Just in. Image titled: We Have Lift Off by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images. Location: Sunset Beach, Oregon. Date: April 2017. Proceeds in support of NCLC.
Please visit NCLCtrust.org to read more about North Coast Land Conservancy.

See more info about Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images and other exhibits at http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com /…artists /…Neal Maine …/blog.

Q: Where is Sunset Beach, you ask?

A: Sunset Beach is a state park in Clatsop County, Oregon. The park comprises 120 acres along the Pacific Ocean on the Clatsop Plains and is located between Gearhart and Warrenton, Oregon.

For more info please go to:
Sunset Beach State Recreation Site – Oregon State Parks and …
oregonstateparks.org/index.cfm?do=parkPage.dsp_parkPage&parkId=182
Sunset Beach State Recreation Site comes with a very famous past. The park marks the west trailhead of the historic Fort-to-Sea Trail

The osprey is a very unique raptor, standing out not only for its beauty but also for its choice of prey.
7 fun facts about ospreys:

1. The osprey is the only hawk species in North America that eats almost exclusively live fish.

2. The raptor can dive as deep as three feet into the water for fish, but prefers to hunt in shallower areas.

3. This species is also known as the river hawk, fish hawk or sea hawk. But don’t confuse it with the Seahawk, the mascot of the Seattle-based football team. First, there is no such thing as a “seahawk” (one word). Second, the team actually uses an augur hawk as its mascot, a species native to Africa. The osprey may be known as a sea hawk, but it has no connection to football.

4. The osprey is the second most widely distributed raptor species, after the peregrine falcon, and can be found on every continent except Antarctica.

5. All of the ospreys around the world are part of a single species, with the exception of the eastern osprey which is native to Australia.

6. The osprey species is at least 11 million years old and is so well adapted to fishing that it has evolved unique characteristics that set it apart from other raptor species. These include nostrils that can be closed during dives, and an outer toe that can be angled backwards to better grasp fish. The species is so unique, it is listed in its own genus (Pandion) and family (Pandionidae).

7. Ospreys can live to be 15-20 years old. The oldest known osprey was just over 25 years old. During that long lifetime, the migratory birds can rack up over 160,000 miles of travel. In fact, in 2008 an osprey being tracked by researchers flew an amazing 2,700 miles in just 13 days, traveling from Massachusetts to French Guiana, South America!

For more info about ospreys go to:
Osprey, Life History, All About Birds – Cornell Lab of Ornithology
https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Osprey/lifehistory


THE OSPREY IS BEING CONSIDERED TO BECOME THE STATE BIRD OF OREGON.

Oregon Senate chooses osprey over western … – Statesman Journal
http://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/…/oregon…osprey…state-bird…/100124452/
Apr 7, 2017

 

Seaside Osprey Cam youtube.com

 

Seaside Osprey Nest located in Broadway Park in Seaside, Oregon

 

 

 

The Seaside Osprey nest cam is up and running, in exceptional HD quality! HUGE thanks to Sunset Empire Park and Recreation District for hosting the camera, and installing fiber optic cable so the cam can be so clear!

 

Necanicum Watershed Council

 

Named the “state animal” in 1969, the American beaver builds the dams and wetlands that serve as habitat for Oregon salmon, steelhead, birds, amphibians and insects. Beavers are nature’s hydrologists, “Beaver Tales: A Celebration of Beaver Art” curator Sara Vickerman … click of the following link to read the entire front page article by Eve Marz, reporter for the Seaside Signal …

Source: From near extinction to a place in art

For more info the participating Fairweather  artists, please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com …artists … Paul Brent, Mike Brown, Susan Curington, Agnes Field, Jo Pomeroy Crockett, Neal Maine and Denise Joy McFadden.

Save the date and time.

BEAVER TALES, a celebration of art.

May 6th, 5-7:pm in the historic Gilbert District Block of downtown Seaside

For more info about the Art Walk, please go to http://www.facebook.com/SeasideFirstSaturdayArtWalk

SAVE THE DATE AND TIME!

http://www.NCLCtrust.org
Listening to the Land: Dam, Beaver! Dam!
Wednesday, April 19
6 to 8 pm
Seaside Public Library

And, too, a lot more info about Beavers and all the good things they do for us:

Dr. Stephen Ramsey, from the OSU Center for Genome Research & Biocomputing (the Center has recently announced the completion of its sequencing of the beaver genome, so this is very well timed – http://registerguard.com/rg/news/local/35185225-75/oregon-state-university-researchers-find-benny-the-beaver-fills-big-genes.html.csp)

Frances Backhouse will offer a talk based on her research and writing that appeared in her award-winning book, Once They Were Hats: In Search of the Mighty Beaver. At Beach Books on May 6th at 1:pm. http://www.backhouse.ca/books/once-they-were-hats-in-search-of-the-mighty-beaver/.

The Wetlands Conservancy has posted information on the Beaver Tales art project. The link is below. Feel free to share it with your friends and contacts.
http://wetlandsconservancy.org/stewardship/beaver-tales

http://wetlandsconservancy.org/stewardship/beaver-tales/beaver-inspiration

https://northernwoodlands.org/discoveries/pathways-to-ponds

Here’s a link to an excellent short video, with great aerial depiction of the changes that beaver dams bring to meadows . . .
http://www.animalplanet.com/tv-shows/other/videos/fooled-by-nature-beaver-dams

And for more inspiration, a video of beaver swimming on U-Tube. .https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9cwu_Wu5ONI

CBC News Posted: Apr 02, 2017Great parenting: animals that care for their young in ‘amazing’ ways BEAVERS…

Some parents are a little more dedicated than others, according to wildlife expert Frank Ritcey. Ritcey says beavers take a more paws-on approach to raising their young. They give birth inside their lodges, where kits will stay until they’re old enough to start eating solid food.

“Once they’re old enough to venture forth, they travel about with the parent to learn how to become a beaver. [Kits] follow the adult around and mimic the adults actions,” said Ritcey.

“It’s so cute to watch — but it’s also very important as the young have to learn a whole set of skills like using the right trees to fall and how to build dams and lodges, and in general — how to be as busy as a beaver should be.”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_23vuRU2Ews

 

While nothing can compare to the real beaver it is great to see more comprehensive research about the positive impacts of beaver dams.

http://www.ktvz.com/…/osu-cascades-students-scien…/394113930

 

 

 

Baltimore Oriole

Image titled: Stranger in Town.

April 2017

Photographer Neal Maine, PacificLight  Images.

Just in time for BLOOM, an exhibition, at Fairweather’s.

A Baltimore Oriole visiting a backyard in Seaside, Oregon! 

Image backstory:

Once again, one Baltimore Oriole, a stranger to the North coast area, usually not a visitor to the West, has appeared, again in the spring of 2017, to the same flowering tree in the Seaside area, first visited in the spring of 2016.

Fun facts:

One of the most brilliantly colored songbirds in the east, flaming orange and black, sharing the heraldic colors of the coat of arms of 17th-century Lord Baltimore.

Widespread east of the Great Plains.

Baltimore Orioles are often very common in open woods.

Visits flowers for nectar.

http://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/baltimore-oriole

Baltimore Oriole migration map.

Open woods, riverside groves, elms, shade trees. Breeds in deciduous or mixed woodland, generally in open woods or edges rather than interior of dense forest. May be common in trees in towns. Often favors elms. Winters mostly in the tropics around forest edge and semi-open country.

Rarely west of the Rocky Mountains!!!

 

Neal Maine/ PacificLight  Images

NATURE’S TRAILS

A limpet creeps up a wave-washed rock, following the rise of the tide. A salmon follows ancient watershed trails to its natal stream. An otter travels along its living trap line for crabs in the estuary to crayfish up side creeks. A vole tunnels into the soft sponge on the forest floor. In the treetops, in the forest, across the land, in the water, and in the air, all become a living slate for NATURE’S TRAILS. This tracery of interwoven trails are unsigned but indelible to generations of travelers.

THE NEXT FRONTIER, OUR OWN BACKYARD

Humans: We take pictures, walks, deep breaths, memories, ride on waves, water, timber, in habitat that used to belong to other trail makers. We thought we could never catch all the salmon, never cut all the big trees, and never pollute the ocean. In our hubris, we thought we could make our own trails. With renewed humility, we are learning how to share this place, to live together with our partner trail makers. PacificLight Images celebrates this partnership as we use our images to inspire others to honor nature’s trails in OUR OWN BACKYARD. –Neal Maine

 Proceeds to support North Coast Land Conservancy, NCLC. 

Please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com …artists …Neal Maine for more images and info

 

And, too, the 2016 famous Baltimore Oriole photo by Neal Maine.

Baltimore Oriole

Image titled: Birds of a Feather. The famous Seaside osprey pair!

Image backstory: Flying above their nesting platform. An eagle came too close and the pair moved in tandem to a safer spot. The female, with a band on her right leg, kept the flounder that her mate had delivered. Wildlife action within steps of downtown Seaside! Image from 2016 above Broadway Park on the Neawanna River.

Seaside/ Gearhart nature photographer Neal Maine.

Signed, matted and framed. Proceeds in support of North Coast Land Conservancy/ NCLC.

To view a catalog of Neal Maine’s images, please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com …artists …Neal Maine

Heard from naturalist Neal Maine today.

March 31, 2017. Those that do were performing some light housekeeping on the camera today, as the ospreys were expected before “tax day.” The workers left for a parts run and when they returned the male osprey was on the platform! The female osprey should be arriving “shortly”.

Take a note!
Naturalist Neal Maine will share his latest habitat stories at 6 p.m. at Fairweather’s during the Seaside First Saturday Art Walk on April 1st.

For more info go to https://www.facebook.com/ Seaside First Saturday Art Walk

LIVE camera courtesy of Necanicum Watershed Council and City of Seaside.

https://livestream.com/necanicum/seasideosprey

For more info go to: http://www.necanicumwatershed.org

“Like” https://www.facebook.com/ City of Seaside

Fun Facts:
Unique among North American raptors for its diet of live fish and ability to dive into water to catch them, Ospreys are common sights soaring over shorelines, patrolling waterways, and standing on their huge stick nests, white heads gleaming.

These large, rangy hawks do well around humans and have rebounded in numbers following the ban on the pesticide DDT.

Hunting Ospreys are a picture of concentration, diving with feet outstretched and yellow eyes sighting straight along their talons.

Ospreys are unusual among hawks in possessing a reversible outer toe that allows them to grasp with two toes in front and two behind. Barbed pads on the soles of the birds’ feet help them grip slippery fish. When flying with prey, an Osprey lines up its catch head first for less wind resistance.

Most Ospreys that breed in North America migrate to Central and South America for the winter.

Males and females follow a different migration route. Males overwinter inland and females overwinter along the coast.

Ospreys mate for life.

An Osprey may log more than 160,000 migration miles during its 15-to-20-year lifetime.

For more info go to https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Osprey/lifehistory

Varied Thrush by Neal Maine.
Fun Fact: Discovered in Doug Ray’s back yard in March, 2017.

About Neal Maine:

After a thirty-year career as an award-winning biology teacher at Seaside High School, Neal Maine became the first executive director of North Coast Land Conservancy, which he co-founded in 1986. Since his retirement from the land trust in 2010, he has pursued his passion for nature photography through PacificLight Images, dedicated to raising awareness of coastal ecology and the wildlife with whom we share the region’s estuaries, freshwater wetlands and forests. Their photography centers around coastal and Columbia River landscape, ecology and the rich estuary habitat with the surrounding wetlands and forest systems. PacificLight Images is dedicated to working with coastal communities to protect wildlife habitat and its connectivity. A percentage of all photography sales are donated to North Coast Land Conservancy to help further this goal.
——————————————————————————————————————————————
THE COASTAL EDGE
In cycles older than time, forces deep within the earth push apart tectonic plates, creating and expanding the oceans whose waters are pushed and pulled by the sun and moon, cooled and heated and calmed and stirred to fury by the skies. Ocean collides with continent, shattering the shore into a thousand facets: bare rock monoliths, vast expanses of sand, saltwater pools that drown, then drain, then drown, then drain. And in that shattering, life asserts itself, creeping and burrowing and swimming and perching in particular niches, particular flora and fauna whose collective presence defines THE COASTAL EDGE.
——————————————————————————————————————————————
NATURE’S TRAILS
A limpet creeps up a wave-washed rock, following the rise of the tide. A salmon follows ancient watershed trails to its natal stream. An otter travels along its living trap line for crabs in the estuary to crayfish up side creeks. A vole tunnels into the soft sponge on the forest floor. In the treetops, in the forest, across the land, in the water, and in the air, all become a living slate for NATURE’S TRAILS. This tracery of interwoven trails are unsigned but indelible to generations of travelers.
——————————————————————————————————————————————
THE NEXT FRONTIER, OUR OWN BACKYARD
Humans: We take pictures, walks, deep breaths, memories, rides on waves, water, timber, in habitat that used to belong to other trail makers. We thought we could never catch all the salmon, never cut all the big trees, and never pollute the ocean. In our hubris, we thought we could make our own trails. With renewed humility, we are learning how to share this place, to live together with our partner trail makers. PacificLight Images celebrates this partnership as we use our images to inspire others to honor nature’s trails in OUR OWN BACKYARD.
——————————————————————————————————————————————

To view a catalog of images by Neal Maine, please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com …artists/ Neal Maine.

Q: What make the Varied Thrush unique, you ask?

A: Does much foraging on the ground, usually under dense cover but sometimes in the open, it can surprise birders in winter; may use its bill to toss leaf-litter aside as it searches for insects.
The haunting songs of the Varied Thrush echo through the lands of the Pacific Northwest. Long minor-key whistles repeated after deliberate pauses, they seem like sounds without a source; only a careful searcher will find the bird itself.

Although it looks superficially like a robin, often nicknamed the Alaskan Robin, the Varied Thrush is very elusive. Could be vulnerable to loss of habitat through cutting of northwestern forests. Currently still common.

For more info go to http://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/varied-thrush

norhtern-harrier

Image titled: Flight Master.

Northern Harrier, photographed on Del Ray Beach, Gearhart, Oregon by Neal Maine/PacificLight Nature Images. March 2017.

Proceeds in support of NCLC, North Coast Land Conservancy.
For more than 30 years, North Coast Land Conservancy has been preserving Oregon’s vital coastal landscapes.
Please visit http://www.nclctrust.org for more information.

Flight Master, latest Neal Maine image, of a Northern Harrier, truly, has a story connection to Ireland.

Neal Moments

On March 4th at Fairweather’s, photographer/ biologist/ naturalist Neal Maine spoke about the local ecology and specifically about his latest image, found within steps from our own back yards, along the coastal edge.

Please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseangallery.com/ tab artists/ Neal Maine to view the catalog of images available from PacificLight Nature Images.

To some extent, experiencing Ireland and the Irish, is being part philosopher.

Irish people “seem to dance to the tune of their muse, and in doing so have preserved for us traditional prose, skills, and art that beach back to the beginning of time and are a tribute to humankind’s unfailing ingenuity.” –Muriel Gahane

 

 

About Northern Harriers.

North America has only one variety, the Northern Harrier, a raptor. Harriers are very distinctive hawks, long-winged and long-tailed, usually seen quartering low over the ground in open country. At close range, the face of our Northern Harrier looks rather like that of an owl; like an owl (and unlike most other hawks) it may rely on its keen hearing to help it locate prey as it courses low over the fields.

Often nests in loose colonies; one male may have two or more mates. In courtship, male flies up and then dives, repeatedly, in a roller-coaster pattern. Nest site is on ground in dense field or salt march or wetlands, sometimes low over shallow water. Nest built mostly by female, with male supplying some material. Nest may be shallow depression lined with grass, or platform of sticks, grass, weeds.

The Northern Harrier is distinctive from a long distance away: a slim, long-tailed hawk gliding low over a marsh or grassland, holding its wings in a V-shape and sporting a white patch at the base of its tail. Up close it has an owlish face that helps it hear mice and voles beneath the vegetation. Each gray-and-white male may mate with several females, which are larger and brown. These unusual raptors have a broad distribution across North America, Ireland and Eurasia.

The hen harrier or northern harrier is a bird of prey. The genus name Circus is derived from Ancient Greek kirkos, meaning “circle”, referring to a bird of prey named for its circling flight.  For more info please visit www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/northern-harrier

————————————————————————–

Q: Are there harriers in Ireland, as well,  you ask?

A: Yes, in Ireland, Northern Harriers, previously called Hen-Harriers, were persecuted almost to extinction in the nineteenth century, but spread due to the planting of forestry plantations which offered suitable habitat and safety while the trees were still young. Overgrazing of uplands and the loss of semi-natural habitats are threats to the harrier across its range. In Ireland, while there is less anxiety about persecution, the condition of the harriers’ upland breeding grounds is the main concern.

Hen harriers in Ireland are specially protected under the Wildlife (NI) Order 1985
There are designated SPAs for Hen Harriers in Northern Ireland
Forest Service, in conjunction with the Northern Ireland Raptor Study Group and RSPB, are developing procedures designed to prevent disturbance and destruction of nests in forests under their control

————————————————————————–

Fun Facts:

The Northern Harrier is also called Hen Harrier and Marsh Hawk.
The silvery grey male Northern Harrier has been nicknamed the Grey Ghost.
Northern Harriers are the only hawk-like bird known to practice polygyny – one male mates with several females.
The Northern Harrier is capable of considerable, sustained, horizontal speed in pursuit of prey. Speeds of 38 mph have been reported
The common name, Harrier, is from the Old English word “herigan” which means to harass or plunder.
Unusual among hawks, Northern Harriers use their sense of hearing to help locate prey. They have an owl-like facial disk to help with directional hearing and soft feathers for a quieter flight.
A group of harriers is called a “swarm” and a “harassment” of harriers.

————————————————————————–

Please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com for more information about read more about our doing good works, our  vision and our mission statement, and read more about our regional artists who show original art in our gallery.

Celebrating 11 years of service to our community.  

We are committed to be a strong and vibrant arts voice in our area.

feathers-by-wind

Title: Feathers of the Wind.

Neal Maine, photographer.

Subject: Great Blue Heron/ Feb. 2017.

For more information about the photographer, please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/Artists/Neal Maine

Ecology lecture.

Neal Maine speaks during the opening artist receptions at Fairweather’s for the Seaside First Saturday Art Walk at 6:pm.

neal engaging

Pictured in conversation before a nature ecology  lecture: Jan and Jay Barber,  Sara Vickerman Gage and Jeff Gage, Neal Maine and Denise Fairweather during a previous Art Walk.

For more information about the Art Walk, please visit http://www.facebook.com/Seaside First Saturday Art Walk.

seaside-art-walk-logo

About the photographer:

After a thirty-year career as an award-winning biology teacher at Seaside High School, Neal Maine became the first executive director of North Coast Land Conservancy, which he co-founded in 1986. Since his retirement from the land trust in 2010, he has pursued his passion for nature photography through PacificLight Images, a partnership with Michael Wing, dedicated to raising awareness of coastal ecology and the wildlife with whom we share the region’s estuaries, freshwater wetlands and forests. Their photography centers around coastal and Columbia River landscape, ecology and the rich estuary habitat with the surrounding wetlands and forest systems.

Neal focuses his imagery on exploring wildlife in the context of its habitat, while Michael’s specialty is capturing action images that illustrates the dynamic nature of coastal wildlife. PacificLight Images is dedicated to working with coastal communities to protect wildlife habitat and its connectivity.

A percentage of all photography sales are donated to North Coast Land Conservancy to help further this goal by PacificLight Images. Please visit http://www.nclctrust.org to read more about  NCLC.

And, too, all commission proceeds at Fairweather’s are given back in support of NCLC.

“Unless otherwise noted, images are presented as they were photographed. Slight adjustment by cropping, lightening or darkening may have been used, but the photo subject is presented as recorded in the Oregon coastal landscapes.”

Ever humbled and grateful to be selected to represent Neal Maine and Michael Wing/ PacificLight Images. Signed, matted and framed images available exclusively at Fairweather’s. A Certificate of Authenticity is provided with each copyrighted and signed image.