Moulton Skies over Tiilamook Head. Original oil by Micheal Muldoon.

To view more art by Michael Muldoon, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Micheal Muldoon

 

 

Eagle Sunrise by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images.

To view more images by Neal Maine, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/  …artists/ …Neal Maine

 

 

 

Art by Marga.

To view more art by Marga, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Marga Stanley

 

Calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson

To read more about the artist, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ ….artists/ …Penelope Culbertson

“We are all like the bright moon, we still have our darker side.” — Kahlil Gibran

 

“We must strive to be like the moon.’ An old man in Kabati repeated this sentence often… the adage served to remind people to always be on their best behavior and to be good to others.  No one grumbles when the moon shines. Everyone becomes happy and appreciates the moon in their own special way. Children watch their shadows and play in its light, people gather at the square to tell stories and dance through the night. A lot of happy things happen when the moon shines. These are some of the reasons why we should want to be like the moon.”   –Ishmael Beah

 

“We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard.”

–John F. Kennedy

Found for FINDINGS  before the artist created…

 

 

and after= Frazzled Model Mom by Karynn Kozij, marine debris artist.

 

 

Q: Who is Karynn Kozij, you ask?
A: Growing up on a farm in the province of Saskatchewan in Canada, Karynn Kozij loved perusing her Dad’s stash of materials in his shop, shed, garage and outbuildings. He had everything to create anything from a bird house or a toolbox, to a trailer or a potato planter.

She can’t pass up anything that at first seems to be trash but could possibly be turned into something else. She’s the one you see stopping on the sidewalk to pick up a squashed flat metal bottle cap or pull tab from a beer can, or a scrap of wire that is lying near a utility pole. She takes apart dried up writing pens before they go into the trash can to salvage the metal spring inside it. She is picking up trash, going through trash and making something out of nothing.

March 2016 spring storms spilled a treasure chest of marine debris onto our Northwest coast. It was sad and depressing to find so much trash on our shores. Karynn drove down onto the beach daily and hauled carloads of trash off the beach. The sadness and depression turned into fascination and obsession. With that awakening, she was unable to throw away so much perfectly good rope and became inspired.

Karynn saw possibility in those hundreds of feet of rope with an elaborate entry into the Marine Debris Art contest in Cannon Beach where she won the People’s Choice Award and third place in the judged contest with her entry, Octopus Family Reunion at the Beach.

Karynn works in many media. Something first destined as trash really grabs her eye; it’s a win win! Look closely in her art to see some part of it that was something else in a former life.

She was FOUND while picking up mail.

 

 

Foreign exchange student Kim visiting the Gearhart beach with Tillamook Head  of Seaside in the distance. Indeed, every piece found had foreign letters and numbers, hence, the name!  And, too, SOLD at FINDINGS, the exhibition.

 

But, wait,  there’s more…

 

Fortune teller, Pearl

 

Great Great Grandfather Kraken…

 

fondly watching over his offspring at the Gearhart beach.

 

Appreciation to Don Frank Photography.

Shoutout clues:

Karynn  Kozij lives in ____________, is the postmistress at the US Post Office in _____________, and will be at the Fairweather Gallery FINDINGS opening reception, Aug 5th with her marine debris art.  Octopus family reunion  at the ______________beach. The artist and her story of finding things was found while picking up mail in __________________.  Don Frank shows selected  art photos in the ____________Gallery in Seaside, as well.

 

Title: “Winged Wonder” by Neal Maine, PacificLight Images.

Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly. Location: Neacoxie Creek. Seaside/Gearhart.

Signed, matted and framed.

“Unless otherwise noted, images are presented as they were photographed. Slight adjustment by cropping, lightening or darkening may have been used, but the photo subject is presented as recorded in the Oregon coastal landscapes.”

A Certificate of Authenticity is provided with each copyrighted and signed image.

Available exclusively at Fairweather’s.

Proceeds to support North Coast Land Conservancy/NCLC.

 

 

THE NEXT FRONTIER, OUR OWN BACKYARD

Humans: We take pictures, walks, deep breaths, memories, rides on waves, water, timber, in habitat that used to belong to other trail makers. We thought we could never catch all the salmon, never cut all the big trees, and never pollute the ocean. In our hubris, we thought we could make our own trails. With renewed humility, we are learning how to share this place, to live together with our partner trail makers. PacificLight Images celebrates this partnership as we use our images to inspire others to honor nature’s trails in OUR OWN BACKYARD.Neal Maine

To read more about the photographer, please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Neal Maine

 

Save the date and time. 
Neal Maine, scientist and wildlife photographer to present a lecture on the ecology of the North Coast habitats.

August 5th, 6:pm
Fairweather House and Gallery
612 Broadway, Seaside, OR
Opening reception for FINDINGS

Seaside First Saturday Art Walk 

 

To read more about the Art Walk, please go to http://www.facebook.com/ Seaside First Saturday Art Walk.

Q: Where can the Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly be found, you ask?

A:  Habitat: Small ponds and slow streams. It perches on the tips of twigs, grasses and other vegetation.

Fun Creature Facts:

Distribution: Western U.S., West Indies and Central America south to Chile and Argentina.

Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly wings sit flat when perched and have a strong sustained flight; flitting about on gossamer wings and quiet as a whisper.

Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonflies are swift fliers, reminiscent of tiny airplanes.

Their eyes are huge, often meeting at the top of the head.

The Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly, will eat almost any soft-bodied flying insect including mosquitoes, flies, small moths, mayflies, and flying ants or termites.

The Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly are aptly named as they mimic hawks, relentlessly pursuing their prey.

The Latin name for this genus, Sympetrum, means “with rock” and refers to their habit of basking on rocks to absorb heat early in the day.

This species is one of the first dragonflies to emerge each year.

imnh.isu.edu/digitalatlas/bio/insects/drgnfly

 

 

 

WaterSign Fiber Arts by Mariana Mace

For almost my entire life, I have been fascinated by using my hands to make things, to put materials together, to interconnect elements. Yarns, beads, fabric pieces, parts of plants – each small stitch, or row, or piece of fabric is much like every other, but, oh, how they combine to create endless variety!
Working with my hands connects me to family – to the aunt who taught me to knit, the parents who encouraged me to bead, the daughter who wound skeins and balls of yarn for my weaving, and the granddaughters who learn basketry from me. Hand work also connects me to artisans of other times and other cultures.

My academic background is in anthropology, Native American art history, and world textiles. I study the art and fine craft of many cultures in museums, books, and world markets. My goal is to respectfully use some of their ideas, materials and techniques in my own way, in my own work, creating new art from old traditions.

I enjoy collecting or creating the materials I use, going out in the woods to pull bark from cedar trees and grub in the dirt for spruce root or tules. The weaving that travels through my loom is inspired by my handspun or hand dyed yarns.  –Mariana Mace

 

 

 

Woven Fire Designs by Deb Curtis

I create baskets using traditional basketry materials combined with abalone shells. I link traditional basket materials with tapestry weaving, beading, stitching and surface design. By combining a variety of fiber techniques in one vessel that uses basketry materials I create “new” baskets. By blending colors and textures I change the character of the basket from only a functional vessel to a container that expresses a concept. Some of my latest work explores shape and uses beading and stitching with birch bark and creating wall pieces using a variety of fiber techniques. Currently I’m focusing on knitting basketry using materials that represent Northwest native tribes. I’ve been taught by Ed Carriere (Suquamish), Bruce Miller (Skokomish), Anna Jefferson (Lummi) and Dawn Walden (Ojibway).  –Deb Curtis

Fun facts:

Abalone shell is sacred to the Native Americans and is used in smudging ceremonies. These shells are up to 6″ long, just right for holding sage and other herbal leaves.

Lore: Abalone helps one shift to comprehend and really hear other viewpoints. In addition, it is used as a shamanic tool for cleansing & stabilizing energy.

Deb Curtis and Marianna Mace were juried into the 2017 BEAVER TALES ART SHOW and EXHIBITION.

 

To read the latest news  about the traveling  beaver exhibition, go to The Daily Astorian:

A celebration of beavers
Beaver Tales comes to Nehalem
Date: 2017-07-20
story

The Mighty Beaver

Beavers are back in Los Gatos Creek in Santa Clara County, California, for the first time since the mid-1800s. This spontaneous return is a fantastic affirmation for members of the South Bay Clean Creeks Coalition, who prepared the ground for this historic event.

http://abc7news.com/…/family-of-beavers-moves-to-l…/2264864/

 

And, too, a grace note received:

Thank you for your generous gift of $747.30.  Your donation will result in conserving more of Oregon’s wetlands. Thank you for all you did to make Beaver Takes happen on the North Coast.  I am so impressed and grateful for your vision, energy, gallery and the community you have created around art  and the environment.

Please visit http://www.wetlandsconservnacy.org to see how we’re using your donation to make a lasting difference.  Thank you.  We are happy to have you as a partner.  –Esther Lev, Executive Director, The  Wetlands Conservancy.

 

 

 

Petrified Wood Cuff.  Oregon picture jasper pendant.   Fossilized coral Pendant.

 

Double lapis ring.

 

Oregon thunder egg cuff.

 

 Lapis cuff.

 

 

 Tigers eye pendant.

Alan Stockham creates handmade, one of a kind silver jewelry with stones from the Northwest and beyond. Each silver piece is signed, marked by the artist & numbered.

Available exclusively at Fairweather House and Gallery.  Please call 503-738-8899 for more details.

 

 

Petrified Wood is a fossil. It forms when plant material is buried by sediment. Groundwater flows through the sediment, replacing the original plant material by inorganic materials such as opal. The result is a fossil of the original woody material that often exhibits preserved details of the wood
Some specimens of petrified wood are such accurate preservations that people do not realize they are fossils until they pick them up and are shocked by their weight.

Oregon Picture Jasper is distinguished from other Chalcedony varieties such as Agate and Carnelian by its opacity. The appeal of Jasper is its interesting color patterns and formations. Jasper is an ancient gemstone, and is mentioned in the bible and other classical sources.

Fossilized Coral is a natural stone that is formed when ancient coral is gradually replaced with agate. The fossilized coral typically appears as small flower-like patterns in the stone.

Lapis is a blue rock composed of multiple minerals that has been used by people as a gemstone, sculpting material, and ornamental material for thousands of years.

Thundereggs are nodules or geodes that form when agate, chalcedony, or opal precipitate within the cavities of rhyolite, welded tuff, or perlite. When they are cut open, a treasure of colorful gem material and crystals is often revealed. The most popular rock in Oregon is said to be the thunderegg.

Tiger’s Eye forms when Quartz forms over existing Crocidolite, and eventually entirely replaces it. During the replacement process, the iron within the Crocidolite dissolves and stains the Quartz, thereby providing the golden yellow to brown color of the Tiger’s Eye.

–geology.com / …Fossils/ …Gemstones

Image titled: Lucky 13. Female Wood Duck pictured with 13 offspring, “…all that could fit in one image… she had 19 young swimming  behind her… ” –Neal Maine, nature photographer. Location, Gearhart Westlake.

 

 

Fun Facts:

Wood Ducks live in wooded swamps, where they nest in holes in trees or in nest boxes put up near or over water. They are equipped with strong claws that can grip bark and perch on branches. These cavities are typically places where a branch has broken off and the tree’s heartwood has subsequently rotted. Wood Ducks cannot make their own cavities. https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Wood_Duck/lifehistory

Beavers are responsible for creating the wetlands that the wood ducks call home. Beavers and wood ducks go hand in hand. Woodies are fond of waters with plenty of wooded cover — hence the name — and a new-built beaver pond offers habitat that attracts and keeps wood ducks in the vicinity.

Beaver Art Exhibit in Seaside, was created by the Wetlands Conservancy to celebrate all things BEAVER. Signature beaver art will be on display at Fairweather House & Gallery through September. In addition, the Seaside Library featured stories and crafts (with beaver sticks provided by Neal Maine and Joyce Hunt/ Necanicum Watershed Council), hands-on stewardship at Beaver Creek with the NCLC. “Neal Maine gave a brilliant talk on the ecology of beavers.” –Necanicum Watershed Council BIENNIAL REPORT.

wetlandsconservancy.org/stewardship/beaver-tales

http://www.dailyastorian.com/SS/news/20170412/from-near-extinction-to-a-place-in-art

https://thegilbertdistrict.wordpress.com/…/the-art-of-beaver-tales-seaside-exhibition-o

Read more about beavers and the wetlands they create, go to http://www.necanicumwatershed.org/ … and http://www.nclc.org

 

seaside-art-walk-logo

 

SAVE THE DATE AND TIME.  

Nature lecture by Neal Maine at 6:pm on July 1st

Fairweather House and Gallery
612 Broadway

 

Seaside First Saturday Art Walk opening reception for “Waves,” an exhibition featuring resident artists Victoria Brooks, Linda Fenton-Mendenhall and Ron Nicolaides, and introducing Jim Young and Karen Lewis.

Brooks paints in oils to capture landscapes and emotional moments of people in natural settings. Fenton-Mendenhall, a lifelong resident of Clatsop County, offers fresh perspectives of the fleeting moments of waves and the whisper of the sea.  Nicolaides has mastered the mesmerizing translucent waves in his depiction of luminous seascapes.

Young, a fishery biologist for the National Marine Fisheries Service, and later a research scientist for a U.S. Department of Energy national laboratory, uses photography as documentation, illustrating articles written for a website and publications. “My aim as a photographic artist is to capture images expressed in nature that would be forgotten if not recorded permanently after the events have passed,” he said.

Lewis has a lifelong relationship with water. She grew up kayaking, swimming, and snorkeling. She tries to capture the many moods of water, and her sweeping brush strokes express fluidity and color in motion.

Naturalist and biologist Neal Maine will speak at 6 p.m. about the ecology of the local habitat.  Shirley 88 will play live music.

To read more about the upcoming Art Walk, please visit http://www.facebook.com/Seaside First Saturday Art Walk.

 

 


Neal Maine, biologist, ecologist and nature photographer.

 

After a thirty-year career as an award-winning  biology teacher at Seaside High School, Neal Maine became the first executive director of North Coast Land Conservancy, which he co-founded in 1986. Since his retirement from the land trust in 2010, he has pursued his passion for nature photography through PacificLight Images. Photographs center around coastal and Columbia River landscape, ecology and the rich estuary habitat with the surrounding wetlands and forest systems.

Neal focuses his imagery on exploring wildlife in the context of its habitat. PacificLight Images is dedicated to working with coastal communities to protect wildlife habitat and its connectivity. A percentage of all photography sales are donated to North Coast Land Conservancy to help further this goal.

To view the catalog of all the images avialalbe from Neal Maine, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Neal Maine
Image

 

 

Waves by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

“I feel very new to the world of photography, starting just five years ago. It’s been an awesome experience as photographer for the Seaside First Saturday Art Walk, along with my love of capturing our beautiful, North Oregon Coast landscapes.”  –Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

 

Yes, indeedie, Linda Fenton-Mendenhall is the official Seaside First Saturday Art Walk photographer!

Please visit http://www.facebook.com/Seaside First Saturday Art Walk for her beautiful moments shared about the events.

Yes, sir-re-bob, Linda is seen, oftentimes, running between the galleries, businesses and boutiques, during an art event, in all sorts of weather!

 Linda is a featured artist for the opening reception of WAVES at Fairweather House and Gallery on July 1st.

PSST: We won’t  ever tell what Linda wears as a head-gear!  Gad hopping about for the arts.

 

 

“I’m drawn to the vibrant colors of our sunsets and forests to the contrasts of coastal storms.”

“The ever-changing weather and lighting are a constant inspiration.”

 

Linda Fenton-Mendenhall

“As a lifelong resident of Clatsop County, I still discover new views and perspectives that I love to share through my images.”

“I’m driven to seek out those moments that may be fleeting, so that they can be enjoyed by others.”

 

The biggest reward is hearing how one of my images sparked a memory or gave the viewer a true sense of “being there”.

 

 

 

About the Seaside First Saturday Art Walk:

Residents and visitors alike enjoy an evening of community and culture as various art venues within walking distance of each other host art exhibits and refreshments, between 5-7 p.m. with the Seaside First Saturday Art Walk. The art walk, celebrating 13 years in 2017, is in the historic Gilbert District. The Gilbert District, established in 1914, celebrated 100 years of rich history and timeless tradition in 2014. Awarded the 2004 Oregon Main Street Downtown Gateway Award, the area is now home to shops, restaurants, galleries and boutiques. Dedicated parking is located one block West off the Pacific Coast Highway 101, on the corner of Holladay and Broadway.

Held the first Sat. of every month inside shops, dining establishments and galleries in and around the historic Gilbert District of Seaside Oregon.
The following 2017 dates:

Aug 5th
Sep 2nd
Oct 7th
Nov 4th
Dec 2nd