Just in. Image titled: We Have Lift Off by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images. Location: Sunset Beach, Oregon. Date: April 2017. Proceeds in support of NCLC.
Please visit NCLCtrust.org to read more about North Coast Land Conservancy.

See more info about Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images and other exhibits at http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com /…artists /…Neal Maine …/blog.

Q: Where is Sunset Beach, you ask?

A: Sunset Beach is a state park in Clatsop County, Oregon. The park comprises 120 acres along the Pacific Ocean on the Clatsop Plains and is located between Gearhart and Warrenton, Oregon.

For more info please go to:
Sunset Beach State Recreation Site – Oregon State Parks and …
oregonstateparks.org/index.cfm?do=parkPage.dsp_parkPage&parkId=182
Sunset Beach State Recreation Site comes with a very famous past. The park marks the west trailhead of the historic Fort-to-Sea Trail

The osprey is a very unique raptor, standing out not only for its beauty but also for its choice of prey.
7 fun facts about ospreys:

1. The osprey is the only hawk species in North America that eats almost exclusively live fish.

2. The raptor can dive as deep as three feet into the water for fish, but prefers to hunt in shallower areas.

3. This species is also known as the river hawk, fish hawk or sea hawk. But don’t confuse it with the Seahawk, the mascot of the Seattle-based football team. First, there is no such thing as a “seahawk” (one word). Second, the team actually uses an augur hawk as its mascot, a species native to Africa. The osprey may be known as a sea hawk, but it has no connection to football.

4. The osprey is the second most widely distributed raptor species, after the peregrine falcon, and can be found on every continent except Antarctica.

5. All of the ospreys around the world are part of a single species, with the exception of the eastern osprey which is native to Australia.

6. The osprey species is at least 11 million years old and is so well adapted to fishing that it has evolved unique characteristics that set it apart from other raptor species. These include nostrils that can be closed during dives, and an outer toe that can be angled backwards to better grasp fish. The species is so unique, it is listed in its own genus (Pandion) and family (Pandionidae).

7. Ospreys can live to be 15-20 years old. The oldest known osprey was just over 25 years old. During that long lifetime, the migratory birds can rack up over 160,000 miles of travel. In fact, in 2008 an osprey being tracked by researchers flew an amazing 2,700 miles in just 13 days, traveling from Massachusetts to French Guiana, South America!

For more info about ospreys go to:
Osprey, Life History, All About Birds – Cornell Lab of Ornithology
https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Osprey/lifehistory


THE OSPREY IS BEING CONSIDERED TO BECOME THE STATE BIRD OF OREGON.

Oregon Senate chooses osprey over western … – Statesman Journal
http://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/…/oregon…osprey…state-bird…/100124452/
Apr 7, 2017

 

Seaside Osprey Cam youtube.com

 

Seaside Osprey Nest located in Broadway Park in Seaside, Oregon

 

 

 

The Seaside Osprey nest cam is up and running, in exceptional HD quality! HUGE thanks to Sunset Empire Park and Recreation District for hosting the camera, and installing fiber optic cable so the cam can be so clear!

 

Necanicum Watershed Council

 

Named the “state animal” in 1969, the American beaver builds the dams and wetlands that serve as habitat for Oregon salmon, steelhead, birds, amphibians and insects. Beavers are nature’s hydrologists, “Beaver Tales: A Celebration of Beaver Art” curator Sara Vickerman … click of the following link to read the entire front page article by Eve Marz, reporter for the Seaside Signal …

Source: From near extinction to a place in art

For more info the participating Fairweather  artists, please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com …artists … Paul Brent, Mike Brown, Susan Curington, Agnes Field, Jo Pomeroy Crockett, Neal Maine and Denise Joy McFadden.

Save the date and time.

BEAVER TALES, a celebration of art.

May 6th, 5-7:pm in the historic Gilbert District Block of downtown Seaside

For more info about the Art Walk, please go to http://www.facebook.com/SeasideFirstSaturdayArtWalk

SAVE THE DATE AND TIME!

http://www.NCLCtrust.org
Listening to the Land: Dam, Beaver! Dam!
Wednesday, April 19
6 to 8 pm
Seaside Public Library

And, too, a lot more info about Beavers and all the good things they do for us:

Dr. Stephen Ramsey, from the OSU Center for Genome Research & Biocomputing (the Center has recently announced the completion of its sequencing of the beaver genome, so this is very well timed – http://registerguard.com/rg/news/local/35185225-75/oregon-state-university-researchers-find-benny-the-beaver-fills-big-genes.html.csp)

Frances Backhouse will offer a talk based on her research and writing that appeared in her award-winning book, Once They Were Hats: In Search of the Mighty Beaver. At Beach Books on May 6th at 1:pm. http://www.backhouse.ca/books/once-they-were-hats-in-search-of-the-mighty-beaver/.

The Wetlands Conservancy has posted information on the Beaver Tales art project. The link is below. Feel free to share it with your friends and contacts.
http://wetlandsconservancy.org/stewardship/beaver-tales

http://wetlandsconservancy.org/stewardship/beaver-tales/beaver-inspiration

https://northernwoodlands.org/discoveries/pathways-to-ponds

Here’s a link to an excellent short video, with great aerial depiction of the changes that beaver dams bring to meadows . . .
http://www.animalplanet.com/tv-shows/other/videos/fooled-by-nature-beaver-dams

And for more inspiration, a video of beaver swimming on U-Tube. .https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9cwu_Wu5ONI

CBC News Posted: Apr 02, 2017Great parenting: animals that care for their young in ‘amazing’ ways BEAVERS…

Some parents are a little more dedicated than others, according to wildlife expert Frank Ritcey. Ritcey says beavers take a more paws-on approach to raising their young. They give birth inside their lodges, where kits will stay until they’re old enough to start eating solid food.

“Once they’re old enough to venture forth, they travel about with the parent to learn how to become a beaver. [Kits] follow the adult around and mimic the adults actions,” said Ritcey.

“It’s so cute to watch — but it’s also very important as the young have to learn a whole set of skills like using the right trees to fall and how to build dams and lodges, and in general — how to be as busy as a beaver should be.”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_23vuRU2Ews

 

While nothing can compare to the real beaver it is great to see more comprehensive research about the positive impacts of beaver dams.

http://www.ktvz.com/…/osu-cascades-students-scien…/394113930

 

 

 

Roseway by Gretha Lindwood,  pastel

“Thus in art, does nature work through the will of a man filled with the beauty of her first works,” wrote the 19th-century poet Ralph Waldo Emerson. And so it does. Emerson’s simple musing captures the spirit of  painters, who sing nature’s praises with their brushes and palette knives.

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Please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com …artists… Gretha Lindwood for more about the artist.

 

“The use of vibrant color and strong design are hallmarks of my work which I developed during my career as an illustrator and graphic designer. As a lifelong resident of the Pacific Northwest, I cherish our unique landscapes honed by water and time and delight in capturing their beauty in the lush colors of pastels or oils to share with the viewer.” —Gretha Lindwood, featured artist for BLOOM, an exhibition at Fairweather’s throughout April, 2017.

 

 

Bev Drew Kindley “Cyclamen

Cyclamen by Bev Drew Kindley.  Please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com …artists …Bev Drew Kindley for more info

best bev painting

And, too, on April 1st, Bev Drew Kindley offered a Painting Seaside LIVE ™ event at the opening of BLOOM, an exhibition throughout April at Fairweather’s.

In addition, the artist, Bev Drew Kindley, with dual degrees in art and philosophy, offered a lecture of being in the moment while painting nature  during the opening reception of BLOOM at Fairweather’s on April 1st.

  “Thanks, Denise, I am proud to be part of your artistically designed BLOOM show and enjoy seeing how you fit all our paintings in among the other unique treasures.      BLOOM to me is about the time after this year’s dark  season when plants reawaken and we feel like celebrating each hopeful victory–the first faint coloring of new leaves and branches, (like my painting “Awakening Wetlands “), the first crocus, daffodils, tulips and wildflowers for  “The Joy of Spring “.        Sometimes we need a bouquet of flowers to keep our spirits up–or a pot of bright cyclamen –or photos of flowers to remind us there is more to come. Soon the steady rhythm of blooming begins, each flower in its own time, and then on to fields of lavender, crimson clover and more!  Flowers do make us happy!”

 

 

Quote in original calligraphy by artist Penelope Culbertson.  Please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com …artists …Penelope Culbertson for more info

Bouquet by Gretha Lindwood

Please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com …artists …Gretha Lindwood for more info

gretha lecturing

Artist Gretha Lindwood lectured about the art of flowers during the opening reception of BLOOM, at  Fairweather’s on April 1st.  In the background on display are original pastels by the artist.  And, too, note the wardrobe selection chosen by the artist to complement her art!

 

In addition, large encaustic (painting with beeswax)  portrait by artist Rebecca Gore. Please visit https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/…/a-decade-of-emerging-artist-bac… Jan 7, 2017 – For more information about each of Fairweather’s emerging artists please the links following their individual … Rebecca Gore, emerging artist.

In the background and in the far left is an original oil, “Garden Party” by artist Melissa Jander.  For more info go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com  …artists… Melissa Jander .

better Susan

Artist Susan Curington offered a Painting Seaside LIVE ™ episode during the opening reception of BLOOM at Fairweather’s on April 1st, in addition to lecturing about the love of nature and speaking kindly.

Please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com …artists …Susan Curington for more info

The language of flowers…

A team of researchers explored the link between flowers and life satisfaction in a study of participants’ behavioral and emotional responses to seeing flowers, either in a bouquet or in nature. The results show that flowers are a natural and healthful moderator of moods.

“What’s most exciting about this study is that it challenges established scientific beliefs about how people can manage their day-to-day moods in a healthy and natural way,” said Jeannette Haviland-Jones, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology at Rutgers and lead researcher on the study.

Growing flowers, handling flowers, seeing flowers in art have an immediate impact on happiness. All study participants expressed smiles upon being near flowers, demonstrating extraordinary delight and gratitude. The language of flowers have a long-term positive effect on moods.
Flowers and nature make intimate connections. The presence of flowers led to increased contact with family and friends.

“Common sense tells us that flowers make us happy,” said Dr. Haviland-Jones. “Now, science shows that not only do flowers and nature make us happier than we know, they have strong positive effects on our emotional well-being.”

 

And, too, a favorite quote in art by Penelope Culbertson, calligrapher for BLOOM, an exhibition at Fairweather’s through April.

BLOOM grace note received:

“Thank you for inviting me to participate in this fun event in your beautiful gallery. I had a wonderful time visiting with the gallery visitors as I created my pastel painting in a live painting demonstration.” Best regards, Gretha Lindwood, artist

“I’m working on new pieces for June. Thanks for the sweet and supportive card you sent.
It was the nicest card I’ve ever gotten from a gallery!”
Penelope Culbertson

Image titled: Birds of a Feather. The famous Seaside osprey pair!

Image backstory: Flying above their nesting platform. An eagle came too close and the pair moved in tandem to a safer spot. The female, with a band on her right leg, kept the flounder that her mate had delivered. Wildlife action within steps of downtown Seaside! Image from 2016 above Broadway Park on the Neawanna River.

Seaside/ Gearhart nature photographer Neal Maine.

Signed, matted and framed. Proceeds in support of North Coast Land Conservancy/ NCLC.

To view a catalog of Neal Maine’s images, please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com …artists …Neal Maine

Heard from naturalist Neal Maine today.

March 31, 2017. Those that do were performing some light housekeeping on the camera today, as the ospreys were expected before “tax day.” The workers left for a parts run and when they returned the male osprey was on the platform! The female osprey should be arriving “shortly”.

Take a note!
Naturalist Neal Maine will share his latest habitat stories at 6 p.m. at Fairweather’s during the Seaside First Saturday Art Walk on April 1st.

For more info go to https://www.facebook.com/ Seaside First Saturday Art Walk

LIVE camera courtesy of Necanicum Watershed Council and City of Seaside.

https://livestream.com/necanicum/seasideosprey

For more info go to: http://www.necanicumwatershed.org

“Like” https://www.facebook.com/ City of Seaside

Fun Facts:
Unique among North American raptors for its diet of live fish and ability to dive into water to catch them, Ospreys are common sights soaring over shorelines, patrolling waterways, and standing on their huge stick nests, white heads gleaming.

These large, rangy hawks do well around humans and have rebounded in numbers following the ban on the pesticide DDT.

Hunting Ospreys are a picture of concentration, diving with feet outstretched and yellow eyes sighting straight along their talons.

Ospreys are unusual among hawks in possessing a reversible outer toe that allows them to grasp with two toes in front and two behind. Barbed pads on the soles of the birds’ feet help them grip slippery fish. When flying with prey, an Osprey lines up its catch head first for less wind resistance.

Most Ospreys that breed in North America migrate to Central and South America for the winter.

Males and females follow a different migration route. Males overwinter inland and females overwinter along the coast.

Ospreys mate for life.

An Osprey may log more than 160,000 migration miles during its 15-to-20-year lifetime.

For more info go to https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Osprey/lifehistory

Source: Beaver Tales arriving to the historic Gilbert District for an Art Walk! May 6th.

norhtern-harrier

Image titled: Flight Master.

Northern Harrier, photographed on Del Ray Beach, Gearhart, Oregon by Neal Maine/PacificLight Nature Images. March 2017.

Proceeds in support of NCLC, North Coast Land Conservancy.
For more than 30 years, North Coast Land Conservancy has been preserving Oregon’s vital coastal landscapes.
Please visit http://www.nclctrust.org for more information.

Flight Master, latest Neal Maine image, of a Northern Harrier, truly, has a story connection to Ireland.

Neal Moments

On March 4th at Fairweather’s, photographer/ biologist/ naturalist Neal Maine spoke about the local ecology and specifically about his latest image, found within steps from our own back yards, along the coastal edge.

Please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseangallery.com/ tab artists/ Neal Maine to view the catalog of images available from PacificLight Nature Images.

To some extent, experiencing Ireland and the Irish, is being part philosopher.

Irish people “seem to dance to the tune of their muse, and in doing so have preserved for us traditional prose, skills, and art that beach back to the beginning of time and are a tribute to humankind’s unfailing ingenuity.” –Muriel Gahane

 

 

About Northern Harriers.

North America has only one variety, the Northern Harrier, a raptor. Harriers are very distinctive hawks, long-winged and long-tailed, usually seen quartering low over the ground in open country. At close range, the face of our Northern Harrier looks rather like that of an owl; like an owl (and unlike most other hawks) it may rely on its keen hearing to help it locate prey as it courses low over the fields.

Often nests in loose colonies; one male may have two or more mates. In courtship, male flies up and then dives, repeatedly, in a roller-coaster pattern. Nest site is on ground in dense field or salt march or wetlands, sometimes low over shallow water. Nest built mostly by female, with male supplying some material. Nest may be shallow depression lined with grass, or platform of sticks, grass, weeds.

The Northern Harrier is distinctive from a long distance away: a slim, long-tailed hawk gliding low over a marsh or grassland, holding its wings in a V-shape and sporting a white patch at the base of its tail. Up close it has an owlish face that helps it hear mice and voles beneath the vegetation. Each gray-and-white male may mate with several females, which are larger and brown. These unusual raptors have a broad distribution across North America, Ireland and Eurasia.

The hen harrier or northern harrier is a bird of prey. The genus name Circus is derived from Ancient Greek kirkos, meaning “circle”, referring to a bird of prey named for its circling flight.  For more info please visit www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/northern-harrier

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Q: Are there harriers in Ireland, as well,  you ask?

A: Yes, in Ireland, Northern Harriers, previously called Hen-Harriers, were persecuted almost to extinction in the nineteenth century, but spread due to the planting of forestry plantations which offered suitable habitat and safety while the trees were still young. Overgrazing of uplands and the loss of semi-natural habitats are threats to the harrier across its range. In Ireland, while there is less anxiety about persecution, the condition of the harriers’ upland breeding grounds is the main concern.

Hen harriers in Ireland are specially protected under the Wildlife (NI) Order 1985
There are designated SPAs for Hen Harriers in Northern Ireland
Forest Service, in conjunction with the Northern Ireland Raptor Study Group and RSPB, are developing procedures designed to prevent disturbance and destruction of nests in forests under their control

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Fun Facts:

The Northern Harrier is also called Hen Harrier and Marsh Hawk.
The silvery grey male Northern Harrier has been nicknamed the Grey Ghost.
Northern Harriers are the only hawk-like bird known to practice polygyny – one male mates with several females.
The Northern Harrier is capable of considerable, sustained, horizontal speed in pursuit of prey. Speeds of 38 mph have been reported
The common name, Harrier, is from the Old English word “herigan” which means to harass or plunder.
Unusual among hawks, Northern Harriers use their sense of hearing to help locate prey. They have an owl-like facial disk to help with directional hearing and soft feathers for a quieter flight.
A group of harriers is called a “swarm” and a “harassment” of harriers.

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Please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com for more information about read more about our doing good works, our  vision and our mission statement, and read more about our regional artists who show original art in our gallery.

Celebrating 11 years of service to our community.  

We are committed to be a strong and vibrant arts voice in our area.