Beloved artist Victoria Brooks arrives to paint LIVE on July 1st for the opening reception of WAVES at Fairweather’s during the Seaside First Saturday Art Walk.

 

 

Sea Power by Victoria Brooks, reprinted from the Steppin’ Out magazine summer 2017 edition.

Of course, like any other job, being an artist has its challenges. You need the discipline to master many different craft tools and techniques. You must develop keen analytical and problem-solving skills. You need the dedication to refine your sensibilities into a unique artistic voice. Moreover, you must learn how to run the business of Yourself, Inc. 

None of this happens overnight. Nevertheless, the work also offers deeply satisfying rewards—from the thrill of discovery to the satisfaction of bringing something beautiful into the world, from the validation of your work by experts at art shows and competitions to the joy of seeing how your creations affect the lives of others. For me, this last—how my work connects with my clients—is the most rewarding.

These connections can be both profound and simple. Sometimes a painting resonates with a client emotionally, and she takes my painting home to savor the feelings it evokes again and again. Sometimes a painting reminds a client of something in her own life, and she presents the painting to a friend or relative to rekindle memories of shared moments, they cherish. In addition, sometimes clients just like a painting’s technical execution or want to add a little beauty to their lives and “know it when they see it.”

It is with these connections in mind that I select my subjects and my style. Although I do lots of studio work, I love the outdoors and favor the direct approach of working en plein air (in the open air). When I work outside, I use oils and all my senses to capture landscapes, portraits, and emotional moments of people in natural settings. Working outside means, I have to chase the ephemeral effects of sunlight, moving water, wind, and weather (while dealing with the occasional animal, insect, or onlooker). As a result, my paintings have a strong sense of spontaneity and freshness.

A graceful woman strolls along a beach alone, the wind teasing her hair. Sun-washed children discover treasures translucent, breaking waves have tossed ashore. A monumental rock formation, bathed in a kaleidoscope of hues by the setting sun, stands guard where sea meets land and day meets night. You get the picture.
Because I am serious about my work, I am always looking for ways to grow artistically, spiritually, and professionally. To that end, for the past dozen years or so, I have had the pleasure of hosting en plein air workshops and classes around the world. My students have represented a wide range of ages, backgrounds, and skill levels.
My goal has been to help all of them reach the next level in their journeys as artists. For some, painting is now a fulfilling pastime. Others have become accomplished, award-winning pros in their own right. As for me, my students’ enthusiasm, sharing, and comradery have been inspirational in many ways. In addition, they continue to affirm in me the one great Truth about art: We are all chasing the light together. I feel blessed to have a career in fine art.

 

For more info about the Stepin Out magazine, please visit http://www.traveltowinecountry.com/

 

 

Through numerous gallery exhibitions and shows, art lovers around the world have come to admire and enjoy the art works of Victoria Brooks. She captures the essence of sun-drenched images typical of  a vibrant, impressionistic style.

Victoria’s paintings are characterized by intimate moments set in romantic, richly conceived landscapes and seascapes. The result is a hauntingly personal connection with the viewer that resonates at the deepest emotional level. Her special talents are particularly evident in her expressive portraits where she reflects the mood and inner nature of her subjects.

After a successful career and many national awards as an art director in television and motion pictures, she pursued her love of painting, which she has been doing for 20 years.

For more about the artist, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Victoria Brooks.

Note the time! Fred Luken’s myrtle wood clock…arrived just in time for the June 3rd, 5:pm opening reception of Iconic at Fairweather’s.

About Fred Lukens:

I was born in 1942 during the height of World War Two and my parents raised myself and my two brothers in Portland. We had a very happy childhood with many family members close at hand.

When I was 6 years old we moved out to east county and lived on an acre of property raising a lot of our own food both vegetables and meat.
I attended school at Gilbert Grade School and David Douglas High School. When I turned 16, I joined the U.S Naval Reserves and upon graduation from high school, I immediately went into active service which happened during the Berlin Wall crisis, this placed me active duty prior to my 18th birthday. I spent 2 years of active service both in the Asian theater and then stateside based out of San Francisco, Ca. At 21 years old I moved back to Oregon and worked in the retail market for a number of years and then into product management for a couple of manufactures in the local area.

In 1972 I had another career change by going into sales as a manufactures agent covering Oregon, Washington & Alaska.

In 1985 along with a business partner we created a business that started at zero and by the time I retired in 2005 sales had reached unexpected results. We specialized with any product that involved water, this included water handling, purification, and irrigation. I am proud to say that we were recognized as one of the “go to” authorities in our field. I had the great pleasure to work with some very gracious and wonderful people in my business career of whom I still communicate with.

In 2006 my wife and I decided to sell our home and purchase a travel trailer and set out to see the greater Pacific North West. We traveled thru Oregon, Washington Idaho and parts of Canada before settling back down in Oregon and purchased an acre of land in Sandy, Oregon. I took an old garage that was already on the property and completely refurbished the exterior and had the interior rewired to allow the necessary wood tools that I needed to start working on the projects I am currently able to present for sale and at the same time enjoy producing.

“Much of the raw wood products come from all over the world, South America, Africa, and also our beautiful southern Oregon coast which grows Myrtle wood which many say will soon disappear from the United States.”-– Fred Lukens

 

 

“A finished myrtle wood piece is gorgeous and it is easy to see why people fall in love with them. After all, each provides the new owner a little piece of Oregon created by a local artisan who take tremendous pride in creating unique works in rare wood. “ — Grant McCombie

For more about Grant’s recommendations, please visit  http://traveloregon.com/trip-ideas/grants-getaways/

 

Q:  Where in Oregon is myrtle wood is found, you ask?

A: Oregon has a “banana belt,” a warm landscape along the southern coast, but you will not find pineapple, mango, or papaya growing there. Instead, you will find plenty of cedar, fir and even giant redwoods – plus, one particular hardwood variety that grows from south of Reedsport through Northern California and east from the Coast Range Mountains to the I-5 corridor in the Alfred A. Loeb State Park.  

Q: Where is the Alfred A. Loeb State Park, you ask?

A: The park is located near Brookings, Oregon.  Your first impression of Loeb may well be the scent of the myrtle wood forest … a crisp, bay leaf aroma. The park is nestled in a grove of lovely myrtle wood trees through Alfred  A. Loeb State Park. It is the largest public-owned old growth myrtle stand in the state! The park land was acquired by gift from the State Board of Forestry.  It was a tract purchased by Save the Myrtle Woods, Inc. from Alfred A. Loeb of Portland for protecting the outstanding native myrtle trees and other vegetation along the Chetco River.

For more info please visit http://www.stateparks.com/alfred_a_loeb_state_park_in_oregon.html

 

Fun Fact: Myrtle wood, a rare hard wood,  is a distinctly Oregon wood, found nowhere else in the United States; indeed some  may say,  found nowhere else other than in the Holy Land.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kimberly Kent artist 

 

Kimberly has worked in the art community for over 30 years as an artist, teacher, curator, gallery owner and art broker. She holds a degree in painting, drawing and printmaking from Portland State University.

 


Her oil and encaustic paintings germinate from plein air studies that bear the torch for larger paintings. Her work ranges in style from expressive landscape to abstract, working with a vibrant palette and a close look at light, reflection and color.

 


As an art broker Kimberly curates and procures art for hospitals, clinics and multi family housing projects. Her business focuses on bringing local art to high mission clients.

 

 

Q:  What is encaustic art, you ask?

A: Encaustic is a Greek word meaning “to heat or burn in” (enkaustikos). Heat is used throughout the process, from melting the beeswax and varnish to fusing the layers of wax. Encaustic consists of natural bees wax and crystallized tree sap. The medium is melted and applied with a tool or brush.  Each layer is then reheated to fuse it to the previous layer with colored pigments added.

 

Fun fact: encaustic painting is an ancient technique, dating back to the Greeks, who used wax to caulk ship hulls!

The 20th century has seen a rebirth of encaustic on a major scale. It is an irony of our modern age, with its emphases on advanced technology, that a painting technique as ancient and involved as encaustic should receive such widespread interest. Earlier attempts to revive encaustic failed to solve the one problem that had made painting in encaustic so laborious – the melting of the wax. The availability of portable electric heating implements and the variety of tools made the use of encaustic more accessible.

 

www.eainm.com/what-is-encaustic/  .. Encaustic Art Institute

 

 

Image titled:  Woody on Parade by Gearhart/ Seaside naturalist, biologist and scientist Neal Maine of PacificLight Images.

 Gallery proceeds to support NCLC, North Coast Land Conservancy.

Fun fact about the Wood Duck: The Wood Duck is the only North American duck that regularly produces two broods in one year. 

Male Wood Duck  photographed on West Lake  in April 2017.

Q: Where in the world is West Lake, you ask?

A: West Lake  is located is Gearhart, Oregon on Highway 101, just north of Hertig Fire Station near the cross road of Del Moore Loop Road.

 

For more about the artist, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseangallery.com/ artists/ … Neal Maine

 

 

Timely quote by master calligrapher Penelope Culbertson.

For ICONIC, an art exhibition, through June, 2017.

 Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway, Seaside

Definition of iconic:

1: of, relating to, or having the characteristics of an icon

2: widely recognized and well-established •an iconic brand name

3: widely known and acknowledged especially for distinctive excellence •an iconic image •an iconic vacation

 

Penelope Culbertson offered a scribing LIVE episode during the opening reception of Iconic on June 3rd.

 

 

 

For Iconic, an exhibition, Penelope Culbertson created new water-color works combined with calligraphy.  In addition, in the photo are seascapes  by Lee Munsell.  Throughout the years, water-color artist and master calligrapher Penelope Culbertson  has appeared during events at Fairweather’s to offer art lectures, calligraphy history lessons, and scribing LIVE events.

For more about the artists, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseangallery.com/ artists/ … Penelope Culbertson. …Lee Munsell

Original work by Penelope Culbertson.

Penelope Culbertson began her art studies at the Portland Art Museum as a child, in the art department at Cleveland High School, at Reed College with calligraphy master Lloyd Reynolds, at Willamette University in Salem, at the San Francisco Art Institute, and the Institute de Bellas Artes in San Miguel, Mexico.

Penelope was the co-founder of the Art Academy of Kona and the West Hawaii Arts Guild where she served on the Executive Board. Penelope worked in the Hawaii State Artist-in-School program and showed as the Artist-in-Residence at the Hyatt Regency. Her work is in the permanent collection at the Royal Waikoloan Hotel.

Since her return to Portland, Penelope has had seventeen solo exhibits of her watercolors. She showed year round at the Hawthorne Arts Gallery and annually at the Buckman Art Show where she was the founding chairman of the Children’s Art Sale. She taught children’s art classes at the Buckman Arts Magnet Elementary and for the Portland Parks Dept. in their after-school program. In 1999 she helped produce a book of children’s watercolors about the Portland Water System. She was co-founder of The Hawthorne Arts Guild and showed in all their monthly group shows.

Penelope teaches weekly classes in calligraphy and watercolors for the disabled. She experiments in watercolors, oil pastels, collage, tapestry weaving and calligraphy. She is a member of the Portland Society of Calligraphy.

 

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Q: What is calligraphy, you ask?

A: Calligraphy is the art of forming beautiful symbols by hand and arranging them well. It’s a set of skills and techniques for positioning and inscribing words so they show integrity, harmony, some sort of ancestry and rhythm.

Symbol is a mark which has a specific agreed-upon meaning in a language, like a letter of the alphabet, a numeral or a word. Integrity of a letter means admirable proportions and form. Harmony describes a pleasing relationship between different visual elements in a piece of calligraphy: parts of a letter, letters, words, the whole text and surrounding space. Ancestry refers to the heritage of letter-shapes, materials and techniques which calligraphers use. Rhythm means the calligrapher’s deliberate repetition and variation of marks and spaces to create feelings of pattern and emphasis.

But wait, there’s more about calligraphy…

The Oxford English Dictionary defines calligraphy as:

1. Beautiful handwriting; elegant penmanship. (Early seventeenth century.)
2. Style of handwriting, penmanship generally. (Mid-seventeenth century.)
3. In painting etc.: beauty of line; (elegant) brushwork. (Early twentieth century.)

(The word comes from kallos, Greek, meaning ‘beauty’ and -graphy, ‘a style of method or writing, drawing, etc’ which in turn comes from graphe, Greek, meaning ‘drawing, writing’.)

… calligraphy is a script that exhibits exceptional and often self-conscious artistry and aesthetic quality in design and execution. (M. P. Brown, Understanding Illuminated Manuscripts: A Guide to Technical Terms (London: The British Library, 1994)

Calligraphy is a skill. This skill involves touch, pressure, hand movement, unity, and that elusive quality we term “beauty.” (V. Studley, Calligraphy (NY: Dover, 1991)

http://www.calligraphy-skills.com/what-is-calligraphy.html

State of Conscious. Original abstract oil.

Carmela Newstead,  featured artist, June 2017.


For ICONIC, an exhibition.

Definition of iconic:

1: of, relating to, or having the characteristics of an icon

2: widely recognized and well-established •an iconic brand name

3: widely known and acknowledged especially for distinctive excellence •an iconic image  •an iconic vacation

Fairweather House and Gallery

 

For more information about the artist, please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/  artists tab/ Carmela Newstead

morning-glory

“Life’s challenges are like climbing mountains

Look ahead, to the sky, to the birds

Don’t fall back into the sea.”

In addition, showing at the Larson Gallery in Yakima, Washington, a gallery dedicated to supporting artists that are teachers and educators from the Yakima College, Carmela selected specific original works of art for her on-going exhibitions Fairweather House & Gallery.

She and her husband, Dr. Bob Newstead, had a summer home in Gearhart, Oregon and has been a frequent guest of honor during the Art Walk events at Fairweather’s.

Carmela’s family moved from Chicago from New York, leaving a huge Italian family from which they have never broken their deep ties. After earning a degree in Education and then teaching, she married and moved to many different states. She had already been studying art at the University of Iowa and continued with private instructors in California while living there. In Yakima, attending the Yakima College, she reaped life-long art benefits from R. K. Smith’s and Robert Fisher’s skilled instruction.

Later, Carmela attended Pratt School of Art in Seattle and numerous workshops including those of Margarette Olson Fletcher and Zolton Szabo.

Over the years she has been a visiting art professor in the Yakima School District and has had private students both children and adults. Carmela has received numerous awards in juried shows. She has been in many solo exhibits and group exhibits throughout Washington, Oregon and California.

About Carmela Newstead’s art in the LARSON GALLERY, Yakima, WA

In its 6oth year, the “Central Show” featured 113 artists, including Carmela Newstead. Juror, Greg Kucera, owner of the well-known Greg Kucera Gallery in Seattle, welcomed artists from Benton, Chelan, Douglas, Kittitas, Walla Walla, and Yakima counties to the Larson Gallery. In his juror’s statement, Kucera states, “There was a pleasing level of well-made works that restores my confidence in artists who are getting their hands dirty to make this work.”

In addition, Carmela Newstead has shown work in the Oak Hollow Gallery in Yakima, as well.

 

Grace note received:

“THANK YOU DENISE FOR THE LOVELY WRITE UP. YOU HAVE BEEN A WONDERFUL SUPPORT AND FRIEND. THANK YOU FOR YOUR CONTINUED SUPPORT OF MY ART. I APPRECIATE IT SO MUCH. THE BEST OF LUCK WITH THE OPENING. YOUR OPENINGS ARE ALWAYS SO WELL THOUGHT OUT AND THEREFORE FABULOUS.”
–Carmela

Carmela

North Coast Beaver by Neal Maine

NEAL MAINE, SCIENTIST AND WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHER TO PRESENT A LECTURE ON BEAVER ECOLOGY MAY 25TH 7-8PM

Necanicum Watershed Council and North Coast Land Conservancy and The Wetlands Conservancy, present Beaver Tales –Neal Maine, scientist and wildlife photographer to present a lecture on Beaver Ecology

 

Date: May 25
Time: 7 –8 PM
Location: Beaver Tales Exhibition Gallery, 608 Broadway, located in the historic Gilbert District of downtown Seaside
Next to Fairweather Gallery (612 Broadway)

To celebrate beavers and their contribution to the ecology of the North Coast, the nonprofit organizations have teamed up with local businesses to host the Beaver Tales Art Exhibit and Sale in Seaside. The purpose of the exhibit is to highlight the importance of beavers in creating wetlands and other aquatic habitat.

Neal Maine will explain how beavers engineer wetlands on the North Coast, and how people can learn to take advantage of their environmental benefits while protecting property from flooding and other damage. Maine’s vast experience in studying and photographing wildlife enables him to tell fascinating stories about these industrious little rodents that most people never see.

For more info please visit NCLC.org
http://www.necanicumwatershedcouncil

The Wetlands Conservancy has posted information on the Beaver Tales art project. The link is below. Feel free to share it with your friends and contacts.
http://wetlandsconservancy.org/stewardship/beaver-tales

http://wetlandsconservancy.org/stewardship/beaver-tales/beaver-inspiration

https://northernwoodlands.org/discoveries/pathways-to-ponds

Here’s a link to an excellent short video, with great aerial depiction of the changes that beaver dams bring to meadows . . .
http://www.animalplanet.com/tv-shows/other/videos/fooled-by-nature-beaver-dams

And for more inspiration, a video of beaver swimming on U-Tube. .https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9cwu_Wu5ONI