“Subtle Treasure” mixed-media stone and water collection by Jan Rimerman

“Stories from the Past” mixed media stone and water collection  by Jan Rimerman

“The powdered charcoal under painting plus the 22 layers of transparent fluid acrylics provide a sense of visual textural mystery. By altering one’s viewing perspective you may observe symbols and stones as the waves gently flow over them.”   Jan Rimerman

 

 

“Waves” by Leah Kohlenberg  pastel and acrylic framed 16×20

 

 

“Light and Waves” by Karen E. Lewis oil on canvas.

 

 

July 6- July 31

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

 

 

 MAKING WAVES

Fairweather’s July exhibition explores the deep, multifaceted relationship with the ocean.

Art for the exhibition, largely significant pieces include new original work, created entirely by North coast artists.

 

Artist Jan Rimerman offered an artist talk about her MAKING WAVES art.

 

 

Artist Leah Kohlenberg spoke about her MAKING WAVES art/

 

Featuring selected Fairweather artists: Blue Bond, Victoria Brooks, Paul Brent, Nick Brakel, Karen Doyle, Leah Kohlenberg, Karen E. Lewis, Emily Miller, Lee Munsell, Richard Newman, Ron Nicolaides, Jan Rimerman, Lisa Sofia Robinson, Peg Wells, Russell J. Young and Dale Veith. 

 

In addition, artist Leah Kohlenberg assisted naturalist Neal Maine for his habitat lecture during the opening reception of MAKING WAVES.

 

Introducing artists Sharon Abbott-Furze, Phil Juttelstad, Mary Burgess and Helen Brown.

The range in the show reveals the extraordinary impact of the sea and waves.

 

 

A trio of fun facts:

Jan Rimerman, Lean Kohlenberg and Karen E. Lewis were  juried into the Ode to the Tides Art Show and Sale, a traveling exhibition in support of the Wetlands Conservancy.

Karen E. Lewis is a rough water river guide.

Leah Kohlenberg’s art for Making Waves was delivered to the gallery from fellow Fairweather artist Russell J. Young.
“Those that live for the arts, support the arts.”

http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

“Lily Leap” by Neal Maine wood duck chick on West Lake lily pad.  Just in for MAKING WAVES. July exhibition.

Proceeds in support of NCLC.

 

 

“Seaside Sand Dollars” by Richard Newman fine art photo printed on glass.

 

 

Neal Maine received an anniversary cake for ten years of exhibiting at Fairweather’s during the opening reception of Making WAVES.

 

Artists Paul Brent and Victoria Brooks celebrated a ten year milestone with Neal Maine during the  Seaside First Saturday Art Walk on July 6.

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadyway

MAKING WAVES

July 6-July 30

Fairweather’s July exhibition explores the deep, multifaceted relationship with the ocean.

Art for the exhibition, largely significant pieces include new original work, created entirely by North coast artists.

Featuring selected Fairweather artists: Blue Bond, Victoria Brooks, Paul Brent, Nick Brakel, Karen Doyle, Leah Kohlenberg, Karen Lewis, Emily Miller, Lee Munsell, Richard Newman, Ron Nicolaides, Jan Rimerman, Lisa Sofia Robinson, Peg Wells, Russell J. Young and Dale Veith.

Introducing artists Sharon Abbott-Furze and Phil Juttelstad.

The range in the show reveals the extraordinary impact of the sea and waves.

 

For more info go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com /  artists tab/ Neal Maine

 

“Life on the Edge” by Mary Burgess watercolor 21×21

 

About Mary Burgess artist:

Drawing on her travel experience and interest in nature, Mary Burgess expresses herself through watercolor painting.  She is especially interested in the effect of light and shadow on her subjects.  Each painting is started with a colorful wash, which acts to provide unity in the paintings and masterful color shifts reflect the subtleties found in nature.  The paint is glazed, one lay over another to achieve a rich and complex color palette.

Burgess is a resident of Lake Oswego where she lives with her husband and a small flock of chickens.

Her work may be viewed a various regional shows in addition to the  Fairweather House and Gallery.  She is a member of the Watercolor Society of Oregon and Lake Area Artists.  Burgess offers adult watercolor classes at the Village Gallery of Arts.

 

 

 

“Halfway Home” by Helen Brown  rice paper and watercolor 25×32 framed.

 

Q: Rice paper, you say?

A: Yes, indeed. Rice paper is a product made of paper-like materials from different plants. It has been used for centuries in China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam for writing, artwork, and architecture.  Rice Paper makes suitable support for drawing media like soft pastel. It can be used for drawing with subtle and well-developed tonal effects.

 

 

Helen Brown artist statement:

I enjoy the spontaneity of watercolor. When considering subjects to paint, I am attracted to those with interesting perspective, dramatic light and elements that are meaningful to me personally. Patterns and unique shapes are particularly interesting to me.

My watercolor in the Making Waves show is one in my solo 30-painting exhibit that occupied the Oregon Historical Society in Portland for four months in 2018 titled “My Journey with Lewis and Clark.” This painting is titled “Halfway Home” because when the explorers of the Corps of Discovery arrived at the Pacific Ocean, they were only halfway through their heroic journey. They had to retrace their steps back to St. Lewis, Missouri after finding that there was not a continuous water route to the sea from there. In Seaside, there are two reminders of this journey: the statue at the turnaround, and the salt works where they boiled salt out of seawater for their food.

The painting in this show is a watercolor batik; an age-old process normally used on silk, but I use ginwashi rice paper. As I paint each layer and let it dry, I protect colors and shapes by painting with molten wax. Since rice paper is very absorbant, the wax is needed to create a harder edge. I continue painting in this way until many layers of color have been applied. In the end, I iron out the wax so what is left is simply watercolor on rice paper.

Helen is a member of the Tumalo Art Co. (Bend’s Old Mill District), the High Desert Art League, Arts Central and the Watercolor Society of Oregon.

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

MAKING WAVES

July 6- July 30

Fairweather’s July exhibition explores the deep, multifaceted relationship with the ocean.

Art for the exhibition, largely significant pieces include new original work, created entirely by North coast artists.

Featuring selected Fairweather artists: Blue Bond, Victoria Brooks, Paul Brent, Nick Brakel, Karen Doyle, Leah Kohlenberg, Karen Lewis, Emily Miller, Lee Munsell, Richard Newman, Ron Nicolaides, Jan Rimerman, Lisa Sofia Robinson, Peg Wells, Russell J. Young and Dale Veith. 

Introducing artists Sharon Abbott-Furze, Phil Juttelstad, Mary Burgess and Helen Brown.

The range in the show reveals the extraordinary impact of the sea and waves.

Grace note:

“I enjoyed meeting you with Mary Burgess, at your gallery this last week. You mentioned that your next exhibit is about waves, so I thought I would send you an image and see if it is not too late to participate in this show.”   Helen Brown

 

 

And, see, it was not too late to participate in Making Waves.  On exhibit July 6- July 20.

Helen Brown is the sister of Mary Burgess.

Mary Burgess participated in the Ode to the Tides Art Show and Sale, Seaside edition, as an artist and a volunteer for the installation May 30.

 

http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

“Heading out at Sunrise” by Dale Veith fine art photograph

 

“Fishermen at Sea” by Dale Veith fine art photograph

“Windswept” by Dale Veith fine art photograph

 

 

“I chose for Making Waves exhibit because they capture some of the different moods of the sea, and the way that the forces of Nature combine to create awe, exhilaration, and soothing. I love being out in weather. The heavy weather of 75+ mph winds that were howling when I shot, Windswept, and the calm, early morning sunrises that greeted us when I shot, Fishermen at Sea, and Heading Out At Sunrise.

Hopefully, these photos will connect their viewers with the same sort of deep sense of awe and appreciation of Nature and her many moods that they inspire in me.” Dr. Dale Veith Clinical Psychologist, Fine Art Photographer

 

 

Dale Veith offered a lecture on the healing nature of photography during the opening reception of MAKING WAVES, Fairweather’s July exhibition.

 

Photo: by Russell J Young

 

The Photography of Russell J Young

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

Seaside, Oregon

July 6 – July 30

 

MAKING WAVES

Fairweather’s July exhibition explores the deep, multifaceted relationship with the ocean.

Art for the exhibition, largely significant pieces, include new original work, created entirely by North coast artists.

Featuring selected artists: Blue Bond, Victoria Brooks, Paul Brent, Nick Brakel, Karen Doyle, Leah Kohlenberg, Karen Lewis, Emily Miller, Lee Munsell, Richard Newman, Ron Nicolaides, Jan Rimerman, Lisa Sofia Robinson, Peg Wells, Russell J. Young and Dale Veith.

Introducing artists Sharon Abbott-Furze and Phil Juttelstad.

The range in the show reveals the extraordinary impact of the sea and waves.

“Deep” by Emily Miller encaustic

Emily Miller is a lifelong artist with a passion for materials. Her ocean-inspired artwork ranges from plein air watercolor landscapes to abstract encaustic wax paintings, ceramics, fiber art, and more. Her artwork often focuses on conservation issues, recycled materials, and ecology themes, with a portion of sales benefiting ocean conservation.

Born in California, Emily spent childhood summers on the tiny island of Deer Isle, Maine, and moved to Kauai at the age of sixteen. After twelve years on Kauai as an award-winning artist and graphic designer, Emily relocated to Oregon where her artwork continues to explore the coast and the seasons.

Emily fell in love with watercolor over 25 years ago, painting landscapes and local culture on Kauai and around the world. Her paintings now specialize in sharing the beauty of Oregon landscapes and seascapes in a variety of mediums including watercolor, acrylic, and encaustic wax.

“Kelp Shadows” by Emily Miller encaustic

 

 

 

 

During the opening reception of MAKING WAVES, Emily Miller offered an artist talk.

Photo collage by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

Seaside, Oregon

July 6 – July 30

MAKING WAVES

Fairweather’s July exhibition explores the deep, multifaceted relationship with the ocean.

Art for the exhibition, largely significant pieces include new original work, created entirely by North coast artists.

Featuring selected Fairweather artists: Blue Bond, Victoria Brooks, Paul Brent, Nick Brakel, Karen Doyle,Leah Kohlenberg, Karen Lewis, Emily Miller, Lee Munsell, Richard Newman, Ron Nicolaides, Jan Rimerman, Lisa Sofia Robinson, Peg Wells, Russell J. Young and Dale Veith.

 

“Tideline” by Emily Miller  encaustic

“The rhythms of the ocean are my greatest source of inspiration. I find painting with encaustic wax to be a spontaneous and intuitive process reminiscent of the ocean’s movement. I use techniques that generate sweeping, gestural forms to create my most fluid and abstract artwork. Bold color, unpredictable detail and collaged natural elements explore the ocean’s deep currents and ever-changing tideline.” Emily Miller

Introducing artists Sharon Abbott-Furze and Phil Juttelstad.

The range in the show reveals the extraordinary impact of the sea and waves.

Q: Where in the world has Emily Miller been recently, you ask?

A: Emily Miller was the artist behind the paper moon for her work that was juried into the Ode to the Tides Art Show and Sale May-December 2019.

Q; Where was the artist, most recently, you ask?

A:  Emily Miller was the artist in residence at Elisabeth Jones Art Center May 2 – June 23 for the Ghost Net Landscape, a community interactive installation & performance.

 

 

Q: Anywhere else in the last 30 days, you ask?

A: Emily Miller was the artist on the ledge at the group art show for Ode to the Tides at Art-in-the-Loft Gallery in Seaside, installing on May 30 and de-installing the exhibition on May 30.

 

 

After ten years as a painter, Emily began her study of sculpture and ceramics with an endless enthusiasm for exploring new materials. Her recent projects include the “100 Turtles” ceramics project, “Ghost Net Baskets” made with reclaimed fishing rope, and “Urchin Bowls,” a line of sea urchin-inspired porcelain bowls.

#12 _Morning Crest Oil 30x40 Morning speaks to me of hope and energy and new possibilities. Each bright day is new and will be as rich as i make it.

ARTIST STATEMENT

“I have spent my life on the coast, and all my artwork has its roots in my love of the sea. My work explores natural beauty and cycles of change centered on coastal environments, where our human connection to nature becomes clear.

“A central part of my art practice deals with changes at the meeting point of the natural and human worlds. I see the coast as a border between the known and the unknown, and I am fascinated with what lies beyond this dividing line.”

© Emily Miller 2018- 2019

http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

Pam Haunschild in her studio

About artist Pam Haunschild:

In her artistic practice, Pam explores nature.  She goes beyond realism and provides a different, very powerful vision of her natural subjects that deepens the connection between the viewer and the natural world.  Her distinctive style is colorful, highly textured and semi-abstract, but the natural forms can be identified.  She works in watermedia — both acrylics and watercolor, often in the same painting.   She builds complex, textured layers, often using natural materials that leave impressions in the paint.

Although she had a scholarship to attend art school when she was young, she went into academia instead.  After a career as social science professor at Stanford and University of Texas-Austin, Pam turned back to her first love and has been painting full time ever since.

She has been fortunate to have been selected as artist-in-residence at three National Parks:  Lassen (CA), Glacier (MT), and Lake Clark (AK), and continues to be inspired by her time there.  She has also received several private and two key public commissions:  to produce the 2019 Britt Festival playbill cover and poster art, and to design and coordinate the painting of a native plant mural at Southern Oregon University.  Her work is held in many private and public collections, including the National Park Service.

She has had her work shown as part of several juried one-person and group exhibitions and has won awards for her art, including an Award of Distinction from the Northwest Watercolor Society for her painting “Octopus Garden”.  She was juried into the Watercolor Society of Oregon and is also a member of several other arts organizations.  She has been on TV and radio, and her paintings have been used in Southern Oregon literary journals and catalogue covers.

 

“Salmon Swim” mixed media watercolor by Pam Haunschild

 

Pam Haunschild, Artist’s Statement:

Being outside in nature is everything to me!  So it’s no surprise that nature is my subject.  In my paintings, I attempt to capture the essence of nature without copying it exactly.  I want to get past the obvious — to the essence of why many of us find being outside in nature soothing to our souls.  Whether this is conveying the power behind a falcon’s gaze, the wonder of the vast number and variety of creatures that live in a tidepool, or the majesty of a salmon swimming upstream to spawn, I hope to capture something that will inspire viewers to connect more deeply with the natural world.

 

I find artistic inspiration from living on a wooded high-elevation property near Ashland, Oregon, as well as from having held several National Park Artist-in-Residence positions (Lassen, Glacier, and Lake Clark (Alaska)). 

 

 

“Tidepool VI” mixed media watercolor by Pam Haunschild

I work with both watercolors and acrylics — often together in the same painting.  Much as nature is created through the addition and washing away of materials over time, my artistic process involves creating layers in my art.  I build textures in the paint, often using natural objects like leaves, stones, and shells.  Although later removed, they leave their impressions.  I often use paint in a way that mimics natural processes, e.g., washes of very wet color produce rivulets and wave-like patterns like those found in the ocean.  Stones texture paint in patterns that mimic wind-blown surfaces and geological layers.  The resulting paintings are colorful, highly textured, and semi-abstract, but the natural forms can still be identified. 

 

As John Muir says, I hope “Nature’s peace will flow into you as sunshine flows into trees” when you view my work. –Pam Haunschild

 

 

 

“I just got back from my trip to the coast and wanted to write to say what a pleasure it was to meet you.  And I am so honored to be represented by your beautiful Fairweather Gallery!”  Pam

 

Fun fact:

A series of  Pam Haunschild’s tidepool mixed media paintings were selected for the Wetlands Conservancy Ode to the Tides Art Show and Sale.

Read more at https://wetlandsconservancy.org/stewardship/ode-to-tides-art-exhibit/

 

 

 

 

Jan and Jay Barber, Sara and Jeff Gage with Neal Maine

 

“On Thursday, June 13th, the Friends of the Seaside Library welcome award-winning biology instructor and naturalist, Neal Maine, sponsored by the Fairweather House and Gallery. Joann Pari-Mueller, Leah Kohlenberg, and Paul Brent will talk about their creations for the Ode to the Tides exhibit at Fairweather Gallery and Beach Books. 

 

Neal will speak on estuaries and how they gather nutrients from land and sea, forming an ecosystem that contains more life per square inch than the richest Midwest farmland.  He will detail how Oregon’s major estuaries are ecologically essential for fish and wildlife which includes salmon, herring, flounder, crab, oysters, clams, wading birds, ducks, and otters, providing habitat for reproduction, rearing, resting and foraging.

 

After a thirty-year career as a teacher at Seaside High School, Neal Maine has pursued his passion for nature photography through Pacific Light Images. “Dedicated to raising awareness of coastal ecology and the wildlife with whom we share the region’s estuaries, freshwater wetlands and forests.”

 

The program will be presented in the Seaside Public Library, 1131 Broadway Street, in the Community Room at 6:00 p.m. A selected grouping of the Ode to the Tides art will be displayed and the gallery will provide refreshments.

 

If you haven’t visited Fairweather Gallery and Beach Books to see the exhibit, you have until the end of June. It features 90 artists and 200 pieces that focus on coastal estuaries and tide pools, and benefits the Wetlands Conservancy.”   Sara Vickerman-Gage, Ode to the Tides art curator

 

 

https://wetlandsconservancy.org/stewardship/ode-to-tides-art-exhibit/

 

For more about the nature photography by Neal Maine, please visit the artist’s tab Neal Maine and Michael Wing  at http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com