Full Moon Bowl by Emily Miller

 

 

“I have a brand new full moon bowl (first one out of the kiln!) Creating a different perspective on my passion for exploring unknown environments in art. Although most of my artwork has focused on the ocean, I find the beauty, mystery, and science of outer space as compelling as the deep-sea.”  —Emily Miller, artist

 

Q: When is the full moon in June, you ask?

A: The full moon will be on June 27 and June 28. To the casual observer, however, the moon will appear full the day before and after its peak brightness. https://www.moongiant.com/moonphases/June/2018

 

 

Concept drawings by Emily Miller.

“I love the fanciful scientific names for the lunar “seas” (which are actually flat regions of dark basalt where lava oozed to the surface, pulled by Earth’s gravity up towards the near side of the moon). The Sea of Nectar and the Sea of Clouds are two of my favorites. I also love that the Seas of Tranquility and Crises are right next to each other.”  Emily Miller

 

 

“I am captivated by the beautiful contrast between light and darkness in our natural world, and the necessity of both for life to thrive. .”  Emily Miller

 

 

 Spiny urchin porcelain bowls by Emily Miller

 

 

Sea anemone porcelain vases by Emily Miller.

Heavily textured raw porcelain exteriors are  reminiscent of sunlight patterns in a shallow lagoon. Watertight.

 

Read more about Emily Miller at https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/tag/fairweather-house…gallery/…/1…

 

Save the date and time

Opening artist reception for the exhibition  “Ocean Folk”

July 7, 5-7:pm

Emily Miller launches her 100 Turtles project at the Fairweather Gallery

 

“Here is the post I just wrote about my 100 Turtles project.” Emily Miller

  http://ejmillerfineart.com/news/2018/06/14/100-turtles-project/

 

 

End note: Two Fairweather Gallery artists featuring a North Oregon coast night scene with a full moon over the Pacific Ocean, which is the largest ocean in the world.   At full moon, the Moon and Sun are in a straight line on opposite sides of the Earth. Their gravitational forces combine to create larger waves.

“Night Sea” by Ron Nicolaides.  Original oil on Linen.

 

For more info about the artist, please go to  https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/Artist/Ron/Nicolaides.html

 

  “North Coast Sea” by Nicholas Oberling.  Original oil on linen.

For more info about the artist, please go to  https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/…/welcoming-nicholas-oberling-art.

 

Precious moonstone, a translucent, opalescent, pearly blue gemstone cuff bracelet by Alan Stockam. Signed and numbered by the silversmith.

 

 

 

 

 

 

“My mixed-media paintings are mainly powered charcoal, gelled onto watercolor paper.  Charcoal may weird, it is not just black and white and it is not smudgy, provides texture.  Along with charcoal, I  add as many as twenty-two layers of transparent paint, each layer is sealed with clear gel.  I hide things in layers, like  turtles.  It takes awhile as each layer has to be  dry before another layer can be applied.  The resulting art work has a three-dimensional aspect.  Truly, working with charcoal gives the  painting visual textural mystery. The technique allows the viewer to dive in and have their own adventure.  It is never the same.  In different light or from different angles, various images come forward or recede.  Indeed, the painting offers a new perspective each time it is viewed.”    Jan Rimerman

 

 

Artist Jan Rimerman with Megan, art assistant to the artist, at Fairweather House and Gallery.

 

Megan, art assistant, at the Fairweather Gallery during the opening reception of “Sense of Place”, shows an exciting composition by Jan Rimerman  featuring multiple layers of charcoal and paint creating stones and water.

 

 

 

At the opening artist’s reception at Fairweather House and Gallery, Jan Rimerman opens the magazine Cascade Living/ spring 2018 edition, to an article about working magic with charcoal and paint while raising money for wetlands and her favorite animal.

Close up of “Secrets of the Stream”

“I hide turtles in layers,” Jan Rimerman

More about the artist:

Jan Rimerman has followed her artistic muse since childhood. This journey has carried her to South America, the British Isles, Western and Eastern Europe, Africa, Asia and Indonesia.

Jan’s work was influenced by Dürer, Schöngauer, and Blake.  Carl Hall and Robert Hess were influential professors at Willamette University.    Rimerman also studied art at the City University in London, Portland State University and at the University of Washington.

Her own work began to exhibit a contemporary twist using traditional elements and principles of design of these masters.

She spent many months in France studying the lives and techniques of her favorite Impressionists and Post-Impressionists.   These masters use of light and color taught her to look at her subject matter more critically in terms of light and shadow.   Her silent mentors were Pissarro, Van Gogh, and Monet.

Then…colored pencil was introduced into Jan’s world when a box was presented to her by her Aunt and Uncle.  This gift changed her life forever.  The world of colored pencil wrapped Jan up and massaged every bit of drawing talent in her.  Line, shape, color and texture magically became borders, flowers and landscapes coming alive under her fingertips.  She was pushed into the limelight winning many national awards and was published in internationally distributed books and magazines.  The rhythmic movement and elegance of Art Nouveau, and particularly Mucha’s borders, are evident influences in this era of her art work.

Gradually the light and color Jan used to create representational art metamorphosed into abstract images.   Her appreciation of Klimt, Rothko, and Kahn has influenced her abstract style.  Most recently,  Jan has been exploring color, movement, and composition using mixed media. The powdered charcoal and fluid transparent acrylics give her the freedom to work out color theory and multiple dimensions with her very individual layered style.  Jan is constantly reaching and stretching for new shapes and color combinations to create exciting compositions to create the illusion that you may jump right into the painting and swim through it.

Jan Rimerman discusses her art process  during an artist’s reception at Fairweather House and Gallery.

 

Grace note received:

“Thank you for the beautiful reception! The gallery looked stunning! I wish you a splendid summer season. Thank you for including me in your juried show.” Jan Rimerman

 

Read more about the artist Jan Rimerman:

janrimerman.com/event/94680/rockpaperturtleart-for-wetlands

Rock…Paper…Turtle…Art for Wetlands is a fundraiser to help restore the Western Pond Turtle habitat in the Nyberg Wetlands…

https://www.cascadesothebysrealty.com/services/cascade-living-magazine/

Cascade Sotheby’s International Realty flagship publications … Cascade Living Magazine – Spring 2018 – … /For the Lover of Turtles/  ...Jan Rimerman

 

In good company, “Sense of Place” photo collage. Images from the Fairweather House and Gallery artist’s reception.

For more info, about the event, please go to http://www.facebook.com/ Seaside First Saturday Art Walk.

 

The Fairweather June exhibit, “Sense of Place,  laid claim to our unique little corners  of our individual  world –special only to ourselves.  Surely, what we all seek is a place that allows us to indulge in out dreams, hopes and wishes.  What we all seek to find is that special place and time that offers a bit of momentary solitude that fortifies our spirits and rejuvenates our energies. 

 

“Sense of Place” through June, 2018.

For more information, go to www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

“Sunset at Tillamook Head” watercolor by Emily Milller

“A stormy winter sunset over Tillamook Head as seen from Seaside beach, on the northern Oregon coast. Brilliant oranges and pinks lit up the clouds and reflected in the waves for just a few minutes between rain showers. A low fog hanging over the headland created separation between the layers of trees. I set up to paint on a log near the high tide line, stopping only when the light faded and my paper was too wet to continue!”

 

 

“I have spent my life on the coast, and all my artwork has its roots in my love of the sea. I see the coast as a border between the known and unknown, amid constant cycles of change.” –Emily Miller

 

“Needles and the Haystack” watercolor by Emily Miller

“Two narrow sea stacks known as “The Needles” at Cannon Beach, next to Oregon’s iconic Haystack Rock. This was painted on a beautiful summer day, sitting on the steps leading down to the beach. The Needles are some of my favorite sea stacks on the Oregon coast!”

 

“Kites at Cannon Beach” watercolor by Emily Miller

“Colorful kites on a summer afternoon fly over Haystack Rock at Cannon Beach, on the northern Oregon coast.”

 

“Sea Stacks at Siletz Bay” watercolor by Emily Miller

“Wind-swept trees grow on a series of sea stacks known as “Four Brothers” in Siletz Bay, outside Lincoln City on Oregon’s central coast. The water was calm and shallow on this summer morning, when I set up in the warm sand to paint with a friend.”

 

 

“Cape Meares Lighthouse” watercolor by Emily Miller

“The tiny Cape Meares lighthouse is the smallest lighthouse in Oregon, but worked as a beacon visible for 21 miles out to sea from 1890 to 1963. Its unique octagonal tower sits on a high cliff on the northern Oregon coast near Tillamook. The lighthouse is accessible down a shady, forested path, with the tower and red lens framed by mossy trees.”

 

“Exploring the Oregon coast with my painting kit and camera is one of my greatest joys. Every visit creates a stronger bond with my favorite beaches and trails, beautiful in all weathers and seasons.” –Emily Miller

 

Q:  What are sea stacks, you ask?

A:  Sea stacks are blocks of erosion-resistant rock isolated from the land by sea. Sea stacks begin as part of a headland or sea cliff. Relentless pounding by waves erodes the softer, weaker parts of a rock first leaving harder, more resistant rock behind.

The Oregon coastline naturally has areas of rocky headlands alternating with sandy coves due to variation in the local rock types. As waves approach the shore, they are refracted nearly parallel to shore so that wave energy is concentrated on headlands. Rocky cliffs develop on the headlands and sand is deposited in the bays, forming beaches.

Sea stacks sit like giants half-submerged in the ocean, not far from shore. As if they were massive, mythological sentinels set with the mission to guard Oregon’s coast. They are indeed ancient – millions and millions of years old.   www.nature.nps.gov/geology

 

For more info, go to  www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

 

 

Christine Trexel for Fairweather’s “Sense of Place” 

 

A blank journal with an iconic vintage photo of Highway 101 at Neahkahnie Mountain. Sometimes writing can help us to further develop our ideas and our sense of being.  I believe it helps foster creativity to have a beautiful book to contain our thoughts.

 

 

 Sometimes writing can help us to further develop our ideas and our sense of being.  I believe it helps foster creativity to have a beautiful book to contain our thoughts.

 

The accordion book enclosed behind doors shows children in their place, at play as children should be.  The images are from a late 1800’s children’s book and are on paper springs to give more of a dimensional element.  They have been lightly hand colored to bring them to life.

 

 

The multilayered structure demonstrates a balance as the drawers are staggered and balanced to make a tower.  Little ladders allow them to be explored by small creatures.  Inside the door on the top is a winged horse who managed to fly in and settle down.  The drawers all open fully and are available to store small things that need their own place.”Christine Trexel

 

 

 

 

Christine Trexel

 

Books have been an integral part of Christine Trexel’s life since early childhood. She grew up on a farm in southeastern Colorado and spent many happy hours lost inside the pages of a book. She firmly believes a day without time set aside for reading is an incomplete day.

As an adult she began her journey in creating her own books, which led to boxes, and then to making paper while living in Oregon. She has been fortunate to have taken a wide variety of classes at the Oregon School of Arts and Crafts, as well as, with international known artists in book binding and papermaking.

Christine lived in Panama for years where she learned to harvest and process plants from her garden to make paper for the books and boxes she creates. The wealth of vegetation forested experimentations and a great love of learning.

“It is truly a magical experience to convert a growing thing into a beautiful piece of paper.”  Christine Trexel

 

Grace note:

“In my work for the June exhibition at Fairweather’s  I created new pieces with various interpretations of “A Sense of Place”.   I am amazed every time I come into the gallery and see how you it has been transformed.   Your gallery was my first foray in the PNW for displaying my work and it helped spur me in my creative field.  Thank you!”    Christine Trexel

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more info go to www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Christine Trexel

 

Grace note received:

“Thanks for another beautiful art walk. I am amazed every time I come into the shop and see how you have transformed it. I feel fortunate that you accepted me into your space now 5 years ago. You were my first foray in the Pacific North West for displaying my work and it helped spur me in my creative field. Thank you!”  Christine Trexel

“Seaside Dreams” 16×12, original oil by Melissa Jander

 

“Lavender in Window” 12×16, original oil by Melissa Jander

 

“Sweet Peas in Window” 12×12, original oil by Melissa Jander

 

 

 

Melissa Jander, a “home-grown” Pacific Northwestern painter, brings “A Sense of Place” to her latest works by combining objects, settings and a glimpse of the environment. Using carefully chosen colors and expressive brushwork she hopes to invite the art viewer to participate by evoking a mood, memory or emotion.

 

 

Grace note received:

“Looking forward to a fabulous show and another fun visit to Seaside. In addition, on three paintings I have updated my framing, adding linen liners and new frame molding. I was selected as the 2018 Skagit Valley Tulip Festival poster artist! Here is the NW News article. See you soon!” 🙂 Melissa

 

 

Home/News & Features/News/2018 Skagit Valley Tulip Festival poster art created by Woodinville artist

Each year a committee of community volunteers selects a local artist to create the official poster, which is unique to the Skagit Valley Tulip Festival.

Local artists submit their applications and the winner is free to choose their medium and style in a way that will interpret their vision of the festival and the tulips of Skagit Valley. In a testament to the quality of the art, several previous posters received the Gold Pinnacle award from the International Festival & Events Association. The new poster is unveiled in November each year, and this year’s artist is one of our own.

Woodinvile artist Melissa Jander was chosen to create the 2018 official poster. She created her Tulip Festival poster painting with oils on a smooth, acrylic-primed masonite board. Said Melissa, “I will leave the style of the painting up to the viewer to decide, but the styles of art I’m most interested in are impressionist and post-impressionist… My favorite artists are Pierre Bonnard, Claude Monet, Vincent Van Gogh, and Paul Cezanne…their work really resonates with me because of their use of color, representation of light and expressiveness of brushstrokes.”

Melissa used inspiration from years of visiting the tulip fields to create her painting. She said, “It’s a wonderful experience every visit. I do quick sketches and paintings out in the fields; and take photos as well in all kinds of weather. The sunny days are great for the contrasts in light and shadow, but overcast days can’t be beat for seeing the powerful, rich color of those blooms. Then at home I combine my resource material into an idea for a painting. It starts with several sketches and composition ideas, then after deciding on a favorite I do a larger sketch and move it onto a larger canvas or panel.”

After earning a bachelor of arts in foreign language and literature from Washington State University, a Graphic Design certificate from the Art Institute of Seattle, and a Web Design certificate from Bellevue College, Melissa started her career as a graphic designer and marketing professional before seriously pursuing her art in 2001. Current art associations include Women Artists of the West, American Impressionist Society, Northwest Artists in Action and Woodinville Arts Alliance. She is currently represented by Fairweather Gallery in Seaside, OR, and Scott Milo Gallery in Anacortes, WA.

When asked how she felt about being chosen to paint the poster for the 35th anniversary she replied, “Gosh, I was so thrilled to be invited to paint the 35th anniversary poster! I have hoped to contribute to the SVTF poster in some way for many years… but it took a long time of learning skills, practice, and life experience before the time was right to pursue it further. I appreciated the opportunity to meet and work with the Tulip Festival committee and the tulip farm owners because many of us around here have been the beneficiaries of all of their hard work over the years. The tulip farms and Tulip Festival are a real treasure for us here.”


Melissa Jander artist with her 2018 Skagit Valley Tulip Festival poster art.

Published by Woodinville Weekly/ April 2018

 

 

To learn more about the artist, please visit

www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

…artists/ …Melissa Jander

“The Escarpment” by Barbara Martin

Mixed media

Q: What is an escarpment, you ask?

A:  An escarpment  is a long, high area of continuous rock that has one steep side.  The Oregon coast escarpments are  deeply serrated, having been carved up by watercourses over millions of years.

An escarpment image along the Oregon coast.

About the artist:

Barbara Martin grew up on three continents — and has lived in ten states coast to coast. She earned an MBA, is a certified creativity coach and teaches  art classes.

She is a guild member of the Arts Council Lake Oswego, the Green Cab, and Westside Art Share near Portland.

Her work is contemporary in style and leans toward the abstract and sometimes surreal or visionary.

Barbara Martin

Descended from a line of story tellers and herbalists, inspirations come from repressed dreams and the natural world.

Recent recognitions include a juror’s award in the national “Dream” show at ARC Gallery in San Francisco, and publication in numerous journals.

 

 

 

 

In addition, to  the June 2018 Fairweather Gallery’s “Sense of Place” exhibition, Barbara Martin’s juried Oregon shows include “Abstract Catalyst” at Verum Ultimum Gallery in Portland, the 2017 Portland BIG 500, and “Raining Cats and Dogs” at the Portland’5.

 

 

Grace note received.

“Just got word I’ve been awarded a generous RACC Professional Development grant!!! Super helpful and really exciting looking ahead.” –-Barbara Martin

 

Barbara Martin’s rough draft of her artist speech for the opening reception at Fairweather’s.  Note, even the paper is colorful!

 

 

Barbara Martin did just fine,”  posted Linda Fenton Mendenhall/ Art Walk photographer.

 

And, so,  now, a quote dedicated to Barbara Martin: from a Fairweather art card:

 

Perseverance

If a task is one begun

Never leave it until it is done.

Be it labor big or small,

Do it well or not at all.

AUTHOR UNKNOWN

Quote shared from a Fairweather art card.

 

www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

“Stream Treasure” original watercolor by Jan Rimerman

 

Jan Rimerman grew up around the waters of the Pacific Northwest. The “Sense of Place” that inspires her includes waves of movement in the streams, rivers and tidal edges. The flowing liquid negotiating the stones and the reflections of light fascinate Jan. She observes this evolution of changing forms and captures it with charcoal and paint.

 

“Secrets of the Stream”mixed media art by Jan Rimerman

This watery “Sense of Place” allows each viewer to dive in to go on their own adventure. It gives permission to get immersed into the many layers that whisks one away into a different environment.

 

“Sunlight in the Stream” mixed media art by Jan Rimerman

Everyone connects with their own experiences and “Sense of Place” whether from their childhood, recent memories or perhaps where they would like to be in the future.

“Summer Veil” mixed media art by Jan Rimerman

Rimerman’s unique technique allows the work to present a new perspective each time it’s seen. By slightly altering one’s viewing perspective you may see different symbols, waves and stones appear. As flowing water is constantly changing so do the paintings due to the many layers and applied textures that are revealed in different lights of the day & the season.

 

Jan Rimerman carefully observes the evolution of these changing forms. Placing layers of color, texture, form, light & shadow are all part of the intentional creative process. An under painting of powdered charcoal gelled onto heavy watercolor paper gives the finished painting a hint of visual textural mystery. As many as 22 layers of transparent fluid acrylic paint are applied on the initial powdered charcoal foundation allowing the adventure to begin.

 

 

About the artist:

As an arts educator for 33 years, Jan pioneered the Art After Hours program for high school students & community members.  Jan Rimerman created the art cultural exchange, The “Common Connection” between schools in Poland & Tigard High School.   She is the 2002 Secondary Art Educator of the Year in the State of Oregon.  She has been included in the Who’s Who Teachers Edition for 2004-2010 & in the Who’s Who of American Women 2008 & 2009.

Jan Rimerman was the Open Show Director at the Lake Oswego Festival of the Arts for 25 years.

 

 

Open Show of the Lake Oswego Festival of the Arts.

Altruistic projects include the International Land Fill Project,  Kows for Kids, Children First, Audubon, Susan G, Koman Foundation, Turtle Head Start Program at the Oregon Zoo, & painting doors for the Lake Oswego Art Foundation.    Jan is the director of the Rain Spark Gallery, a seasonal pop up, the Visual Arts Director of the Lakewood Center & gives talks to the community of her international adventures entitled:  Through an Artist’s Eyes.  She is a fundraiser for the World Wildlife Fund, the Di Ji Orphanage in Lhasa, Tibet & creator of the Rock…Paper…Turtle…Art for Wetlands for The Wetlands Conservancy.   Rimerman is the Art Exhibition Director for Lake Oswego Reads.  This program interprets the book that the entire community reads in a 2-D creative form and presents it in an exhibit.

 

Jan Rimerman

Jan Rimerman’s work is found in ten books, magazines and on greeting cards.  Her work is exhibited in invitational shows in the Pacific Northwest.  It is also found at the Portland Art Museum Rental Sales Gallery, the Coos Art Museum and at the Blackfish Gallery in La Conner, WA.

 

 

 

 

 

Grace note received:

“The BLOG is great!!!  I am thrilled to be included at the “Sense of Place” exhibition at the Fairweather House and Gallery.  I am so pleased that you like the work & excited that you selected all  pieces in the series. My assistant, Megan, and I will be attending the opening!  Seaside will be popping  for almost every room in the land is booked.  Should be a terrific opening at the gallery.”  Jan Rimerman

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery photo collage by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

 

Featuring Jan Rimerman’s  “Sense of Place” original paintings created from powdered charcoal and 22 layers of transparent fluid acrylic paint on watercolor paper.  “Inspired  by the Pacific Northwest natural environments.”

 

 

For more info please visit www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com