Naturalist, ecologist, photographer Neal Maine

Photo of Neal Maine on location/ c. Randall Henderson used with permission.

 

Naturalist, ecologist and acclaimed photographer Neal Maine will lecture during the Seaside June “Ode to the Tides” show, a Wetlands Conservancy traveling art exhibit to highlight the beauty and economic value of near-shore coastal habitats.

 “Raising the Capacity of Estuary and Wetlands Awareness” by Neal Maine

Seaside Public Library

1131 Broadway Street

June 13, 6-8:00 pm

Free  program and open to the public


“Communities must explore a strategic framework that functions and bridges the gap at the community and regional level that makes ongoing community-based awareness an everyday agenda item.”

Neal Maine often lectures throughout the region raising awareness of coastal ecology and the wildlife with whom we share the region’s estuaries, freshwater wetlands and forests.

“Communities must find ways to ensure systemic community renewal for all citizens beyond government meetings. Efforts need to include comprehensive engagement of citizens in a broad range of community processes.”

 

After a thirty-year career as an award winning biology teacher at Seaside High School since his retirement, Neal Maine has pursued his passion for nature photography through PacificLight Images. Photography centers around coastal and Columbia River landscape, ecology and the rich estuary habitat with the surrounding wetlands. PacificLight Images, is dedicated to working with coastal communities to protect habitat.

 

Watercolor by Pam Haunschild/ Ode to the Tides Art Show and Sale

 

 

The Wetlands Conservancy and partners are sponsoring Ode to the Tides, a traveling art exhibit and sale to highlight the ecological value of near-shore coastal habitats.

 For more info, go to https://wetlandsconservancy.org/stewardship/ode-to-tides-art-exhibit/

 

Image:  “Eelgrass Meadow” watercolor by Emily Miller/ logo calligraphy by Kajira Berry

 

Ode to the Tides Art Show and Sale contains original art in a variety of media, created by Northwest artists at venues on the Northern Oregon coast and Willamette Valley.

Through May 28th– Giustina Gallery, LaSells Stewart Center, Corvallis OR

Through June 30th Fairweather Gallery and Art-in-Loft Gallery in Beach Books, Seaside OR

August 2nd – September 25th Newport Visual Arts Center & Hatfield Marine Science Center Visitor Center & Maritime Museum, Newport OR

November – December Beaverton Library & Beaverton City Hall, Beaverton OR

For a sneak peek at the art created for the exhibit, please go to https://1drv.ms/f/s!ApX3G0K1CP6QvUoil55E7MCQvR8Y

 

 

The Wetlands Conservancy is the only organization in Oregon dedicated to permanently protect, conserve and restore Oregon’s greatest wetlands.

 

Ode to the Tides goals are to recognize the aesthetic and ecological significance Oregon’s estuaries, tide pools and intertidal habitats, to spark community and creative interdisciplinary engagement, promote conservation and enhance visitor experience and support of coastal resources and communities.

https://wetlandsconservancy.org/

 

Grant funding  for the SEASIDE Ode to the Tides exhibit and program made possible through:

Purpose The Clatsop County Cultural Coalition grants are funded by the Oregon Cultural Trust and awarded to projects that support, maintain, preserve and …

“Polar Snow Shoe” by Neal Maine

“Whale Within” by Neal Maine 

 

 

Wildlife photographers Daniel Dietrich and Neal Maine in 2015.

 

An event hosted in Seaside for the Alaska Wilderness League in 2015 has earned  recent  kudos and a connection to Art Wolfe, internationally known photographer. Neal Maine shared the news at the opening reception of ‘Portraiture’ on May 4, 2019.

 

Daniel Dietrich traveled to the Arctic with Neal Maine in 2014. Daniel recently entered his polar bear image, a photo one/tenth of a second from Neal Maine, in a competition.

“Thanks to BigPicture: Natural World Photography Competition for selecting my polar bear image as a finalist in this year’s competition. The photo will be on display at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco July-October.”  Daniel Dietrich

 

And, too, Daniel Dietrich is with Art Wolfe on location in 2019.

 

 

To recall the 2015 event, go to…

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/tag/arctic-light

 

‘Arctic Light’ draws attention to global warming Presentation …

https://www.discoverourcoast.com/…/arctic-light…/article_1d181096-2d41-5d56-a37…

Feb 16, 2015 – ‘Arctic Light’ draws attention to global warming Presentation, … Neal Maine and Daniel Dietrich will speak about Alaska Wilderness League at …

 

 

Osprey portrait by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images.  Proceeds in support of NCLC.

 

‘Portraiture’ habitat lecture by local naturalist, wildlife photographer Neal Maine was given at Fairweather’s on May 4.

 

Ospreys return to Seaside

May 17, 2019/  Seaside Signal newspaper article

Oregon coast naturalist Neal Maine still gets a thrill after many years of watching the osprey return to their nests in Seaside. Maine has found nine nests so far and estimates that there are about 20 osprey locally, but he admits that there are likely some he is missing.

“When nature keeps on marching, you get excited. When the osprey return, somethings still right, they flew all the way from South America,” said Maine.

The annual return of the osprey not only marks the coming of summer, it is a sign of the progress being made in conservation. Osprey, along with other raptors, suffered a population decimation from the use of DDT, which caused eggshell thinning. Once the pesticide was banned, the bird of prey made a sharp recovery.

However, they are not out of the woods yet. There is a growing trend of osprey nesting on man-made objects. Osprey typically nest near rivers on the top of dead trees, but as forest composition changed and old growth snags disappeared, they started relying on utility poles and other tall objects to rear their young.

In addition, their choice location is not always convenient. When osprey in Seaside decided to nest on a pole near the Broadway baseball field the raptors did not consider that the power line may one day need replacement. The nest was relocated on a 60-foot high pole installed off Neawanna Creek. Fortunately, the birds were fine with the move and have continued to nest at the new location since 2012. Maine, who oversaw the project, has watched the same birds come back to the same nests since 2009.

Osprey that summer in Oregon typically winter off the islands and coast of Mexico, Central and South America, segregating into male and female territories. Osprey typically live to 25 in the wild and will continue to use the same nest with their monogamous partner, unless something tragic happens. The juveniles also come back to the area where they were reared so the birds on the coast have been here for many, many generations.

While their numbers rebounded significantly in most of the world after the banning of DDT, osprey are still threatened or endangered globally, including in many states nationally. In Oregon, they are not considered legally endangered, although are not as abundant as they once were. Currently, the biggest threat to osprey is aquaculture, which causes habitat loss because of damming. The raptors are often shot while hunting fish at aquaculture facilities in their southern territory.

However, here in Oregon the birds are increasingly overwintering locally rather than migrating and it is not clear as to why. The birds rely on an abundant source of fish, which may be harder for the birds to find as more rivers are dammed for agriculture, flood control, aquaculture and hydropower. It’s also possible that they are finding the Willamette Valley’s maritime climate more amenable than in year’s past and have moved north, like many birds, as a result of climate change. Moreover, it could be a slough of other variables not yet identified. There are not many resources on the coast dedicated to the study of osprey.

We didn’t even know where the nests were, it wasn’t on anyone’s agenda. ODFW was budgeted back to survival level, there’s not even an ODFW office in Clatsop County,” said Maine. Since the ospreys are not a priority species, answering these questions might fall on the shoulders of people like Maine, who engages regularly in citizen science. “More and more are staying every winter in the valley, and last year I found one here in January,” he said.

Nature certainly does find a way and osprey are a testament to that. They are resilient birds and can make themselves at home in the busiest of human environments. “It seems like they watch the baseball games,” Maine said about the birds at the Broadway field.

 

Check out the osprey cam at seasideosprey.org or better yet, go find them in person in Seaside.


“Virginia Rail” by Neal Maine, PacificLight Images.

The Virginia rail is a small waterbird, fairly common despite continuing loss of habitat, but are secretive by nature and more often heard than seen.

Read more at https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/virginia-rail

 

 

 

Seaside First Saturday Art Walk

Fairweather House and Gallery

Through the years, local habitat lecture every First Saturday by Neal Maine at 6:pm.

 

 

Neal Maine,  naturalist,  spoke about the nurse logs that establish marching orders for future forests during the Fairweather Gallery opening reception of ‘March’ on the March 2nd Seaside First Saturday Art Walk.

 

Even though they’re dead, they are not gone — trees find a way to help each other out postmortem. Introducing the nurse log. Defined as fallen trees that provide “ecological facilitation” as they decay, nurse logs offer seedlings shade, nutrients, water and protection from disease and pathogens, thus nurturing and making way for the new generation.

How does it work, you ask? Well, the process begins with a fallen tree’s gradual breakdown of lignin following its death. Lignin is a group of polymers that help form the trees’ structural tissues, especially in wood and bark. Biodegradation of lignin is facilitated by microorganisms such as fungi and bacteria — white rot fungi, more specifically, is responsible for breaking down wood on the forest floor. As the lignin deteriorates, holes and niches in the bark begin to grow in size and, over time, become filled with soil, moss, mushrooms and small plants. This dark soil is called humus, the nitrogen-rich organic matter that forms when plant and animal matter decay. When moss covers the exterior of the log itself, the decaying process is expedited, and new plant species are more easily supported.

Plants aren’t the only ones that benefit, however. Many small animal species such as squirrels are also known to roost on or in nurse logs, enriching the humus and providing additional fertilization for germinating seeds and sprouts with their food debris.  –Allie Wisniewski, American Forests

 

 

“This tree I saw at Skipanon Forest, an NCLC Reserve. This Sitka spruce fell over some time ago, but instead of dying, it decided to become at least seven new “trees” from its branches. The largest new tree (just left of center) looked to be nearly a foot in diameter and perhaps 30’ tall. Amazing what a tree will do to keep on keeping on.”   Jeffrey Roehm, NCLC steward

 

Take a note!

Next Seaside First Saturday Art Walk

April 6

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Next local habitat lecture by Neal Maine at 6:pm on April 6.

For more info about the Art Walk events, please visit www.facebook.com/SeasideFirstSaturdayArtWalk

 

Neal Maine introduced a catalog of PacificLight Images recently at Fairweather House and Gallery; an exclusive catalog featuring his entire collection with images that can be special ordered as framed prints or as matted prints, representing more than a decade of habitat photography.

 

 

100% profits from the sale proceeds in support of North Coast Land Conservancy, NCLC.

To read more about North Coast Land Conservancy, please go to https://nclctrust.org/rare-

For more about the naturalist/ photographer Neal Maine, please visit his artist’s page at

www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

“White Wings.”

Common white egret by Neal Maine, PacificLight Images.

November, 2018

Sunset Beach, Oregon

 

Read more about Herons and Egrets | Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife

https://myodfw.com/wildlife-viewing/species/-herons-and-egrets

After a thirty-year career as an award-winning biology teacher at Seaside High School, Neal Maine became the first executive director of North Coast Land Conservancy, which he co-founded in 1986. Since his retirement from the land trust in 2010, he has pursued his passion for nature photography through PacificLight Images, which is dedicated to raising awareness of coastal ecology and the wildlife with whom we share the region’s estuaries, freshwater wetlands and forests. The photography centers around coastal and Columbia River landscape, ecology and the rich estuary habitat with the surrounding wetlands and forest systems. Neal Maine focuses his imagery on exploring wildlife in the context of its habitat.

 

To view more of Neal Maine’s photography, please go to the  artists tab/ Neal Maine http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

100% of profits from Neal Maine’s photography  are donated to NCLC,  North Coast Land Conservancy.

 

 

 

Q: “Would it be possible to share the poem that Kim Stafford dedicated to NCLC as a story for the “All is Calm” Art Walk at Fairweather’s?”

A:  “We’re so glad you were touched and appreciate you wanting to share it with others,”  NCLC/North Coast Land Conservancy.

For more about NCLC go to https://nclctrust.org/ North Coast Land Conservancy. Helping to conserve Oregon’s coastal lands, forever.

Mother Mountain
Heaven, the old proverb says, is at your mother’s feet—
and here we are at the forest hem watching fog climb
through trees toward the queen’s crown peak,
hidden harvester of rain, alpine realm of silence
and starlight, home to bear cave, elk wallow,
cougar range, rare flowers brimming from persistent
seeps, trees shaggy with centuries on their blue ridge
where sister peaks layer shadows far.
So close the gate, let the alders usher in young fir,
cedar, hemlock, spruce, let the road become a path
for pilgrims seeking myriad mysteries, magic
not yet known, the black petaltail dragonfly
born from fog-fed, moss-footed mud to soar
before our eyes from the time of legends.
Here we dwell at our mother’s feet, blessed
with bounty we protect, home to wild origin.
Kim Stafford

 

Kim Stafford named Oregon Poet Laureate | Oregon Cultural Trust
https://culturaltrust.org/blog/news/kim-stafford-named-oregon-poet-laureate/

 

Please note another Fairweather blog post next week will present the entire back story to the poem created by Kim Stafford for NCLC with a letter by Katie Voelke, executive director.

 

 

 

“All is Calm”

Fairweather’s December Exhibition.

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

“All is Calm”, an exhibition featuring the art of Susan Romersa, among others.

 

The Seaside artist paints in oil celebrating the beauty in portraits and figure paintings.

Susan was ordained as a Minister of Religious Science after many years of study.

 

Fairweather’s  fourth annual harp petting zoo features  a beautiful Limerick harp by NW wood artisan  Duane Bolster.

 

 

 

 

Naturalist and wildlife photographer Neal Maine lectured during the opening reception of “Expanding Horizons”   at Fairweather’s on Nov. 3rd.

 

Take away notes:

 

Q: What is Natural History?

A:  Natural history tells the story of our living earth. It comprises the systematic observation, classification, interpretation, and description of the biosphere and its inhabitants.

Natural history is a primary component of culture. Every society develops some system for classifying, interpreting, and valuing animals, plants, and other natural phenomena. These systems shape our understanding of the world and our place in it.

Natural history is field-based. It begins with direct observation and study of organisms in the conditions under which they actually live.

Natural history is interdisciplinary. While grounded in the natural sciences, it engages the humanities, social sciences, and the arts, and it informs technical fields such as medicine, agriculture, forestry, and environmental management.

 

 

 

Q: What is the difference being a scientist or a naturalist, you ask?

 

A: “Lots of scientists never leave the lab. You can just see them in white coats, crunching numbers on computers, pouring stuff in and out of test tubes, torturing animals, etc. Naturalists are people who actually go outside, learn about, and appreciate nature. And although there is some overlap, there is a huge difference, and it is very disappointing that there aren’t many naturalists out there any more. I guess there is no money and academic prestige associated with being a naturalist any more. That’s why Neal Maine is such a special person to have around.”  –Sara Vickerman-Gage

 

Through November

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway Street

Expanding Horizons, an exhibition, featuring artists turning to nature seeking to express its evocative power on personal level.

Painters and photographers included in this exhibit are Linda Fenton-Mendenhall,  Lee Munsell, Ron Nicolaides, Judy Horning Shaw,  Jim Young and Russell Young, as well as Neal Maine.

Introducing Michael Fox, Jeni Lee and Barbara Folawn.

 

 

Q; Why Does Natural History Matter?

A: Natural history helps to shape communities and individuals. It gives us deeper insights into our relationships with other beings and places we inhabit.

Natural history promotes sound environmental practice. It grounds policy in ecological reality, guides decision-making, and inspires conservation efforts at all levels.

Natural history informs and energizes environmental education. It connects students with natures, creates synergy across fields, and draws strength from all major divisions of a community. It prepares people to live honors and responsibly in a sustainable world.

http://www.naturalhistroynetwork.org/philosophy.

 

 

 “Best book to read ever on naturalist writing.” D. Fairweather

 

Save the date and time.

Next Neal Maine lecture at Fairweather’s.

December 1, 6:pm.

 

To view photographs  by naturalist  Neal Maine, go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Neal Maine

 

“Power of Flight”  by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images

Pacific Flyway

Snow Geese

 

 

Snow geese fly along the Pacific Flyway  in narrow corridors, more than 3,000 miles from traditional nesting areas in the Arctic tundra to wintering areas along the coast. They visit traditional stopover habitats in spectacular numbers.

 

Q: What is the Pacific Flyway, you ask?

A: The Pacific Flyway is a major north-south flyway for migratory birds in America, extending from Alaska to Patagonia. Naturalists can often predict to the day when a particular species will show up in their area.

 

https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/snow-goose

 

 

 

Neal Maine habitat lectures every First Saturday at 6:pm. Fairweather House and Gallery.

 

After a thirty-year career as an award-winning biology teacher at Seaside High School, Neal Maine became the first executive director of North Coast Land Conservancy, which he co-founded in 1986. Since his retirement from the land trust in 2010, he has pursued his passion for nature photography through PacificLight Images. His photographs center around coastal and Columbia River landscape, ecology and the rich estuary habitat with the surrounding wetlands and forest systems.

Neal focuses his imagery on exploring wildlife in the context of its habitat. PacificLight Images is dedicated to working with coastal communities to protect wildlife habitat and its connectivity. 100% profits are donated to NCLC, North Coast Land Conservancy, to help further this goal

To read more about the naturalist, please go to artists tab … Neal Maine at https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

Fun facts about Snow Geese:

SIZE: 27 to 33 in; wingspan, 4.5 ft

Snow Geese stay with the same mate for life.

The oldest Snow Goose on record was 27 and a half.

Snow Geese make epic journeys by air, but they are impressive on foot, too. Within the first three weeks of hatching, goslings may walk up to 50 miles with their parents.

The Snow Goose breeds north of the timberline in Greenland, Canada, Alaska, and the northeastern tip of Siberia. They fly high as far as 5,000 feet about the ground.

The Snow Goose has two color plumage morphs, white (snow) or gray/blue (blue), thus the common description as “snow goose” and “blue goose.”