“Ostrea” by Emily Miller.

A  large-scale sculpture inspired by the gnarled shells of oysters, the fluted ruffles of nudibranchs, and other beautiful and mysterious sea creatures. Sculpted with outdoor architectural stoneware ceramics. Weather-safe and water-tight. Recommended to protect from freezing. Signed by the artist.

 

 

But wait, there’s more.  See, there’s three! 

Ostrea I, Ostrea II and Ostrea III.

20″ to 30″ wide, each

 

Q: What is the meaning of the word, ostrea, you ask?

A: “Ostrea” is the Latin name / classification for oysters and the title of a set of large-scale sculptures I created, inspired by the gnarled shells of oysters, the fluted ruffles of nudibranchs, and other beautiful and mysterious sea creatures. The tactile contrast of smooth and rough surfaces is an ongoing theme in my artwork. I use these contrasts to explore ideas of inner and outer spaces, playful discovery, and delight in the unknown. Fun fact about the Ostrea: I like the rough, hidden underside as much as the top glazed surface! -Emily  Miller

 

 

Order from Chaos by Emily Miller

In addition, the 2018 rope basket project with a new palette of Pacific Ocean rope collected from Oregon, wilder and more eroded, weathered by months or years at sea. Cleaned, unraveled, and restitched, the colorful rope became a collection of unique baskets accented with local stones and other beach treasures.

Reclaimed fishing rope, 2018/ Mint Green basket

4.5″ high x 6″ diameter

Green and white fishing rope gathered from the Oregon coast and accented with a local beach stone.

“It begins with days spent hauling rope from the tide line in all weathers, connecting and collecting from other beach clean-up crews. A quick soak in water to loosen the sand, mud, and surface grime, then the long, meditative process of untangling knotted nests into their separate lengths. Each length slowly unwound by hand into its three segments, a second longer soak and scrub in hot soapy water, and a final rinse where the water runs clean. “Emily Miller

 

Fun fact:  Karynn Kozij, introduced as the 2017 Fairweather emerging artist with her Octopus ocean debris art, gifted Emily her recent beach debris.

 

Read what Eve Marx wrote about Karynn’s art: View from the Porch: Art from the ‘Octopus’s Garden’

Artist transforms marine debris/Date: 2017-08-18 Seaside Signal

Story The Daily Astorian | Signal News
http://www.dailyastorian.com/SS/news

The Daily Astorian | Signal News

http://www.dailyastorian.com/SS/news

 

 

Photo credit: Katie Frankowicz/ The Daily Astorian

Unlike plastic bottles or larger items, microplastics can be difficult to recycle and plague Clatsop County beachesAnd, so,  too, Neal Maine, Seaside naturalist, “re-gifted”  ocean debris to Emily Miller, artist. 

 

 

 

 

Your journey has uncovered the trouble the oceans are in, and drawn something beautiful from that trouble. It is a model for all of us, who each face our own perplexing tangle of strands and nets that we call “life.”   –M. Miller

 

 

“I have spent my life on the coast, and all my artwork has its roots in my love of the sea. I see the coast as a border between the known and unknown, amid constant cycles of change. My work explores these transition environments as a marker of our place within the larger network of natural systems. I believe that joyful exploration of the unknown creates a positive, active environment that enriches our relationships with ourselves, each other, and our world.  I am a lifelong artist with a passion for materials.”  —Emily Miller

c. Emily Miller

 

Image title:  “Stranger in town.”

Baltimore Oriole

Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images

 Photographed in Seaside, Oregon (very rare to see a Baltimore Oriole west of the Rocky Mountains)!

Proceeds in support of NCLC/ North Coast Land Conservancy

To view a catalog of  images, please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Neal Maine

 

Q: Why is it a rare sighting to find a Baltimore Oriole in Seaside, Oregon, you ask?

A:  Most commonly sighted in central North America—including Kansas, Nebraska, Saskatchewan, and Alberta.  On a rare occasion, a straggler crosses the Rocky Mountains to survive the winter in the upper coastal area of the United States!   

 

Baltimore Orioles usually  winter  in Central America, where they occupy open woodlands, gardens, and shade-grown coffee and cacao plantations.  On their breeding grounds in eastern and east-central North America, you’ll most often find Baltimore Orioles high in leafy deciduous trees, but not in deep forests; they prefer open woodland, forest edge, river banks, and small groves of trees. They also forage for insects and fruits in brush and shrubbery. Baltimore Orioles have adapted well to human settlement and often feed and nest in parks, orchards, and backyards. They frequently visit flowering trees and vines in search of fruit and nectar.  –www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/baltimore-oriole

 

Baltimore Oriole map (first sighting reports 2018).

 

 

 

“Sunflowers with Blue”  by Nick Brakel.

 

“Sunflowers II” by Nick Brakel.

Close up detail of  gouache, crayon and watercolor. 

 

Q: What is gouache painting, you ask?

A: Gouache, a painting technique in which an opaque white pigment is added to watercolors to produce opacity. In gouache painting the color lies on the surface of the paper, forming a continuous layer. A gouache is characterized by a directly reflecting brilliance. A painting technique of great antiquity, gouache was used by the Egyptians.  It possesses unique material qualities that make it unlike any other type of paint. One of the easiest mediums to work with, it is also considered by many painters to be the most complicated to master. Contemporary painters use gouache alone or in combination with watercolor and other mediums. –Encyclopedia Britannica

 

 

Nick Brakel Artist Statement

 

Early on in my painting career, I was immersed in landscape painting.  I was learning all I could about Van Gogh, Edvard Munch, and other expressionist painters, while traversing up and down the shores of Lake Superior with paints and canvases.  I spent as much time as I could out in nature painting. 

I have been fortunate to show work at Fairweather House and Gallery for 5 years now.  Much of that work delved into my work as a printmaker.  After finishing my BFA from the University of Wisconsin Superior, I was in the PAN Emerging Printmakers Residency and an intern at Atelier Meridian Printmaking Studio in Portland for several years. 

 

I learned a lot, and primarily focused on collagraphs, linocuts and monotypes while there.  The subject matter was often still nature based, but more focused on the creatures inhabiting the natural world with collagraphs of birds, swirling linocuts of ocean creatures, often with an emphasis on climate change’s possible effect on these creatures.

 

 

 

Artist Statement 2018

 

“My life had a big change recently.  I received a serious concussion while working in June 2016.  This created many visual difficulties for me, and I had to undergo extensive vision therapy to train my eyes how to draw again. 

When faced with a challenge of this magnitude, I returned to my painting roots, and once again began landscape painting.  First drawing gesture drawings, and improving and improving until I was eventually painting mixed media watercolor paintings of the land around me.  I would utilize watercolor crayons, watercolor, gouache and pencil in forming these landscape paintings and floral still life.  This has proven to be a great release and is something that I intend to continue for the near future.” —Nick Brakel

 

 

“Nick Brakel enthusiastically re-imagined his art practice recently, initiating art work using a combination of gouache, crayon and watercolor. Fairweather House and Gallery has been honored to represent Nick Brakel throughout his art journey . ” D. Fairweather, gallerist

 

 

 

 

 

Q: Where in the world is Mt. Hood, you ask?

A:   Mount Hood is the highest peak (11,239 feet) in Oregon and the fourth highest peak in the Cascade Range, 45 miles east-southeast of Portland. For more info. go to  http://www.britannica.com/place/Mount-Hood

 

Q:  Where in the world is Sauvie Island, you ask?

A:  It is the largest island in the Columbia River and one of the largest islands in the U.S. Located at the junction of the Columbia River to the east, Willamette River to the south and Multnomah Channel to the west, the island’s northern half is a wildlife refuge and the southern half is predominantly rural
farmland with…  For more info. go to:   sauvieisland.org/
Q: Where in the world is Mt. St. Helens,  you ask?
A:  Mount St. Helens, located in southwestern Washington about 50 miles northeast of Portland, Oregon, is one of several lofty volcanic peaks that dominate the Cascade Range of the Pacific Northwest. Mount St. Helens erupted on May 18, 1980. The volcano, located in southwestern Washington, used to be a beautiful symmetrical cone about 9,600 feet  above sea level. The eruption, which removed the upper 1,300 feet of the summit, left a horseshoe-shaped crater and a …  For more info. go to: www.mountsthelens.com/history

 

 

 

 

 

To read more about the artist, please visit:

Nick Brakel | https://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com
https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/tag/nick-brakel/
The GUYS TAKE OVER Art Walk. September 7, 2013. The lineup: guys who matter. the guys take over. Marc Ward, activist/scientist; Michael Wing, emerging artist; Nick Brakel, artist/print maker; Jan Shield, art professor; Paul Brent, nationally recognized artist, with Neal Maine, NW naturalist/photographer…

Seaside’s First Saturday Art Walk – Seaside Oregon
https://www.seasideor.com/event/seasides-first-saturday-art-walk-2-2017-08-05/
Aug 5, 2017 – FINDINGS, will be the 11th annual emerging artist exhibition in the gallery and will include former emerging artists Britney Drumheller, Nick Brakel, Linda Trexler, Ashley Howarth, Diane Copenhaver, Ashley Howarth, Gayle H. Seely, Kristin Qian and Rebecca Gore. Seaside nature photographer, ecologist …

 

“A Pelican Insists There Still is a Heart” by Nick Brakel.

Seaside Art Walk celebrates history as well as creativity – Seaside …
http://www.dailyastorian.com/SS/…/seaside-art-walk-celebrates-history-as-well-as-creativity
Sep 5, 2014 – A pelican that insists there still is a heart, created by Nick Brakel will be on display at Fairweather House  during the First Saturday Art Walk in Seaside Sept. 6. The Seaside First Saturday Art Walk Sept. 6 completes its 10th anniversary and continues its celebration of the 100th anniversary of the …

 

 

Artists Jan Shield, Nick Brakel, Bev Drew Kindley, Paul Brent and Rosemary Klein. 2014

Nick Brakel, artist, spoke during the opening reception for Observing Botany at the Fairweather House and Gallery for the April Seaside First Saturday Art Walk.

 

 


“Keep a Tree in your Heart.” Artist Diane Copenhaver.

“Keep a Green Tree in Your Heart and Perhaps a Singing Bird will come.” –Chinese Proverb/ art  inspiration

 

 

For more info about the artist,  please visit https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/category/artists/diane-copenhaver/

 

“Shaped by Nature.”
Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images.
Great Blue Heron.

West Lake/ Highway 101 near Warrenton.

 

“Feather Delight.”

Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images.

Great Blue Heron.

Proceeds from PacificLight Images/ Neal Maine are  given back in support of North Coast Land Conservancy/ NCLC.

For more images and info, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com … artists/  …Neal Maine

 

Calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson.

For more info about the artist, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com …/ artists/ … Penelope Culbertson

 

Cut work stained glass hanging sculpture by Lori Bedard.

 

 

Save the date and time.

April 7, 5-7:pm

Seaside First Saturday Art Walk

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Fairweather House and Gallery offers an exploration between the study of botany and fine art.

The opening reception for Observing Botany, the gallery’s April exhibition, presents original artworks in watercolor, graphite, colored pencil and pen & ink and the exploration of the many styles, forms and approaches unique to botanical illustration.

Regional artists will be on hand at the exhibit to answer questions, provide interesting facts or anecdotes about Observing Botany.

Featured April artists are Nick Brakel, Lori Bedard, Diane Copenhaver, Penelope Culbertson , JoAnn Pari-Mueller, among others.

In addition, the gallery introduces new artist, Patti Isaacs, who paints on silk.

Seaside/Gearhart naturalist and biologist, Neal Maine, will speak about the ecology of the coastal habitat at 6: pm. Artist Carolyn Macpherson will offer a Seaside Painting LIVE ™ episode. Free fused glass art demonstration by Lori Bedard.

 “Nature is beauty sublime. To use the botanical as a subject for art, invokes memories of that beauty and how it inspires each of us. As an artist, if we incite that reaction with each view; we were successful.” —Lori 

LIVE music by Shirley 88.

For more about the Art Walk, please go to:

http://www.facebook.com/ Seaside First Saturday Art Walk.

 

 

 

Gayle H. Seely, artist,  spoke about her art at the Fresh Greens Opening reception.

 

Opening reception hostesses,  Denise, Joan and Kemy Kay,  with arms full of  fresh-cut Bells of Ireland.

“Lively, bright, fresh and spontaneous.”Gayle H. Seely


FRESH GREENS, Fairweather March exhibition, opening reception trays.

“Recent, original, stimulating, cool and refreshing.”  —Gayle H. Seely

 

 

Close up of Gayle H. Seely’s seed pearl beaded box.

“Green: the color associated with nature.” — Gayle

Chasing the Light by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Nature Images.

“Green. Brings to mind the  chosen to sooth the soul.”-Gayle H. Seely

Gayle H.  Seely showing the http://www.coastweekend.com article written about her art.

“Green:  Brings to mind the special place for art to please the eye.”  –Gayle H. Seely

 

 

Gallery patrons listen to Neal Maine’s ecology lecture, at Fairweather’s FRESH GREENS opening reception.

“Fresh: flourishing, active and new.”  Gayle H. Seely

 

“Lately, I’ve been fascinated by the idea of objects as functional, not in how they hold liquid or whatever, but in how they hold history.” Tim Christensen, potter

“There are very few human beings who receive the truth, complete and staggering, by instant illumination. Most of them acquire it fragment by fragment, on a small scale, by successive developments, cellular, like a laborious mosaic.” Anaiis Nin

“The voyage of discovery is not in seeking new landscapes but in having new eyes.” Marcel Proust

“He paints like a man going over the top of a hill, singing.” THE ART SPIRIT Robert Henri

 

“Have fun, enjoy your creativity, and surround yourself with beauty.” Gayle H. Seely

 

“Nature’s Linkage”” by Neal Maine, PacificLight Images.

Swallowtail Larva on Coast Angelica. 

Neawanna Point. 

Seaside, Oregon.

Please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Neal Maine for a complete catalog of exclusive  images. Proceeds in support of NCLC.

 

March Exhibiton

Fresh Greens

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside, Oregon

Featuring resident artists Karen E. Lewis, Fred Lukens, Michael Muldoon, Carolyn Macpherson, Richard Newman, Mike Mason and Gayle H. Seely.

Welcoming artist Judy Horning Shaw.

Seaside/Gearhart naturalist, wildlife photographer and biologist, Neal Maine, spoke about the ecology of the local habitat at the opening reception of FRESH GREENS on March 3, 2018 at Fairweather’s.

 

Image titled: Pacific Forces.

Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images.

January 18, 2018.

Tillamook Rock Lighthouse encounters the Pacific Ocean, the largest ocean in the world, during unusually high seas at

12: o’clock, high noon.

Seaside, Oregon.

 Neal Maine, photographer, biologist, retired educator, shares the back story perspective:

The Tillamook Rock Lighthouse, at 133′ high,  encounters a wave, calculated  at 196′ high, during a winter storm on January 20, 2018.

Neal Maine captured the photograph from Ecola Point,  approx. one  and 1/2 miles  away.

 

Ecola Point, elevation 190 feet, is part of Ecola State Park, which extends north over Tillamook Head, south of Seaside and north of Cannon Beach in Oregon. William Clark, one of the leaders of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, applied the name “Ekoli” to what is now Ecola Creek. “Ehkoli” is a Chinook Native American word for whale.

 

 

 

Tillamook Rock Lighthouse, Seaside, Oregon, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

 

 

 

One mile west of Tillamook Head, a headland located between Seaside and Cannon Beach, Oregon,  Tillamook Rock Lighthouse rises from the ocean.

An intriguing and powerful testament of the will and determination of the human spirit, the story of Tillamook Rock Lighthouse began in 1878 when Congress appropriated funds for a lighthouse to mark this section of the Oregon Coast. Originally, it was hoped that a lighthouse could be built at Tillamook Head, a 1,000-foot-high headland twenty miles south of the Columbia River, however, the top of the headland was often shrouded in fog, and as its sheer face offered no acceptable alternative, Tillamook Rock was considered instead.

The Tillamook Rock Lighthouse, “Terrible Tilly,” shone her light for seventy-seven years before being replaced by a red whistle buoy, anchored one mile seaward of the rock.

On September 1, 1957, Keeper Oswald Allick, who had served twenty years at the station, turned off the light, and penned the following final entry in the logbook, which today is on display at the Columbia River Maritime Museum in Astoria, Oregon:

“Farewell, Tillamook Rock Light Station. An era has ended. With this final entry, and not without sentiment, I return thee to the elements. You, one of the most notorious and yet fascinating of the sea-swept sentinels in the world; long the friend of the tempest-tossed mariner. Through howling gale, thick fog and driving rain your beacon has been a star of hope and your foghorn a voice of encouragement. May the elements of nature be kind to you. For 77 years you have beamed your light across desolate acres of ocean. Keepers have come and gone; men lived and died; but you were faithful to the end. May your sunset years be good years. Your purpose is now only a symbol, but the lives you have saved and the service you have rendered are worthy of the highest respect. A protector of life and property to all, may old-timers, newcomers and travelers along the way pause from the shore in memory of your humanitarian role.” 

High Surf Advisory- National Weather Service Watch Warning

U.S. Dept. of Commerce NOAA National Weather Service/ Seaside braced itself Thursday, Jan. 18, as the National Weather Service warned of dangerous high surf through the day.

 

“In cycles older than time, forces deep within the earth push apart tectonic plates, creating and expanding the oceans whose waters are pushed and pulled by the sun and moon, cooled and heated and calmed and stirred to fury by the skies. Ocean collides with continent, shattering the shore into a thousand facets: bare rock monoliths, vast expanses of sand, saltwater pools that drown, then drain, then drown, then drain.” –Neal Maine

 

Image titled: Pacific Forces II.

Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images.

January 18, 2018.

Tillamook Rock Lighthouse encounters  the Pacific Ocean.

Seaside, Oregon

In this image, the wave is calculated at 183′ high.

 

For more images by Neal Maine, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Neal Maine

“Images are presented as they were photographed. Slight adjustment by cropping, lightening or darkening may have been used, but the photo subject is presented as recorded in the Oregon coastal landscapes.”  –Neal Maine

A Certificate of Authenticity is provided with each copyrighted and signed image. Available exclusively at Fairweather’s.

Proceeds to support North Coast Land Conservancy/  NCLC.

Pacific Forces II by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images is available in black and white, as well.