/ Seaside First Saturday Art Walk

Title: Leaping for the Future I

Neal Maine/ PacificLight images

Male Coho salmon in the  Klaskanine River/ near Astoria, OR 

September, 2017

Proceeds in support of NCLC

 

 

 

Title: Leaping for the Future II

Neal Maine/ PacificLight images

Female Coho salmon in the  Klaskanine River/ near Astoria, OR 

September, 2017

Proceeds in support of NCLC

 

For more information about the photographer, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ Neal Maine

 

 

Q: Where in the world is the Klaskanine River, you ask?

A:  The Klaskanine River is a tributary of the Youngs River in northwest Oregon in the United States. It drains a section of the Coast Range in the extreme northwest corner of the state in the watershed of the nearby Columbia River. It rises in three short forks in the mountains in  Clatsop County, in the Clatsop State Forest north of Saddle Mountain State Natural Area.

A  Native American word, Tlats-kani, refers to a point in the Nehalem Valley but applied  to two rivers in the area, the Klaskanine and the Clatskanie.  

 

SAVE THE DATE AND TIME!

Celebrating 13 years in 2017, the next Seaside First Saturday Art Walk, will be held on October 7, 5-7: pm.

The event is free and is all about seeing and selling art in the sponsoring galleries and boutiques located between Holladay and Broadway in the historic Gilbert District of downtown Seaside. Complimentary parking  is on the corner of Holladay and Oceanway.

Fairweather House and Gallery, 612 Broadway

Opening reception for SHADOWS, an exhibition that focuses on the interplay of light and dark through selected art that expresses time as the fall season progresses. New artwork by Northwest artists Diane Copenhaver, Gregory Bell, Janet Hickox, Penelope Culbertson, Whelsey Whelp, Ashley Howarth, Lisa Wiser, Karen E. Lewis, Tamara Johnson and Marga Stanley will be featured.

Naturalist, biologist and scientist  Neal Maine will speak at 6: pm about the autumn ecology of the local habitat.

LIVE music by Shirley 88.

LIVE scribing by calligraphy artist Penelope Culbertson.

Special guest of honor will be Flynn,  “the handsomest Kestrel around and one of the  WCNC Ambassador Birds”  will be on hand celebrating the opening of Fairweather’s new exhibition SHADOWS!

And, too, during the opening reception of  SHADOWS on October 7th there will be a paddle auction  of selected Neal Maine images  to benefit the  WCNC.

 

Wildlife Center of the North Coast (WCNC) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit Oregon corporation, that specializes in wildlife rehabilitation of resident and migratory birds, mammals and other wild creatures naturally occurring in Oregon.

WCNC provides primary services to communities along 167 miles of coastline in Oregon and southwest Washington offering humane care and professional medical treatment to sick, injured, orphaned and displaced native wildlife with the goal of releasing healthy wild animals back into their appropriate habitat; offers quality conservation + environmental education programs concerning local wildlife, their ecosystems, and the human impact on these systems and individuals.

Fused glass platter:  individual pieces of colored glass are cut by hand into shapes and arranged to form the desired design.  The pieces are arranged on a base piece of glass that defines the shape.

 

Drop Pot piece:   very organic looking with serendipitous swirls. Each bowl is totally unique and un-reproducible.

Mosaic design:  individually cut pieces of glass are used to create the design and are fused together in a kiln.

 

Carousel basket:  very complicated, using pattern bars, shaping  per the design plan, and arranging the pieces on the kiln shelf.

 

 

Bubble bowl:  created using a technique to capture purposefully placed bubbles in the glass.

Coral inspired basket: created by placing pieces of glass rods or strips of glass into an arrangement that simulates coral.

 Sandy and Bob Lercari, fused glass artists

About the artists:

Sandy has been an artist for nearly 40 years creating art in multiple mediums. She began as a Functional Potter in Los Angeles, where she was born. She then ventured into painting, which included oils, acrylics as well as pastels.

Sandy expanded her artistic talent to include kiln-formed glass. She loves glass for its boldness of color, reflection and transparency. It has opened up boundless joy for her, as have the endless possibilities of fused glass.

She feels she has now come full circle… back to using a kiln to create functional pieces as her expression of art. She continuously experiments with different techniques and approaches to apply to her glass art.

Her husband Bob was an engineer and program manager for over 40 years. He has always admired Sandy’s artwork, assisting her on weekends and thereby learning by observing the techniques and processes used to create fused glass.

When he retired, he immediately jumped into creating his own style of glass art. Bob’s work integrates his engineering experience with art…as a left brain/right brain “meeting of the minds”.

Geometric designs are in much of his work.

 

The artists selected exclusive glass designs for the Fairweather Gallery.  WELCOME!

 

Lisa Wiser is a visual artist living and working in Oregon. She draws inspiration from the scenic northwest, travel adventures and reading novels to create watercolor, acrylic, and mixed media paintings. Also an avid photographer, she chronicles her visual inspirations as she records obscure landscapes, architectural details, and other intriguing painting subjects.

 

Pursuits in life drawing and plein air painting confirms that she prefers a direct association with her subjects while working from life both outdoors or in the studio.

 

 

“The foundation of my work is a keen interest in the concept of structure in both the natural and built environment. My primary interest is capturing landscape scenes that visually articulate my emotional response upon approaching the scene.”–Lisa Wiser

 

Shadows of Butte by Lisa Wiser

 

Her representational work is characterized by vivid color, great depth of space and attention to detail.

Lisa earned a BS Degree in Art Education from the University of Oregon and has completed graduate coursework in graphic design, art education and painting. Lisa has been invited to serve in both curatorial and juror positions for various arts organizations in the area. She has taught art from pre-school through college and adult level courses and has recently retired as a substitute art teacher for her local school district to devote more time to her painting.

Aside from painting Lisa enjoys hiking, reading, gardening, skiing, and family time with her three adult children and husband, travel and fixing things. Her favorite getaways are the forests and deserts of Central Oregon and her family’s rustic retreat on Payette Lake in McCall, Idaho.

Save the date and time.

October 7th, 5-7pm

Opening reception for SHADOWS, an exhibition, Fairweather House and Gallery.

Welcoming artist Lisa Wiser.

Introducing glitter house artist Tamara Johnson and Janet Hickox.

 “SHADOWS,  expressed through a variety of works; bold and expressive, muted and gentle, solid and soft edges, and layers of dark and light.” –Diane Copenhaver

SHADOWS will feature new artwork by Fairweather resident artists Diane Copenhaver, Gregory Bell, Whelpsy Whelp, Marga Stanley and  Neal Maine.

Featured artists will be in attendance and will offer an artist talk about their works of art.

 

Special guest, FLYNN, an American Kestrel, from the Wildlife Center of the North Coast. 

Take a note!

SHADOWS,  the opening reception, will be a benefit for the WCNC.

Wildlife Center of the North Coast (WCNC) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit Oregon corporation, that specializes in wildlife rehabilitation of resident and migratory birds, mammals and other wild creatures.

 WCNC relys on the generosity of individuals and community groups for annual funding through donations, as well as grants from foundations, both local and from around the country.

 

 

More information to follow.

 

Lava vases by Emily Miller, Pelican and Buoy original art by Whelpsey Whelp, Sea Turtle original water-color by Rosemary Klein, hand-made journals and boxes by Christine Trexel, hammered copper and gold earrings by Steven Schankin and Natura shell series of original oil paintings by Paul Brent.

 

On the grass cloth wall: coral original oil by Paul Brent, coral wood cut series by Gregory Graham, Puffin on the Rock (facing left)original by Nick Brakel, Puffin fine art photograph (facing right) by Donna Geissler, and on the twig wall sculpture, Oregon myrtlewood earrings by Fred Lukens.

On the table scape: Puffin Portrait original pen and ink (facing right) by Britney Drumheller, Sea Star original pen and ink by Britney Drumheller, and  hand hemmed tie dyed silk scarves by Beth Collins.

 

Eel and pipe fish original pen and ink collage by emerging artist Whelpsey Welp (easel display), The Snorkler by Marga Stanley (on the circle table) rare CoCo Chanel vintage jewelry by Renee Hafeman,  spoons by Mike Morris,  Moulton Sky original oil seascape  by Michael Muldoon and Oregon lighthouse watercolor series by Emily Miller.

Sea Within original shell art by Jan Shield, original water colors by Carolyn Macpherson, tclam style  carry all bags by textile artist Linda Ballard  and…ta! da! …grand piano found by a friendly neighbor for the Fairweather Gallery!!!

Displays by Denise Fairweather,  Allied Member, A.S.I.D., American Society of Interior Designers.

 

For more about  the accredited interior design work at the gallery , please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …about/ Denise Faiweather page

And, too,  questions to the audience at FINDINGS, the opening reception for the August exhibition, at Fairweather House and Gallery.

What is new?

What is bigger than a bread box?

What took one and 1/2 hours to install?

What took 5 men to move?

What has the number 88 to do with this piece?

 

And, the art patron who answered the question…is it the grand  piano?  The lovely lady in black.  She graciously called for a round of applause, after listening to the piano stories  (past, current and future musical lives).

 

For more info please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Found for FINDINGS  before the artist created…

 

 

and after= Frazzled Model Mom by Karynn Kozij, marine debris artist.

Former model Fritzy’s hands are FULL: children in arms, cooking, cleaning, picking after everyone.  She looks and feels fabulous and feisty, is a friend and an inspiration for everyone.  She wears the BEST smile.  Dreamily recalls your young, carefree model days, she wears her sapphire glow so well on her every digit.  Litter Patron is highest on her volunteer list.  She is exceedingly proud of her twins.  It’s a juggling job being that of a mon; she handles it with grace!  –Karynn

 

 

 

Q: Who is Karynn Kozij, you ask?
A: Growing up on a farm in the province of Saskatchewan in Canada, Karynn Kozij loved perusing her Dad’s stash of materials in his shop, shed, garage and outbuildings. He had everything to create anything from a bird house or a toolbox, to a trailer or a potato planter.

She can’t pass up anything that at first seems to be trash but could possibly be turned into something else. She’s the one you see stopping on the sidewalk to pick up a squashed flat metal bottle cap or pull tab from a beer can, or a scrap of wire that is lying near a utility pole. She takes apart dried up writing pens before they go into the trash can to salvage the metal spring inside it. She is picking up trash, going through trash and making something out of nothing.

March 2016 spring storms spilled a treasure chest of marine debris onto our Northwest coast. It was sad and depressing to find so much trash on our shores. Karynn drove down onto the beach daily and hauled carloads of trash off the beach. The sadness and depression turned into fascination and obsession. With that awakening, she was unable to throw away so much perfectly good rope and became inspired.

Karynn saw possibility in those hundreds of feet of rope with an elaborate entry into the Marine Debris Art contest in Cannon Beach where she won the People’s Choice Award and third place in the judged contest with her entry, Octopus Family Reunion at the Beach.

Karynn works in many media. Something first destined as trash really grabs her eye; it’s a win win! Look closely in her art to see some part of it that was something else in a former life.

She was FOUND while picking up mail.

 

 

Foreign exchange student Kim visiting the Gearhart beach with Tillamook Head  of Seaside in the distance. Indeed, every piece found had foreign letters and numbers, hence, the name! 

Kim’s back story: Kim spent a school year here as an exchange student a few years ago and comes back every year to visit his Pacific Northwest host family.  He plans his study trips around the Spring tides for beach combing opportunities.  He is fascinated by the wind and ocean currents. He documents every single thing he finds from other countries.  Kim majors in world climatology and  is on a scholarship from the National Oceanic Administration.  –Karynn

 

 

But, wait,  there’s more…

 

Fortune teller, Pearl

 

Pearl’s back story:  Trust the Zodiac and its signs, reads Tarot cards and white horoscopes.  Gathers beach debris daily.  washes and sorts items according to a color chart.  Make art in communal workspaces and sells worldwide. Monitors marine debris worldwide; gets overwhelmed by it, but does her part locally in taching classes about recycling. –Karynn

 

Great Great Grandfather Kraken…

 

fondly watching over his offspring at the Gearhart beach.

Great Great Grandfather Kraken’s back story:  “Oh my arms don’t work like they used to.  Stories and novels have been written that I used to pull down ships with east but now I am weak and very, very old.  The little  guys snicker at my bowtie but I have always  liked  being a dapper dresser. I do love the lore of sea monsters.  –Karynn

 

 

Appreciation to Don Frank Photography.

Shoutout clues:

Karynn  Kozij lives in ____________, is the postmistress at the US Post Office in _____________, and will be at the Fairweather Gallery FINDINGS opening reception, Aug 5th with her marine debris art.  Octopus family reunion  at the ______________beach. The artist and her story of finding things was found while picking up mail in __________________.  Don Frank shows selected  art photos in the ____________Gallery in Seaside, as well.

 

Read what Eve Marx wrote about Karynn’s art:

View from the Porch: Art from the ‘Octopus’s Garden’

Artist transforms marine debris

Date: 2017-08-18 Seaside Signal

Story The Daily Astorian | Signal News
http://www.dailyastorian.com/SS/news

The Daily Astorian | Signal News

http://www.dailyastorian.com/SS/news

Title: “Winged Wonder” by Neal Maine, PacificLight Images.

Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly. Location: Neacoxie Creek. Seaside/Gearhart.

Signed, matted and framed.

“Unless otherwise noted, images are presented as they were photographed. Slight adjustment by cropping, lightening or darkening may have been used, but the photo subject is presented as recorded in the Oregon coastal landscapes.”

A Certificate of Authenticity is provided with each copyrighted and signed image.

Available exclusively at Fairweather’s.

Proceeds to support North Coast Land Conservancy/NCLC.

 

 

THE NEXT FRONTIER, OUR OWN BACKYARD

Humans: We take pictures, walks, deep breaths, memories, rides on waves, water, timber, in habitat that used to belong to other trail makers. We thought we could never catch all the salmon, never cut all the big trees, and never pollute the ocean. In our hubris, we thought we could make our own trails. With renewed humility, we are learning how to share this place, to live together with our partner trail makers. PacificLight Images celebrates this partnership as we use our images to inspire others to honor nature’s trails in OUR OWN BACKYARD.Neal Maine

To read more about the photographer, please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Neal Maine

 

Save the date and time. 
Neal Maine, scientist and wildlife photographer to present a lecture on the ecology of the North Coast habitats.

August 5th, 6:pm
Fairweather House and Gallery
612 Broadway, Seaside, OR
Opening reception for FINDINGS

Seaside First Saturday Art Walk 

 

To read more about the Art Walk, please go to http://www.facebook.com/ Seaside First Saturday Art Walk.

Q: Where can the Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly be found, you ask?

A:  Habitat: Small ponds and slow streams. It perches on the tips of twigs, grasses and other vegetation.

Fun Creature Facts:

Distribution: Western U.S., West Indies and Central America south to Chile and Argentina.

Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly wings sit flat when perched and have a strong sustained flight; flitting about on gossamer wings and quiet as a whisper.

Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonflies are swift fliers, reminiscent of tiny airplanes.

Their eyes are huge, often meeting at the top of the head.

The Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly, will eat almost any soft-bodied flying insect including mosquitoes, flies, small moths, mayflies, and flying ants or termites.

The Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly are aptly named as they mimic hawks, relentlessly pursuing their prey.

The Latin name for this genus, Sympetrum, means “with rock” and refers to their habit of basking on rocks to absorb heat early in the day.

This species is one of the first dragonflies to emerge each year.

imnh.isu.edu/digitalatlas/bio/insects/drgnfly

 

In addition, read more about North Coast dragonflys:

Wild Side: Dragonfly – Coastal Life – Coast Weekend

Aug 31, 2017 – Read Wild SideDragonfly from Coast Weekend. … By Lynette Rae McAdams. For Coast … Even while eating, a dragonfly can remain in flight.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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