Title: “Winged Wonder” by Neal Maine, PacificLight Images.

Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly. Location: Neacoxie Creek. Seaside/Gearhart.

Signed, matted and framed.

“Unless otherwise noted, images are presented as they were photographed. Slight adjustment by cropping, lightening or darkening may have been used, but the photo subject is presented as recorded in the Oregon coastal landscapes.”

A Certificate of Authenticity is provided with each copyrighted and signed image.

Available exclusively at Fairweather’s.

Proceeds to support North Coast Land Conservancy/NCLC.

 

 

THE NEXT FRONTIER, OUR OWN BACKYARD

Humans: We take pictures, walks, deep breaths, memories, rides on waves, water, timber, in habitat that used to belong to other trail makers. We thought we could never catch all the salmon, never cut all the big trees, and never pollute the ocean. In our hubris, we thought we could make our own trails. With renewed humility, we are learning how to share this place, to live together with our partner trail makers. PacificLight Images celebrates this partnership as we use our images to inspire others to honor nature’s trails in OUR OWN BACKYARD.Neal Maine

To read more about the photographer, please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Neal Maine

 

Save the date and time. 
Neal Maine, scientist and wildlife photographer to present a lecture on the ecology of the North Coast habitats.

August 5th, 6:pm
Fairweather House and Gallery
612 Broadway, Seaside, OR
Opening reception for FINDINGS

Seaside First Saturday Art Walk 

 

To read more about the Art Walk, please go to http://www.facebook.com/ Seaside First Saturday Art Walk.

Q: Where can the Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly be found, you ask?

A:  Habitat: Small ponds and slow streams. It perches on the tips of twigs, grasses and other vegetation.

Fun Creature Facts:

Distribution: Western U.S., West Indies and Central America south to Chile and Argentina.

Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly wings sit flat when perched and have a strong sustained flight; flitting about on gossamer wings and quiet as a whisper.

Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonflies are swift fliers, reminiscent of tiny airplanes.

Their eyes are huge, often meeting at the top of the head.

The Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly, will eat almost any soft-bodied flying insect including mosquitoes, flies, small moths, mayflies, and flying ants or termites.

The Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly are aptly named as they mimic hawks, relentlessly pursuing their prey.

The Latin name for this genus, Sympetrum, means “with rock” and refers to their habit of basking on rocks to absorb heat early in the day.

This species is one of the first dragonflies to emerge each year.

imnh.isu.edu/digitalatlas/bio/insects/drgnfly

 

 

 

Image titled: Lucky 13. Female Wood Duck pictured with 13 offspring, “…all that could fit in one image… she had 19 young swimming  behind her… ” –Neal Maine, nature photographer. Location, Gearhart Westlake.

 

 

Fun Facts:

Wood Ducks live in wooded swamps, where they nest in holes in trees or in nest boxes put up near or over water. They are equipped with strong claws that can grip bark and perch on branches. These cavities are typically places where a branch has broken off and the tree’s heartwood has subsequently rotted. Wood Ducks cannot make their own cavities. https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Wood_Duck/lifehistory

Beavers are responsible for creating the wetlands that the wood ducks call home. Beavers and wood ducks go hand in hand. Woodies are fond of waters with plenty of wooded cover — hence the name — and a new-built beaver pond offers habitat that attracts and keeps wood ducks in the vicinity.

Beaver Art Exhibit in Seaside, was created by the Wetlands Conservancy to celebrate all things BEAVER. Signature beaver art will be on display at Fairweather House & Gallery through September. In addition, the Seaside Library featured stories and crafts (with beaver sticks provided by Neal Maine and Joyce Hunt/ Necanicum Watershed Council), hands-on stewardship at Beaver Creek with the NCLC. “Neal Maine gave a brilliant talk on the ecology of beavers.” –Necanicum Watershed Council BIENNIAL REPORT.

wetlandsconservancy.org/stewardship/beaver-tales

http://www.dailyastorian.com/SS/news/20170412/from-near-extinction-to-a-place-in-art

https://thegilbertdistrict.wordpress.com/…/the-art-of-beaver-tales-seaside-exhibition-o

Read more about beavers and the wetlands they create, go to http://www.necanicumwatershed.org/ … and http://www.nclc.org

 

seaside-art-walk-logo

 

SAVE THE DATE AND TIME.  

Nature lecture by Neal Maine at 6:pm on July 1st

Fairweather House and Gallery
612 Broadway

 

Seaside First Saturday Art Walk opening reception for “Waves,” an exhibition featuring resident artists Victoria Brooks, Linda Fenton-Mendenhall and Ron Nicolaides, and introducing Jim Young and Karen Lewis.

Brooks paints in oils to capture landscapes and emotional moments of people in natural settings. Fenton-Mendenhall, a lifelong resident of Clatsop County, offers fresh perspectives of the fleeting moments of waves and the whisper of the sea.  Nicolaides has mastered the mesmerizing translucent waves in his depiction of luminous seascapes.

Young, a fishery biologist for the National Marine Fisheries Service, and later a research scientist for a U.S. Department of Energy national laboratory, uses photography as documentation, illustrating articles written for a website and publications. “My aim as a photographic artist is to capture images expressed in nature that would be forgotten if not recorded permanently after the events have passed,” he said.

Lewis has a lifelong relationship with water. She grew up kayaking, swimming, and snorkeling. She tries to capture the many moods of water, and her sweeping brush strokes express fluidity and color in motion.

Naturalist and biologist Neal Maine will speak at 6 p.m. about the ecology of the local habitat.  Shirley 88 will play live music.

To read more about the upcoming Art Walk, please visit http://www.facebook.com/Seaside First Saturday Art Walk.

 

 


Neal Maine, biologist, ecologist and nature photographer.

 

After a thirty-year career as an award-winning  biology teacher at Seaside High School, Neal Maine became the first executive director of North Coast Land Conservancy, which he co-founded in 1986. Since his retirement from the land trust in 2010, he has pursued his passion for nature photography through PacificLight Images. Photographs center around coastal and Columbia River landscape, ecology and the rich estuary habitat with the surrounding wetlands and forest systems.

Neal focuses his imagery on exploring wildlife in the context of its habitat. PacificLight Images is dedicated to working with coastal communities to protect wildlife habitat and its connectivity. A percentage of all photography sales are donated to North Coast Land Conservancy to help further this goal.

To view the catalog of all the images avialalbe from Neal Maine, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Neal Maine
Image

 

 

 

Image titled:  Woody on Parade by Gearhart/ Seaside naturalist, biologist and scientist Neal Maine of PacificLight Images.

 Gallery proceeds to support NCLC, North Coast Land Conservancy.

Fun fact about the Wood Duck: The Wood Duck is the only North American duck that regularly produces two broods in one year. 

Male Wood Duck  photographed on West Lake  in April 2017.

Q: Where in the world is West Lake, you ask?

A: West Lake  is located is Gearhart, Oregon on Highway 101, just north of Hertig Fire Station near the cross road of Del Moore Loop Road.

 

For more about the artist, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseangallery.com/ artists/ … Neal Maine

 

 

North Coast Beaver by Neal Maine

NEAL MAINE, SCIENTIST AND WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHER TO PRESENT A LECTURE ON BEAVER ECOLOGY MAY 25TH 7-8PM

Necanicum Watershed Council and North Coast Land Conservancy and The Wetlands Conservancy, present Beaver Tales –Neal Maine, scientist and wildlife photographer to present a lecture on Beaver Ecology

 

Date: May 25
Time: 7 –8 PM
Location: Beaver Tales Exhibition Gallery, 608 Broadway, located in the historic Gilbert District of downtown Seaside
Next to Fairweather Gallery (612 Broadway)

To celebrate beavers and their contribution to the ecology of the North Coast, the nonprofit organizations have teamed up with local businesses to host the Beaver Tales Art Exhibit and Sale in Seaside. The purpose of the exhibit is to highlight the importance of beavers in creating wetlands and other aquatic habitat.

Neal Maine will explain how beavers engineer wetlands on the North Coast, and how people can learn to take advantage of their environmental benefits while protecting property from flooding and other damage. Maine’s vast experience in studying and photographing wildlife enables him to tell fascinating stories about these industrious little rodents that most people never see.

For more info please visit NCLC.org
http://www.necanicumwatershedcouncil

The Wetlands Conservancy has posted information on the Beaver Tales art project. The link is below. Feel free to share it with your friends and contacts.
http://wetlandsconservancy.org/stewardship/beaver-tales

http://wetlandsconservancy.org/stewardship/beaver-tales/beaver-inspiration

https://northernwoodlands.org/discoveries/pathways-to-ponds

Here’s a link to an excellent short video, with great aerial depiction of the changes that beaver dams bring to meadows . . .
http://www.animalplanet.com/tv-shows/other/videos/fooled-by-nature-beaver-dams

And for more inspiration, a video of beaver swimming on U-Tube. .https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9cwu_Wu5ONI


Image title: Hidden Gold.

Long-Billed Curlew.

On migration.

Location: Del Rey Beach, Oregon State Park.

Framed, matted and signed by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images

Proceeds in support of NCLC, North Coast Land Conservancy

For more info please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ … artists/ Neal Maine

This incredibly long-billed curlew is the largest of our shorebirds. It spends the summer on the grasslands of the arid west, appearing on coastal mudflats only in migration. It often occurs alongside the Marbled Godwit, which is very similar in size and color pattern; but the godwit’s bill curves up, not down.

Forages by walking rather quickly over coastal mudflats, using its long bill to probe just below the surface searching for crabs, ghost shrimps, and other creatures.

http://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/long-billed-curlew
http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Long-billed_Curlew

Tracking long-billed curlew | The Nature Conservancy
http://www.nature.org/ourinitiatives/regions/…/tracking-long-billed-curlew-1.xml

•North American Bird Conservation Initiative. 2016. The State of North America’s Birds 2016. Environment and Climate Change

 

Q: Where in the world is Del Rey Beach, you ask?

 

A: The largest ocean in the world, the Pacific Ocean  is a just a steps away walk from Del Rey Oregon State Park, just north of Gearhart on the Pacific Coast Highway 101.  There is a quiet, secluded parking area.  Each of the Oregon State Parks is an individual place where people play, picnic, rest, hike, renew, and everything in between.  They are an everyday reminder of the things that make Oregon great, and their very existence is a testament to what we collectively value.

 

Park History: The land was acquired in 1970 by gift from Clatsop County. Free annual day-use attendance: 98,318

 

 

For more info go to: http://www.traveloregon.com   See & Do …Del Rey Beach State Recreation Site | Travel Oregon

 

Agnes Field II

Here is the work on paper and other pieces for the exhibit opening May 6. I have one slightly larger on panel…similar image and color. –Agnes Field

Artist Statement:

“This work is assembled from my surrounding using ephemeral and commonly accessible materials, such as styrofoam, plastic, cardboard, wood and fabric. Tied to the contemporary legacy of Arte Povera, the work attempts to create intrinsic objects that minimize the boundary between everyday experience and the commercialization of formal practice.” –AgF

For more about the artist please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Agnes Field

Q: What is the art movement called, Arte Povera, you ask?
A: Arte Povera means literally ‘poor art’ but the word poor here refers to the movement’s signature exploration of a wide range of materials beyond the traditional ones of oil paint on canvas, bronze, or carved marble. Materials used by the artists included soil, rags and twigs. In using such throwaway materials they aimed to challenge and disrupt the values of the commercialised contemporary gallery system.

For more info about Arte Povera go to:

http://www.visual-arts-cork.com/history-of-art/arte-povera.htm
https://news.artnet.com/market/an-introduction-to-arte-povera-

Fairweather House and Gallery
Seaside First Saturday Art Walk
May 6th, 5-7: pm

Opening reception for HELLO…BEAVER TALES!

New original work by Fairweather resident artists Paul Brent, Mike Brown, Susan Curington, Agnes Field, Mike Brown, Jo Pomeroy Crockett, PhD., and Neal Maine, as well as selected NW artists.

Beaver, our beloved state animal, is woefully misunderstood and blamed for dam building, flooding and munching on plants. In fact, Oregon beaver creates wetlands, habitat for salmon and create pools that keep water clean and moderate fluctuations in water flow.

They are nature’s hydrologists. There is a slow but growing appreciation and recognition of the positive benefits that beaver play in Oregon. It is time for more Oregonians to know about and celebrate our state mammal. Art exhibits are a great way to raise the profile of beaver, wetlands and Oregon artists.
The goal of the exhibition is to recognize the aesthetic and ecological significance our state animal plays in the creation and maintenance of wetland habitats.

Speaker guest speaker at Fairweather’s BEAVER TALES will be Katie Voelke, executive director of the North Coast Land Conservancy.

NCLC is a nonprofit based in Seaside, working toward a Oregon Coast where healthy communities of people, plants and wildlife all thrive.

Please go to http://www.NCLC.org for more information about the land trust.

Katie Voelke grew up in Sacramento and earned a bachelor’s degree in biology at the University of California, Santa Cruz. She worked as a field biologist for the U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife before joining NCLC as its first stewardship director in 2005; three years later, she became its second executive director.

She and her husband, Scott Kirby, are the parents of three boys. They live in Nehalem.

Seaside/ Gearhart nature photographer Neal Maine, co-founder of NCLC, North Coast Land Conservancy, will be available to meet and greet visiting artists, guests and art patrons.

Please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/… Neal Maine to view a catalog of images available. Proceeds in support of NCLC.

Seaside First Saturday Art Walk hostesses will assist with photo ops, lite bites, and beverages.

Q: What is an  Art Walk, you ask?
A: Residents and visitors alike enjoy an evening of community and culture as various art venues within walking distance of each other host art exhibits, between 5-7 p.m. with the Seaside First Saturday Art Walk. The Art Walk, celebrating 13 years in 2017, is in the historic Gilbert Block Building. It is free and open to the public. Motto: “Those that live for the arts, support the arts.”

FUN FACT:
The Gilbert District, established in 1914, celebrated 100 years of rich history and timeless tradition in 2014. The historic district was awarded the 2004 Oregon Main Street Downtown Gateway Award.

The area is now home to shops, restaurants, galleries and boutiques. Dedicated parking for the district is located one block West off the Pacific Coast Highway 101, on the corner of Holladay and Broadway. Next Art Walk is May 6th, 2017.

For more about the Art Walk, please go to http://www.facebook.com/SeasideFirstSaturdayArtWalk.

Just in. Image titled: We Have Lift Off by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images. Location: Sunset Beach, Oregon. Date: April 2017. Proceeds in support of NCLC.
Please visit NCLCtrust.org to read more about North Coast Land Conservancy.

See more info about Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images and other exhibits at http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com /…artists /…Neal Maine …/blog.

Q: Where is Sunset Beach, you ask?

A: Sunset Beach is a state park in Clatsop County, Oregon. The park comprises 120 acres along the Pacific Ocean on the Clatsop Plains and is located between Gearhart and Warrenton, Oregon.

For more info please go to:
Sunset Beach State Recreation Site – Oregon State Parks and …
oregonstateparks.org/index.cfm?do=parkPage.dsp_parkPage&parkId=182
Sunset Beach State Recreation Site comes with a very famous past. The park marks the west trailhead of the historic Fort-to-Sea Trail

The osprey is a very unique raptor, standing out not only for its beauty but also for its choice of prey.
Seven fun facts about ospreys:

1. The osprey is the only hawk species in North America that eats almost exclusively live fish.

2. The raptor can dive as deep as three feet into the water for fish, but prefers to hunt in shallower areas.

3. This species is also known as the river hawk, fish hawk or sea hawk. But don’t confuse it with the Seahawk, the mascot of the Seattle-based football team. First, there is no such thing as a “seahawk” (one word). Second, the team actually uses an augur hawk as its mascot, a species native to Africa. The osprey may be known as a sea hawk, but it has no connection to football.

4. The osprey is the second most widely distributed raptor species, after the peregrine falcon, and can be found on every continent except Antarctica.

5. All of the ospreys around the world are part of a single species, with the exception of the eastern osprey which is native to Australia.

6. The osprey species is at least 11 million years old and is so well adapted to fishing that it has evolved unique characteristics that set it apart from other raptor species. These include nostrils that can be closed during dives, and an outer toe that can be angled backwards to better grasp fish. The species is so unique, it is listed in its own genus (Pandion) and family (Pandionidae).

7. Ospreys can live to be 15-20 years old. The oldest known osprey was just over 25 years old. During that long lifetime, the migratory birds can rack up over 160,000 miles of travel. In fact, in 2008 an osprey being tracked by researchers flew an amazing 2,700 miles in just 13 days, traveling from Massachusetts to French Guiana, South America!

For more info about ospreys go to:
Osprey, Life History, All About Birds – Cornell Lab of Ornithology
https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Osprey/lifehistory


THE OSPREY IS BEING CONSIDERED TO BECOME THE STATE BIRD OF OREGON.

To learn more go to: Oregon Senate chooses osprey over western … – Statesman Journal
http://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/…/oregon…osprey…state-bird…/100124452/ Apr 7, 2017

 

 

 

“The Seaside Osprey nest cam is up and running, in exceptional HD quality! HUGE thanks to Sunset Empire Park and Recreation District for hosting the camera, and installing fiber optic cable so the cam can be so clear!”

Thank you Necanicum Watershed Council!

Seaside Osprey Nest located in Broadway Park in Seaside, Oregon 

 

 https://youtu.be/POrdO5y0XxY

 

 

 

Melyssa Graeper
Coordinator
Necanicum Watershed Council
1115 Broadway | PO Box 474
Seaside, OR 97138
503-717-1458 office

CLICK HERE to support our osprey nest cam goals
http://www.necanicumwatershed.org

For more info go to: http://www.facebook.com/necanicumwatershedcouncil