Full Moon Bowl by Emily Miller

 

 

“I have a brand new full moon bowl (first one out of the kiln!) Creating a different perspective on my passion for exploring unknown environments in art. Although most of my artwork has focused on the ocean, I find the beauty, mystery, and science of outer space as compelling as the deep-sea.”  —Emily Miller, artist

 

Q: When is the full moon in June, you ask?

A: The full moon will be on June 27 and June 28. To the casual observer, however, the moon will appear full the day before and after its peak brightness. https://www.moongiant.com/moonphases/June/2018

 

 

Concept drawings by Emily Miller.

“I love the fanciful scientific names for the lunar “seas” (which are actually flat regions of dark basalt where lava oozed to the surface, pulled by Earth’s gravity up towards the near side of the moon). The Sea of Nectar and the Sea of Clouds are two of my favorites. I also love that the Seas of Tranquility and Crises are right next to each other.”  Emily Miller

 

 

“I am captivated by the beautiful contrast between light and darkness in our natural world, and the necessity of both for life to thrive. .”  Emily Miller

 

 

 Spiny urchin porcelain bowls by Emily Miller

 

 

Sea anemone porcelain vases by Emily Miller.

Heavily textured raw porcelain exteriors are  reminiscent of sunlight patterns in a shallow lagoon. Watertight.

 

Read more about Emily Miller at https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/tag/fairweather-house…gallery/…/1…

 

Save the date and time

Opening artist reception for the exhibition  “Ocean Folk”

July 7, 5-7:pm

Emily Miller launches her 100 Turtles project at the Fairweather Gallery

 

“Here is the post I just wrote about my 100 Turtles project.” Emily Miller

  http://ejmillerfineart.com/news/2018/06/14/100-turtles-project/

 

 

End note: Two Fairweather Gallery artists featuring a North Oregon coast night scene with a full moon over the Pacific Ocean, which is the largest ocean in the world.   At full moon, the Moon and Sun are in a straight line on opposite sides of the Earth. Their gravitational forces combine to create larger waves.

“Night Sea” by Ron Nicolaides.  Original oil on Linen.

 

For more info about the artist, please go to  https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/Artist/Ron/Nicolaides.html

 

  “North Coast Sea” by Nicholas Oberling.  Original oil on linen.

For more info about the artist, please go to  https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/…/welcoming-nicholas-oberling-art.

 

Precious moonstone, a translucent, opalescent, pearly blue gemstone cuff bracelet by Alan Stockam. Signed and numbered by the silversmith.

 

 

 

 

 

Bumble bee jasper pendant #568 by Alan Stockam.

 

Q:  What is bumble bee jasper and where is it found, you ask?

A: Highly polished bumble bee jasper  portrays intricate patterns and marvelous yellow/orange hues. The colors within this stone have the same characteristics of a bumble bee, which is how it got its name. These stones contain natural cracks and fractures. It is a notoriously difficult mineral to score because the volcanic mine where bumble bee jasper is located has activated from its previously dormant state. It comes to us exclusively from West Java, Indonesia near Mount Papandayan.

 

Alan Stockam creates handmade silver jewelry with gemstones from the Northwest and beyond.

 

A cool blue gold Labradorite ring  #785 by Alan Stockam

Alan Stockam set this sideways to give it a softer, more classic look. This piece of Labradorite has a lot to see in the stone, a couple of flashes and it almost looks faceted by the way the lines are in the stone but it is not. It is a flat high shine stone.

 

Each silver piece is signed, marked by the artist, Alan Stockam, and numbered.

 

 

Lapis ring #783 by Alan Stockam

Jewelry staging by Heather Rieder.

Available exclusively at Fairweather House and Gallery.

 

Fun facts about the semi-precious gemstones selected by Alan Stockam and Heather Rieder.

 

  • Amethyst is best known for its rich, violet-purple hue. Historically it has been highly valued as a precious stone for the uniqueness of its color, as there are few purple gemstones. The Greek name for the stone, “amethustos” became known as amethyst.
  • Agates are a form of quartz that are banded or lined in a variety of patterns of colored layers. Agate is derived from the Greek word “achates”, which is a river in Sicily where agate was mined in abundance as early as 3000 BC.
  • Jasper is an opaque variety of chalcedony. Jasper is derived from the Greek word “iaspis”. One of the characteristics of jasper is that it is able to take a high polish.
  • Lapis is a beautiful, rich ultramarine-blue stone consisting largely of lazurite and speckled with golden pyrite. It was one of the most prized stones of ancient times. Egyptian blue paint was made from finely ground lapis.
  • Turquoise was one of the first gemstones to be mined by the native people of Egypt. It is easily shaped and polished.

 

Please call 503-738-8899 for more details.

 

www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

“My mixed-media paintings are mainly powered charcoal, gelled onto watercolor paper.  Charcoal may weird, it is not just black and white and it is not smudgy, provides texture.  Along with charcoal, I  add as many as twenty-two layers of transparent paint, each layer is sealed with clear gel.  I hide things in layers, like  turtles.  It takes awhile as each layer has to be  dry before another layer can be applied.  The resulting art work has a three-dimensional aspect.  Truly, working with charcoal gives the  painting visual textural mystery. The technique allows the viewer to dive in and have their own adventure.  It is never the same.  In different light or from different angles, various images come forward or recede.  Indeed, the painting offers a new perspective each time it is viewed.”    Jan Rimerman

 

 

Artist Jan Rimerman with Megan, art assistant to the artist, at Fairweather House and Gallery.

 

Megan, art assistant, at the Fairweather Gallery during the opening reception of “Sense of Place”, shows an exciting composition by Jan Rimerman  featuring multiple layers of charcoal and paint creating stones and water.

 

 

 

At the opening artist’s reception at Fairweather House and Gallery, Jan Rimerman opens the magazine Cascade Living/ spring 2018 edition, to an article about working magic with charcoal and paint while raising money for wetlands and her favorite animal.

Close up of “Secrets of the Stream”

“I hide turtles in layers,” Jan Rimerman

More about the artist:

Jan Rimerman has followed her artistic muse since childhood. This journey has carried her to South America, the British Isles, Western and Eastern Europe, Africa, Asia and Indonesia.

Jan’s work was influenced by Dürer, Schöngauer, and Blake.  Carl Hall and Robert Hess were influential professors at Willamette University.    Rimerman also studied art at the City University in London, Portland State University and at the University of Washington.

Her own work began to exhibit a contemporary twist using traditional elements and principles of design of these masters.

She spent many months in France studying the lives and techniques of her favorite Impressionists and Post-Impressionists.   These masters use of light and color taught her to look at her subject matter more critically in terms of light and shadow.   Her silent mentors were Pissarro, Van Gogh, and Monet.

Then…colored pencil was introduced into Jan’s world when a box was presented to her by her Aunt and Uncle.  This gift changed her life forever.  The world of colored pencil wrapped Jan up and massaged every bit of drawing talent in her.  Line, shape, color and texture magically became borders, flowers and landscapes coming alive under her fingertips.  She was pushed into the limelight winning many national awards and was published in internationally distributed books and magazines.  The rhythmic movement and elegance of Art Nouveau, and particularly Mucha’s borders, are evident influences in this era of her art work.

Gradually the light and color Jan used to create representational art metamorphosed into abstract images.   Her appreciation of Klimt, Rothko, and Kahn has influenced her abstract style.  Most recently,  Jan has been exploring color, movement, and composition using mixed media. The powdered charcoal and fluid transparent acrylics give her the freedom to work out color theory and multiple dimensions with her very individual layered style.  Jan is constantly reaching and stretching for new shapes and color combinations to create exciting compositions to create the illusion that you may jump right into the painting and swim through it.

Jan Rimerman discusses her art process  during an artist’s reception at Fairweather House and Gallery.

 

Grace note received:

“Thank you for the beautiful reception! The gallery looked stunning! I wish you a splendid summer season. Thank you for including me in your juried show.” Jan Rimerman

 

Read more about the artist Jan Rimerman:

janrimerman.com/event/94680/rockpaperturtleart-for-wetlands

Rock…Paper…Turtle…Art for Wetlands is a fundraiser to help restore the Western Pond Turtle habitat in the Nyberg Wetlands…

https://www.cascadesothebysrealty.com/services/cascade-living-magazine/

Cascade Sotheby’s International Realty flagship publications … Cascade Living Magazine – Spring 2018 – … /For the Lover of Turtles/  ...Jan Rimerman

 

In good company, “Sense of Place” photo collage. Images from the Fairweather House and Gallery artist’s reception.

For more info, about the event, please go to http://www.facebook.com/ Seaside First Saturday Art Walk.

 

The Fairweather June exhibit, “Sense of Place,  laid claim to our unique little corners  of our individual  world –special only to ourselves.  Surely, what we all seek is a place that allows us to indulge in out dreams, hopes and wishes.  What we all seek to find is that special place and time that offers a bit of momentary solitude that fortifies our spirits and rejuvenates our energies. 

 

“Sense of Place” through June, 2018.

For more information, go to www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

“High Seas” 8 x 10 Original oil on linen by Ron Nicolaides.

 

The  Pacific coast is the predominant subject of Nicolaides’ paintings. With years of study and experience, Ron Nicolaides  has become a powerful accomplished artist. He has captured majestic landscapes and has mastered the mesmerizing translucent waves in his depiction of the sea without freezing its energetic rhythms. His strength is his capacity to push the limits of oils and multiply glazes to create the masterful works that bring the viewer right into the scene.

 

http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com   …artists/  …Ron Nicolaides.

 

About the illuminating art wood display:

Hand made and hand-finished lighted display stands for art glass and other translucent objects.  Each display is solid natural wood, textures and colors are unique.  Finishes include cherry, maple and walnut. High-intensity LED lights (without the need of batteries)  emphasize the intricate details of art and objects – much like a fine p[picture frame.  LED bulbs last up to ten years.  “Investing in art is spiritually and emotionally rewarding,” Andrew Nelson.

 

About the painted glass jewelry:

Pouring paint into glass is the artist’s favorite medium because of the bright color mixing.  The Northwest artist creates colorful  drippings, reminiscence of ocean waves and skies, to make one-of-a-kind  personal jewelry.   “I hope you enjoy my art, as much as I enjoyed creating it,” Tanya Gardner

 

 

It’s beginning to look like high season at the beach. Yes, indeed,  it is the nearly that time of year when Seaside has most tourists or visitors.

Kemy Kay, gallery hostess.

“Welcome to the Seaside.”

 

The lists are “Best Summer Vacations” and “Best Summer Vacations in the U.S.”

U.S. News Travel considered 700 cities, parks, beaches and small towns around the world and in this country, measuring “affordability, weather and variety of things to do plus traveler and expert sentiment.”

According to the rankings, Paris, France is the world’s No. 1 summer vacation list, followed by Florence, Italy; Boston, Massachusetts; and Dublin, Ireland. Seaside, Oregon is fifth. I mean, we’re talking about Paris, the City of Lights, and Seaside, the city of surreys and fried clams.

Read to full article:

Southern Exposure: Seaside under the radar no more
Can you say ‘Seaside’ and ‘Boston’ in the same sentence?
Date: 2018-05-14/ RJ Marx
story

Editor Gwendolyn Shearman of U.S. News Travel said her team initiates the process by selecting destinations from throughout the world. They score each destination in 11 different categories.

For rankings such as the Best Summer Vacations and the Best Summer Vacations in the USA, editors also factor in the seasonality of a destination and when the best time to visit is for the everyday traveler. Rankings are based on user ratings and editors’ scores, from 0 to 5 — “phenomenal.”

Editors apply these ratings to categories including sights, culture, people, food, shopping, family, nightlife, adventure, romance and accessibility. Destinations’ overall scores are a weighted average of the individual editors’ averages, based on which factors users said were most important to them.

This is the first year Seaside has been included in the scoring, Shearman said, receiving high marks in the sights, family, food and accessibility categories.

“Seaside stood out this year because of its appeal to both beach-going families and outdoor enthusiasts. Plus, its location in the Pacific Northwest is a great alternative to more well-known (and more crowded) beach destinations further south.”

 

In 2018, editors have found readers are particularly interested in visiting more under-the-radar vacation spots and smaller towns in the United States, she said. “More of those types of vacations appearing on many of our ranking lists.”

In Seaside, all you have to do is take a leisurely stroll along the Prom on a clear  morning  to place the city high on your own list. We’re proud to have our home named among the finest in the world.

 

For more info, go to  www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

“Sense of Place” Fairweather’s June exhibition opened on June 2 with LIVE music featuring  western songs by guitarist Ron Burghard, luscious treats (featured watercolor art by Bill Baily), sunny weather, hostesses dressed in denim and art loving patrons.

 

 

 

Minutes before the “Sense of Place” opening, finishing touches completed for Fairweather’s front display by Kathy B., director of hospitality. Featured art:  “Dune Grass” plein air painting by Bev Drew Kindley, “Ocean” original oil on board by Melissa Jander, “Beach Finds” watercolor/ mixed media by Rosemary Klein,  raku pottery by Emily Miller, “Waves” original oil on linen by Ron Nicolaides, jewelry by Mary Boitta and calligraphy by Penelope Culberson.

Melissa Jander

“Sense of Place” oil painting artist

 

 

Christine Trexel

“Sense of Place”  paper craft artist

 

Watercolor on yupo artist Carolyn Macpherson

Seaside Painting LIVE ™ demonstration

Barbara Martin

“Sense of Place” mixed media artist


Jan Rimerman

“Sense of Place” mixed media artist

Amy Osborne

“Sense of Place” watercolor artist

 

Before the Fairweather show opening, talented and inventive regional artists arrived to pose together at the opening reception for “Sense of Place”.  Left to right: Barbara Martin, curator Denise Fairweather, Amy Osborne, Carolyn Macpherson, Jan Rimerman, Christine Trexel and Melissa Jander.

 

 

 

 

 

“Sense of Place” through June 30

Fairweather House and Gallery

www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

With appreciation to Art Walk photographer Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

 

Grace note received from artist Bev Drew Kindley:

“Thanks for choosing some of my paintings for the Sense Of Place show!     I’ll be painting in Cannon Beach June 20–24 and during the PleinAir and More event that weekend, hoping for good weather.”

 

Artist Carolyn Macpherson has offered several Painting Seaside LIVE ™ episodes at Fairweather’s!

 

Last month, the artist explained why color was added,  why the composition changed and so on.  Patrons watched and realized how much effort goes into one painting and how unique the process really is.

For more info about the artist, go to  www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com   …artists/ …Carolyn Macpherson

 

Q: What is a Painting Seaside LIVE ™ episode, you ask?

A: Fariweather House and Gallery has had the privilege to offer do painting demonstrations, titled Painting Seaside LIVE ™ during the Seaside First Saturday Art Walks. Resident artists have been very generous, as it is a compliment to be asked, and they always immediately respond with an enthusiastic, “yes” when asked to perform a painting episode.

 

“Painting is a passion, and the Painting Seaside LIVE ™ process gives the artists the chance to share this passion with the onlookers. Artists enjoy the opportunity being authentic in what they are experiencing. Surely, the LIVE episodes, sponsored by Fairweather House and Gallery, are, truly, one of the ways that artists “live the process” and help patrons grow to appreciate art, as well.” D. Fairweather, gallerist.

To read more about the gallery and view the artist’s work , please go to  http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Sunset at Tillamook Head” watercolor by Emily Milller

“A stormy winter sunset over Tillamook Head as seen from Seaside beach, on the northern Oregon coast. Brilliant oranges and pinks lit up the clouds and reflected in the waves for just a few minutes between rain showers. A low fog hanging over the headland created separation between the layers of trees. I set up to paint on a log near the high tide line, stopping only when the light faded and my paper was too wet to continue!”

 

 

“I have spent my life on the coast, and all my artwork has its roots in my love of the sea. I see the coast as a border between the known and unknown, amid constant cycles of change.” –Emily Miller

 

“Needles and the Haystack” watercolor by Emily Miller

“Two narrow sea stacks known as “The Needles” at Cannon Beach, next to Oregon’s iconic Haystack Rock. This was painted on a beautiful summer day, sitting on the steps leading down to the beach. The Needles are some of my favorite sea stacks on the Oregon coast!”

 

“Kites at Cannon Beach” watercolor by Emily Miller

“Colorful kites on a summer afternoon fly over Haystack Rock at Cannon Beach, on the northern Oregon coast.”

 

“Sea Stacks at Siletz Bay” watercolor by Emily Miller

“Wind-swept trees grow on a series of sea stacks known as “Four Brothers” in Siletz Bay, outside Lincoln City on Oregon’s central coast. The water was calm and shallow on this summer morning, when I set up in the warm sand to paint with a friend.”

 

 

“Cape Meares Lighthouse” watercolor by Emily Miller

“The tiny Cape Meares lighthouse is the smallest lighthouse in Oregon, but worked as a beacon visible for 21 miles out to sea from 1890 to 1963. Its unique octagonal tower sits on a high cliff on the northern Oregon coast near Tillamook. The lighthouse is accessible down a shady, forested path, with the tower and red lens framed by mossy trees.”

 

“Exploring the Oregon coast with my painting kit and camera is one of my greatest joys. Every visit creates a stronger bond with my favorite beaches and trails, beautiful in all weathers and seasons.” –Emily Miller

 

Q:  What are sea stacks, you ask?

A:  Sea stacks are blocks of erosion-resistant rock isolated from the land by sea. Sea stacks begin as part of a headland or sea cliff. Relentless pounding by waves erodes the softer, weaker parts of a rock first leaving harder, more resistant rock behind.

The Oregon coastline naturally has areas of rocky headlands alternating with sandy coves due to variation in the local rock types. As waves approach the shore, they are refracted nearly parallel to shore so that wave energy is concentrated on headlands. Rocky cliffs develop on the headlands and sand is deposited in the bays, forming beaches.

Sea stacks sit like giants half-submerged in the ocean, not far from shore. As if they were massive, mythological sentinels set with the mission to guard Oregon’s coast. They are indeed ancient – millions and millions of years old.   www.nature.nps.gov/geology

 

For more info, go to  www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com