Word of Mouth


“Snowbound”

Great Blue Heron by Neal Maine/PacificLight Images.

“After many years of trying to capture a heron in the snow, it finally happened along the Neawanna River in Seaside.” Neal Maine

 

For more images from Neal Maine, please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com /  …artists tab/  …Neal Maine and Michael Wing

 

Question:

“Would it be possible to share the link that has Katie’s thank you as an end of year story on the Fairweather blog?”

Answer:

“Of course! We would love that. We’re so glad you were touched by the letter and appreciate you wanting to share it with others.”

Lorraine Ortiz
Development Director

 

December 2018

Dear Friend of North Coast Land Conservancy,

When I look back on this wonderful year at North Coast Land Conservancy, there is one day that stands out as nothing less than magical. As someone who has joined an On the Land outing or pulled weeds with us, who regularly donates to us or who simply follows us through our newsletters or e-news, you know that among our many projects, the big one we’re working on is conservation of what we call the Rainforest Reserve—3,500 acres of forestland adjacent to Oswald West State Park. I’ve made more than two dozen trips up there this year alone, with old and new friends. But this one day was unique.

 

We heard that Oregon’s poet laureate, Kim Stafford, was visiting the coast to do a reading, and we invited him to visit the Rainforest Reserve with us. The morning we set out, the coast was socked in with dense fog—classic pea-soup conditions. Yet barely a couple hundred feet up into the forest, the clouds gave way to blue skies and sunshine. The higher we climbed, the warmer the day became. As we climbed the ridge, the summit of Onion Peak gradually came into view: Onion Peak, the highest point in the proposed Rainforest Reserve.

High on the ridge, at the headwaters of streams that plunge down steep chasms to meet the ocean, at the tree line where meadows flourish on rocky balds, I felt like I was perched on an island of wilderness, a secret floating mountain in the sky. We couldn’t see the towns or highway that we’d left behind just minutes earlier. It was strikingly quiet. Quiet, but not silent. I closed my eyes to better hear the sounds of the rainforest: the buzzing, the singing, the whispering, and the whooshing of wings. I felt transported.

 

I often feel that way when I get off the beaten path just a little bit; do you? When I notice that I don’t hear the road anymore. When I realize my breathing has slowed and I can feel my heart beat. When instead of reaching for my phone, I look to the trees, trying to locate with my eyes the bird that my ears can hear so clearly. Happy memories wash over me, and I feel a sense of kinship with all of creation, past and present. It’s at times like these that I tend to get some of my best ideas.

As Kim put it that day, “This place offers not only clarity of water but clarity of thought. Maybe that’s the business we’re really in: conserving places where all species can be their best selves. Your gifts are the only way we can make that happen. In our land conservation work, I often bump up against folks who say, “I’m not an environmentalist,” or say “I like open space, but I’m no tree-hugger.”  I’ll admit that I have been known to actually hug trees now and then, mostly to feel for myself the scale of some of the big trees we still have on the Oregon Coast. But to the extent that tree-hugger means by-any-means-necessary, I realize that’s not me. And that’s not the organization I work for. By working with willing landowners, by keeping in mind the people part of our people-plants-and-wildlife formula for coastal conservation, we keep open the lines of communication with everyone.

 

Because I don’t think I’ve ever met anyone who hasn’t experienced one way or another, a moment of magic in the natural world. Who hasn’t felt transported, or felt a deepening of connection with all of creation by being in a wild place, away from the houses, roads, and towns where we spend most of our lives.

The way Kim Stafford spoke about the land that day was so grounding, and so humble and human. It reminded me that we are all just people, doing the best we can to take care of our place, and for so very many reasons:

We save this land because it brings life, water and breath.

We save this land because we love the critters that live here, the wildflowers, and the forests.

We save this land because, in the end, we know it will save us.

Or as Kim said that day, on the shoulder of Onion Peak, one of the pieces of ground we are working so hard to conserve, “It occurs to me, while standing here, that this project will offer what we will long for more and more: clear water, quiet, and starlight.”

Thank you for sharing your time and your treasure and allowing us to do just that, here on our coast: offering clear water, quiet, and starlight, for all creatures, forever.

If simply being in nature is already such a powerful experience for me, what was it about being in one of my favorite wild places with a poet such as Kim Stafford that made the experience even more profound?

Part of it was the day itself: standing on a peak floating upon fog, in the gold and blue of a fall day that felt stolen from summer. But I think Kim was somehow able to read my heart and put words to what I was feeling better than I could myself. Each of us, every human being, has a need for nature, is part of nature. Each of us feels that connection, deep in our hearts and souls, even if we can’t put that awe and that sense of wonder into words the way he could.

The next day Kim emailed us to thank us for the day we shared. What a gift it is to work with such amazing people—people such as yourself—who care so deeply about our coast and for our coast.

 

Thank you for helping to conserve Oregon’s coastal lands, forever.

All my best,

Katie Voelke

Executive Director

North Coast Land Conservancy

Preserving the Oregon Coast Forever

PO Box 67, Seaside, OR 97138

503.738.9126

https://nclctrust.org/

 

 

Hosted by the Seaside Library Art Committee

“Maybe no other local wildlife creature represents the natural history of the North Coast land ocean interface better than the great blue heron.”  Neal Maine

19 images of the Great Blue Heron, a natural history art show, by Neal Maine at the Seaside Library, on public display combined with a printed image guide  detailing the natural history of the great blue heron.

 

 

“The goal of this photography display is to celebrate this unique bird and bring life to how the features of the great blue heron fir the abundance and freshwater systems of the North Coast.  Natural history photography places high value on the quality of the image but even more important, is the desire, skill and patience to capture and illuminate the beauty of the coast landscape and its unique wildlife.”   Neal Maine

“This is the perfect time to share NCLC’s gratitude for FAIRWEATHER’S support of our conservation work on the coast.  We are delighted to share about the new social media outreach program NCLC has launched for our business partners as a thank you for your support. Four times a year NCLC will be posting a thank you to FAIRWEATHER on our FB page, with a photo.”

Here is the schedule for FAIRWEATHER’S posts:

Last week of February 2019

Last week of May 2019

Last week of September 2019

Last week of November 2019

Thank you for valuing the beauty and magnificence of the Oregon Coast. Thank you from all of us at NCLC to all of you at FAIRWEATHER.

Lorraine Ortiz

Development Director

North Coast Land Conservancy

Preserving the Oregon Coast Forever

 

 

 

 

Question to Erick Bengel Coastweekend.com features writer:

“May we share your wonderful article about finding a place of quiet  in a Fairweather blog post in December?”

Answer from Erick Bengel

“Absolutely.”

http://www.coastweekend.com/cw/editor/20181128/scratch-pad-the-quest-for-quiet-spaces

 

 

 

Over a recent weekend, while staying at the Sylvia Beach Hotel in Newport, I came upon a preciously rare sight: a roomful of strangers silently reading.

 

In the warmly lit, amply furnished top-floor reading area, a young girl stretched herself across a sofa, and read. Couples leaned against each other, sipped tea and hot spiced wine, and read. Finally, my partner and I, after surveying this sweet scene, took our places, dug out our books, and read.

 

No cell phones in use. No inane chatter. No pressure to entertain anyone but ourselves. Just the pages before us, pictures of famous authors bearing witness, and the rain beyond the darkened windows. This was quality time.

 

We need more public places where people can gather to pursue solitary activities.

 

Libraries can meet this need, especially when they allow coffee, stay open late-ish, aren’t fully open-concept and boast quiet reading rooms where you don’t get caught in the crosstalk of self-conscious patrons.

 

Cafes can do this as well. A personal problem, however: When I read, I hear a voice in my head reading to me. This means I prefer absolutely no music in my surroundings. Same deal when I write or edit. To work with words — to process information and evaluate a piece of writing — I have to discern their tone and rhythm. Anything that disrupts the voice makes me feel as if I’m trying to listen to a radio station while another keeps overriding it.

 

Most cafes, then — likely by design — aren’t options for reading at length. Even on a slow day, when the staff are totally cool with a cheap skate bookworm hogging a table for hours and just buying coffee and maybe a brownie — and many, understandably, aren’t — they play music as if it’s a matter of policy.

 

What about outdoor seating? Great idea — during spring and summer. But fall and winter on the coast do not guarantee hours of rain-free skies. My eyes scan desperately for eaves and covered patios during the cold months and find them in short supply.

 

Good grief, Erick, why don’t you just read at home?

 

Fair enough. And I do. But fellow introverts who don’t want to be shut-ins know what I’m talking about. Sometimes we like to see humanity without interacting with it, make eye contact and acknowledge people without it turning into a thing.

 

Quiet people can have trouble advocating for themselves in their quest for quiet spaces. We tend to feel weird being ourselves in a world that demands most public pursuits be social ones. When we read or write around others, we don’t get the affirmation that comes with, say, playing softball. But when we notice someone else holding a book or notebook — doing something in public that engages their mind and doesn’t require a companion — we feel validated.

 

Which brings me back to the Sylvia’s reading area. A no-talking rule didn’t have to be enforced (it was, you might say, unspoken). When a pair of women wanted to work on a puzzle in the kitchen nearby, they closed the door behind them. We all knew what we were there to do, and used the space for that which it was intended. We were out and about, but having inward experiences.

 

And we need more spaces like it, where we can be solitary, but not alone.

 

 

 

 

“le Petit Garcon” by Barbara Martin.  Art chosen for Fairweather’s Shape and Color exhibition  selected as poster child for a show that opens on Sept. 7 in Chico, California!

AWARDED BEST IN SHOW!

 

 

 

 

 

“Super Elf”  by Barbara Martin’s SuperPly series, some of which are on display and available for sale at Fairweather’s during September for the Shape and Color exhibition.

Notes from Barbara Martin

 

“One of my SuperPly series won the Juror’s Award at the show in San Francisco’s Arc Gallery in June.

Another of my SuperPly series won a Blue Ribbon Award at the huge open show in Lake Oswego’s Festival of the Arts in June.” —Barbara Martin

 

Magnolia Pod by Edlee Quensell for Shape and Color through September. 

“As a young child from Yakima, my creativity started with playing a variety of wood musical instruments. Then, as a young man, I progressed to designing and handcrafting jewelry and leather products that were displayed at  galleries throughout seven western states. Wood turning, wall art, and sculpture has been my focus. Current techniques include texturing, coloring, and pyrography. As for subjects, I have been focusing on NW landscape, western motif, marine and wild life.” Edlee  Quensell

Note from Edlee Quensell…

“Received Honorable mention Award for wood sculpture “Sun Rays & Moon Phases” at WA STATE FAIR Fine Art Gallery. Sculpture sold during Preview Night Gala 8/30/18.!”  Edleee

 

 

Note from Victoria Brooks…

“My plein air-painting workshop at Lake Como, Italy has only a couple of spots left! It is September 19-26, 2018. More info  at http://www.toscanaamericana.com/victoriabrookslakecomo.html –Victoria Brooks

 

 

For more info about the artists, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

“Through the Door” by Barbara Rosbe Felisky. Miniature oil on linen.

Barbara Rosbe Felisky
is known for rich impressionist paintings of gardens and landscapes. The afternoon sun warming a wall or a glorious profusion of roses climbing over a gate, miniatures that impart a sense of tranquility and awe in an all-too-often hectic world.

Travel is an important facet of Felisky’s life. Her frequent trips provide inspiration and source material for her images of Provence, Tuscany, the Amalfi Coast, Italy’s Lake District, the Pacific Coast, and, of course, many gardens. Felisky’s rich palette and vibrant colors capture the exhilarating hues of the flowers and shrubs, while the paths draw the viewer deep into the quiet tranquility of the vistas viewed through windows and doors.

“Looking Toward” by Barbara Rosbe Felisky. Miniature oil on linen.

 

Travel is an important facet of  Barbara Felisky’s life. Her frequent trips provide inspiration and source material for her images of Provence, Tuscany, the Amalfi Coast, Italy’s Lake District, along the Pacific Coast, and, of course, many  gardens. Felisky’s rich palette and vibrant colors capture the exhilarating hues of the flowers and shrubs, while the paths draw the viewer deep into the quiet tranquility of the vistas viewed through windows and doors.

Born in Chicago, Illinois, Felisky now resides in Southern California and the North Coast Oregon, painting daily at her studios. She received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Art and Education from the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. In order to further develop her skills, Felisky studied oil painting with a number of artists as well as drawing under Fredrick Odell.

 

 

Barbara Felisky, whose biography appears in Who’s Who in American Art, has also been featured in American Artist magazine on a number of occasions. Her work has been shown in a number of major juried exhibitions and featured in many gallery shows.

SHOWS & EXHIBITIONS

Annual One-Woman Show, Simic New Renaissance Galleries,      Carmel, CA (15 years)

Annual Exhibitor, Decor Expo Trade Show,       Atlanta GA (15 years)

Exhibitor, Art Expo, New York and Los Angeles      (three years)

Haystack Gallery, Cannon Beach, Oregon

JURIED EXHIBITIONS

Guggenheim Gallery, Chapman College, Orange, CA

Catherine Lorillard Wolfe Art Club 81st National Exhibit,      National Arts Club, NYC

Miniature Art Society of Washington D.C., National Show

Miniature Art Society of Florida, National Show

AWARDS

First Place: National Miniature Show

First Place: National Western Small Paintings Show

First Place: Allegheny Small Paintings Show

CORPORATE COLLECTIONS

Nordstrom’s Corporate Collection, Seattle

Bank of America, Los Angeles, CA (various locations)

The Park Hotel, Los Vegas, NV

Marriott Hotels, Newport Beach, and Los Angeles, CA

Marriott Hotels, New Orleans, LA

The Breakers Hotel, Long Beach, CA

PUBLIC COLLECTIONS

City of Brea, California, Civic Center

City of Orange, California, Civic Center

 

 

Welcoming Barbara Felisky,  previously showing at Haystack Gallery in Cannon Beach, Oregon (closed),  now  showing at Fairweather Gallery.

 

 

Grace note! Thank you Paul Brent for the referral.

For more about the gallery, please visit www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

“Birds of a Feather” by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images.

 

Osprey, sometimes known as the sea hawk, fish eagle, river hawk or fish hawk, is a large raptor, reaching more than 2 feet in length and 6 feet in wing span. As its other common name suggests, the osprey’s diet consists almost exclusively of fish. It possesses specialized physical characteristics and exhibits unique behavior to assist in hunting and fishing. The Broadway Park osprey nest has a live camera placed by the Necancium Watershed Council and the City of Seaside.

 

 

After a thirty-year career as an award winning biology teacher at Seaside High School, Neal Maine became the first executive director of North Coast Land Conservancy, which he co-founded in 1986. Since his retirement from the land trust in 2010, he has pursued his passion for nature photography through PacificLight Images, a partnership with Michael Wing, dedicated to raising awareness of coastal ecology and the wildlife with whom we share the region’s estuaries, freshwater wetlands and forests. Their photography centers around coastal and Columbia River landscape, ecology and the rich estuary habitat with the surrounding wetlands and forest systems.

Neal focuses his imagery on exploring wildlife in the context of its habitat, while Michael’s specialty is capturing action images that illustrates the dynamic nature of coastal wildlife. PacificLight Images is dedicated to working with coastal communities to protect wildlife habitat and its connectivity. A percentage of all photography sales are donated to North Coast Land Conservancy to help further this goal.

 

 

Seaside ospreys by Neal Maine.

The Broadway Park osprey nest has a live camera placed by the Necancium Watershed Council and the City of Seaside.

In Clatsop County, Oregon there are about 14 osprey nests.

Watch the osprey at Seasideosprey.org.

 

Fairweather House and Gallery EMERGING artist Hall of Fame

2006-2018

 Kristin Qian

Britney Drumheller

Nick Brakel

Robert McWhirter

Michael Wing

Michele Bettger

Rebecca Gore

Gayle H. Seely

Linda Trexler

Diane Copenhaver

Veronica Russell

For more info about the gallery, go to www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

“Seaside Dreams” 16×12, original oil by Melissa Jander

 

“Lavender in Window” 12×16, original oil by Melissa Jander

 

“Sweet Peas in Window” 12×12, original oil by Melissa Jander

 

 

 

Melissa Jander, a “home-grown” Pacific Northwestern painter, brings “A Sense of Place” to her latest works by combining objects, settings and a glimpse of the environment. Using carefully chosen colors and expressive brushwork she hopes to invite the art viewer to participate by evoking a mood, memory or emotion.

 

 

Grace note received:

“Looking forward to a fabulous show and another fun visit to Seaside. In addition, on three paintings I have updated my framing, adding linen liners and new frame molding. I was selected as the 2018 Skagit Valley Tulip Festival poster artist! Here is the NW News article. See you soon!” 🙂 Melissa

 

 

Home/News & Features/News/2018 Skagit Valley Tulip Festival poster art created by Woodinville artist

Each year a committee of community volunteers selects a local artist to create the official poster, which is unique to the Skagit Valley Tulip Festival.

Local artists submit their applications and the winner is free to choose their medium and style in a way that will interpret their vision of the festival and the tulips of Skagit Valley. In a testament to the quality of the art, several previous posters received the Gold Pinnacle award from the International Festival & Events Association. The new poster is unveiled in November each year, and this year’s artist is one of our own.

Woodinvile artist Melissa Jander was chosen to create the 2018 official poster. She created her Tulip Festival poster painting with oils on a smooth, acrylic-primed masonite board. Said Melissa, “I will leave the style of the painting up to the viewer to decide, but the styles of art I’m most interested in are impressionist and post-impressionist… My favorite artists are Pierre Bonnard, Claude Monet, Vincent Van Gogh, and Paul Cezanne…their work really resonates with me because of their use of color, representation of light and expressiveness of brushstrokes.”

Melissa used inspiration from years of visiting the tulip fields to create her painting. She said, “It’s a wonderful experience every visit. I do quick sketches and paintings out in the fields; and take photos as well in all kinds of weather. The sunny days are great for the contrasts in light and shadow, but overcast days can’t be beat for seeing the powerful, rich color of those blooms. Then at home I combine my resource material into an idea for a painting. It starts with several sketches and composition ideas, then after deciding on a favorite I do a larger sketch and move it onto a larger canvas or panel.”

After earning a bachelor of arts in foreign language and literature from Washington State University, a Graphic Design certificate from the Art Institute of Seattle, and a Web Design certificate from Bellevue College, Melissa started her career as a graphic designer and marketing professional before seriously pursuing her art in 2001. Current art associations include Women Artists of the West, American Impressionist Society, Northwest Artists in Action and Woodinville Arts Alliance. She is currently represented by Fairweather Gallery in Seaside, OR, and Scott Milo Gallery in Anacortes, WA.

When asked how she felt about being chosen to paint the poster for the 35th anniversary she replied, “Gosh, I was so thrilled to be invited to paint the 35th anniversary poster! I have hoped to contribute to the SVTF poster in some way for many years… but it took a long time of learning skills, practice, and life experience before the time was right to pursue it further. I appreciated the opportunity to meet and work with the Tulip Festival committee and the tulip farm owners because many of us around here have been the beneficiaries of all of their hard work over the years. The tulip farms and Tulip Festival are a real treasure for us here.”


Melissa Jander artist with her 2018 Skagit Valley Tulip Festival poster art.

Published by Woodinville Weekly/ April 2018

 

 

To learn more about the artist, please visit

www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

…artists/ …Melissa Jander

Lynda Campbell, artist, spoke at the opening reception of “Perfect Pear, Perfect Pair, Perfect Pare” on May 5 at Fairweather’s.

 

 

And, too, a grace note:

“Thank you for your interest and support of my work. Your gallery is highly regarded among artists so it is special to be included in one of your showings. The “pear, pair, pare” theme was fun and it was interesting to see everyone’s interpretations. I appreciate all your did (and all you do) to share artists accomplishments. It is a lot of work for you each month. My best.”  —Lynda Campbell

 

 

Read more about the artist lecture at:

Fairweather House and Gallery | https://www

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/tag/fairweather-house-and-gallery/

A “pear”antly by Lynda Campbell for Perfect Pear…

 

“Those that live for the arts, support the arts.” Art patrons capture the artist lecture presented by Lynda Campbell.

 

Read more about the opening reception at:

https://www.seasideor.com/event/first-saturday-art-walk-3/ …Blue Bond, Marga Stanley, Bill Baily, and Lynda Campbell

 

Pastel Pears by Lynda Campbell

Read more about the artist at:

https://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com | extraordinary home …

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/

Lynda Campbell, pastel artist, has worked in the medium for about 14 years. She has a BS degree in Art Education from the University of Oregon. She has lived …

 

 

 

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside, Oregon

Through May 31

Perfect Pear, Pair, Pare Exhibition

Regional artists were selected due to their art related to scale and perspective, and the way things correlate and interact.

Featuring artists Lisa Wiser, Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, Blue Bond, Marga Stanley, Bill Baily, and Lynda Campbell.

 

Take a note

Upcoming Fairweather Exhibition

June 2, 5-7pm

Seaside First Saturday Art Walk

Artist Reception

“Sense of Place”

 

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