Image titled: Power of Flight

Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images

Snow Geese

Lower Columbia River

Nov. 2017

About Snow Geese:

In the winter and during migration and winter in coastal marshes, estuaries, freshwater marshes, agricultural country. Forages mostly by walking in shallow water or on land. In summer on Arctic tundra usually within 5 miles of coast, near lakes or rivers. Usually feeds in flocks, sometimes mixed with other kinds of geese.  Please go to http://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/snow geese for more info

 

Neal Maine habitat lecture

Fairweather House and Gallery
612 Broadway
Seaside, Oregon

Fun Fact:

Nearly every month Neal Maine, naturalist, biologist and wildlife photographer,  lectures about the ecology of the local habitat at the Fairweather Gallery.

Forever honored to show his PacificLight Images  in the Gallery.

Forever humbled to have Neal Maine lecture in the Gallery.

Proceeds to support NCLC.

And, too,  Neal Maine  has introduced plans for a new open edition of a coffee table book of selected images from  PacificLight Images.

The book will be available on  special order.

The book is to support North Coast Land Conservancy, NCLC.

 

Neal Maine was a biology teacher for 30 years with the Seaside School District. After retiring from teaching, he served on the founding board for the North Coast Land Conservancy and served as its director for 12 years. Maine currently spends most of his time prowling the coastal edge as a wildlife photographer and helping others appreciate “living in paradise” on the North Coast through presentations and exhibits.

 

 

Image titled: Pray Prey 

Peregrine Falcon

Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images

Location: Del Rey Beach

Gearhart Oregon

November 2017

About Peregrine Falcons;
Habitat Open country: cliffs (mountains to coast). Often near water, especially along coast, and migrants may fly far out to sea.
One of the world’s fastest birds; in power-diving from great heights to strike prey, the Peregrine may possibly reach 200 miles per hour. Regarded by biologists alike as one of the noblest and most spectacular of all birds of prey.  Please go to http://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/ peregrine falcon for more info

 

Image title: Flying the North Coast

Purplish Copper

 Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images 

November 2017

 

The Purplish Copper is a hardy butterfly, visible when most other species are absent. Adults visit  Heliotrope, Aster and many other flowers. They often show up in late and early winter in places where the species has not otherwise been seen all year.  The larval hosts in moist areas where Knotweed (Polygonum) and Dock (Rumex) grow.

 

Neal Maine has re-introduced the image titled: Whale Within, a photograph  from a wildlife trip to the high Arctic for the Alaska Wilderness League. 

Available at Fairweather’s through December, 2017

Proceeds in support of North Coast Land Conservancy, NCLC.

 

To view images by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images, please go to wwww.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Neal Maine

 

“Unless otherwise noted, images are presented as they were photographed. Slight adjustment by cropping, lightening or darkening may have been used, but the photo subject is presented as recorded in the Oregon coastal landscapes.” A Certificate of Authenticity is provided with each copyrighted and signed image. –PacificLight Images, Neal Maine

 

Hooded Merganser by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images. Proceed in support of NCLC.

Art titled: Duck Daze, a trio of native ducks by Neal Maine.

Golden Eye, Wooduck and Merganser photographed on the Neacoxie water, Gearhart, Oregon.

For more about the ducks, please visit http://www.audubon. org …

To view more Neal Maine/ PacifcLight Images, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Neal Maine

 

AND, TOO, FOR FIRST LOOK… HAND TURNED ORNAMENTS BY MIKE BROWN!

 

One-of-a-kind burl and ebony wood ornaments!

To view more work by Mike Brown, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Mike Brown

 

 

In addition, wood worker Daniel Harris just delivered a set of new bowls for FIRST LOOK!

Title: Leaping for the Future I

Neal Maine/ PacificLight images

Male Coho salmon in the  Klaskanine River/ near Astoria, OR 

September, 2017

Proceeds in support of NCLC

 

 

 

Title: Leaping for the Future II

Neal Maine/ PacificLight images

Female Coho salmon in the  Klaskanine River/ near Astoria, OR 

September, 2017

Proceeds in support of NCLC

 

For more information about the photographer, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ Neal Maine

 

 

Q: Where in the world is the Klaskanine River, you ask?

A:  The Klaskanine River is a tributary of the Youngs River in northwest Oregon in the United States. It drains a section of the Coast Range in the extreme northwest corner of the state in the watershed of the nearby Columbia River. It rises in three short forks in the mountains in  Clatsop County, in the Clatsop State Forest north of Saddle Mountain State Natural Area.

A  Native American word, Tlats-kani, refers to a point in the Nehalem Valley but applied  to two rivers in the area, the Klaskanine and the Clatskanie.  

 

SAVE THE DATE AND TIME!

Celebrating 13 years in 2017, the next Seaside First Saturday Art Walk, will be held on October 7, 5-7: pm.

The event is free and is all about seeing and selling art in the sponsoring galleries and boutiques located between Holladay and Broadway in the historic Gilbert District of downtown Seaside. Complimentary parking  is on the corner of Holladay and Oceanway.

Fairweather House and Gallery, 612 Broadway

Opening reception for SHADOWS, an exhibition that focuses on the interplay of light and dark through selected art that expresses time as the fall season progresses. New artwork by Northwest artists Diane Copenhaver, Gregory Bell, Penelope Culbertson, Whelsey Whelp, Ashley Howarth, Lisa Wiser, Karen E. Lewis, Tamara Johnson and Marga Stanley will be featured.

Naturalist, biologist and scientist  Neal Maine will speak at 6: pm about the autumn ecology of the local habitat.

LIVE music by Shirley 88.

LIVE scribing by calligraphy artist Penelope Culbertson.

Special guest of honor will be Flynn,  “the handsomest Kestrel around and one of the  WCNC Ambassador Birds”  will be on hand celebrating the opening of Fairweather’s new exhibition SHADOWS!

And, too, during the opening reception of  SHADOWS on October 7th there will be a paddle auction  of selected Neal Maine images  to benefit the  WCNC.

 

Wildlife Center of the North Coast (WCNC) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit Oregon corporation, that specializes in wildlife rehabilitation of resident and migratory birds, mammals and other wild creatures naturally occurring in Oregon.

WCNC provides primary services to communities along 167 miles of coastline in Oregon and southwest Washington offering humane care and professional medical treatment to sick, injured, orphaned and displaced native wildlife with the goal of releasing healthy wild animals back into their appropriate habitat; offers quality conservation + environmental education programs concerning local wildlife, their ecosystems, and the human impact on these systems and individuals.

 

For SHADOWS original calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson.

 

Imagine quote by John Lennon created in calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson.

 

 

Shadows quote by Penelope Culbertson.

 

Penelope Culbertson began her art studies at the Portland Art Museum as a child, in the art department at Cleveland High School, at Reed College with calligraphy master Lloyd Reynolds, at Willamette University in Salem, at the San Francisco Art Institute, and the Institute de Bellas Artes in San Miguel, Mexico.

Penelope was the co-founder of the Art Academy of Kona and the West Hawaii Arts Guild where she served on the Executive Board. Penelope worked in the Hawaii State Artist-in-School program and showed as the Artist-in-Residence at the Hyatt Regency. Her work is in the permanent collection at the Royal Waikoloan Hotel.

Since her return to Portland, Penelope has had seventeen solo exhibits of her watercolors. She showed year round at the Hawthorne Arts Gallery and annually at the Buckman Art Show where she was the founding chairman of the Children’s Art Sale. She taught children’s art classes at the Buckman Arts Magnet Elementary and for the Portland Parks Dept. in their after-school program. In 1999 she helped produce a book of children’s watercolors about the Portland Water System. She was co-founder of The Hawthorne Arts Guild and showed in all their monthly group shows.

 

 

Penelope teaches weekly classes in calligraphy and watercolors for the disabled. She experiments in watercolors, oil pastels, collage, tapestry weaving and calligraphy. She is a member of the Portland Society of Calligraphy. She exhibits her art at Fairweather  Gallery in Seaside, Oregon.

 

Fun facts: 

In Penelope Culberston’s calligraphy class at Reed College there was a fellow student, Steve Jobs (Apple computer founder).

There is a theory that the computers today would not have the font choices without the learning seed  planted by Reed College calligraphy professor Lloyd Reynolds. 

 

Penelope Culbertson, at the opening reception of SHADOWS on October 7th, in addition to offering a scribing LIVE episode, will offer an artist’s talk  about  significant quotes that have made a difference in tilting the world to a better place!!!

 

Save the date and time!

 

Celebrating 13 years in 2017, the next Seaside First Saturday Art Walk, will be held on October 7, 5-7: pm.

Visitors meet artists, see original art, sip wine or snag appetizers by favorite restaurants or personal chefs, view artist demonstrations and, oftentimes, enjoy live performances in music.

The event is free and is all about seeing and selling art in the sponsoring galleries and boutiques located between Holladay and Broadway in the historic Gilbert District of downtown Seaside. Complimentary parking for the historic Gilbert District is on the corner of Holladay and Oceanway.

Fairweather House and Gallery, 612 Broadway

Opening reception for SHADOWS, an exhibition that focuses on the interplay of light and dark through selected art that expresses time as the fall season progresses.

New artwork by Northwest artists Diane Copenhaver, Penelope Culbertson, Gregory Bell, Lisa Wiser , Ashley Howarth,  Whelsey Whelp, Karen E. Lewis, Tamara Johnson and Marga Stanley will be featured.

Artists will be in attendance to meet patrons and to speak about their art.

Take a note!

Calligrapher Penelope Culbertson will offer her annual Fairweather scribing LIVE episode!

 

Seaside/ Gearhart naturalist Neal Maine will speak at 6: pm about the autumn ecology of the local habitat.

LIVE music by Shirley 88.

 

Special guest of honor will be Flynn,  “the handsomest Kestrel around and one of the  WCNC Ambassador Birds”  will be on hand celebrating the opening of Fairweather’s new exhibition SHADOWS!

 

SHADOWS, the opening reception for Fairweather’s October exhibition, will be a benefit for Wildife Center of the North Coast!

 

 

 

Diane Copenhaver, abstract artist

Diane is a resident of the northwest and recently embarked on a journey of discovery to unleash her creative talents after a successful career in business. Art classes at Bellevue College have provided foundational skills focused on the principles and elements of design, color theory and harmonies, and painting techniques and processes.

Diane is painting primarily abstract using acrylics on varied surfaces. She also produces collage and mixed media works, is studying calligraphic arts and has begun to explore encaustic painting.

Color and texture are often the focus of Diane’s paintings. She uses layers of paint, as well as a variety of tools and mediums.

 

 

“As I contemplated the subject of ‘Shadows’, I found inspiration in a variety of perspectives around the idea of shadow; shadow as opposite, reflection, repetition, companion, or as enabled by light.”

 

“I enjoy the freedom of non-representational painting and used these ideas of shadow to explore the use of black and white and the beautiful gradients of grey. I have expressed ‘Shadows’ through a variety of works; bold and expressive, muted and gentle, solid and soft edges, and layers of dark and light. I am naturally moved to create a sense of mystery in my painting and hope that my work for ‘Shadows’ provides the space to engage and create a personal story and interpretation of shadow.” –Diane Copenhaver

 

 

 

 

One of four.  Gradient series by Diane Copenhaver.

 

 

Sincerely series. I and II by Diane Copenhaver.

 

Layer series. I, II, III and IV by Diane Copenhaver.

 

 

Mysteries by Diane Copenhaver.

 

Fairweather House and Gallery, 612 Broadway

 SHADOWS, an exhibition  through October,  focuses on the interplay of light and dark with through selected art that expresses time as the fall season progresses.

New artwork by Northwest artists Diane Copenhaver, Gregory Bell,  Penelope Culbertson, Whelsey Whelp, Lisa Wiser, Karen E. Lewis, Tamara Johnson and Marga Stanley will be featured.

 

Fall leaf display for COLOR IT FALL, a September Fairweather Gallery exhibition, by naturalist, scientist and photographer Neal Maine.

About the photography:  I found many display of fall leaves along the Necanicum River in Seaside.  The goal of the project was to create a sense of motion and dynamics of the life process of leaves and their part in driving the entire energy cycle (99.9%) of plant earth. –Neal Maine, PacificLight Images

MORE THAN FALL COLORS lecture notes:

Fall leaf color has a beauty of its own, even though it is the effect of some amazing internal chemistry of leaves. The green pigment in leaves is chlorophyll, which absorbs red and blue light from the sunlight that fall on them. Chloroplasts inside the leaves capture the energy of photons, liberated from the sun and traveling at 186,00 miles a second, to blast apart carbon dioxide and water to reform as oxygen and carbohydrates.

As the leaves bring about their magic in the fall, the pigment of chlorophyll is absorbing parts of the light spectrum and reflecting others, thus the red and yellow are reflected even more as the fall breakdown of chlorophyll fades from the leaves and exposes this cascade of color.
Two other pigments in plant leaves contribute to the array of fall colors. Carotenes, producing yellow reflected light and anthocyanins make the reds.

With the physiology of leaves aside, the beauty of fall leaf color is one of the highlights of the year in many parts of the country. In the North East, fall color tourism is a major part of the economy. In Michigan, over 1 billion dollars comes into the state from the “fall color” visitors.

In our local setting, the vine maple trees produce some of the most spectacular visual displays and are best be found along local rivers and streams. –Neal Maine

 

Color it Fall quote selected by Neal Maine:  “The human brain, so frail, so perishable, so full of inexhaustible dreams and hungers, burns by the power of the leaf.”  –-Loren Eiseley, the Star Thrower

 

 

Each month, during the Seaside First Saturday Art Walk at the Fairweather Gallery, Neal Maine offers a unique nature lecture tailored specifically for each exhibition.

SAVE THE DATE AND TIME!
October 7th, 2017
5-7pm
Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway
SHADOWS
Opening exhibition

Take a note!

Neal Maine lecture at 6:pm

Please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Neal Maine for more doing good works.

Take another note!

Special guest, Flynn, an Amercian Kestrel, will visit  from the Wildlife Center of the North Coast! 

More information later…

Title: “Winged Wonder” by Neal Maine, PacificLight Images.

Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly. Location: Neacoxie Creek. Seaside/Gearhart.

Signed, matted and framed.

“Unless otherwise noted, images are presented as they were photographed. Slight adjustment by cropping, lightening or darkening may have been used, but the photo subject is presented as recorded in the Oregon coastal landscapes.”

A Certificate of Authenticity is provided with each copyrighted and signed image.

Available exclusively at Fairweather’s.

Proceeds to support North Coast Land Conservancy/NCLC.

 

 

THE NEXT FRONTIER, OUR OWN BACKYARD

Humans: We take pictures, walks, deep breaths, memories, rides on waves, water, timber, in habitat that used to belong to other trail makers. We thought we could never catch all the salmon, never cut all the big trees, and never pollute the ocean. In our hubris, we thought we could make our own trails. With renewed humility, we are learning how to share this place, to live together with our partner trail makers. PacificLight Images celebrates this partnership as we use our images to inspire others to honor nature’s trails in OUR OWN BACKYARD.Neal Maine

To read more about the photographer, please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Neal Maine

 

Save the date and time. 
Neal Maine, scientist and wildlife photographer to present a lecture on the ecology of the North Coast habitats.

August 5th, 6:pm
Fairweather House and Gallery
612 Broadway, Seaside, OR
Opening reception for FINDINGS

Seaside First Saturday Art Walk 

 

To read more about the Art Walk, please go to http://www.facebook.com/ Seaside First Saturday Art Walk.

Q: Where can the Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly be found, you ask?

A:  Habitat: Small ponds and slow streams. It perches on the tips of twigs, grasses and other vegetation.

Fun Creature Facts:

Distribution: Western U.S., West Indies and Central America south to Chile and Argentina.

Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly wings sit flat when perched and have a strong sustained flight; flitting about on gossamer wings and quiet as a whisper.

Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonflies are swift fliers, reminiscent of tiny airplanes.

Their eyes are huge, often meeting at the top of the head.

The Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly, will eat almost any soft-bodied flying insect including mosquitoes, flies, small moths, mayflies, and flying ants or termites.

The Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly are aptly named as they mimic hawks, relentlessly pursuing their prey.

The Latin name for this genus, Sympetrum, means “with rock” and refers to their habit of basking on rocks to absorb heat early in the day.

This species is one of the first dragonflies to emerge each year.

imnh.isu.edu/digitalatlas/bio/insects/drgnfly

 

In addition, read more about North Coast dragonflys:

Wild Side: Dragonfly – Coastal Life – Coast Weekend

Aug 31, 2017 – Read Wild SideDragonfly from Coast Weekend. … By Lynette Rae McAdams. For Coast … Even while eating, a dragonfly can remain in flight.