Emerging artist Hall of Fame:

2006 Kristin Qian

2007 Britney Drumheller

2008 Nick Brakel

2009 Robert McWhirter

2010 Michael Wing/ Neal Maine

2011 Michele Bettger

2012 Rebecca Gore

2013 Gayle H. Seely

2014 Linda Trexler

2015 Diane Copenhaver

2016 Ashley Howarth

2017 Whelpsy Whelp

Take note!

2018 Veronica Russell

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

August 4, 2018

5-7:pm 

Seaside First Saturday Art Walk

12th Annual Emerging Artist exhibition

Veronica Russell artist launch.

 

“Beneath” lino wood block print.   

2018 emerging artist.

Veronica Russell.

 

Veronica Russell is a mixed media artist whose work explores her fascination with the natural world, and also at times, her avid fandom for sci-fi and horror. Her pieces are typically built around printmaking, for example an original lino cut printed in black on the foundation of a watercolor background, with finish details painted in metallics as a third, light-catching layer.

Russell’s current series Lost & Found at Seaside depicts everyday organic objects that one may find lying around on the beach. Pieces in this series draw from Russell’s previous work in macro photography, encouraging beachcombers to look closer at what they may have considered “common.” In looking closer we discover unexpected beauty, the intricacies that most people don’t stop to notice: a faint pattern in the texture of a sand dollar skeleton, the ridges looping in ovals around the shell of a clam with razor-sharp edges, the slick other-worldly pods adorning the strands of a bull kelp tangle at surf’s edge.

However, it’s not only beauty one finds when looking so closely. This is where those touches of the surreal may come in to Russell’s work. Looking closely at this series, one may notice that the subjects are beautiful and interesting pieces of nature, but they are all either dead, dying, or about to be eaten!

Russell hopes her work celebrates the fleeting beauty and some of the mystery in our naturally imperfect world.

Veronica Russell is a mixed media artist who has lived on the Oregon coast for 25+ years. While studying creative writing at Pacific University in 2001, she took as many art courses as she could: photography, pottery & sculpture, graphic design, and her favorite, printmaking. Her fascination for creating wood and linocuts stuck. After college, while her art was relegated to a hobby, she spent time as managing editor and graphic designer for travel publications on the coast. Russell feels blessed to be able to work on her art full time now. Her work draws from her deep admiration for the natural world, and on occasion, her avid fandom for film and literature, particularly the sci-fi and horror genres. Russell’s current mixed-media work centers around a block print, using other media to layer in texture, color, and overall finish to her multilayered pieces.

 

TAKE A NOTE!

 

Veronica Russell  and her art will be launched at Fairweather’s! 

Fairweather’s emerging artists are selected through an audition process and receive gallery mentoring.

Since 2006 Fairweather’s has selected emerging artists who take risks, embrace challenges and are rigorous in their approach to creation and production.

All the featured artists have yearned to further their professional achievement through a curated gallery exhibition.

 

 

 

 

 

Photo by Neal Maine / PacificLight Images
Bald eagles on Clatsop Beach.

Image title:  Eagle Speak

 

After a thirty-year career as an award-winning biology teacher at Seaside High School, Neal Maine became the first executive director of North Coast Land Conservancy, which he co-founded in 1986. Since his retirement from the land trust in 2010, he has pursued his passion for nature photography through PacificLight Images dedicated to raising awareness of coastal ecology and the wildlife with whom we share the region’s estuaries, freshwater wetlands and forests. His photography centers around coastal and Columbia River landscape, ecology and the rich estuary habitat with the surrounding wetlands and forest systems.

PacificLight Images is dedicated to working with coastal communities to protect wildlife habitat and its connectivity. A percentage of all photography sales are donated to North Coast Land Conservancy to help further this goal.

Eagle Sunrise by Neal Maine

 

On June 20th, 1782 the American Bald eagle was chosen as the symbol of the United States of American because of its long life, strength, majestic look and its representation of the freedoms enshrined in out constitution.

 

 

Image title:  Shaped by Wind.  Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images

 

Eagle conservation lecture  notes by naturalist Neal Maine:

Neal Maine graduated from Seaside High, returned as an educator in the Seaside School District.

It was not until 20 years after collage that he viewed an eagle on the North coast for the first time!

In 1961, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) counted  only 471 pairs of Amercian Bald Eagles.

 

 

Neal Maine lectures during a Fairweather Gallery event.

 

 

July 7- July 31

Fairweather House and Gallery

100 Turtles project by Emily Miller

 

“I have spent my life on the coast, and all my artwork has its roots in my love of the sea. I see the coast as a border between the known and the unknown, and a place where our connection to larger natural systems becomes clear. My artwork focuses on the delight of exploring this mysterious and beautiful environment. I found a positive voice in SeaLegacy, a conservation group creating a movement towards healthy oceans through visual storytelling. 25% of July sale proceeds in support of SeaLegacy,”  Emily Miller.

Launching of the 100 Turtles project by artist Emily Miller, who has spent the early summer sculpting tiny ceramic sea turtles: curling and shaping two hundred front flippers and carving details into two hundred eyes.

 

 

 

 I found a positive voice in SeaLegacy, a conservation group creating a movement towards healthy oceans through visual storytelling. 25% of July sale proceeds in support of SeaLegacy,”  Emily Miller.

 

 

For more info go to

 

http://ejmillerfineart.com/news/2018/06/14/100-turtles-project/

 

 

Read more:

The Story of Silent Spring. How a courageous woman took on the chemical industry and raised important questions about humankind’s impact …

http://www.rachelcarson.org/

Perhaps the finest nature writer of the Twentieth Century, Rachel Carson (1907-1964) is remembered more today as the woman who challenged the notion that …

 

To view more Neal Maine images, please visit  www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Paul Brent is an artist whose work has become internationally known to represent the coastal lifestyle.

 

Aqueous Seahorse 12×12 Paul Brent original watercolor

Before the Storm Sailing 16×20 Paul Brent original oil

From his watercolors to his recent oil paintings, Paul Brent captures nature in its best and most idyllic form. He especially enjoys painting local scenes, seascapes and beachscapes that he views near his two home studios in Panama City, Florida and Seaside, Oregon.

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While being best known for his beach subjects, Paul Brent paints seascapes that are equally indicative of his talent to recreate all aspects of nature.

Artist grace note:

“Many of the new works I will be bringing in for the summer of 2018 are sailboat oriented.  That will be the theme for my new work.” Paul Brent

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside

July 7 -July 31

 OCEAN FOLK, an exhibition, featuring  Paul Brent and other regional artists.

 

 Two Oyster Shells on Deck 11×14 Paul Brent original watercolor

Paul Brent was born in Oklahoma City and lived in rural Southwest Oklahoma with his family until he was thirteen. His parents, who were educators, moved their family to Long Beach, California, and Paul attended high school and California State College in Long Beach. He majored in art but in his junior year of college, he transferred to the University of California at Berkeley to study architecture. He completed his Bachelors of Architecture and joined the Air Force where he was stationed in Panama City, Florida. There he met his wife, Lana Jane and after they were married, he left the service and they returned to California where he completed his Master’s degree in Architecture at Cal Berkeley. He and Lana Jane have an art gallery in Panama City, Florida, where they live part of the year.

Paul Brent has been profiled in many publications including the Wall Street Journal, Coastal Living, Florida Monthly and many more. He is a signature member of the National and Florida Watercolor Societies and a member of the Society of Illustrators. He had authored a book on watercolor instruction titled Wonderful Watercolors and illustrated the children’s book J. Rooker, Manatee. He has been active in arts and planning organizations both locally and in the state of Florida. © 2006-2018 All images copyright Paul Brent

From June to October they live in Seaside, Oregon, where they have had a home and an artist’s studio for more than 10 years.

Paul Brent has exhibited his work in Seaside at Fairweather House and Gallery on Broadway for more than seven years.

Seascape on Marble Oil 16×20 Paul Brent original

To view more art by the artist, please go to www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com / …artists/ …Paul Brent

© 2006-2018 All images copyright Paul Brent

 

“Sea-urchin”  watercolor on hand-marbled paper

#1 of an original triptych by JoAnn Pari-Mueller

 

“Sea life has always been mysterious to me.” JoAnn Pari-Mueller

 

“Sea-horse” watercolor on hand-marbled paper

#2 of an original triptych by JoAnn Pari-Mueller

“I use my watercolors, calligraphy, pastels, and collage to capture their beautiful colors, shapes, and textures.” JoAnn Pari-Mueller

 

“I sea one” watercolor on hand-marbled paper

#3 of an original triptych by JoAnn Pari-Mueller

“The absolute immensity in variety of sea creatures is awe-inspiring.” JoAnn Pari-Mueller

 

 

Artist Statement:

I have always lived in the countryside and always been a collector. I was raised in farmland Wisconsin and moved to farmland Oregon in my mid-twenties, continuously amassing interesting objects of nature and hand-made textiles and crafts from around the world.

I use watercolors, pastels, marbling, collage, and/or calligraphy to put down on paper the observations I make about the colors, lines, shapes, and patterns of these natural and handcrafted items. It is my goal to have others take away some of the awe I feel when studying their intricacies.

 

Often fine details catch my eye; other times I am interested in the relationship between objects – the “collector mentality.”  I like the starkness of a subject against a white background, but may also intersperse geometric lines or shapes with the mostly curvilinear subjects. Often I use richly colored or detailed borders or backgrounds – influences of the many patterns and colors in my collections. I always use 100% rag paper and high-quality pigments, so care should always be taken to protect these materials from light with archival framing.

 

After 15 years as an art museum tour guide, in 2009 I began immersing myself in art classes at area art schools and colleges. I am an active member of the Oregon Society of Artists, the Watercolor Society of Oregon, and the Portland Society for Calligraphy and have participated in numerous exhibits throughout the state and my county’s October Open Art Studio.   JoAnn Pari-Mueller/ Pacific NW artist specializing in watercolor, pastels, and calligraphy.

 

“I followed many of Jacque Cousteau’s adventures as a child. and am thrilled to live near the Pacific Ocean as an adult.”  JoAnn Pari-Mueller

 

For more about the gallery, please go to  www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Full Moon Bowl by Emily Miller

 

 

“I have a brand new full moon bowl (first one out of the kiln!) Creating a different perspective on my passion for exploring unknown environments in art. Although most of my artwork has focused on the ocean, I find the beauty, mystery, and science of outer space as compelling as the deep-sea.”  —Emily Miller, artist

 

Q: When is the full moon in June, you ask?

A: The full moon will be on June 27 and June 28. To the casual observer, however, the moon will appear full the day before and after its peak brightness. https://www.moongiant.com/moonphases/June/2018

 

 

Concept drawings by Emily Miller.

“I love the fanciful scientific names for the lunar “seas” (which are actually flat regions of dark basalt where lava oozed to the surface, pulled by Earth’s gravity up towards the near side of the moon). The Sea of Nectar and the Sea of Clouds are two of my favorites. I also love that the Seas of Tranquility and Crises are right next to each other.”  Emily Miller

 

 

“I am captivated by the beautiful contrast between light and darkness in our natural world, and the necessity of both for life to thrive. .”  Emily Miller

 

 

Deep blue spiny sea urchin bowl

 

 

White moonlight spiny sea urchin bowl

 Hand made and artist signed porcelain bowls by Emily Miller

 

 

Sea anemone porcelain vases by Emily Miller.

Heavily textured raw porcelain exteriors are  reminiscent of sunlight patterns in a shallow lagoon.

Hand made and signed by the artist.

Watertight.

 

Read more about Emily Miller at https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/tag/fairweather-house…gallery/…/1…

 

Save the date and time

Opening artist reception for the exhibition  “Ocean Folk”

July 7, 5-7:pm

Emily Miller launches her 100 Turtles project at the Fairweather Gallery

 

“Here is the post I just wrote about my 100 Turtles project.” Emily Miller

  http://ejmillerfineart.com/news/2018/06/14/100-turtles-project/

 

 

End note: Two Fairweather Gallery artists featuring a North Oregon coast night scene with a full moon over the Pacific Ocean, which is the largest ocean in the world.   At full moon, the Moon and Sun are in a straight line on opposite sides of the Earth. Their gravitational forces combine to create larger waves.

“Night Sea” by Ron Nicolaides.  Original oil on Linen.

 

For more info about the artist, please go to  https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/Artist/Ron/Nicolaides.html

 

  “North Coast Sea” by Nicholas Oberling.  Original oil on linen.

For more info about the artist, please go to  https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/…/welcoming-nicholas-oberling-art.

 

Precious moonstone, a translucent, opalescent, pearly blue gemstone cuff bracelet by Alan Stockam. Signed and numbered by the silversmith.

 

 

 

For more about the gallery, please go to www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

“My mixed-media paintings are mainly powered charcoal, gelled onto watercolor paper.  Charcoal may weird, it is not just black and white and it is not smudgy, provides texture.  Along with charcoal, I  add as many as twenty-two layers of transparent paint, each layer is sealed with clear gel.  I hide things in layers, like  turtles.  It takes awhile as each layer has to be  dry before another layer can be applied.  The resulting art work has a three-dimensional aspect.  Truly, working with charcoal gives the  painting visual textural mystery. The technique allows the viewer to dive in and have their own adventure.  It is never the same.  In different light or from different angles, various images come forward or recede.  Indeed, the painting offers a new perspective each time it is viewed.”    Jan Rimerman

 

 

Artist Jan Rimerman with Megan, art assistant to the artist, at Fairweather House and Gallery.

 

Megan, art assistant, at the Fairweather Gallery during the opening reception of “Sense of Place”, shows an exciting composition by Jan Rimerman  featuring multiple layers of charcoal and paint creating stones and water.

 

 

 

At the opening artist’s reception at Fairweather House and Gallery, Jan Rimerman opens the magazine Cascade Living/ spring 2018 edition, to an article about working magic with charcoal and paint while raising money for wetlands and her favorite animal.

Close up of “Secrets of the Stream”

“I hide turtles in layers,” Jan Rimerman

More about the artist:

Jan Rimerman has followed her artistic muse since childhood. This journey has carried her to South America, the British Isles, Western and Eastern Europe, Africa, Asia and Indonesia.

Jan’s work was influenced by Dürer, Schöngauer, and Blake.  Carl Hall and Robert Hess were influential professors at Willamette University.    Rimerman also studied art at the City University in London, Portland State University and at the University of Washington.

Her own work began to exhibit a contemporary twist using traditional elements and principles of design of these masters.

She spent many months in France studying the lives and techniques of her favorite Impressionists and Post-Impressionists.   These masters use of light and color taught her to look at her subject matter more critically in terms of light and shadow.   Her silent mentors were Pissarro, Van Gogh, and Monet.

Then…colored pencil was introduced into Jan’s world when a box was presented to her by her Aunt and Uncle.  This gift changed her life forever.  The world of colored pencil wrapped Jan up and massaged every bit of drawing talent in her.  Line, shape, color and texture magically became borders, flowers and landscapes coming alive under her fingertips.  She was pushed into the limelight winning many national awards and was published in internationally distributed books and magazines.  The rhythmic movement and elegance of Art Nouveau, and particularly Mucha’s borders, are evident influences in this era of her art work.

Gradually the light and color Jan used to create representational art metamorphosed into abstract images.   Her appreciation of Klimt, Rothko, and Kahn has influenced her abstract style.  Most recently,  Jan has been exploring color, movement, and composition using mixed media. The powdered charcoal and fluid transparent acrylics give her the freedom to work out color theory and multiple dimensions with her very individual layered style.  Jan is constantly reaching and stretching for new shapes and color combinations to create exciting compositions to create the illusion that you may jump right into the painting and swim through it.

Jan Rimerman discusses her art process  during an artist’s reception at Fairweather House and Gallery.

 

Grace note received:

“Thank you for the beautiful reception! The gallery looked stunning! I wish you a splendid summer season. Thank you for including me in your juried show.” Jan Rimerman

 

Read more about the artist Jan Rimerman:

janrimerman.com/event/94680/rockpaperturtleart-for-wetlands

Rock…Paper…Turtle…Art for Wetlands is a fundraiser to help restore the Western Pond Turtle habitat in the Nyberg Wetlands…

https://www.cascadesothebysrealty.com/services/cascade-living-magazine/

Cascade Sotheby’s International Realty flagship publications … Cascade Living Magazine – Spring 2018 – … /For the Lover of Turtles/  ...Jan Rimerman

 

In good company, “Sense of Place” photo collage. Images from the Fairweather House and Gallery artist’s reception.

For more info, about the event, please go to http://www.facebook.com/ Seaside First Saturday Art Walk.

 

The Fairweather June exhibit, “Sense of Place,  laid claim to our unique little corners  of our individual  world –special only to ourselves.  Surely, what we all seek is a place that allows us to indulge in out dreams, hopes and wishes.  What we all seek to find is that special place and time that offers a bit of momentary solitude that fortifies our spirits and rejuvenates our energies. 

 

“Sense of Place” through June, 2018.

For more information, go to www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Christine Trexel for Fairweather’s “Sense of Place” 

 

A blank journal with an iconic vintage photo of Highway 101 at Neahkahnie Mountain. Sometimes writing can help us to further develop our ideas and our sense of being.  I believe it helps foster creativity to have a beautiful book to contain our thoughts.

 

 

 Sometimes writing can help us to further develop our ideas and our sense of being.  I believe it helps foster creativity to have a beautiful book to contain our thoughts.

 

The accordion book enclosed behind doors shows children in their place, at play as children should be.  The images are from a late 1800’s children’s book and are on paper springs to give more of a dimensional element.  They have been lightly hand colored to bring them to life.

 

 

The multilayered structure demonstrates a balance as the drawers are staggered and balanced to make a tower.  Little ladders allow them to be explored by small creatures.  Inside the door on the top is a winged horse who managed to fly in and settle down.  The drawers all open fully and are available to store small things that need their own place.”Christine Trexel

 

 

 

 

Christine Trexel

 

Books have been an integral part of Christine Trexel’s life since early childhood. She grew up on a farm in southeastern Colorado and spent many happy hours lost inside the pages of a book. She firmly believes a day without time set aside for reading is an incomplete day.

As an adult she began her journey in creating her own books, which led to boxes, and then to making paper while living in Oregon. She has been fortunate to have taken a wide variety of classes at the Oregon School of Arts and Crafts, as well as, with international known artists in book binding and papermaking.

Christine lived in Panama for years where she learned to harvest and process plants from her garden to make paper for the books and boxes she creates. The wealth of vegetation forested experimentations and a great love of learning.

“It is truly a magical experience to convert a growing thing into a beautiful piece of paper.”  Christine Trexel

 

Grace note:

“In my work for the June exhibition at Fairweather’s  I created new pieces with various interpretations of “A Sense of Place”.   I am amazed every time I come into the gallery and see how you it has been transformed.   Your gallery was my first foray in the PNW for displaying my work and it helped spur me in my creative field.  Thank you!”    Christine Trexel

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more info go to www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Christine Trexel

 

Grace note received:

“Thanks for another beautiful art walk. I am amazed every time I come into the shop and see how you have transformed it. I feel fortunate that you accepted me into your space now 5 years ago. You were my first foray in the Pacific North West for displaying my work and it helped spur me in my creative field. Thank you!”  Christine Trexel