Image:  “Eelgrass Meadow” watercolor by Emily Miller/ logo calligraphy by Kajira Berry

Ode to the Tides goals are to recognize the aesthetic and ecological significance Oregon’s estuaries, tide pools and intertidal habitats, to spark community and creative interdisciplinary engagement, promote conservation and enhance visitor experience and support of coastal resources and communities.

 

 

To view the art selection for  the Ode to the Tides Show and Sale, go to https://1drv.ms/f/s!ApX3G0K1CP6QvUoil55E7MCQvR8Y

For more info about the art, please contact art curator, Sara Vickerman,   svickerman@comcast.net

Naturalist, ecologist, photographer Neal Maine

Photo of Neal Maine on location/ c. Randall Henderson used with permission.

 

Naturalist, ecologist and acclaimed photographer Neal Maine will lecture during the Seaside June “Ode to the Tides” show, a Wetlands Conservancy traveling art exhibit to highlight the beauty and economic value of near-shore coastal habitats.

 “Raising the Capacity of Estuary and Wetlands Awareness” by Neal Maine

Seaside Public Library

1131 Broadway Street

June 13, 6-8:00 pm

Free  program and open to the public


“Communities must explore a strategic framework that functions and bridges the gap at the community and regional level that makes ongoing community-based awareness an everyday agenda item.”

Neal Maine often lectures throughout the region raising awareness of coastal ecology and the wildlife with whom we share the region’s estuaries, freshwater wetlands and forests.

“Communities must find ways to ensure systemic community renewal for all citizens beyond government meetings. Efforts need to include comprehensive engagement of citizens in a broad range of community processes.”

 

After a thirty-year career as an award winning biology teacher at Seaside High School since his retirement, Neal Maine has pursued his passion for nature photography through PacificLight Images. Photography centers around coastal and Columbia River landscape, ecology and the rich estuary habitat with the surrounding wetlands. PacificLight Images, is dedicated to working with coastal communities to protect habitat.

 

Watercolor by Pam Haunschild/ Ode to the Tides Art Show and Sale

 

 

The Wetlands Conservancy and partners are sponsoring Ode to the Tides, a traveling art exhibit and sale to highlight the ecological value of near-shore coastal habitats.

 For more info, go to https://wetlandsconservancy.org/stewardship/ode-to-tides-art-exhibit/

 

Image:  “Eelgrass Meadow” watercolor by Emily Miller/ logo calligraphy by Kajira Berry

 

Ode to the Tides Art Show and Sale contains original art in a variety of media, created by Northwest artists at venues on the Northern Oregon coast and Willamette Valley.

Through May 28th– Giustina Gallery, LaSells Stewart Center, Corvallis OR

Through June 30th Fairweather Gallery and Art-in-Loft Gallery in Beach Books, Seaside OR

August 2nd – September 25th Newport Visual Arts Center & Hatfield Marine Science Center Visitor Center & Maritime Museum, Newport OR

November – December Beaverton Library & Beaverton City Hall, Beaverton OR

For a sneak peek at the art created for the exhibit, please go to https://1drv.ms/f/s!ApX3G0K1CP6QvUoil55E7MCQvR8Y

 

 

The Wetlands Conservancy is the only organization in Oregon dedicated to permanently protect, conserve and restore Oregon’s greatest wetlands.

 

Ode to the Tides goals are to recognize the aesthetic and ecological significance Oregon’s estuaries, tide pools and intertidal habitats, to spark community and creative interdisciplinary engagement, promote conservation and enhance visitor experience and support of coastal resources and communities.

https://wetlandsconservancy.org/

 

Grant funding  for the SEASIDE Ode to the Tides exhibit and program made possible through:

Purpose The Clatsop County Cultural Coalition grants are funded by the Oregon Cultural Trust and awarded to projects that support, maintain, preserve and …

 

Image: “Eelgrass Meadow” watercolor by Emily Miller/ logo calligraphy by Kajira Berry

 

 

The Wetlands Conservancy presents Ode to the Tides

Seaside Oregon

To celebrate the aesthetic and ecological significance of Oregon’s estuaries and tide pools, The Wetlands Conservancy has collaborated with the Clatsop County Cultural Coalition, Oregon Sea Grant, and Institute for Natural Resources to host the Ode to Tides art exhibit and sale. The exhibit, first shown at Oregon State University through May, arrives in Seaside through June.

The exhibit opens on June 1 at two locations in Seaside.

Fairweather House and Gallery, 612 Broadway Street and The Art-in-Loft Gallery at Beach Books 616 Broadway Street.

The traveling exhibit includes artwork of all kinds, from paintings to fiber, wood, stone, glass and ceramics. With regional and local artists displaying their work, the exhibit and sale bring together a multitude of styles and creativity.

The exhibit will feature juried art for purchase. A portion of the sale of each piece of art will support The Wetlands Conservancy’s program to conserve Oregon’s Coastal estuaries.

The exhibit focuses on the plants, animals, fish, land formations and the magic of estuaries and tide pools, the rich mixing zones where freshwater from the land meets salt water from the sea. This blend creates a unique environment with abundant and diverse life. Estuaries gather nutrients from both land and sea, forming an ecosystem that contains more life per square inch than the richest Midwest farmland.  Oregon’s 22 major estuaries are ecologically essential for many fish and wildlife species, including salmon, herring, flounder, crab, oysters, clams, wading birds, ducks, and otters, providing habitat for reproduction, rearing, resting and foraging.

 

Ode to the Tides goals are to recognize the aesthetic and ecological significance Oregon’s estuaries, tide pools and intertidal habitats, to spark community and creative interdisciplinary engagement, promote conservation and enhance visitor experience and support of coastal resources and communities.

The exhibit will be on view in Seaside through June 30.

About The Wetlands Conservancy: Founded in 1981, The Wetlands Conservancy is the only organization in Oregon dedicated to working in partnership with communities statewide to permanently protect, conserve and restore Oregon’s greatest wetlands– our most biologically rich and diverse lands. The mission of The Wetlands Conservancy is to conserve, enhance and restore the physical and ecological values of Oregon’s greatest wetlands for current and future generations. For more information, please visit http://www.wetlandsconservancy.org.

 

 

To view the art selection for  the Ode to the Tides Show and Sale, go to https://1drv.ms/f/s!ApX3G0K1CP6QvUoil55E7MCQvR8Y

For more info about the art, please contact art curator, Sara Vickerman,   svickerman@comcast.net

Ode to the Tides Art Show and Sale

Fairweather Gallery Exhibition Hours

June 2019

Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri, Sat 10-6

Sun 11-4

(503) 738-8899

http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

 

Grant funding  for the SEASIDE Ode to the Tides exhibit and program made possible through:

Purpose The Clatsop County Cultural Coalition grants are funded by the Oregon Cultural Trust and awarded to projects that support, maintain, preserve and …

 

“Polar Snow Shoe” by Neal Maine

“Whale Within” by Neal Maine 

 

 

Wildlife photographers Daniel Dietrich and Neal Maine in 2015.

 

An event hosted in Seaside for the Alaska Wilderness League in 2015 has earned  recent  kudos and a connection to Art Wolfe, internationally known photographer. Neal Maine shared the news at the opening reception of ‘Portraiture’ on May 4, 2019.

 

Daniel Dietrich traveled to the Arctic with Neal Maine in 2014. Daniel recently entered his polar bear image, a photo one/tenth of a second from Neal Maine, in a competition.

“Thanks to BigPicture: Natural World Photography Competition for selecting my polar bear image as a finalist in this year’s competition. The photo will be on display at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco July-October.”  Daniel Dietrich

 

And, too, Daniel Dietrich is with Art Wolfe on location in 2019.

 

 

To recall the 2015 event, go to…

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/tag/arctic-light

 

‘Arctic Light’ draws attention to global warming Presentation …

https://www.discoverourcoast.com/…/arctic-light…/article_1d181096-2d41-5d56-a37…

Feb 16, 2015 – ‘Arctic Light’ draws attention to global warming Presentation, … Neal Maine and Daniel Dietrich will speak about Alaska Wilderness League at …

 

 

Osprey portrait by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images.  Proceeds in support of NCLC.

 

‘Portraiture’ habitat lecture by local naturalist, wildlife photographer Neal Maine was given at Fairweather’s on May 4.

 

Ospreys return to Seaside

May 17, 2019/  Seaside Signal newspaper article

Oregon coast naturalist Neal Maine still gets a thrill after many years of watching the osprey return to their nests in Seaside. Maine has found nine nests so far and estimates that there are about 20 osprey locally, but he admits that there are likely some he is missing.

“When nature keeps on marching, you get excited. When the osprey return, somethings still right, they flew all the way from South America,” said Maine.

The annual return of the osprey not only marks the coming of summer, it is a sign of the progress being made in conservation. Osprey, along with other raptors, suffered a population decimation from the use of DDT, which caused eggshell thinning. Once the pesticide was banned, the bird of prey made a sharp recovery.

However, they are not out of the woods yet. There is a growing trend of osprey nesting on man-made objects. Osprey typically nest near rivers on the top of dead trees, but as forest composition changed and old growth snags disappeared, they started relying on utility poles and other tall objects to rear their young.

In addition, their choice location is not always convenient. When osprey in Seaside decided to nest on a pole near the Broadway baseball field the raptors did not consider that the power line may one day need replacement. The nest was relocated on a 60-foot high pole installed off Neawanna Creek. Fortunately, the birds were fine with the move and have continued to nest at the new location since 2012. Maine, who oversaw the project, has watched the same birds come back to the same nests since 2009.

Osprey that summer in Oregon typically winter off the islands and coast of Mexico, Central and South America, segregating into male and female territories. Osprey typically live to 25 in the wild and will continue to use the same nest with their monogamous partner, unless something tragic happens. The juveniles also come back to the area where they were reared so the birds on the coast have been here for many, many generations.

While their numbers rebounded significantly in most of the world after the banning of DDT, osprey are still threatened or endangered globally, including in many states nationally. In Oregon, they are not considered legally endangered, although are not as abundant as they once were. Currently, the biggest threat to osprey is aquaculture, which causes habitat loss because of damming. The raptors are often shot while hunting fish at aquaculture facilities in their southern territory.

However, here in Oregon the birds are increasingly overwintering locally rather than migrating and it is not clear as to why. The birds rely on an abundant source of fish, which may be harder for the birds to find as more rivers are dammed for agriculture, flood control, aquaculture and hydropower. It’s also possible that they are finding the Willamette Valley’s maritime climate more amenable than in year’s past and have moved north, like many birds, as a result of climate change. Moreover, it could be a slough of other variables not yet identified. There are not many resources on the coast dedicated to the study of osprey.

We didn’t even know where the nests were, it wasn’t on anyone’s agenda. ODFW was budgeted back to survival level, there’s not even an ODFW office in Clatsop County,” said Maine. Since the ospreys are not a priority species, answering these questions might fall on the shoulders of people like Maine, who engages regularly in citizen science. “More and more are staying every winter in the valley, and last year I found one here in January,” he said.

Nature certainly does find a way and osprey are a testament to that. They are resilient birds and can make themselves at home in the busiest of human environments. “It seems like they watch the baseball games,” Maine said about the birds at the Broadway field.

 

Check out the osprey cam at seasideosprey.org or better yet, go find them in person in Seaside.

 

“The Sacred” by Shelby Silver

“SOLD”

On view through May 29

Medium: Mixed media, acrylic impasto and PMD (plastic marine debris)

 

Gallery display featuring Shelby Silver’s art “The Sacred.”  In addition, green and butter hand blown art glass, handmade journal and boxes by Christine Trexel.  In the back ground is portraits by Leah Kohlenberg.

Shelby Silver artist statement:

To quote Louise Doughty “Muscle has memory: the body knows things the mind will not admit.”

I agree with this concept whole heartedly*. It has only been through the process of painting and allowing myself to be a conduit that I have been able to tap into the message my body has been trying to convey for the past 35 years. I have opened myself to create portraiture from a place of ancestral memory, meaning I am not using a live model, and I am not operating from a photograph. I am recalling a memory, from a past I have not lived in this life, but one I have lived before.

 

Through blood lines long dusted now presenting themselves to me through meditative visualizations I am sharing this gift. I am sharing ancestral wisdom not only from my long forgotten historical background, but yours as well. You and I are unified, and eat from the same earth that those who’ve gone before us are now growing out of. It is only natural that together we feel connected and protective over our earth and this sacred right. As I open myself more completely to the nature of our familial totemic inheritance I am finding that my spirit is feeling fulfilled. My guardianship values are deepening in an innate yearning to reconnect mankind with the wild and essential beauties surrounding us.

There are untold gifts waiting to be received should we care for this planet in ways that symbiotically and ecologically allow it to care for us.

“Remembering our connection is remembering our responsibility to Earth, Sea, and All Living Beings.”

 

 

With “illumined gratitude” Shelby Silver  recently spoke about  “remembering our connection is remembering our responsibility to earth, sea, and all living beings” at Fairweather’s.

 

Please visit www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com to read more about Doing Good Works

 

*Q: What is the difference between heartedly and heartily, you ask?
Heartedly definition, having a specified kind of heart (now used only in … hearted. adj. now used only in combinations, meaning “at heart,” since c.1200, first … As adverbs the difference between heartily and heartedly is the heartily is in a hearty manner while heartedly is in a hearted manner.

Love and Mindfulness Advocate, & Steward of Earth and Sea, Shelby Silver, Pacific Northwest born and raised Ecological Artist couple’s self-taught impasto techniques, and her back ground in fiber art with plastic marine debris she collects along the Oregon Coast.

It is through this bold marriage of media she invites you to drop into your heart space and look ever more closely at the world we share as invaluable and sacred. ​Along with her evolving art career Shelby is a Writer, and Illustrator and is currently working on multiple books. One of specific interest may be her Educational Marine Alphabet, drawing awareness towards the declining conditions in which sea animals are living under.

End note:

“Just received the May 2019 edition of Southwest Art magazine.  There is an article about my  art.  Happy to bring extra copies for the opening artist reception to the Fairweather Gallery on May 4!”  

 

Shelby Silver

Environmental Artist

Love and Mindfulness Advocate

Steward of Earth and Sea

 

Portraiture opening reception collage; Top: Neal Maine habitat lecture and Carolyn Macpherson artist talk. Bottom:  Shelby Silver artist lecture and Blue Bond artist introduction.

Portraiture collage by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

 

 

“For ‘Life Abundant’  my paintings  are part of a series of regional paintings of forest, vineyards, wheat and lavender farms of the Tualatin Valley in Oregon.” -Jan Shield, Professor Emeritus of Art at Pacific University, Forest Grove

 

Read more about the artist…

https://www.oregonlive.com/hillsboro/2012/02/retired_pacific_university_pro.html

Jan Shield was at Pacific University in Forest Grove for forty years, twenty one of them as chairman of the art department. His tenure is the longest of any professor in the school’s history.

 

 

“These paintings express a sort of witness to the soil becoming the grass and how plant life abounds joined in a harmony of space and form. No doubt the influence of Da Vinci’s fascination with life, the movement of water, and his brushwork called sfumato (softness of all edges) is evident in my interest in the flow and modulation of color and rich contrasts that beyond being representational. From a slight breeze in the early morning to the enclosure and stillness of the coming of late afternoon before darkness … I keep painting.”  Jan Shield

 

 


“Some of my  new work is very abstract, textural done for the pure enjoyment of itself, more expressive, experimental and highly representational  to environmental responses.”  Jan Shield

 

 

Dancing Trees Sanctuary

“It is my home, studio and forest preserve in Oregon. It is an environment of thick fir and maple forest blanketed with lush ferns and punctuated with sun lit meadows.”  Jan Shield

 

 

Jan Shield at Fairweather’s 

 

“For April my works are full of energy to create a feeling of the air merging with the trees and fields where from the earth they grow.  They express a sort of witness to the soil becoming the grass and how plant life abounds joined in a harmony of space and form,” Jan Shield, Professor Emeritus of Art at Pacific University.

 

“I was commissioned to create for the new Astoria Memorial Cancer Planetree Hospital/ CMH-OHSU Knight Cancer Collaborative.  A Select number of seventeen regional artists were requested to make work for the interior spaces along with Richard Rowland of Astoria to create a large anagama fired ceramic entry mural.  My painting is an acrylic on canvas, 6ft 8in by 3ft 4in related to a forest visit.” Jan Shield

For more info visit the artist’s tab www.fairweatherhouseangallery.com

 

“Nana’s Red Tulips” original art by Barbara Bacon Folawn.

 

 

“Yellow Crocus” original  art on canvas by Barbara Bacon Folawn.

 

“Light House Meadow” original art on canvas by -Barbara Bacon Folawn

 

“Welcome spring! We awake from sleepy winter to see color peeking out from buds in trees and gardens and meadows. Wait a few weeks longer and we have the thrill of seeing whole blossoms opening up to show us bright yellow crocus and red tulips. Coastal meadows covering the cliffs are full of new life.

This is what inspired me to paint for the “Life Abundant” exhibit at Fairweather Gallery in April. Every year, spring catches my eye and feels like a celebration of spirit all over again. What better way to recognize the season than dipping a paintbrush and letting the colors flow over a canvas to our heart’s delight!” –Barbara Bacon Folawn.

 

“I so enjoyed talking with you at the gallery. And the current displays throughout the space are lovely. Many intriguing pieces to look at and admire! I appreciate your energy in keeping the Blog current and interesting to read.

Again, it was fun to spend some time with you on Monday and I hope you are having a good week. The snow arrived here in the valley again today (March 6), so I’m glad I returned home when I did, avoiding driving through new snow and possibly ice at the summit of Highway 26.” —Barbara Bacon Folawn

 

 

 

 

 

As a tribute, the OHSU School of Medicine established a permanent endowment for Robert Bacon, Barbara Bacon Folawn’s father.  The fund has supported student projects including sophisticated lab research, studies related to bicycle helmet safety and perfecting communication skills to better convey complex medical information to patients and their families. Bacon also became known as an environmental leader. He trained whale-watch volunteers and taught Elderhostel participants about local estuaries and rocky intertidal ecology. He helped to organize the Haystack Rock Awareness Program and led the effort to save the beaches for public use with the Oregon Beach Bill.

 

Read more at

https://www.dailyastorian.com/obituaries/the-consummate-teacher/article_926c0343-ffc5-5d38-8a93-06f16fe03984.html

 

The Consummate Teacher

For Robert Bacon, scientist, researcher, environmentalist and consummate teacher, being curious about the world around him came as …

https://m.washingtontimes.com/news/2017/jul/6/oregons-beach-bill-signed-50-years-ago/

 

Landmark legislation passed in 1967, known as the Beach Bill, guarantees us access that only Hawaii can match.

Tom McCall, the 30th governor of Oregon, signed the Beach Bill into law … DrRobert Bacon and Laurence Bitte led a group called Citizens to …

Oregon’s 362-mile coastline is a recreational playground, with hiking, camping, fishing and biking, surfing and beachcombing opportunities galore. It is one big viewing platform, with enchanting beaches, seductive headlands and glorious vistas at every single turn…