Word of Mouth


Close up of over the shoulder, one-of-a-kind crafted leather purse designed by Luan. 

 

“Handcrafting products that have the perfect blend of fashion and function.”

 

 

 

Just in! Leather cosmetic cases, crafted and designed by Luan!

Cases are pictured on Luan’s  work bench with a pair of leather mallets. 

In the background are bins, bins and more bins of bling bling.

 

“Using only the best raw materials available, with the belief that by only using quality materials will make quality products. Anything from a basic functional leather set to a sparkling fashion statement that will no doubt turn heads.” 


And, too, a close up from the work room’s bulletin board, a favorite quote.

 

 

 

The artist showed her leather art at The National Finals Rodeo (NFR), known popularly as the “Super Bowl of rodeo,” (a championship event held annually by the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association/ PRCA).

Luans Leathers display at the National Finals Rodeo. December, 2017.

 

Fun Fact: The leather designers are relatives.  Luan, a sister-in-law, and  her daughter,  Annie, a niece, are family farm relatives of D. Fairweather, gallerist. In addition, the leather work is crafted on the family farm that was established in 1904!

 

 

 

SEEK opening remarks:

 

“As a company, we experienced first hand the destruction and loss during the Great Coastal Gale of Dec. 2, 2007.  Yet amid the crisis, friends and neighbors reached out seeking to help.  SEEK, as an exhibition, 10 years later, casts light on the beauty of art and artist stories that inspire. 

Yes, indeed, sometimes the world can feel dark with reports of loss, but it is also filled  with the pursuit of light, love and friendship. ” D. Fairweather  December 2, 2017

 

And, too, sharing the 10th anniversary articles that appeared in the local media in 2017.

The great coastal gale of 2007 brought neighbors together. For some people it was an adventure. For others it was horrific.. Date: 2017-12-09   Seaside Signal story/ http://www.dailyastorian.com/signal

 

How Seaside’s leaders faced the storm. Voices from the Great Coastal Gale of 2007.

Date: 2017-12-08 Seaside Signal story/ http://www.dailyastorian.com/signal

 

Column: Recalling parallels between the Great Coastal Gale and Hurricane Katrina. A tale of two storms

Date: 2017-12-01   Seaside Signal/ http://www.dailyastorian.com/signal

 

 

 

The first Fairweather House  business was located on Park Drive/ Highway 101. Building destroyed on Dec. 2, 2007 during the Great Coastal Gale.

Left to right: Sesame & Lillies, Romancing the Home, Fairweather House, Judith M Interiors, Gearhart Gallery, Northwest Natural Foods, Dr. Theodosia Woods Wellness Center and Coast Business.  The businesses  were destroyed in the building when the roof blew off.

One in five Clatsop County residents reported damage from the Great Coastal Gale. –State Farm Insurance/ 2007

Reprinting a thank you placed in the Daily Astorian. December   07, 2007

Thank you to the entire Gearhart Volunteer Fire Department, George Daggat and staff at Gearhart Fine Furniture, Walter Daggat at Walter Daggat Antiques, to the entire John and Tina Cook family of John Cook Glass Studio, Ned and Geri Malcolm, Cathie and Jack Cates and staff at the Natural Nook Flower Shop, Sheila Coleman, Jim and Terry Morrisey, Monica,  Hunter, Vickie Lawson, Joan and Sue of the Gearhart Angel Network, Cindy and Misty Fitzsimmons, Les Lyson, Marie and Allen Hofmann, Philomenia Lloyd, CC Carrow, Karen Wilson, Heidi Futon, Robert and Dianne Widdop, Bernie and Carol Komm, Louise Whitehead, Cherry Harris and many more neighbors and friends that weathered the storm to assist Fairweather House.–D. Fairweather

 

 

And, too, reprinting an article from 2008

The Power of Story

Vance
South Coast Coach

As coaches we are always attuned to the power and the meaning of story. Aside from being careful that our own story doesn’t dominate a conversation with one of our clients, we, by are nature pay close attention to the stories that unfold around us.

I recently had one such incident and with her permission I am going to share it. The small town of Gearhart was besieged with a tremendous damaging windstorm in early December of 2007. Denise Fairweather, being fairly new to the community, had not had her gallery open long when the storm hit. It tore her business apart and left her in the hospital with a serious knock on the noggin that she was lucky to survive with. The beautiful things she had marketed in her shop and even large parts of the shop were scattered all over the area.

While she lay recuperating, her new neighbors combed through the wreckage, scoured the area, and retrieved what they could of her inventory. They did what they could to clean up the area enough for Denise’s insurance company and for FEMA to assess the level of damage to her shop, her person, and her life in general. As she recuperated, her new neighbors carefully stored her things in their houses, garages, cars, anywhere they could find. Denise slowly made a recovery from what could have been life long disabling brain damage as the process of insurance and assistance rolled on.

Her insurance company decided her business was a total loss, and FEMA decided that Denise qualified for a small business loan with their assistance. She now had what was left of her former inventory to deal with. All the community brought forth what had survived and they had a large sale in the Seaside Community Center. What was not sold for pennies on the dollar was donated to anyone in the community. The result was that Denise was in her new location with new stock in time for what Seaside refers to as the Spring rush. She had been made whole by that strange blend of the kindness of fellow community members, her insurance company, the skill of her physicians, and her own will to survive. Each year they celebrate her survival and the strength of the community on the with a  sale called the Foulweather event.

Denise had been worried that she was losing her short-term memory as a result of her injury. Her doctor told her that the best thing she could do was to tell the story and gradually the pain and the victory would return to her. Jane and I were honored to hear this story as part of that process and to spend time with this wonderful woman in her amazing business known as Fairweather House & Gallery. It is located in the historic Gilbert district of Seaside Oregon. If you want to re-connect with why so many of us love what we do as coaches, stop by if you are in the area. Denise will remind you with every word she says. She only promotes local artists to the area, and the shop and Denise are an example of goal, focus, and overcoming the adversity that we are sometimes handed.

To read more about the 10th anniversary of the Great Coastal Gale, go to:

http://www.oregonlive.com/news/index.ssf//11/oregons_storm_king_considers.html

 

Q: How to you handle a severe high wind weather warning today? –Renee

A: “Whenever a wind storm arrives that sounds like a freight train overhead, I gather a cozy sleeping bag, a down comforter, a lot of feather pillows and spend the night sleeping in the Jacuzzi…using it as a personal safe haven.” –Denise

For more about the gallery and its history, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

Prize winning Northwest artist Mike Mason

Carefully dried, pressed and placed botanicals.  Floral impressionism is created with nature’s color and form as brushstrokes. Mike Mason has been using the flora and organic palette for over 9 years. His body of work which contains over 150 pieces consist of: landscape studies animal images and abstracts. Art is created using all botanical material and made into various fine art collectables.  Mike is using his art to support natural habitat conservation.

 

 

Above: Blue Sun by Mike Mason.

Inspired by the graphic design of the Zia symbol which is a sacred cross, sacred sun symbol. Image consists of rhododendron, rose, carnation, Protea, love in the mist, hydrangea and dill.

 

 

 

Above: Star of Bahai by Mike Mason

Symbol of faith. Nine point star. Peaceful Religion. Image consists of  hydrangea, queen anne’s lace, tulips, rose, rhododendron, peony and foliage.

 

Above: Red Shift  by Mike Mason

Reference to the “Big Bang Theory,” Suggesting a point of origin, a catalyst for the expansion of the known of the universe, and beyond. Image consists of, but not limited to: Iris, squash blossom, fuchsia, rose, gerbera daisy and peony.

 

 

 

 

Artist Hope:  Natural color and form used as brushstrokes is the next step in the journey of understanding. Timeless tales of truth resound in each petal, leaf and root. The impressions of ideas expressed in botanical source material magnify when shared with each other.”–Mike Mason

 

About Mike Mason
Evergreen State College Olympia, WA 1973-1974
Portland State University Portland, OR 1975
San Francisco Art Institute BA Fine Arts San Francisco, CA 1978
BA Arts Administration 1983

2017 Juried Shows:
Beaver Tales Oregon Wetlands Conservancy Art Sale and Exhibit:
OSU LaSells Stewart Center Giustina Gallery, Corvallis, OR 1/2017
Lake Oswego Arts Association, Lake Oswego, OR 2/2017
Fairweather Gallery, Seaside, OR 5/2017
North County Recreation Facility, Nehalem, OR 8/2017
Oregon Zoo Portland, OR 10/2017
Beaverton City Hall, Beaverton, OR 11/2017Portland Open Studios 2015 & 2017
Washington County Open Studios 2016 & 2017
Fairweather Gallery Color Exhibit Seaside, OR 9/2017
The OSU 150 Space Grant Art Exhibit Corvallis, OR 8/2017
Art Splash Tualatin, OR 7 2015-2017*Award
Art Over Macleay Park, Portland, OR 2014-2017

2017 Community Display
Garibaldi Maritime Museum Garibaldi, OR 2013-2017
OSU LaSells Stewart Center Giustina Gallery Fish and Fish Habitat Exhibit Corvallis, OR 2017
The Gaufre Gourmet (Gigi’s Cafe) Portland, OR 2017
Insomnia Coffee House Hillsboro, OR 2017
503 Salon Portland, OR 2011-2017

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Through September

 

The summer art season ends with a most perfect exhibition titled COLOR IT FALL.

New original art compositions revolve around the complementary clash of the deliberately heightened blues, bright oranges and warm yellows.

Color is the dominant element in art.

 

Featuring prize-winning artist Mike Mason, who uses carefully dried, pressed and placed botanicals to create art to support natural habitats conservation. 

 

 

 

 

 

Cape Arago Lighthouse by Emily Miller

Late summer sun illuminates the turquoise waters and rocky, forested shoreline of the southern Oregon coast near Coos Bay. Cape Arago Lighthouse is visible in the distance.

Cape Arago Lighthouse was built on Chief’s Island in 1866 to guide merchant ships into Coos Bay, just 13 years after white settlers first arrived in the area. Chief’s Island is just offshore, but proved dangerous to access with multiple washed-out bridges and boat disasters over the years. The current lighthouse is the third to be built at Cape Arago. It was deactivated in 2006 after 140 years of service.

In 2013, the last bridge to the island was removed and the land transferred to the Confederated Tribes of the Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians. The Confederate Tribes hope to establish an interpretive center on the mainland near the lighthouse.

Cleft of the Rock Lighthouse by Emily Miller

Late summer fog hangs over the horizon at Cape Perpetua, near Yachats on the central Oregon coast. The beacon from Cleft of the Rock Light can be seen 16 miles offshore, and might be welcomed at sea on these frequent foggy days.

The lighthouse and attached dwelling were built as a labor of love in 1976 by James Gibbs, a former Tillamook Rock Light attendant and lighthouse historian. He lived here until his death in 2010.

 


Yaquina Head Lighthouse from Cobble Beach by Emily Miller

Yaquina Head Lighthouse is the tallest lighthouse in Oregon, with a 93 ft. tower and a light that can be seen 19 miles out to sea. It was built in 1873 and continues to operate today. It is located on a high, exposed cliff near Newport, on Oregon’s central coast.

The lighthouse is part of the Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area, a federal reserve that is home to an incredible array of wildlife and beautiful coastline. The site has been popular with visitors since the 1930s, when nearly 12,000 visitors made it the 4th most visited lighthouse in the United States. Today it receives over 400,000 visitors per year.

A vein of magnetized iron runs through the bedrock of Yaquina Head, causing ships’ compasses to malfunction if they venture too near.

 

Tillamook Rock Lighthouse from Haystack Rock

Haystack Rock reflects in the shallow waters of an outgoing tide at Cannon Beach, on Oregon’s northern coast. A mile offshore, the Tillamook Rock lighthouse is visible in the distance. The lighthouse is located on a barren, exposed rock, situated to guide merchant ships to the mouth of the Columbia River.

Construction on the Tillamook Rock lighthouse began in 1879 and was not finished until 1881 due to powerful storms that made construction and transport of materials nearly impossible. The lighthouse became known as “Terrible Tilly”. Waves broke over the rock strong enough to drench the entire lighthouse, collapsing roofs, flooding the interior, clogging the mechanisms with debris, breaking loose boulders and sending them flying through the air. The lighthouse keepers were totally isolated and tasked with constant repairs.

In 1957 the lighthouse was deactivated after 77 years of service. After changing hands several times, it was most recently used as a columbarium where the ashes of around 30 people are stored.

“Lighthouses have a mythical quality. A lighthouse stands for untold stories of stormy nights, beautiful sunrises, and the hardship and magic of life at the edge of the sea. A lighthouse symbolizes the journey between wild ocean and safe harbor. This transition zone is one of my favorite places to explore.” –Emily Miller, artist


Emily Miller, artist

Last fall I took a road trip to visit and paint at all eleven lighthouses on the Oregon coast. Lighthouses have a mythical quality to me. They symbolize the journey between wild ocean and safe harbor. I love the ocean and have always lived near it. To me, the coast is a border between the known and unknown. This transition zone is one of my favorite places to explore.

I choose to paint the landscape view rather than close-ups or lighthouse interiors because my artwork is centered on the way we interact with our environments. I am most interested in how we alter the landscape to suit our needs, and how the landscape, in return, alters our structures over time.

The paintings were completed on location (en plein air) or in the studio from my many reference photos. The series is about half-finished.

I enjoy series projects like this because they provide a framework for exploring and understanding an area. I spend more time at beautiful places while I’m painting and photographing. The project gives me a reason to dig deeper into the history of a place, and discover new spots that I might have missed otherwise.
Each lighthouse has its own story. Tillamook Rock Lighthouse is just south of Seaside on a barren rock one mile offshore. It was pounded by incredible storms where waves broke boulders off the cliff side and crashed them into the lighthouse. You can see its silhouette from Ecola State Park and Cannon Beach. Cape Meares Lighthouse in Tillamook and Yaquina Head Light in Newport are both still active and you can go inside the tower and climb up the spiral stairs.

 

 

Emily Miller with her art:  anemone and sea urchin bowls and the Oregon light house series.

 

 

Grace Note received:

“Thanks again for a great Art Walk event FINDINGS, Fairweather opening reception. It was wonderful to see the new gallery layout and chat with the other artists. Someone asked me if I was making a book from the lighthouse painting series. I may do that once it has finished, and then you will not have to hunt down maps in the magazines anymore!–Emily Miller

 

 

 

“Quick update if you want to share with your clients. Now thru the end of 2017, I am donating 10% of my proceeds to local ocean conservancy and art organizations. Thank you for your part in making my art ventures a success!!”

 

And, too,  an encore request for the image of the Sea Urchin bowl with spines by Emily Miller.

 

Making a Difference:  Emily Miller donates 10% of all proceeds to local ocean conservancy and art organizations.

Celebrity artist Britney Drumheller

Save the date and time. 

August 5th, 5-7pm
Fairweather House and Gallery
612 Broadway, Seaside, OR
Opening reception for FINDINGS

Britney Drumheller arrives with new art for 2017.

 

Opening reception for the exhibit “Findings,” which juxtaposes an array of art by Emily Miller, Mariana Mace, JoAnn Pari-Mueller and Chris Boyer about the pleasures of beach combing.

“Findings,” will be the 11th annual emerging artist exhibition in the  Fairweather Gallery and will include former emerging artists Britney Drumheller, Nick Brakel, Linda Trexler, Ashley Howarth, Diane Copenhaver,  Gayle H. Seely, Kristin Qian and Rebecca Gore.

Each of the artists in attendance will discuss the development of their work and the ideas that drive their creativity.

Seaside nature photographer, ecologist and biologist Neal Maine will speak at 6 p.m. Summertime beverages and light bites.

 

Britney Drumheller has a degree from the Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising in Los Angeles, but moved back to her hometown of Cannon Beach – she could not leave the beauty and inspiration of the beach behind. Her work functions as symbolic expressions relating to the value people attach to the North coastal tidelands and its marine life.

 

 

Artist statement:

Art has always been a part of me; in all of its forms, it enriches my life. After graduating from the Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising in Los Angeles, my career in fashion design focused on fashion illustration – until my Dad suggested I try to sell some beach-inspired art. I went to the beach, studied all of the creatures in the tide pools, and tried to put onto paper my discoveries.

 

My good friends suggested I bring my sketches to Fairweather House & Gallery in Seaside, and I was so pleased to be able to put my art in such a beautiful gallery.

My favorite media is to work with markers and colored pencils. The markers I use can give the allure of looking like watercolors, but can also give you crisp, clean lines. I enjoy working within the contrast of the freedom of watercolor and the preciseness of markers. Always sketching when I have a chance, I can get lost in a sketch for hours.

“Through my art, I hope to beautifully translate the sea life that I do so dearly love and honor.” the North coastal tidelands and its marine life.”

FUN FACT:

Fairweather’s launched Britney Drumheller in an emerging artist exhibition several years ago.

Q: Where in the world is Britney’s art today, you ask?

A:  Here, there and everywhere.

OREGON

Fairweather Gallery, Seaside OR

Found, Cannon Beach OR

Inn at Cannon Beach Cannon Beach OR

Purple Moon Boutique, Cannon Beach OR

The Ocean Spa, Cannon Beach, OR

Insomnia Coffee, Cannon Beach, OR

Re/max Reality, Cannon Beach & Manzanita OR

TerHars, Seaside & Cannon Beach OR

Ocean Lodge, Cannon Beach, OR

Cousins, Dalles OR

Cousins, Pasco OR

Red Hills Market, Dundee OR

Village Gifts, Yachats OR

Unique Store Grand Market Place, Portland OR

Marvels by the Sea, Florence OR

Bella, Baker City

Bella, La Grande

 

WASHINGTON

Alki Surf Shop, Seattle WA

Wild Seafood Market, Seattle WA

City Center Drug, Aberdeen WA

For the Love of Spice, Gig Harbor WA

Cotton & Cashmere, Bainbridge Island WA

Manitou Lodge Bed & Breakfast, Forks WA

 

HAWAII

Sandpeople, Moana Surfrider – Honolulu HI

Sandpeople, Sheraton Waikiki – Honolulu HI

Sandpeople, Ala Moana Mall – Honolulu HI

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“My studio has great light and views of our inspirational garden out each window. It is filled with quirky art and unique and stimulating objects. My two Papillion’s, Daphne and Minerva (collectively known as the “goddesses”), like to hang out with me there.”

“I have a huge file of ideas. I am often inspired by the flower or bird or bug “du jour” in the garden. I always take a small journal and paints with me when I travel, too.”

I have many acquaintances that write stories, poetry, music, or create paintings, weavings, sewing, or knitting and realized that I lacked the ability to do any of those things. I had always loved decorating and collecting art, but had never before felt the urge to create. I especially credit my mother and her best friend (both painter/printmakers) with inspiring me to start. I took many classes and tried to work on my art almost daily. I literally started from ground zero, never having touched paper to pencil in an artistic way before.
Finding that hidden creative niche of the brain may take a while, but once you open that door – watch out!”

“I often combine watercolors with calligraphy and like the looks of the colors and curves of nature juxtaposed with black and white and the straight lines of grids.”

 

Here is the photo of the painting that I was commissioned to create for the new Astoria Memorial  Plain Tree Hospital now in process of completion. A select number of regional artists were requested to make work for the interior spaces along with Richard Rowland of Astoria to create a large anagama fired ceramic entry mural. –Jan

 

 

“My painting is an acrylic on canvas, 6ft 8in by 3ft 4in related to a visit to the Gorge Hotel up the Columbia River we had the pleasure to take a very tranquil anniversary at, and enjoy the river and gardens surrounding. It was just a reflection that stopped me there overhanging branches crossing over rocks under water under rocks quiet silence among the leaves  arching form of the old stone bridge still to walk upon.” –Jan Shield

Photo: Art patron, Jan and Dee Shield and another art patron at Fairweather’s during the opening reception of an Art Walk evening.

Jan Shield, Professor Emeritus of Art at Pacific University, Forest Grove, with his art work that was created at Dancing Trees Sanctuary. Also pictured is art by Paul Brent, who has set up a Pop-Up Gallery in Seaside at 608 Broadway for the summer of 2017 (sponsored by the Fairweather Gallery and the Gilbert Block Building).

“It is my home, studio and forest preserve in Newberg, Oregon. It is an environment of thick fir and maple forest blanketed with lush ferns and punctuated with sun lit meadows.”

For more info about the artist, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgalllery.com/ …artists/…Jan Shield

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