“There is the wilderness of innocence. It is  a reminder of all that: the beauty, the power of nature, the fragility of nature and the fragility of our nature and our own being. Nature will always be here.”   Carol Jazzar

 

Oil paintings by Leo Brew, rice paper art by Zifen Qian, glass by Christine Downs, burl wood frames, and speciality wood photo frames.

 

Snowy owl photo by Neal Maine, watercolor by Don Nisbett, handmade box by Christine Trexel, mouth blown art glass, gift cards by Dorota Haber-Lehigh, carved wood candlesticks, and knitted cloches by Linda Olson.

 

Encaustic art by Claudia Fuenzalida Johns, wood  bowl and tops  by Tom Willing, hand woven wire baskets, glass by Monet Rubin,  hand sewn COVID masks by Robin Montero (with the ‘nosey-bendy- thingy’), spooled velvet ribbon, and hand decorated ornaments(fa-la-la is coming).

Watercolor bird blocks by Lieta Gratteri, seed pearl box by Gayle H. Seely, framed watercolor by Mary Burgess, and floral by Mini’s Flower’s.

 

Graphite on yupo by Patricia Clark-Finley, silk and down accent pillows, and mouth blown art glass vessels.

 

Glass by Monet Rubin, sand blasted stemware by Rox Heath, abstract mirror by Neal Small, and hammered nickel candlesticks.

 

 

Impasto oils by Tedd Chilless, watercolors by Lieta Gratteri, drawings by Lori Wallace-Lloyd, myrtle wood bowl by Mike Brown.

 P-s-s-t… can you spot the first hint in the photo above for ALL THAT GLITTERS, Fairweather’s upcoming December exhibition?

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside, Oregon

 WILD BEAUTY Exhibition and Art Sale

Through Nov. 24th

Featuring NW artists Leopoldine “LEO” Brew, Mike Brown, Agnes Field, Patricia Clark-Finley, Dorota Haber-Leligh, Ron Nicolaides, Neal Maine, Jan Rimerman, and Vanessa K. Stokes, among others.

The strength of WILD BEAUTY lies in the detailed and multivariate perspectives each artist brings showing us a different viewpoint.

They all use WILD BEAUTY as the theme of their work but they use different techniques and the way they see it is distinctively unique.

 

The Fairweather’s WILD BEAUTY exhibition is finely nuanced — in the selection of works, their judicious placement and the mastery of composition and diverse spot lighting.” —KR

 

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands.

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Displays by D. Fairweather, gallerist/ allied member A.S.I.D., American Society of Interior Designers. Photos by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

Impasto oil artist Tedd Chilless presented a Painting Seaside LIVE ™ episode during the opening reception of WILD BEAUTY at the November 7th Seaside First Saturday Art Walk at the Fairweather House and Gallery.

 

Artist Leopoldine Brew offered an artist talk about her WILD BEAUTY oil paintings during the opening reception of WILD BEAUTY at the November 7th Seaside First Saturday Art Walk at the Fairweather House and Gallery.

 

Oregon mrytlewood turner Mike Brown showed his artistic endeavors in creating wood mushroom sculptures during the opening reception of WILD BEAUTY at the November 7th Seaside First Saturday Art Walk at the Fairweather House and Gallery. And, too, Diane Brown spoke about the intense labor of love required to find the wood, age the wood, craft the idea, and the hand finishing steps to complete the  one-of-a-kind sculptures.

 

Emerging artist Vanessa K. Stokes gave an inspiring artist talk about her watercolor, pen and ink original works for the opening reception of WILD BEAUTY at the November 7th Seaside First Saturday Art Walk at the Fairweather House and Gallery.

 

Photo top left:

Landscape art by Lee Munsell, encaustic art Peg Wells, segmented  wood vases by Mike Brown, ocean oil by Phil Juttelstad, wave paintings by Sharon Abbott-Furze, woven twig basket by Charles Schweigert, and fused glass art pieces by Monet Rubin.

Photo top right:

Pelican mixed media by Helen Brown, watercolor landscapes by Mary Burgess, fresco paintings by Agnes Field, floral impasto by Tedd Chilless, pen and ink drawings by Vanessa K. Stokes, and fine art photography by Steven A. Bash.

 

Photo bottom left:

Fine art photograph by naturalist Neal Maine, abstract art by Barbara Martin, beeswax paintings by Kathryn Delany, graphite on yupo by Patricia ClarkFinley, landscape oil by Colette Fallon, and pottery by Suzy Holland.

 

Photo bottom right:

Mixed media WILD BEAUTY series by Jan Rimerman, woven twig basket by Charles Schweigert, segmented vases by Mike Brown, and wood bowls by Daniel Harris and Tom Willing

Photo collages by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall

 

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside

 WILD BEAUTY Exhibition and Art Sale

Through Nov. 24th

Featuring NW artists Leopoldine “LEO” Brew, Mike Brown, Agnes Field, Patricia Clark-Finley, Dorota Haber-Leligh, Ron Nicolaides, Neal Maine, Jan Rimerman, and Vanessa K. Stokes, among others.

The strength of WILD BEAUTY lies in the detailed and multivariate perspectives each artist brings showing us a different viewpoint.

They all use WILD BEAUTY as the theme of their work but they use different techniques and the way they see it is distinctively unique.

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands.

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

 

 

 

December 7th- December 23rd

ALL THAT GLITTERS exhibition and sale

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside

 

Featuring products Made by Northwest Hands ™

One-of-a-kind jewelry, sculpture, and glass

 

 

 

 

Save the date and time

December 7th

11:am- 5:pm

ALL THAT GLITTERS

Holiday Open House

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

ALL THAT GLITTERS opening reception

Featuring products made by Northwest Hands ™ and original art by regional and local artists.

 

 

Indeed, we have wonderful holiday memories that make us smile at the remembering of them. So this year, we decided we would do a full embrace of of ALL THAT GLITTERS. These days, we can all use an extra dose of “feel good”! And, our designer, affiliated as an allied member, of A.S.I.D., American Society of Interior Designers, will be on hand to show you how to turn all this shimmering inspiration into high impact displays you will love in a few key spots in your own home.

Trending in 2020

“Think  impermanent and incomplete… two words for the mood we are going to see with decorating at home during the on-going global pandemic.  Design is focused on choosing objects with texture, by adding imperfect items, wrinkled natural fabrics, and by choosing handmade beauty. Colors are muted and raw as well, grey, perhaps, to match the mood of restraint and understated, as holiday celebrations will continue to be limited for the safety of family and friends during COVID.” D. Fairweather, gallerist/ designer

 

 

 

 

“Indeed, we have found wonderful glass ornaments that tugged at our heartstrings, sparking memories of our own glittering trees growing up.” DF

 

 

 

 

 

And, too, a note from our Governor:

“This holiday season, give the gift of Oregon! Our local businesses need support. One way Oregonians can help is to shop homegrown businesses that are run by our neighbors, family, and friends. Local retailers are prepared for you to shop safely.”

 

 

 

 

 

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, our products made by NW hands, and our collections @

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Since 2006 and counting….always have, and always will, feature handmade products and art found in the USA.

A premier source for stylish, chic, one of a kind livable furnishings, unexpected art, and the most extraordinary accessories. Glass, paintings, photography, wood, stone, bronze, sculpture, ceramics, and jewelry.

Representing a collection of fine art by an exceptional group of selected regional artists for over fifteen years from traditional to transitional, contemporary to realism, impressionism to emerging art.

 

 

 

 

“Wild Beauty/ Ash” pen and ink with watercolor by emerging artist Vanessa K. Stokes 

“Get hopelessly lost in the art you make. Go down for days and come out on the other side with scrapes and bruises and a masterpiece.” – Ariel Bloomer

 

“Wild Beauty/ Wolf Spirit” watercolor mixed media by emerging artist Vanessa K. Stokes

 

Vanessa K. Stokes was introduced at Fairweather’s when she was fifteen, as an artist to watch. An emerging artist is someone who is in the early stage of their career, someone who has caught the eye of an art curator at a gallery.

 

“Dragonfly Paradise” sealed watercolor on board by Diana Nadal

Diana Nadal’s inspirations are captured in the quotation:

“It’s not what you look at that matters, it’s what you see.” 
Henry David Thoreau

 “Feather Boa” water media by Pam Haunschild

 

In my paintings, I attempt to capture the essence of nature without copying it exactly.  I want to get past the obvious — to get to the essence of why many of us find being outside in nature soothing to our souls.  Conveying the power behind a bird’s gaze, the wonder of the vast number and variety of creatures that live in a tidepool, or the majesty of a salmon swimming upstream to spawn, I hope to capture something that will inspire viewers to connect more deeply with the natural world.” PH

 

 

“Mountain Cabin” oil impasto by Tedd Chilless

When computers took over my architectural practice. I experienced graphite withdrawal.  The transition from architecture to painting has been easy since the knowledge of form and composition are similar in both.” TC

 

Northwest artists Vanessa K. Stokes, Diana Nadal, Pam Haunschild, and Tedd Chilless created new original work for WILD BEAUTY, a Fairweather exhibition and art sale now through November 24th.

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside

 WILD BEAUTY exhibition

Through Nov. 24th

Featuring NW artists Leopoldine “LEO” Brew, Mike Brown, Agnes Field, Patricia Clark-Finley, Dorota Haber-Leligh, Ron Nicolaides, Neal Maine, Jan Rimerman, and Vanessa K. Stokes.

Welcoming  encaustic artist Claudia Fuenzalida Johns.

Showing new work from Diana Nadal, Pam Haunschild, and Tedd Chilless.

The strength of WILD BEAUTY lies in the detailed and multivariate perspectives each artist brings showing us a different viewpoint.

They all use WILD BEAUTY as the theme of their work but they use different techniques and the way they see it is distinctively unique.

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands.

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

 

 

“Swan” graphite on yupo by Patricia Clark-Finley

With the first snows falling in the Pacific Northwest, it’s an appropriate time to turn our attention to wintering birds that can be found in our region.

Trumpeter Swans, Tundra Swans, and Snow Geese are three white birds that are of particular interest  at this time because their populations are growing and expanding to new locations within the Northwest.

https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Trumpeter_Swanhttps://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Tundra_Swanhttps://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Snow_Goose

 

Neal Maine, NW naturalist and fine art photographer, showing photographs of snowy owls that have sometimes visited the North coast.

The Snowy Owl is an irregular visitor to the North Coast, with sightings most likely from early November to mid-March. Abundance varies from year to year, with none reported some winters, over 100 reported in others, and at least a few most years.

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside

 WILD BEAUTY exhibition

Through Nov. 24th

Featuring NW artists Leopoldine “LEO” Brew, Mike Brown, Agnes Field, Patricia Clark-Finley, Dorota Haber-Leligh, Ron Nicolaides, Neal Maine, Jan Rimerman, and Vanessa K. Stokes.

Welcoming  encaustic artist Claudia Fuenzalida Johns.

“My art process reflects the family cultures I come from. At the foreground are issues of migration, movement, and constant change. My own nomadic wandering is both intellectual and also physical as my studio location and my reading list seems to change every few years. The birds which populate my images seem to echo this freedom of wandering. Most recently, the broad expanse of abstraction and light are inspired by the weather watching I do from my Long Beach Peninsula studio window in Washington.” Patricia Clark-Finley

 

The strength of WILD BEAUTY lies in the detailed and multivariate perspectives each artist brings showing us a different viewpoint.

They all use WILD BEAUTY as the theme in their work but they use different techniques and the way they see it is distinctively unique.

“Fairweather Art Walk is always good. It seems effortless and relaxed as only a talented designer could orchestrate. The space is lighted with precision to display over 100 artworks from a variety of genres and mediums. The artists are comfortable and welcomed as they mingle with visitors and one another. Greetings are pleasant and well-mannered. The evening  progresses with explanations from the artists about their work, and a word from the curator about current projects and events.  Gallerist Denise Fairweather works tirelessly along with loyal friends to set the stage for this genuine paradigm for art in the community.”  PCF

 

Patricia Clark-Finley studied at the UW, UC Berkeley, and completed a BFA at the San Francisco Art Institute. She spent time at the San Francisco Center for the Book, Carl Jung Institute, and Crown Point Press. Her work has been included in exhibitions juried by artists such as Viola Frey, Carlos Villa, and Christopher Brown. She was in the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art Gallery. Her work has been included in galleries and invitational exhibitions.

 

 

 

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands.

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Artist Patricia Clark-Finley and naturalist Neal Maine have exhibited at the Fairweather Gallery for more than ten years.

 

 

Last call for LIGHT and SHADOWS

On exhibit through Oct. 31st

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

LIGHT and SHADOWS Fairweather’s October Art Sale and Exhibition featuring NW artists Paul Brent, Diane Copenhaver, Linda Fenton-Mendenhall, Neal Maine, Emily Miller, Diana Nadal, and Vanessa K. Stokes.

Bringing together works by very different artists – in terms of age, geography, and medium – this exhibition draws the viewer’s attention to the beauty of the understated, giving the viewer a chance to focus on texture.

LIGHT and SHADOWS front counter display featuring art by Patricia Clark-Fiinley and Vanessa K. Stokes. On exhibit through Oct. 31st

 

Enjoy the slide show from the exhibit’s opening on Oct. 3rd.  And, too, please note that social distancing and COVID-19 guidelines were in place. Photos by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall, Seaside First Saturday Art Walk photographer, featuring guests, artists, and visitors on the evening of Oct. 3rd at Fairweather’s.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

LIGHT and SHADOW review: We are so used to seeing seasonal art tinged with the brightest colors, so much so that looking at this exhibition is almost like taking a step out of time.

A show that reflects on the mood of the monochromatic light, shadows, and atmosphere in the NW.”

 

In the historic Gilbert District of downtown Seaside. The event observes COVID-19 guidelines.

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside

Opening reception for WILD BEAUTY

Nov. 7th, 5-7:pm

Exhibiting NW artists Leopoldine “LEO” Brew, Mike Brown, Agnes Field, Patricia Clark-Finley, Dorota Haber-Leligh, Ron Nicolaides, Neal Maine, Jan Rimerman, and Vanessa K. Stokes.

The strength of WILD BEAUTY lies in the detailed and multivariate perspectives each artist brings showing us a different viewpoint.

They all use WILD BEAUTY as the theme in their work but they use different techniques and the way they see it is distinctively unique.

And, too, Tedd Chilless will offer a Painting Seaside Live event in impasto oils during the evening.

 

 

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands.

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

“Watching animals on television is extremely different than seeing them in their own habitat. 

Experiencing the fight for life and survival has given me a great respect for the wild animals of the Serengeti in Africa.    

My safari group saw the animals hunting, being hunted and living together in a complicated environment.” Jan Rimerman

 

Lioness mixed media by Jan Rimerman

The defined muscles and grace of the lioness in the painting doesn’t even hint at the clever maneuvers that she designs to feed her family.     

24″ x 24″ on panel

 

Watching the powerful discipline of the Lioness in the hunt allowed me to see the determination of survival.  Experiencing the lives of the African animals was not always pleasant or beautiful. 

Witnessing the patient dance of the hunt in the Ngorongoro Crater was both wild, beautiful and horrifying.  Luckily an attentive zebra made the warning call and, although the cubs went hungry, a wildebeest’s life was spared.” JR

 

 

 

Cape Buffalo mixed media by Jan Rimerman

The wild beauty in this painting is exhibited in the wonderful shapes found in the animal’s distinctive physical characteristics.

24″ x 24″ on panel

The Cape Buffalo has an entirely different kind of wild beauty.  This animal’s strength, shape and power is evident in its stare and stance. Although this 1,800lb. animal is a vegetarian, it can ward off lions, leopards, hyenas and African wild dogs.

It is considered one of the top most dangerous animals to encounter.  The cape buffalo exudes power as well as a stubborn personality. The snorts and sounds of this animal’s hooves are a good reminder to stay in the vehicle.  JR

 

Thomson’s Gazelle mixed media by Jan Rimerman

This painting captures the alert tension that is ever present.

24″ x 24″

The Thomson’s Gazelle has a beauty and grace of a different kind.  They live in herds alongside the zebras and wildebeests. They have many predators so their acute senses of sight, smell and hearing work in their favor.  They are the fastest and nimblest of all antelope and can reach speeds of between 40-60 miles per hour. 

 

Observing a herd running across the plains is like watching a ballet of well-proportioned muscle moving in synchronized rhythm.  The Thomson’s gazelles are known for their acrobatic leaps which confuse their predators and make them more difficult targets.”  JR

  

 

 

Jan Rimerman studied art at the City University in London, at Willamette University, Portland State University and at the University of Washington. Her work is found in ten books. Her art pieces are all painted on top of an underpainting of powdered charcoal on heavy watercolor paper.  Twenty-two layers of transparent fluid acrylic are applied to create a feeling of three-dimensionality and luminescence.

Jan is the Visual Arts Coordinator of the Lakewood Center, the Art Director of the LO Reads Program, the Director of Rock…Paper…Turtle…Art for Wetlands in partnership with The Wetlands Conservancy & the Director of the Rain Spark Gallery.   Jan’s art is well known for unusual perspectives and narrative.  She uses it for presentations promoting the arts and culture while raising awareness for the World Wildlife Fund and for clean water in Tanzania.

 

 

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside

 WILD BEAUTY exhibition

Through Nov. 24th

Featuring NW artists Leopoldine “LEO” Brew, Mike Brown, Agnes Field, Patricia Clark-Finley, Dorota Haber-Leligh, Ron Nicolaides, Neal Maine, Jan Rimerman, and Vanessa K. Stokes.

Welcoming  encaustic artist Claudia Fuenzalida Johns.

The strength of WILD BEAUTY lies in the detailed and multivariate perspectives each artist brings showing us a different viewpoint.

They all use WILD BEAUTY as the theme in their work but they use different techniques and the way they see it is distinctively unique.

“Nature can be beautiful in many ways.  My life consciously includes travel adventures whether in my own backyard or abroad.  The paintings for this exhibit include some of the wild beauty I was privileged to experience up close and personal in Kenya and Tanzania. Learning and understanding the animal hierarchy, the survival skills of each species and the interconnectedness of their lives allows their wild beauty to be even more vivid.” Jan Rimerman

 

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands.

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

“Petrichor” by Agnes Field

Mixed media fresco painting on panel

24”x 30”

“I paint what I need to see, with references to nature and poetry.”  AF

 

Q:  What is the meaning of petrichor, you ask?

A: Pet·ri·chor/ noun means a pleasant smell that frequently accompanies the first rain after a long period of warm, dry weather.

 

 

“Most of the studio is work-in-progress and I consider them emotional totems– indications of expressions under the surface.” AF

 

 

I produce mixed media paintings assembled from my surroundings using commonly accessible materials, such as cardboard, wood, plaster and fabric.  The artwork attempts to minimize the boundary between everyday experience and objects.   I have shown work and worked as an artist-in-residence in Finland, Italy (SACI-Florence; NYU-Venice, and the Atlantic Center for the Arts in Florida.”  AF

 

 

 

Agnes Field  creates her distinctive art work in an off-the-grid studio on a working farm with her husband high above the Lewis and Clark Road near Seaside. They built their home to be self-sufficient in cooling, electricity, heating, and hot water.

 


Agnes Field, of native Chinook Indian and Finnish descent, uses non-traditional materials and found objects in paintings attempting to imbue the kind of energy found in leftover artifacts.

 

 

 

Petrichor II by Agnes Field.

Mixed media  fresco painting on panel

24” x 24”

“Meaning is always caught below the surface.” AF

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside

 WILD BEAUTY exhibition

Through Nov. 24th

Featuring NW artists Leopoldine “LEO” Brew, Mike Brown, Agnes Field, Patricia Clark-Finley, Dorota Haber-Leligh, Ron Nicolaides, Neal Maine, Jan Rimerman, and Vanessa K. Stokes.

 

Painting makes the wild beauty of the world more knowable and more mysterious at the same time.”  AF

 

Oregonian Agnes Field completed her graduate work at New York University and studied at the Pacific NW College of Art, School of Visual Arts, New York, and SACI in Florence, Italy. The award-winning artist has shown nationally and included in shows at the Portland Art Museum, Coos Bay Art Museum, and the Cheney Cowles Museum.

Welcoming  encaustic artist Claudia Fuenzalida Johns.

The strength of WILD BEAUTY lies in the detailed and multivariate perspectives each artist brings showing us a different viewpoint.

They all use WILD BEAUTY as the theme in their work but they use different techniques and the way they see it is distinctively unique.

 

 

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands.

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

Oregon myrtlewood master turner Mike Brown.

Myrtlewood is recognized for its striking variety of color and character, offering a range from blonde to dark chocolate to radiant gold. This hardwood species is found along coastal areas in Southern Oregon. It can live for several hundred years, regenerating itself from its roots when the trunk and branches are damaged.

 

 

From Burl to Mushrooms 2020

“From friends in Southern Oregon was this burl segment gifted from myrtlewood on their property.” MB

 

“From the burl chunk, I was able to create wood turned mushrooms. This picture depicts them in various stages of creation.” MB

“For each mushroom two pieces of wood were used; one for the stem and one for the cap. This picture shows the turning that was done.”  MB

 

“Three coats of lacquer and three coats of hand-rubbed wax are applied as a finish.” MB

 

“Mortise and tenon joinery craft used to assemble, carved with my maker’s name, and dated 2020 with prices from $75 to $450.”  MB

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside

 WILD BEAUTY exhibition

Through Nov. 24th

Featuring NW artists Leopoldine “LEO” Brew,  Mike Brown, Agnes Field, Patricia Clark-Finley, Dorota Haber-Leligh, Ron Nicolaides, Neal Maine, Jan Rimerman, and Vanessa K. Stokes.

Welcoming  encaustic artist Claudia Fuenzalida Johns.

Mike Brown is a native of the Pacific Northwest with a creative mind and an intense work ethic. As an artist he likes to express himself building works using coastal hardwoods.

The strength of WILD BEAUTY lies in the detailed and multivariate perspectives each artist brings showing us a different viewpoint.

They all use WILD BEAUTY as the theme in their work but they use different techniques and the way they see it is distinctively unique.

 

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands.

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

King Boletes mushrooms by Dorota Haber-Lehigh

 Original art framed, walnut ink, watercolor and color pencil

“Local PNW and edible, these were found in Gearhart last year. Get excited for another fab fungi season!” Dorota


REVIEW: “Along with the mushrooms themselves, you also did a lot of work on that tricky, feathery plant at the base of them along with the bits of pine needles. And I like all those nibbled, imperfect parts, too.”
HB

 

Dorota Haber-Lehigh is an artist, educator and a naturalist with a passion for native plants of the Pacific Northwest. Born in Poland, Dorota loves foraging for berries, mushroom hunting, field sketching and collecting specimens. She is inspired by her grandparents, who were avid mushroom hunters and gardeners.

Click to listen to Dorota’s artist talk during the OVER and UP opening reception:

Dorota Haber-Lehigh is an artist, educator and a naturalist with a passion for native plants of the Pacific Northwest.  Dorota has two degrees in Art and International Studies with a focus on indigenous cultures, and a master’s degree in teaching. She earned a Diploma in Botanical Illustration from Society of Botanical Artists in London. She is a member of Oregon Botanical Artists, Pacific Northwest Botanical Artists and American Society of Botanical Artists.

She has authored two ethnobotanical books: “ABC of Native Plants of the Coastal PNW” and “Native Berries of the Coastal PNW.”

 

 

For the November show Dorota has chosen to depict various seedpods and fall berries. 

 

Fall  fruit and seeds provide food for birds and and are part of ancient harvest rituals for humans.

“Iris Pods and a Bee”  by Dorota Haber-Lehigh

Art mounted on wood block with multiple layers of Dorland wax

8″ x 8″

 

At this time of the year plants prepare for winter, and begin storing the energy and creating fruit and seeds as a promise of spring regeneration.

“Oregon Huckleberries” by Dorota Haber-Lehigh

Art mounted on wood block with multiple layers of Dorland wax

8″ x 8″

 

Seed pods, fruit, fungi and fall flora provide such a visual feast of colors and textures.

“Snowberries and Hummingbird Moth”  by Dorota Haber-Lehigh

Art mounted on wood block with multiple layers of Dorland wax

8″ x 8″

Seeds and seed pods remind us that the cycle of nature continues.

“Magnolia Grandiflora” by Dorota Haber-Lehigh

Framed 12″ x 12″

Art paper stained with walnut ink to create unique surface, and uses artist quality colored pencils such as Faber Castell Polychromos or Caran d’Ache, 100% cotton hot press 140 lbs acid free paper.

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside

 WILD BEAUTY exhibition

Through Nov. 24th

Featuring NW artists Leopoldine “LEO” Brew,  Mike Brown,  Agnes Field,  Patricia Clark-Finley, Dorota Haber-Leligh,  Ron Nicolaides, Neal Maine, Jan Rimerman, and Vanessa K. Stokes.

Welcoming  encaustic artist Claudia Fuenzalida Johns.

The strength of WILD BEAUTY lies in the detailed and multivariate perspectives each artist brings showing us a different viewpoint.

They all use WILD BEAUTY as the theme of their work but they use different techniques and the way they see it is distinctively unique.

Dorota’s interest in portraying individual plants with their sculptural and ephemeral beauty brings attention to importance of ecological diversity of nature and to emphasize nature’s and human fragility.

“It brings me joy and solace to turn to nature during this time of uncertainty and confusion and reflect on the symbolism of seeds offering new growth and new directions.”  Dorota Haber-Leligh 

 

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands.

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com