Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

Seaside

December 4, 5-7 p.m.

Opening reception for A GOOD FIT, an exhibition highlighting Northwest makers and crafters.

Featuring NW art by Toni Avery, woodturning by Mike Brown, wood sculptures by Martin Conley, wood craft by Stuart Dittbrenner, jewelry by metalsmith Nikki Hatt, fused glass by Bob Heath, art blocks by Diana Nadal, and textiles by Jeanne Walker.

Seaside Art Walk hostesses, dressed in theitr holiday finest, will greet guests and patrons.

Artist talks at 5: 30 p.m.

Neal Maine, naturalist, biologist, and photographer, will lecture at 6 p.m.

A Good Fit, art sale and exhibition will be on display through December 23.

 

Fused glass art bowl by Bob Heath, sandblasted beverage glasses by Rox Heath, pendant necklace by Nikki Hatt, glass heart by Bob Heath, and art by Diana Nadal.

Fairweather House & Gallery

A premier source for stylish, chic, one of a kind livable furnishings, unexpected art, and the most extraordinary accessories. Glass, paintings, photography, wood, stone, bronze, sculpture, ceramics, and jewelry made by NW hands.

Fairweather House and Gallery has become one of the historic Gilbert District’s sought after destinations offering an ever-changing amazing visual experience.–The Seaside Signal

Representing a collection of original art by an exceptional group of regional artists for over fifteen years. From traditional to transitional, contemporary to realism, impressionism to emerging art.

 

Fairweather House and Gallery attends to the well being of family, community and business through an uncompromising commitment to honesty, fairness, integrity and excellence.  Mission Statement

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands.

Complimentary jewelry gift wrapping.

Special thanks to Avery and Will for the assortment of gift boxes.

House on the Sand

  • This weaving is a lidded pine needle coil basket. The intricate stitching resembles the waves which constantly wash the sand. On the lid is a small mixed media (wood, fiber, shell, and  bead) sculpture.

“Traditionally houses aren’t built on the sand due to a weak foundation. However, there are times in our lives where due to hardship, we need extreme flexibility. We make plans and like sea waves washing the beach every day,  things change. We survive by having multiple plans. This speaks about  how reasoning is part of resilience. The ability to reason allows us to think of contingencies giving us flexibility  by which we survive another day.”  Martha Denham, fine craft artist

Life on the Rocks

This is a 12-inch diameter by 6-inch height lidded basket. The base is wooden painted on the inside and outside. The interior features a seastar adhered to its home, the rocks. The outside is a painting of standing on the bottom of the water looking up. Pine needle coil weaving completes the base. The hand-cast lid features a hand-painted seastar. The seastar is attached to a brass ring wrapped and suspended in a netting influenced Tenerife weaving. Pine needle coil weaving completes the lid, further adorned with the mesh and colorful wrapped coil. All the materials for the weaving were hand-dyed.

  • I am amazed by the resilience of seastars. They live in an environment of battering by waves, changes in temperature, overcrowding by other sea creatures, and constant attack by predators. They endure while they cling to their rocks. It’s a rough environment yet they thrive. That is what  resilience is about.” Martha Denham, fine craft artist.

Moonlight Sea Garden

This 7-inch tall pine needle coil vase has a glass insert for holding water for flowers. Sewn onto the woven vase are sea flowers made with Mother-of-Pearl and pearl beads. This was a very time-consuming and difficult piece to make. Two different types of needles were simultaneously required to sew the beads on. One needle was a fine needle used for pearls.  The bead was strung, then the needle changed to a large stainless-steel needle tough  enough to sew through the hard pine needle coils.” Martha

Martha H. Denham, fine craft artist:
I am a person whose spirit thrives amongst organic shapes. My sense of balance, function, and durability comes from the civil engineer that resides in my brain. Always asking “what if” I have looked for new ways to achieve to the next challenge.

The passion I found with pine needle coil basketry came from my roots growing up in pine forests and in a culture where everyone stitched. After developing expertise in pine needle basketry, my attributes demanded I evolve the traditional genre into my own expression.

You will see stitched into the weaving a designed collection of thread, beads, shells, and stones.

Recent work has become mixed media incorporating the weaving with metal, wood and hand-cast sculpted/painted medium and pine needles.

With coil construction being inherently uniform, how would I take it outside its apparent boundaries? Intertwining branches, vines, leaves, and shells marry the chaos of nature into the uniformity of the vessel’s function.

Breaking free of traditional expectations and methods allows me to enjoy the craft of stitching coils and the beauty of the stitching.

It is no longer the full expression but an integral part of a diverse expression. My art is only limited by my imagination that knows no boundaries.

Nov. 6 through 25

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

The Sea Endures, an exhibition of NW artists’ new artwork depicting where the Oregon land meets the Pacific Ocean. Featuring Toni Avery, Bill Baily, Martha Denham, Karen Doyle, Colette Fallon, Linda Fenton-Mendenhall, Phil Juttelstad, JoAnn Pari-Mueller, Lee Munsell, and Ron Nicolaides.

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands

“Mysteries” abstract on canvas by Diane Copenhaver

Welcome fall!  Our surroundings are changing.  The brilliant greens and blues of summer are giving way to the vibrant oranges, reds, and even greys of fall.  –DC

“Connection I and II” abstracts on board by Diane Copenhaver

 

The change of seasons is a time that heightens our sense of interconnectedness and the cycles of life. The feeling of connection between what was and what is to come is a message expressed in my pieces entitled ‘Connection’.   –DC

“Autumn” abstract on canvas by Diane Copenhaver

The exhibition ‘Surroundings’ informed my work in the use of color and texture.”   –DC

On Exhibition through October 25

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

Seaside, Oregon

“Surroundings”  features NW artists Diane Copenhaver, Colette Fallon, Dorota Haber-Lehigh, Pam Haunschild, Carolyn Myers Lindberg, Jan Rimmerman, Jan Shield,  Marga Stanley, and Vanessa K. Stokes.

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands



 

 

“Chasing the Light” by Neal Maine/ PacificLIght Images

$295.

Proceeds in support of NCLC, North Coast Land Conservancy

“Shaped by Nature” ancient, living crab tree in the Neocoxie forest, Gearhart, Or

Photographer Neal Maine, PacificLight Images

$395.

Proceeds in support of NCLC, North Coast Land Conservancy

The Green Room

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

Seaside, Oregon

Fittingly, the first Fairweather presentation of the year, for the month-long exhibit, the GREEN ROOM, spotlights art by regional fellow gallerists.

In the entertainment business, the green room is the space in a theatre or similar venue that functions as a waiting room and lounge for artists before, during, and after a performance or show when they are not engaged on stage. The origin of the term is often ascribed to such rooms historically being painted green.

Featuring:

Watercolors by Bill Baily, exhibiting artist from the Portland Art Museum

Fresco art by Agnes Field, founder and past president of the non-profit Astoria Visual Arts

Watermedia by Diana Nadal, fellow designer and frequently showing at Giustina Gallery

Mixed media work by Jan Rimerman, curator for Lakewood Center Gallery and Rain Spark Gallery Director

Abstracts by Bill Shumway, founder of Pegasus Gallery and creator of the Vistas and Vineyards en plein art program

Other historical green room fun facts:

Richard Southern, in his studies of Medieval theatre in the round, states that in this period the performing area was referred to as the green. This central space, often grass-covered, was used by the actors, while the surrounding space and circular banks were occupied by the spectators. From this source then The Green has been a traditional actors’ term for the stage. The green room could thus be considered the transition room on the way to the green/stage. Technical staff at some theatres (such as the London Coliseum) still refer to the stage as the green.

Another explanation is that in the 18th-century theater makeup was a greenish-clay in color.  It took a long time to dry without cracking, so actors waited in the “green room” until it had fully cured.

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And, too,  GREEN ROOM will feature spring vignettes by D. Fairweather, gallerist/ allied member, A.S.I.D., American Society of Interior Designers and GREEN ROOM  display images by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall, special events photographer.

 

 

 

 

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands

Please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com …artists  tab and scroll to …Neal Maine for more images and info

 “A Rare Visitor” Baltimore oriole photographed in a Seaside backyard by Neal Maine

Matted, framed in wood, and signed

17h” x 23w” $295

 

 Proceeds from Neal Maine’s photos to support North Coast Land Conservancy, NCLC.

Check out the NCLC  website for more information about doing good works
NATURE’S TRAILS

A limpet creeps up a wave-washed rock, following the rise of the tide. A salmon follows ancient watershed trails to its natal stream. An otter travels along its living trap line for crabs in the estuary to crayfish up the side creeks. A vole tunnels into the soft sponge on the forest floor. In the treetops, in the forest, across the land, in the water, and in the air, all become a living slate for NATURE’S TRAILS. This tracery of interwoven trails are unsigned but indelible to generations of travelers.

THE NEXT FRONTIER, OUR OWN BACKYARD

Humans: We take pictures, walks, deep breaths, memories, ride on waves, water, timber, in habitat that used to belong to other trail makers. We thought we could never catch all the salmon, never cut all the big trees, and never pollute the ocean. In our hubris, we thought we could make our own trails. With renewed humility, we are learning how to share this place, to live together with our partner trail makers. PacificLight Images celebrates this partnership as we use our images to inspire others to honor nature’s trails in OUR OWN BACKYARD. Neal Maine

Please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com …artists …Neal Maine for more images and info

 

Just in!

“Elk Watershed” photograph by naturalist Neal Maine

January 2021 Coastal elk in the Seaside Necanicum Estuary

Elk will “shake” out their coats to get rain water off their coats. During most periods of heavy rain they get into the thickest cover they can find in order to escape the pelting they would receive if exposed. During extremely high winds they may hunker down in the open favoring driving rain over falling trees.

Framed, matted, and signed $395

Proceeds in support of  NCLC, North Coast Land Conservancy

https://nclctrust.org › Winter-2020-newsltr-for-web
NCLCtrust.org/news.The proposed Rainforest Reserve horizon from Necanicum Estuary, Gearhart …
Clock, standing at 27″ tall, by NW wood  craftsman Stuart Dittbrenner
$550
The timepiece, an award winner, is maple and walnut with hand carved front and back and hand finished to perfection.

“To start with an inspiration from the woods, add the raw materials and manipulate the progress through stages to an artful conclusion, this is my passion as a craftsman.  The challenge is to seek the the essence of wood and convey its form, space, texture, color and motion.” SB

 Rear view of clock stand and handmade back cover of burl wood, signed and dated.

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

“Thank you for your Fairweather House and Gallery  gift total of $xxxx.xx in 2020. We honestly can never thank you enough for all that you continue to do.”  K. Voelke/  Executive  Director NCLC

We are so used to seeing seasonal art tinged with the brightest colors, so much so that looking at this exhibition is almost like taking a step out of time. 

Indeed, the displays and the selected artworks give the viewer a chance to focus on texture rather than hue.

A show that reflects on the mood of the monochromatic light, shadows, and atmosphere in the NW.”

 

 

LIGHT and SHADOWS I:  Mouth blown espresso glass, handmade pottery, by Lyn Cohn, hand wired seed pearl and shell stems, recycled glass hurricane, preserved eucalyptus branches, and original abstract art by Diane Copenhaver.

LIGHT and SHADOWS II:  Original pen and ink drawings by Vanessa K. Stokes, sea star photo by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall, hand made silver ribbed vase,  hand made beaded earrings by Mary Truhler, and chenille/ silk down filled decorative accent pillows.

 

 

 

LIGHT and SHADOWS IV:  Wood and clay bird sculpture by Sandy Visse, hand made wire basket, hand carved wood spheres, antique circle mirror art, and photo printed on wood and macro leaf photograph by Steven A. Bash.

Close up detail of Sandy Visse’s sculpture “mostly made by hand © SV”  with driftwood and woven wire base.

 

LIGHT and SHADOWS V:  Calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson, Tillamook Lighthouse in Seaside wave photo printed on glass by Neal Maine, hand made pottery bowl by Suzy Holland, NCLC gift cards and zinc table.

 

 


LIGHT and SHADOWS VI:  Bronze, zinc and nickel accessories, linen woven runner, decorative  ceramic urn, picture frames in ebony wood with shell inlaid borders, hand-poured luxury ILLUME candles, fused glass platters by Carolyn Myers Lindberg, western gull art by Leah Brown and sea stack original art by Gregory Bell.

Displays by D. Fairweather, gallerist/curator and allied member A.S.I.D., American Society of Interior Designers

Photos by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall for Fairweather House and Gallery

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

LIGHT and SHADOWS Fairweather’s October Art Sale and Exhibition featuring NW artists Paul Brent, Diane Copenhaver, Linda Fenton-Mendenhall, Neal Maine, Emily Miller, Diana Nadal, and Vanessa K. Stokes.

Bringing together works by very different artists – in terms of age, geography, and medium – this exhibition draws the viewer’s attention to the beauty of the understated, giving the viewer a chance to focus on texture.

On exhibit through Oct. 31st

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands.

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

“Eagle Sunrise” by NW naturalist/ wildlife photographer Neal Maine

Proceeds in support of NCLC, North Coast Land Conservancy

For info go to nclctrust.org

“Seaside Sunset” oil painting by Blue Bond

 

“Live in each season as it passes; breathe the air, and resign yourself to the influences of each.

Be blown on by all the winds.

Open all your pores and bathe in all the tides of Nature, in all her streams and oceans, in all her seasons.

For all Nature is doing her best each moment to make us well.

She exists for no other end. Do not resist her.”

— Henry David Thoreau, journal entry August 1853

 

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

HELLO SUNSHINE Art Show and Sale

Now through August 25th

Art for the exhibition created entirely by North coast artists.

Featuring art by Blue Bond, Paul Brent, Lieta Gratteri,  Reneé Hafeman,  Bev Drew Kindley, Karen E. Lewis, Carolyn Lindberg, Neal Maine, and Fedor Zubanov.

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway, Seaside Oregon

Closed until it is safe to reopen

Due to the  novel coronavirus the gallery shut its doors on March 15, 2020

We hope make to it possible to enjoy some of what we have to offer to while you are at home in during the order to Stay at Home, Save Lives. Publishing articles is a way that we can continue to feature our resident artists during the situation,” chief curator Denise Fairweather.

 

 

Close up of Lysichiton americanus/ AKA Skunk Cabbage or Swamp Lantern  watercolor by Jo Pomeroy Crockett

Adored by many and ridiculed by some, Lysichiton americanus, aka skunk cabbage or swamp lantern is one of the first plants to emerge in late winter. Pushing its way through snow and peeking out of bogs, this bright yellow curvaceous “leaf” (spathe) with its inner structure of numerous small flowers (spadix) provides a warm resting and mating place for beetles and other insects. the calla lily. It has a distinctive fragrance similar to garlic or apples that give rise to its popular name.

Lysichton has many uses. Some Native peoples used it as an emergency food and a medicine. Hanis Coos elder Lottie Evanoff reportedly said she liked skunk cabbage very much and found it curious that settlers did not eat it. “Bears eats skunk cabbage, is just crazy for it. So, it must be good eating; everything bear eats is good eating.”  Jo Pomeroy Crockett, PhD/ artist

Jo Pomeroy Crockett

GATHER notes:

Importance of Quality Watercolor Paper

Watercolor, while not fussy is particular about the kind of paper it prefers. A special rough paper, handmade in India, with a very deep tooth is especially suited to this medium. Pigment just skims over the top but if given enough water, likes to settle into the valleys. Gentle glazes provide depth and effects not possible with other papers. The watercolors were painted on this special paper.  JPC

 

 

Jo Pomeroy Crockett, Phd., has often lectured at Fairweather’s.

Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, a North coast resident, works primarily wet-into-wet and strives for dramatic patterns. Vivid colors, an emphasis on the play of light and a touch of whimsy mark her paintings. Although she enjoys painting a variety of subjects, she especially enjoys painting nature. She has exhibited in numerous juried art competitions in the Southwest and the Pacific Northwest. Her work is in private collections in various parts of the United States, England, Canada and Switzerland. In combination with her art, she works as a free-lance writer and educator

 

 

“First Leap” by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images. Proceeds in support of NCLC.

 “This mallard chick seems to be enjoying life to the fullest as it scurries across a lily pad in a pond near my home.”  Neal Maine

After a thirty-year career as an award winning biology teacher at Seaside High School, Neal Maine became the first executive director of North Coast Land Conservancy, which he co-founded in 1986. Since his retirement from the land trust in 2010, he has pursued his passion for nature photography through PacificLight Images, a partnership with Michael Wing, dedicated to raising awareness of coastal ecology and the wildlife with whom we share the region’s estuaries, freshwater wetlands and forests. Their photography centers around coastal and Columbia River landscape, ecology and the rich estuary habitat with the surrounding wetlands and forest systems.

 

Habitat lectures by Neal Maine at Fairweather’s will return when it is safe to re-open the gallery.

 

Artists and speakers were booked for the exhibition, GATHER,  several booked more than one year ago, with some of art delivered before the gallery closed mid-March.

The April exhibition, titled GATHER, which was meant to open in the gallery April 4 and run through April 25, was canceled  due to the novel coronavirus.

 

Elk in the dunes by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images.  Proceeds in support of NCLC.

North Coast Land Conservancy/ reprint
Elk have been on the Oregon Coast a long, long, long, long time. Scientists believe elk migrated from Asia to North America over Beringia—better known as the Bering Land Bridge—some 120,000 years ago. The animals would have been a familiar sight to the first human hunters who migrated here tens of thousands of years later. Elk survived, and continue to survive, by being able to eat almost any kind of plant they can find, while we humans are limited to eating “soft fruits, a few easily digestible seeds, and the milk and flesh of our more versatile animal cousins,” as David Haskell writes in The Forest Unseen, one of naturalist and photographer Neal Maine’s favorite books.

 

 

Chasing the Light by Neal Maine/PacificLight Images.  Proceeds in support of NCLC.

We are all are holed up at home to slow the spread of the virus, hopefully,  this “Fairweather fix” will give moods and psyches a lift with some online R&R.

 

Watch time lapse video showing efforts in creating space for last year’s April exhibition, LIFE ABUNDANT.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dhKYvSZM3bg

Soon, when it is safe to re-open, we will be back in the gallery.

Stay safe at home, save lives.

Fairweather House and Gallery will continue to reach out with on-line blog articles about the arts.

And, too, on a regular basis, during these uncertain times, we will continue to re-post previous LIVE  Fairweather arts events…until it is safe to re-open the gallery.

http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

End note:

Flowers heal broken hearts.
https://youtu.be/ryUxrFUk6MY

 

Neal Maine presenting a signed ArcticLight photograph to Nancy Holmes, lucky raffle winner.

 

Karen Doyle, Fresh Start featured artist,  with Saundra, Art Walk hostess, lecturing about her art painted for the exhibition.

 

Dorota Haber-Lehigh, Fresh Start featured artist, with Joan, Art Walk hostess, lecturing about her art created for the exhibition.

 

Gayle H. Seely, Fresh Start featured artist, with Kathy, Art Walk hostess, lecturing about her art created for the exhibition.

Neal Maine,  Seaside/ Gearhart naturalist, lectured about the new and fresh frames for a series of juvenile eagle images captured in the local habitat.

 

A poised and composed Shirley 88  caught in a pause from playing LIVE during the evening affair.

 

Fresh tidbits: grapes, pineapples, jelly cookies, sugar wafers, sponge cake, kisses, chocolate mints and sugar cookies. Thanks to K. Bowman, Fairweather’s Director of Hospitality.

 

Revealing a fresh take on Neal Maine’s famous “Elk Run” photo.  Custom order in a 38×48 size finished through a lot of collaboration with a fellow gallery owner from Necanicum Gallery. Indeed, the project involved more than four people  working together to complete the goal of enlarging an iconic image from the local habitat.  This image by Neal Maine, nature photographer, was published in the May-June 2015 issue of Bugle magazine (published by the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation). It is pictured in the story printed on page 62 about Gearhart, OR; which is #6 on the list of top ten “elkiest” places in America. The article is titled: Greetings from Elk City USA, pages 56-68. Neal Maine, a former educator,  devotes his time to observing the local wildlife and raising habitat awareness.

 

Fresh Start Exhibition and Sale

Through March 25

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside, OR  97138

“This exhibit’s  expectation lies in its possibility to present fresh, new perspectives, inspiration, experiences, reflection and even the possibility for transcendence in some way. Indeed, the meaning of “fresh start” is: the beginning of a new period or step,”   D. Fairweather, gallerist.

http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

Photos by Kemy Kay Kjemhus.