Moulton Skies over Tiilamook Head. Original oil by Micheal Muldoon.

To view more art by Michael Muldoon, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Micheal Muldoon

 

 

Eagle Sunrise by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images.

To view more images by Neal Maine, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/  …artists/ …Neal Maine

 

 

 

Art by Marga.

To view more art by Marga, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Marga Stanley

 

Calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson

To read more about the artist, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ ….artists/ …Penelope Culbertson

“We are all like the bright moon, we still have our darker side.” — Kahlil Gibran

 

“We must strive to be like the moon.’ An old man in Kabati repeated this sentence often… the adage served to remind people to always be on their best behavior and to be good to others.  No one grumbles when the moon shines. Everyone becomes happy and appreciates the moon in their own special way. Children watch their shadows and play in its light, people gather at the square to tell stories and dance through the night. A lot of happy things happen when the moon shines. These are some of the reasons why we should want to be like the moon.”   –Ishmael Beah

 

“We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard.”

–John F. Kennedy

 On August 2nd FINDINGS, an opening art exhibition introduced past and present emerging artists at the Fairweather House and Gallery.

 

Top row/ left to right images:  resident jeweler Renee Hafeman, art patrons, Joan, Art Walk hostess with Paul Brent, resident artist.

Middle row/ left to right images: art by Britney Drumheller, celebrity artist Britney Drumheller offers an art lecture, artist Emily Miller, and introducing emerging artist Whelpsy Whelp.

Bottom row/ left to right images: marine debris artist Karynn Kozij, Joan, Art Walk hostess demonstrating Octopus art, Paul Brent with Gail and Ellen, Art Walk hostesses at the Paul Brent Pop-Up Art Studio and Gallery, sponsored by Fairweather House and Gallery and The Gilbert Block Building, Denise, Kemmy Kay, Joan and Saundra FINDING art at the FINDINGS opening reception.

Q: What is an emerging artist, you ask?

A:  An emerging artist is considered an artist without commercial representation who has a dedicated art practice but has had limited opportunities to show at a gallery or non-profit spaces.

 

For more info please  go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com.  Celebrating 11 years of sponsoring  NW regional acclaimed and emerging artists in 2017.

Renee Hafeman, vintage jewelry artist

FINDINGS in my work is a collection of tools and other articles used by an artisan to make jewelry.

 

Q:  What is the difference Between “Art Nouveau” and “Art Deco”, you ask?

A: Art Nouveau: means “new art,” reigned from roughly 1880 until just before World War I. It features naturalistic but stylized forms, often combined with more geometric shapes, particularly arcs, parabolas, and semicircles (think of the Eiffel Tower). The movement brought in natural forms that had often been overlooked like insects, weeds, even mythical faeries, as evidenced by Lalique jewelry or Tiffany lamps.

Art Deco emerged after World War I. In fact, the deprivations of the Great War years gave way to a whole new opulence and extravagance that defined the Jazz Age and the Art Deco aesthetic. The movement, prevalent from the 1920s until roughly the start of World War II, took its name from the 1925 Exposition Internationales des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes, held in France and is characterized by streamlined and geometric shapes. It also utilized modern materials like chrome, stainless steel, and inlaid wood. If Art Deco dabbled with natural materials, they tended to be graphic or textural, like jagged fern leaves. As a result, Deco featured bold shapes like sunbursts and zigzags and broad curves.

Renee Hafeman offered an artist’s lecture during the opening reception of FINDINGS, an exhibition through August at Fairweather’s.

Note the difference?

Hours and Events for the Paul Brent Studio

608 Broadway

Seaside, Oregon 

Sponsored by the Gilbert Block Building

 

Open Studio: you are invited to come in, look at the artwork and watch Paul Brent paint on his latest painting.

Paintings may be purchased through Fairweather’s Gallery next door.
Sign up for classes at Fairweathers.

Classes will be kept to a maximum of 12 participants and no prior experience with painting is necessary.

A minimum of 5 participants is necessary for the class to make.

All materials will be provided.

Wed. Aug. 23: Create a painting in water-mixable oil paint
on canvas 10am to 1pm

Thurs. Aug. 24: Open studio 11 am to 3pm

Tues. Aug. 29: Open studio 11 am to 3pm

Wed. Aug. 30: Open studio 11 am to 3pm

Thurs. Aug. 31: Create a Painting in Watercolor Class 10am-12pm

Call 503-738-8899 or email fairweatherkd@gmail.com to register.

For more about the artist, please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Paul Brent

 

For Fairweather’s FINDINGS exhibition, Paul Brent’s paintings.

Found for FINDINGS  before the artist created…

 

 

and after= Frazzled Model Mom by Karynn Kozij, marine debris artist.

 

 

Q: Who is Karynn Kozij, you ask?
A: Growing up on a farm in the province of Saskatchewan in Canada, Karynn Kozij loved perusing her Dad’s stash of materials in his shop, shed, garage and outbuildings. He had everything to create anything from a bird house or a toolbox, to a trailer or a potato planter.

She can’t pass up anything that at first seems to be trash but could possibly be turned into something else. She’s the one you see stopping on the sidewalk to pick up a squashed flat metal bottle cap or pull tab from a beer can, or a scrap of wire that is lying near a utility pole. She takes apart dried up writing pens before they go into the trash can to salvage the metal spring inside it. She is picking up trash, going through trash and making something out of nothing.

March 2016 spring storms spilled a treasure chest of marine debris onto our Northwest coast. It was sad and depressing to find so much trash on our shores. Karynn drove down onto the beach daily and hauled carloads of trash off the beach. The sadness and depression turned into fascination and obsession. With that awakening, she was unable to throw away so much perfectly good rope and became inspired.

Karynn saw possibility in those hundreds of feet of rope with an elaborate entry into the Marine Debris Art contest in Cannon Beach where she won the People’s Choice Award and third place in the judged contest with her entry, Octopus Family Reunion at the Beach.

Karynn works in many media. Something first destined as trash really grabs her eye; it’s a win win! Look closely in her art to see some part of it that was something else in a former life.

She was FOUND while picking up mail.

 

 

Foreign exchange student Kim visiting the Gearhart beach with Tillamook Head  of Seaside in the distance. Indeed, every piece found had foreign letters and numbers, hence, the name!  And, too, SOLD at FINDINGS, the exhibition.

 

But, wait,  there’s more…

 

Fortune teller, Pearl

 

Great Great Grandfather Kraken…

 

fondly watching over his offspring at the Gearhart beach.

 

Appreciation to Don Frank Photography.

Shoutout clues:

Karynn  Kozij lives in ____________, is the postmistress at the US Post Office in _____________, and will be at the Fairweather Gallery FINDINGS opening reception, Aug 5th with her marine debris art.  Octopus family reunion  at the ______________beach. The artist and her story of finding things was found while picking up mail in __________________.  Don Frank shows selected  art photos in the ____________Gallery in Seaside, as well.

 

Title: “Winged Wonder” by Neal Maine, PacificLight Images.

Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly. Location: Neacoxie Creek. Seaside/Gearhart.

Signed, matted and framed.

“Unless otherwise noted, images are presented as they were photographed. Slight adjustment by cropping, lightening or darkening may have been used, but the photo subject is presented as recorded in the Oregon coastal landscapes.”

A Certificate of Authenticity is provided with each copyrighted and signed image.

Available exclusively at Fairweather’s.

Proceeds to support North Coast Land Conservancy/NCLC.

 

 

THE NEXT FRONTIER, OUR OWN BACKYARD

Humans: We take pictures, walks, deep breaths, memories, rides on waves, water, timber, in habitat that used to belong to other trail makers. We thought we could never catch all the salmon, never cut all the big trees, and never pollute the ocean. In our hubris, we thought we could make our own trails. With renewed humility, we are learning how to share this place, to live together with our partner trail makers. PacificLight Images celebrates this partnership as we use our images to inspire others to honor nature’s trails in OUR OWN BACKYARD.Neal Maine

To read more about the photographer, please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Neal Maine

 

Save the date and time. 
Neal Maine, scientist and wildlife photographer to present a lecture on the ecology of the North Coast habitats.

August 5th, 6:pm
Fairweather House and Gallery
612 Broadway, Seaside, OR
Opening reception for FINDINGS

Seaside First Saturday Art Walk 

 

To read more about the Art Walk, please go to http://www.facebook.com/ Seaside First Saturday Art Walk.

Q: Where can the Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly be found, you ask?

A:  Habitat: Small ponds and slow streams. It perches on the tips of twigs, grasses and other vegetation.

Fun Creature Facts:

Distribution: Western U.S., West Indies and Central America south to Chile and Argentina.

Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly wings sit flat when perched and have a strong sustained flight; flitting about on gossamer wings and quiet as a whisper.

Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonflies are swift fliers, reminiscent of tiny airplanes.

Their eyes are huge, often meeting at the top of the head.

The Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly, will eat almost any soft-bodied flying insect including mosquitoes, flies, small moths, mayflies, and flying ants or termites.

The Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly are aptly named as they mimic hawks, relentlessly pursuing their prey.

The Latin name for this genus, Sympetrum, means “with rock” and refers to their habit of basking on rocks to absorb heat early in the day.

This species is one of the first dragonflies to emerge each year.

imnh.isu.edu/digitalatlas/bio/insects/drgnfly

 

 

 

 

Here is the photo of the painting that I was commissioned to create for the new Astoria Memorial  Plain Tree Hospital now in process of completion. A select number of regional artists were requested to make work for the interior spaces along with Richard Rowland of Astoria to create a large anagama fired ceramic entry mural. –Jan

 

 

“My painting is an acrylic on canvas, 6ft 8in by 3ft 4in related to a visit to the Gorge Hotel up the Columbia River we had the pleasure to take a very tranquil anniversary at, and enjoy the river and gardens surrounding. It was just a reflection that stopped me there overhanging branches crossing over rocks under water under rocks quiet silence among the leaves  arching form of the old stone bridge still to walk upon.” –Jan Shield

Photo: Art patron, Jan and Dee Shield and another art patron at Fairweather’s during the opening reception of an Art Walk evening.

Jan Shield, Professor Emeritus of Art at Pacific University, Forest Grove, with his art work that was created at Dancing Trees Sanctuary. Also pictured is art by Paul Brent, who has set up a Pop-Up Gallery in Seaside at 608 Broadway for the summer of 2017 (sponsored by the Fairweather Gallery and the Gilbert Block Building).

“It is my home, studio and forest preserve in Newberg, Oregon. It is an environment of thick fir and maple forest blanketed with lush ferns and punctuated with sun lit meadows.”

For more info about the artist, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgalllery.com/ …artists/…Jan Shield