“Polar Snow Shoe” by Neal Maine

“Whale Within” by Neal Maine 

 

 

Wildlife photographers Daniel Dietrich and Neal Maine in 2015.

 

An event hosted in Seaside for the Alaska Wilderness League in 2015 has earned  recent  kudos and a connection to Art Wolfe, internationally known photographer. Neal Maine shared the news at the opening reception of ‘Portraiture’ on May 4, 2019.

 

Daniel Dietrich traveled to the Arctic with Neal Maine in 2014. Daniel recently entered his polar bear image, a photo one/tenth of a second from Neal Maine, in a competition.

“Thanks to BigPicture: Natural World Photography Competition for selecting my polar bear image as a finalist in this year’s competition. The photo will be on display at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco July-October.”  Daniel Dietrich

 

And, too, Daniel Dietrich is with Art Wolfe on location in 2019.

 

 

To recall the 2015 event, go to…

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/tag/arctic-light

 

‘Arctic Light’ draws attention to global warming Presentation …

https://www.discoverourcoast.com/…/arctic-light…/article_1d181096-2d41-5d56-a37…

Feb 16, 2015 – ‘Arctic Light’ draws attention to global warming Presentation, … Neal Maine and Daniel Dietrich will speak about Alaska Wilderness League at …

 

 

Osprey portrait by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images.  Proceeds in support of NCLC.

 

‘Portraiture’ habitat lecture by local naturalist, wildlife photographer Neal Maine was given at Fairweather’s on May 4.

 

Ospreys return to Seaside

May 17, 2019/  Seaside Signal newspaper article

Oregon coast naturalist Neal Maine still gets a thrill after many years of watching the osprey return to their nests in Seaside. Maine has found nine nests so far and estimates that there are about 20 osprey locally, but he admits that there are likely some he is missing.

“When nature keeps on marching, you get excited. When the osprey return, somethings still right, they flew all the way from South America,” said Maine.

The annual return of the osprey not only marks the coming of summer, it is a sign of the progress being made in conservation. Osprey, along with other raptors, suffered a population decimation from the use of DDT, which caused eggshell thinning. Once the pesticide was banned, the bird of prey made a sharp recovery.

However, they are not out of the woods yet. There is a growing trend of osprey nesting on man-made objects. Osprey typically nest near rivers on the top of dead trees, but as forest composition changed and old growth snags disappeared, they started relying on utility poles and other tall objects to rear their young.

In addition, their choice location is not always convenient. When osprey in Seaside decided to nest on a pole near the Broadway baseball field the raptors did not consider that the power line may one day need replacement. The nest was relocated on a 60-foot high pole installed off Neawanna Creek. Fortunately, the birds were fine with the move and have continued to nest at the new location since 2012. Maine, who oversaw the project, has watched the same birds come back to the same nests since 2009.

Osprey that summer in Oregon typically winter off the islands and coast of Mexico, Central and South America, segregating into male and female territories. Osprey typically live to 25 in the wild and will continue to use the same nest with their monogamous partner, unless something tragic happens. The juveniles also come back to the area where they were reared so the birds on the coast have been here for many, many generations.

While their numbers rebounded significantly in most of the world after the banning of DDT, osprey are still threatened or endangered globally, including in many states nationally. In Oregon, they are not considered legally endangered, although are not as abundant as they once were. Currently, the biggest threat to osprey is aquaculture, which causes habitat loss because of damming. The raptors are often shot while hunting fish at aquaculture facilities in their southern territory.

However, here in Oregon the birds are increasingly overwintering locally rather than migrating and it is not clear as to why. The birds rely on an abundant source of fish, which may be harder for the birds to find as more rivers are dammed for agriculture, flood control, aquaculture and hydropower. It’s also possible that they are finding the Willamette Valley’s maritime climate more amenable than in year’s past and have moved north, like many birds, as a result of climate change. Moreover, it could be a slough of other variables not yet identified. There are not many resources on the coast dedicated to the study of osprey.

We didn’t even know where the nests were, it wasn’t on anyone’s agenda. ODFW was budgeted back to survival level, there’s not even an ODFW office in Clatsop County,” said Maine. Since the ospreys are not a priority species, answering these questions might fall on the shoulders of people like Maine, who engages regularly in citizen science. “More and more are staying every winter in the valley, and last year I found one here in January,” he said.

Nature certainly does find a way and osprey are a testament to that. They are resilient birds and can make themselves at home in the busiest of human environments. “It seems like they watch the baseball games,” Maine said about the birds at the Broadway field.

 

Check out the osprey cam at seasideosprey.org or better yet, go find them in person in Seaside.


“Virginia Rail” by Neal Maine, PacificLight Images.

The Virginia rail is a small waterbird, fairly common despite continuing loss of habitat, but are secretive by nature and more often heard than seen.

Read more at https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/virginia-rail

 

 

 

Seaside First Saturday Art Walk

Fairweather House and Gallery

Through the years, local habitat lecture every First Saturday by Neal Maine at 6:pm.

 

 

Neal Maine,  naturalist,  spoke about the nurse logs that establish marching orders for future forests during the Fairweather Gallery opening reception of ‘March’ on the March 2nd Seaside First Saturday Art Walk.

 

Even though they’re dead, they are not gone — trees find a way to help each other out postmortem. Introducing the nurse log. Defined as fallen trees that provide “ecological facilitation” as they decay, nurse logs offer seedlings shade, nutrients, water and protection from disease and pathogens, thus nurturing and making way for the new generation.

How does it work, you ask? Well, the process begins with a fallen tree’s gradual breakdown of lignin following its death. Lignin is a group of polymers that help form the trees’ structural tissues, especially in wood and bark. Biodegradation of lignin is facilitated by microorganisms such as fungi and bacteria — white rot fungi, more specifically, is responsible for breaking down wood on the forest floor. As the lignin deteriorates, holes and niches in the bark begin to grow in size and, over time, become filled with soil, moss, mushrooms and small plants. This dark soil is called humus, the nitrogen-rich organic matter that forms when plant and animal matter decay. When moss covers the exterior of the log itself, the decaying process is expedited, and new plant species are more easily supported.

Plants aren’t the only ones that benefit, however. Many small animal species such as squirrels are also known to roost on or in nurse logs, enriching the humus and providing additional fertilization for germinating seeds and sprouts with their food debris.  –Allie Wisniewski, American Forests

 

 

“This tree I saw at Skipanon Forest, an NCLC Reserve. This Sitka spruce fell over some time ago, but instead of dying, it decided to become at least seven new “trees” from its branches. The largest new tree (just left of center) looked to be nearly a foot in diameter and perhaps 30’ tall. Amazing what a tree will do to keep on keeping on.”   Jeffrey Roehm, NCLC steward

 

Take a note!

Next Seaside First Saturday Art Walk

April 6

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Next local habitat lecture by Neal Maine at 6:pm on April 6.

For more info about the Art Walk events, please visit www.facebook.com/SeasideFirstSaturdayArtWalk

 

Neal Maine introduced a catalog of PacificLight Images recently at Fairweather House and Gallery; an exclusive catalog featuring his entire collection with images that can be special ordered as framed prints or as matted prints, representing more than a decade of habitat photography.

 

 

100% profits from the sale proceeds in support of North Coast Land Conservancy, NCLC.

To read more about North Coast Land Conservancy, please go to https://nclctrust.org/rare-

For more about the naturalist/ photographer Neal Maine, please visit his artist’s page at

www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

“White Wings.”

Common white egret by Neal Maine, PacificLight Images.

November, 2018

Sunset Beach, Oregon

 

Read more about Herons and Egrets | Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife

https://myodfw.com/wildlife-viewing/species/-herons-and-egrets

After a thirty-year career as an award-winning biology teacher at Seaside High School, Neal Maine became the first executive director of North Coast Land Conservancy, which he co-founded in 1986. Since his retirement from the land trust in 2010, he has pursued his passion for nature photography through PacificLight Images, which is dedicated to raising awareness of coastal ecology and the wildlife with whom we share the region’s estuaries, freshwater wetlands and forests. The photography centers around coastal and Columbia River landscape, ecology and the rich estuary habitat with the surrounding wetlands and forest systems. Neal Maine focuses his imagery on exploring wildlife in the context of its habitat.

 

To view more of Neal Maine’s photography, please go to the  artists tab/ Neal Maine http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

100% of profits from Neal Maine’s photography  are donated to NCLC,  North Coast Land Conservancy.

 

 

 

Q: “Would it be possible to share the poem that Kim Stafford dedicated to NCLC as a story for the “All is Calm” Art Walk at Fairweather’s?”

A:  “We’re so glad you were touched and appreciate you wanting to share it with others,”  NCLC/North Coast Land Conservancy.

For more about NCLC go to https://nclctrust.org/ North Coast Land Conservancy. Helping to conserve Oregon’s coastal lands, forever.

Mother Mountain
Heaven, the old proverb says, is at your mother’s feet—
and here we are at the forest hem watching fog climb
through trees toward the queen’s crown peak,
hidden harvester of rain, alpine realm of silence
and starlight, home to bear cave, elk wallow,
cougar range, rare flowers brimming from persistent
seeps, trees shaggy with centuries on their blue ridge
where sister peaks layer shadows far.
So close the gate, let the alders usher in young fir,
cedar, hemlock, spruce, let the road become a path
for pilgrims seeking myriad mysteries, magic
not yet known, the black petaltail dragonfly
born from fog-fed, moss-footed mud to soar
before our eyes from the time of legends.
Here we dwell at our mother’s feet, blessed
with bounty we protect, home to wild origin.
Kim Stafford

 

Kim Stafford named Oregon Poet Laureate | Oregon Cultural Trust
https://culturaltrust.org/blog/news/kim-stafford-named-oregon-poet-laureate/

 

Please note another Fairweather blog post next week will present the entire back story to the poem created by Kim Stafford for NCLC with a letter by Katie Voelke, executive director.

“Power of Flight”  by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images

Pacific Flyway

Snow Geese

 

 

Snow geese fly along the Pacific Flyway  in narrow corridors, more than 3,000 miles from traditional nesting areas in the Arctic tundra to wintering areas along the coast. They visit traditional stopover habitats in spectacular numbers.

 

Q: What is the Pacific Flyway, you ask?

A: The Pacific Flyway is a major north-south flyway for migratory birds in America, extending from Alaska to Patagonia. Naturalists can often predict to the day when a particular species will show up in their area.

 

https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/snow-goose

 

 

 

Neal Maine habitat lectures every First Saturday at 6:pm. Fairweather House and Gallery.

 

After a thirty-year career as an award-winning biology teacher at Seaside High School, Neal Maine became the first executive director of North Coast Land Conservancy, which he co-founded in 1986. Since his retirement from the land trust in 2010, he has pursued his passion for nature photography through PacificLight Images. His photographs center around coastal and Columbia River landscape, ecology and the rich estuary habitat with the surrounding wetlands and forest systems.

Neal focuses his imagery on exploring wildlife in the context of its habitat. PacificLight Images is dedicated to working with coastal communities to protect wildlife habitat and its connectivity. 100% profits are donated to NCLC, North Coast Land Conservancy, to help further this goal

To read more about the naturalist, please go to artists tab … Neal Maine at https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

Fun facts about Snow Geese:

SIZE: 27 to 33 in; wingspan, 4.5 ft

Snow Geese stay with the same mate for life.

The oldest Snow Goose on record was 27 and a half.

Snow Geese make epic journeys by air, but they are impressive on foot, too. Within the first three weeks of hatching, goslings may walk up to 50 miles with their parents.

The Snow Goose breeds north of the timberline in Greenland, Canada, Alaska, and the northeastern tip of Siberia. They fly high as far as 5,000 feet about the ground.

The Snow Goose has two color plumage morphs, white (snow) or gray/blue (blue), thus the common description as “snow goose” and “blue goose.”

 

Just in! “Hidden Surfaces” by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images.

Location:  Circle Creek wetlands blanketed in mist and spiderwebs. Seaside, Oregon.

100% profits in support of North Coast Land Conservancy, NCLC.

 

Exploring New Surfaces, an exhibition curated by Agnes Field, Astoria based artist with a Master’s Degree in Studio Fine Art from New York University.

Artist, curator Agnes Field

“The works included in this exhibit use either new materials or methods and techniques to amplify the meaning in the content of their art. Adding or embedding new materials to the surface creates surprise, and occasionally, deeper interpretation and understanding of the subject.” –Agnes Field

 

 

 

Neal Maine visits with art patrons at Fairweather’s during the October 6 Seaside First Saturday Art Walk.

 

For more about Neal Maine, go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ … artists tab/ …Neal Maine

 

 

 

 

 

Pacific Force I by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images

Tillamook Rock Lighthouse, Seaside Oregon. Jan. 2018.

 

Q: Why the large wave, you ask?

A: A high surf advisory was issued for the northern Oregon coast according to the National Weather Service. The coast will see breaking waves on the beaches much higher than normal. Forecasters said ocean swells will be above 60 feet for most of the day January 19, 2018. The high surf advisory has caused officials to keep some North Coast Oregon and South Coast Washington beaches closed.

 

 

 

 

January 19, 2018

Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images.

Pacific Force I, Pacific Force II and Pacific Force III

Tillamook Rock Lighthouse.  Seaside Oregon.

Pacific Force I  (wave hgt. 176′)

Pacific Force II (wave hgt. 183′)

Pacific Force III (wave hgt. 211′)

Q: Where in the world is Tillamook Rock Lighthouse, you ask?

 

A: Tillamook Rock Lighthouse stands 133 feet above sea level and sits on a rock a mile off the beach of Seaside and is west of Tillamook Head in Clatsop County, Oregon. Operating from 1881 to 1957, the lighthouse was nicknamed Terrible Tilly for its ferocious storms and the difficulties facing lighthouse keepers stationed there. It was the most expensive lighthouse built in the United States up to that time.  An isolated, storm-battered basaltic island less than an acre in size, Tillamook Rock Lighthouse is 20 miles south of the mouth of the Columbia River. Violently churning seas crash against the steep sides of the Rock and surge high up its sloping eastern face. Tillamook Rock is part of Oregon Islands National Wildlife Refuge, and the lighthouse is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

 

 

100% profits in support of  NCLC, North Coast Land Conservancy

  For more about the photographer, please go to  artists/ Neal Maine  www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com 

 

 

https://traveloregon.com › … › Culture & History › Historic Sites & Oregon Trail

 

 Resting atop a sea stack of basalt, more than a mile off the banks of Oregon’s  Seaside North Coast, the notorious Tillamook Rock Lighthouse, (nicknamed “Terrible Tilly”), is the stuff of aged lore. Although long closed to the public, she still stands today, though battered and …

 

Tillamook Rock Lighthouse – The Oregon Encyclopedia
https://oregonencyclopedia.org/articles/tillamook_rock_lighthouse/
Tillamook Rock Lighthouse sits on a rock a mile offshore of Tillamook Head in Clatsop County, Oregon. Operating from 1881 to 1957, the lighthouse was …

 

 

100% Profits to  NCLC, North Coast Land Conservancy

“Birds of a Feather” by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images.

 

Osprey, sometimes known as the sea hawk, fish eagle, river hawk or fish hawk, is a large raptor, reaching more than 2 feet in length and 6 feet in wing span. As its other common name suggests, the osprey’s diet consists almost exclusively of fish. It possesses specialized physical characteristics and exhibits unique behavior to assist in hunting and fishing. The Broadway Park osprey nest has a live camera placed by the Necancium Watershed Council and the City of Seaside.

 

 

After a thirty-year career as an award winning biology teacher at Seaside High School, Neal Maine became the first executive director of North Coast Land Conservancy, which he co-founded in 1986. Since his retirement from the land trust in 2010, he has pursued his passion for nature photography through PacificLight Images, a partnership with Michael Wing, dedicated to raising awareness of coastal ecology and the wildlife with whom we share the region’s estuaries, freshwater wetlands and forests. Their photography centers around coastal and Columbia River landscape, ecology and the rich estuary habitat with the surrounding wetlands and forest systems.

Neal focuses his imagery on exploring wildlife in the context of its habitat, while Michael’s specialty is capturing action images that illustrates the dynamic nature of coastal wildlife. PacificLight Images is dedicated to working with coastal communities to protect wildlife habitat and its connectivity. A percentage of all photography sales are donated to North Coast Land Conservancy to help further this goal.

 

 

Seaside ospreys by Neal Maine.

The Broadway Park osprey nest has a live camera placed by the Necancium Watershed Council and the City of Seaside.

In Clatsop County, Oregon there are about 14 osprey nests.

Watch the osprey at Seasideosprey.org.

 

Fairweather House and Gallery EMERGING artist Hall of Fame

2006-2018

 Kristin Qian

Britney Drumheller

Nick Brakel

Robert McWhirter

Michael Wing

Michele Bettger

Rebecca Gore

Gayle H. Seely

Linda Trexler

Diane Copenhaver

Veronica Russell

For more info about the gallery, go to www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com