Wood Tulip with Copper Stem $75. with Gift Box by NW artist Mike Brown.

Each flower has 12 staves with 3 accent veneers in between each stave.

Creating a Bouquet of Flowers

Pieces of flowers are cut and ready to be glued.

The flowers are assembled and ready for turning.

Flower petals are traced onto the turned piece.

 

Now each petal is cut using a Scroll Saw.

 

The flowers once the petals have been cut. The foreground also shows the before and after of a flower bud.

Now on to finishing. The flowers, buds, and pistils have had sanding sealer applied.

 

While drying this flower was “Bee Approved” and is now ready for waxing.

To finish the flowers each flower is rubbed with steel wool and three coats of wax are applied.

And so, as we approach the outdoor tulip blooming season, we are sharing our curated collection of wood tulips by crafted by Fairweather’s master wood turner Mike Brown. 

Select a wood tulip and have it shipped freight free.

To purchase contact us on messenger on FB or email fairweatherhouseandgarden@gmail.com

And, too please visit us @  http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway, Seaside Oregon

As we continue following the Oregon state’s stay at home order, the gallery doors will remain shut until further notice. Our staff remains committed to assisting you with your needs during this time via e-mail and through our social media platform.
Here is how we can help…

… with a “doing good works” promise.

A wood tulip selected by April 22 (Earth Day 2020) will have a tree planted by May 1, 2020. 

 

“This grand show is eternal. It is always sunrise somewhere; the dew is never all dried at once; a shower is forever falling; vapor ever rising. Eternal sunrise, eternal sunset, eternal dawn and gloaming, on seas and continents and islands, each in its turn, as the round earth rolls.”
– John of the Mountains: The Unpublished Journals of John Muir, (1938), page 438.

Q; Who was John Muir, you ask?

A: John Muir was an influential Scottish-American naturalist, author, environmental philosopher, glaciologist, and early advocate for the preservation of wilderness in the United States of America. John Muir was perhaps this country’s most famous and influential naturalist and conservationist. He taught the people of his time and ours the importance of experiencing and protecting our natural heritage.

John Muir was  founder of The Sierra Club and is called the father of the National Parks in the United States.

Read more at: https://vault.sierraclub.org/john_muir_exhibit/life/muir_biography.aspx

 

Read more about a connection with Earth Day, John Muir and Fairweather’s…

Seaside Signal April 27, 2011
by Rosemary Dellinger, editor

Seaside Conversation for Earth Day with Denise Fairweather

fairweatherhouseandgallery.com › Inspirations › seasideearth
Denise Fairweather considers herself a steward of the land and is passionate … “the land and being of Irish decent, I would have liked to have known John Muir.”

 

Work in progress by Jackie Leloff

“Yes, I’ve been painting a little  in my free time. I am a little anxious about how my daughter’s senior year is going to end up.   Hope to see you and your gallery soon. Whatever the outcome we will all manage. I remain hopeful that things will return to normal soon. Take care.”  Jackie Leloff

Jackie Leloff has a nursing background.  Some of the fundamental values that drive art — compassion, humanity, empathy, creativity and expression — are the very same values that influence nursing. The creation of art is a wonderful vehicle for nurses, whether the goal is to unwind, replenish the soul or share the nursing experience with the world

 

 

“There is a certain spirit that is inherent in the arts.  There is a tenacity, a sort of can-do attitude that represents the best of creating, thinking and doing.  There is a certain fearlessness in not being dismayed by events that are out of control. Indeed, artists have a unique sensitivity in the ability to pivot and meet needs that enlighten and inform.”  D. Fairweather, gallerist

 

“Thanks for the opportunity to share what I’ve been working on. Here are some of my latest paintings.”  Melisaa Jander

 

Art during “shelter-in-studio by Melissa Jander

 

“Memories of Puebla” 16×20 oil on linen.

 

“Puebla is the location of one of the battles of independence for Mexico. “Cinco de Mayo” is the celebration the country chose as the festival, although it happened over a long period of time. Our family had the privilege to be in the town of Puebla on Cinco de Mayo and enjoy the parade and cultural festivities. Wishing everyone good health and creativity during these unprecedented times.”  Melissa Jander

 

 

“Also, my new studio is finished! I paint upstairs.  Downstairs is a woodworking shop for my spouse. This a dream come true and will be a wonderful place to create.”  Melissa Jander, artist working from home on an island in the San Juan/ WA

 

Melissa Jander began her studies in the field of technical drawing and architecture, later adding a Bachelor of Arts in Foreign Language and Literature from Washington State University, a Graphic Design Certificate from the Art Institute of Seattle, and a Web Design Certificate from Bellevue College. Continuing art instruction included the Gage Academy in Seattle, Kirkland Arts Center, and private art instruction. Melissa is a member of Women Artists of the West, American Impressionist Society, Oil Painters of America, and Camano Arts Association.

 

“From the Edge” Jan Shield

“I think this is a wonderful idea to show art being made. My work is full of energy to create a feeling of the air merging with the trees and fields where from the earth they grow. They express a sort of witness to the soil becoming the grass and how plant life abounds joined in a harmony of space and form.  Look forward to seeing you soon,  probably in May.”  Jan  Shield, Professor Emeritus of Art at Pacific University

Read more about the artist:

https://www.oregonlive.com/hillsboro/2012/02/retired_pacific_university_pro.html

Jan Shield was at Pacific University in Forest Grove for forty years, twenty one of them as chairman of the art department. His tenure is the longest of any professor in the school’s history.

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway, Seaside Oregon

Closed until it is safe to reopen… let us hope… soon

Please visit us at:  http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Due to the  novel coronavirus the gallery shut its doors on March 15, 2020

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway, Seaside Oregon

Closed until it is safe to reopen

Due to the  novel coronavirus the gallery shut its doors on March 15, 2020

We hope make to it possible to enjoy some of what we have to offer to while you are at home in during the order to Stay at Home, Save Lives. Publishing articles is a way that we can continue to feature our resident artists during the situation,” chief curator Denise Fairweather.

 

 

Close up of Lysichiton americanus/ AKA Skunk Cabbage or Swamp Lantern  watercolor by Jo Pomeroy Crockett

Adored by many and ridiculed by some, Lysichiton americanus, aka skunk cabbage or swamp lantern is one of the first plants to emerge in late winter. Pushing its way through snow and peeking out of bogs, this bright yellow curvaceous “leaf” (spathe) with its inner structure of numerous small flowers (spadix) provides a warm resting and mating place for beetles and other insects. the calla lily. It has a distinctive fragrance similar to garlic or apples that give rise to its popular name.

Lysichton has many uses. Some Native peoples used it as an emergency food and a medicine. Hanis Coos elder Lottie Evanoff reportedly said she liked skunk cabbage very much and found it curious that settlers did not eat it. “Bears eats skunk cabbage, is just crazy for it. So, it must be good eating; everything bear eats is good eating.”  Jo Pomeroy Crockett, PhD/ artist

Jo Pomeroy Crockett

GATHER notes:

Importance of Quality Watercolor Paper

Watercolor, while not fussy is particular about the kind of paper it prefers. A special rough paper, handmade in India, with a very deep tooth is especially suited to this medium. Pigment just skims over the top but if given enough water, likes to settle into the valleys. Gentle glazes provide depth and effects not possible with other papers. The watercolors were painted on this special paper.  JPC

 

 

Jo Pomeroy Crockett, Phd., has often lectured at Fairweather’s.

Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, a North coast resident, works primarily wet-into-wet and strives for dramatic patterns. Vivid colors, an emphasis on the play of light and a touch of whimsy mark her paintings. Although she enjoys painting a variety of subjects, she especially enjoys painting nature. She has exhibited in numerous juried art competitions in the Southwest and the Pacific Northwest. Her work is in private collections in various parts of the United States, England, Canada and Switzerland. In combination with her art, she works as a free-lance writer and educator

 

 

“First Leap” by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images. Proceeds in support of NCLC.

 “This mallard chick seems to be enjoying life to the fullest as it scurries across a lily pad in a pond near my home.”  Neal Maine

After a thirty-year career as an award winning biology teacher at Seaside High School, Neal Maine became the first executive director of North Coast Land Conservancy, which he co-founded in 1986. Since his retirement from the land trust in 2010, he has pursued his passion for nature photography through PacificLight Images, a partnership with Michael Wing, dedicated to raising awareness of coastal ecology and the wildlife with whom we share the region’s estuaries, freshwater wetlands and forests. Their photography centers around coastal and Columbia River landscape, ecology and the rich estuary habitat with the surrounding wetlands and forest systems.

 

Habitat lectures by Neal Maine at Fairweather’s will return when it is safe to re-open the gallery.

 

Artists and speakers were booked for the exhibition, GATHER,  several booked more than one year ago, with some of art delivered before the gallery closed mid-March.

The April exhibition, titled GATHER, which was meant to open in the gallery April 4 and run through April 25, was canceled  due to the novel coronavirus.

 

Elk in the dunes by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images.  Proceeds in support of NCLC.

North Coast Land Conservancy/ reprint
Elk have been on the Oregon Coast a long, long, long, long time. Scientists believe elk migrated from Asia to North America over Beringia—better known as the Bering Land Bridge—some 120,000 years ago. The animals would have been a familiar sight to the first human hunters who migrated here tens of thousands of years later. Elk survived, and continue to survive, by being able to eat almost any kind of plant they can find, while we humans are limited to eating “soft fruits, a few easily digestible seeds, and the milk and flesh of our more versatile animal cousins,” as David Haskell writes in The Forest Unseen, one of naturalist and photographer Neal Maine’s favorite books.

 

 

Chasing the Light by Neal Maine/PacificLight Images.  Proceeds in support of NCLC.

We are all are holed up at home to slow the spread of the virus, hopefully,  this “Fairweather fix” will give moods and psyches a lift with some online R&R.

 

Watch time lapse video showing efforts in creating space for last year’s April exhibition, LIFE ABUNDANT.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dhKYvSZM3bg

Soon, when it is safe to re-open, we will be back in the gallery.

Stay safe at home, save lives.

Fairweather House and Gallery will continue to reach out with on-line blog articles about the arts.

And, too, on a regular basis, during these uncertain times, we will continue to re-post previous LIVE  Fairweather arts events…until it is safe to re-open the gallery.

http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

End note:

Flowers heal broken hearts.
https://youtu.be/ryUxrFUk6MY

“During this time of social distancing,  would you be willing to send images of the art being created in your studio during this crisis? ” 

 

“Wonderful idea. I have a few new pieces that I photographed just this evening.I hope this finds you well. Prospering would be nice, too, but that seems a bit out of reach for us these days.”

“You would think that I would be getting more done with all of this time on my hands… Well, I actually am, but it is all priority stuff queued up by circumstances beyond anyone’s control at the moment. That said, here are a couple of images for you to use. These are all pieces that are basically available, which is to say, at this writing, they are not on display in galleries or shows anywhere. The jewelry box been displayed recently, but it was made in January, so it is recent. The free form is still on the lathe, It will be done in a few days. For the time being I plan to leave the bark, moss, etc. on the piece.” Tom Willing

Sculptural free form work by Tom Willing.

 

Tom Willing designs that combine the aesthetic and functional with works that are sensitive to the interplay between light, form, and material.

 

 

Tom Willing’s work is elegantly finished on the lathe with walnut oil and beeswax, then buffed to bring out the natural luster of the wood.

“I seek to find the visual magic within the form of each piece of timber that is waiting to be revealed.”

 

Tom Willing holds his BA degree from the University of Oregon, an MA from Ohio State University, and an MAT from Lewis and Clark University. He taught middle school in Newberg, Oregon, until retiring in 2013.

Past President and Certified Member of the Pacific Northwest Woodturning Guild, he teaches woodturning techniques and is an active member of Northwest Woodturners and the American Association of Woodturners. He currently serves as President of Frogwood, A 501(c)(3) Arts Education Organization.

 

 

“Omnium-Gatherum”  by Barbara Martin  36×48 mixed media

“Created during the depths of winter, this painting is a loving incantation of everything floral — the first thrilling hints of springtime, the heady scent of roses, the glamour and mystery of a moonlit garden. With its many layers, the piece displays alluring depth and richness of color in an imaginative and impressionist style. Exciting color combinations and gestural movement bring high energy and a bold freshness to this beautiful painting. Mixed media: acrylic, charcoal, watercolor pencil, watercolor crayon on generously deep, gallery wrapped canvas.”

 

Barbara Martin is a contemporary painter known for high energy, gestural mark making and intuitive abstract works as well as for her “Super Ply” series of surreal creatures painted in black and white. Her award winning work has been exhibited nationally. Recent achievements include residencies awarded by Jentel Foundation for the Arts, Brush Creek Foundation for the Arts, and Hypatia-in-the-Woods and significant grants from the Oregon Arts Commission and the Regional Arts and Culture Commission.

 

“I have enclosed a couple of photos of a piece I am currently working on.  The photos of this in process piece are taken from a couple of angles showing my work space. Stay safe and healthy.”  Diane Copenhaver
Diane Copenhaver attempts to immortalize the power of art. With that art has the power to transform, heal, progress and enrich.

She recently embarked on a journey of discovery to unleash her creative talents after a career in business with a major northwest aerospace company.

Diane is painting primarily abstract using acrylics on varied surfaces. She also produces collage and mixed media works, is studying calligraphic arts and has begun to explore encaustic painting.

Color and texture are often the focus of Diane’s paintings. She uses layers of paint, as well as a variety of mediums to create texture. Color is selected to express a message, demonstrate beauty, or create energy. Brushes, palette knives, and scrapers are used and she often applies paint then wipes it away. Diane’s work is spontaneous and she is encouraged to let go of the precious and just let the paint flow.

 

Art Saves exhibit at Fairweather House and Gallery.

“Artists have a unique sensitivity in the ability to pivot and meet with needs that enlighten, inform, and insprie.”  D. Fairweather, galleriest.

 

To read more about the artists, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 March 15, 2020:

In order to protect the health and safety our guests, our community, and our staff the Gallery is closing its doors and will re-open only when it is safe to do so.

 

 

 

“Create” folded book art by Mary Bottita

“Read” folded book art by Mary Bottita

 

Sketching and pondering from Karen Doyle

 

Turtle by Paul Brent. C/. 2020

 

Seahorse by Paul Brent. C./ 2020 By

 

Ghost net basket turning inward by Emily Miller C./ 2020

Ghost net basket series. Spring 2020 by Emily Miller

“I’m also working on a wall piece with about 1,000 tiny chips of plastic. The title of the piece is Anthropocene and it’s inspired by the idea that our human impact on the earth has become so significant that it will be written in the fossil record.”  Emily Miller

Reposting  Fairweather Gallery March 15, 2020:

In order to protect the health and safety our guests, our community, and our staff the Gallery is closing its doors to visitors through April.

 

“Artists and those that support the arts have a unique sensitivity in the ability to pivot and meet needs that enlighten and inform, in my opinion.”  D. Fairweather, galleriest

“Air Born” juvenile eagle by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images.

**Proceeds to support NCLC.

 

According to the National Eagle Center, juvenile bald eagles can appear larger than their parents can in the first year because of longer flight feathers that help the birds as they learn to fly. After the first molt, the wing feathers will be the same size as an adult eagle.

Juveniles have a brown body with brown and white mottled wings. The tail is also mottled with a dark band at the very tip, according to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

“The Eagle has Landed” juvenile eagle by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images.

**Proceeds to support NCLC.

 

Sometimes also called a sub-adult, a juvenile is typically an eagle in its first year that does not yet have full adult plumage.
Within a few years, juvenile eagles grow closer to the classic adult plumage. Most birds have the white head and tail feathers between their fourth and fifth year.

 

 

Photo by Neal Maine / PacificLight Images
Bald eagles on Clatsop Beach.

“Eagle Speak” pair of American Bald Eagles eagle by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images. A pair of eagles schooled a juvenile eagle who dared to arrive on the beach.  The takeaway… “we told you to do your own fly way, and no, we will not send you money.”

**Proceeds to support NCLC.

Bald Eagles were common in North America at the time of European colonization and were considered sacred by the Native Americans. They remained common up through the 18th and early 19th centuries, but due to habitat destruction and direct persecution their population was considerably reduced by the start of the 20th century. The boom in chemical pesticide use, particular DDT, during the mid- 20th century lead to a rapid crash in the Bald Eagle population. DDT in the fish that the eagles were eating was making their eggshells thinner causing them to break during incubation. DDT was banned in the 1970s and the Bald Eagle was placed under the protection of the new Endangered Species Act. The population recovered quickly and today the Bald Eagle is abundant across North America.

Neal Maine recent eagle back story:  The wildlife photographer grew up in Seaside, went to college and returned to Seaside as an educator.  It was not until his 20th year of teaching that he saw and  photographed an eagle at the coast.

 

Jan and Jay Barber, Mayor of Seaside, introduced the wildlife photographer Neal Maine during the opening reception of Fresh Start at Fairweather’s.

Fairweather House and Gallery

Through March 25

Fresh Start Exhibition

612 Broadway St.

Seaside, Oregon

“A Fresh Start” featuring artists Toni Avery, Bill Baily, Karen Doyle, Christine Downs, Bob HeathDorota Haber-Lehigh, Neal Maine, Gayle H. Seely and Bill Shumway.

“This exhibit’s expectation lies in its possibility to present fresh, new perspectives, inspiration, experiences, reflection and even the possibility for transcendence in some way,” D. Fairweather, gallerist.

 

Neal Maine lectured at 6:pm at Fairweather’s during the Seaside First Saturday Art Walk.

 

Read more about Neal Maine on the artist tab at http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

**Q: What is NCLC, you ask?

A: North Coast Land Conservancy (NCLC)  has been working since 1986 to conserve and connect the landscape of the Oregon Coast from the Columbia River to northern Lincoln County by acquiring or otherwise managing lands for their habitat value. With a portfolio of more than 50 fee-title properties in addition to more than a dozen conservation easements, NCLC has completed more fee acquisitions in Oregon than any other local land trust, ranking it alongside The Nature Conservancy and The Trust for Public Lands for statewide conservation impact. The nationally accredited private, non-profit land trust works to ensure that this extraordinary region is a place where healthy communities of people, plants and wildlife can all thrive.

 

 

Jay Barber, Mayor of Seaside, prepares to select at random a winner from eggs containing the 14 names of patrons who purchased the “Last Polar Bear” book…

 

Nancy Holmes won the raffle for a signed ArcticLight image by Neal Maine during a drawing at Fairweather’s on March 7.

Nancy Holmes selected the polar bear portrait, signed by Neal Maine, and later shared the display in her home with the “Last Polar Bear” book shown on the mantle.

 

The raffle, a fundraiser  for the Alaska Wilderness League, generated $420 in book sales at the gallery.  The Alaska Wilderness League is a nonprofit organization that works to protect Alaska’s most significant wild lands from oil and gas drilling and from other industrial threats.

Read more about doing good works at Alaska Wilderness Leaguewww.alaskawild.org

 

 

Arctic Light Photographers Daniel Dietrich and Neal Maine

Read more about ArcticLight images at:


‘Arctic Light’ draws attention to global warming Presentation …

http://www.discoverourcoast.com › coast-weekend › arts › article_1d181096-…
Feb 16, 2015 – Arctic Light‘ draws attention to global warming Presentation, photographic journey aim for wildlife. Neal Maine and Daniel Dietrich will speak …

2018 opening spring reception art hostesses: Kay, Kathy, Sara, Joan and Denise.

 

Each new event is hosted by fabulous Art Walk hostesses. 

A new beginning, truly, a fresh start, surely, acts as an agent of change, serving as a language that accommodates experience and expands our view.  Through March 25, this spring, an exhibition titled a FRESH START at Fairweather House and Gallery opening March 7, embodies this definition of a new season.  A Fresh Start combines modern and traditional forms in order to create something wholly new.

 

Gallerist Denise Fairweather draws upon her earlier life in staging and high-design, principally as a senior level interior designer, allied member 1987-present/ American Society of Interior Designers.  She thinks still in terms of show house staging when designing many of her exhibits.  ‘I do see staging art as a kind of a set.  When an exhibit opens, complete with the proper lighting, signing and art on display, so to speak, I want there to be a perfect scene, for the artists, of course, but also for the art patrons.  The assembled accessories  placed to complement the art created with a specifically appointed theme … let us say …are an ensemble cast …all working together to make a perfect exhibition.”  

Watch time lapse video showing efforts in creating space for a spring exhibition in 2019. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dhKYvSZM3bg

 

2017 spring art walk hostesses Joan, Kathy, Denise, Kay, Kathy and Shirley posing just minutes before the opening reception..

In its fourteenth year, Fairweather House and Gallery, located at 612 Broadway in downtown Seaside, Oregon, has established itself as the nexus of the north coast’s art climate with a new exhibition each month.

 

In late 2019, the gallery gave artists the opportunity to select a themed month to exhibit. Regional artists looked over the various themes for 2020 and while, surely, all the themes were of interest, the March artists, truly, believed in the theme for Fresh Start exhibition.  Each artist stepped forward with the willingness to experiment, to try new materials.  For the upcoming exhibition “A Fresh Start” more than one hundred original works of art will be displayed throughout the gallery.

 

The Seaside First Saturday Art Walk on March 7 between the hours of 5-7: pm is all about the arts. Visitors may visit with artists, view an artist demonstration, listen to an art lecture or enjoy live performances in music. The downtown event, celebrating 16 years in 2020, is walk about in the historic district located between Holladay and Broadway. Free and open to the public.

Fairweather House and Gallery

March 7, 5-7:pm

612 Broadway St.

Seaside, Oregon

Opening reception for “A Fresh Start” featuring Northwest artists Toni Avery, Bill Baily, Karen Doyle, Christine Downs, Bob Heath, Dorota Haber-Lehigh, Gayle H. Seely and Bill Shumway.

“This exhibit’s expectation lies in its possibility to present fresh, new perspectives, inspiration, experiences, reflection and even the possibility for transcendence in some way. Indeed, the meaning of “fresh start” is: the beginning of a new period or step.  We, truly, expect the North Coast land to be in full springtime bloom for FRESH START, Fairweather’s March exhibition.”

Fresh Start slate includes:

An inspiring opening introduction with Denise Faiweather, gallerist

Greetings and meetings with featured artists

Flexible program tailored by the attending regional artists

Artist lectures at 5:30 pm

Local farm-to-table snacks

Time to connect and celebrate with friends and colleagues

Spring habitat talk and **raffle drawing for a signed photograph by naturalist Neal Maine at 6:00 pm

**Proceeds to support Alaska Wilderness League

LIVE music by Shirley 88

Read more at http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

About tab/ Blog tab/ Artists tab

http://www.facebook.com/ Seaside First Saturday Art Walk

Photos and video by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall