Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway, Seaside Oregon

Closed until it is safe to reopen.

Due to the  novel coronavirus the gallery shut its doors on March 15, 2020.

We hope make to it possible to enjoy some of what we have to offer to while you are at home in during the order to Stay at Home, Save Lives. Publishing articles is a way that we can continue to feature our resident artists during the situation,” chief curator Denise Fairweather.

 

 

Close up of Lysichiton americanus/ AKA Skunk Cabbage or Swamp Lantern  watercolor by Jo Pomeroy Crockett

Adored by many and ridiculed by some, Lysichiton americanus, aka skunk cabbage or swamp lantern is one of the first plants to emerge in late winter. Pushing its way through snow and peeking out of bogs, this bright yellow curvaceous “leaf” (spathe) with its inner structure of numerous small flowers (spadix) provides a warm resting and mating place for beetles and other insects. the calla lily. It has a distinctive fragrance similar to garlic or apples that give rise to its popular name.

Lysichton has many uses. Some Native peoples used it as an emergency food and a medicine. Hanis Coos elder Lottie Evanoff reportedly said she liked skunk cabbage very much and found it curious that settlers did not eat it. “Bears eats skunk cabbage, is just crazy for it. So, it must be good eating; everything bear eats is good eating.”  Jo Pomeroy Crockett, PhD/ artist

Jo Pomeroy Crockett

GATHER notes:

Importance of Quality Watercolor Paper

Watercolor, while not fussy is particular about the kind of paper it prefers. A special rough paper, handmade in India, with a very deep tooth is especially suited to this medium. Pigment just skims over the top but if given enough water, likes to settle into the valleys. Gentle glazes provide depth and effects not possible with other papers. The watercolors were painted on this special paper.  JPC

 

 

Jo Pomeroy Crockett, Phd., has often lectured at Fairweather’s.

Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, a North coast resident, works primarily wet-into-wet and strives for dramatic patterns. Vivid colors, an emphasis on the play of light and a touch of whimsy mark her paintings. Although she enjoys painting a variety of subjects, she especially enjoys painting nature. She has exhibited in numerous juried art competitions in the Southwest and the Pacific Northwest. Her work is in private collections in various parts of the United States, England, Canada and Switzerland. In combination with her art, she works as a free-lance writer and educator

 

 

“First Leap” by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images. Proceeds in support of NCLC.

 “This mallard chick seems to be enjoying life to the fullest as it scurries across a lily pad in a pond near my home.”  Neal Maine

After a thirty-year career as an award winning biology teacher at Seaside High School, Neal Maine became the first executive director of North Coast Land Conservancy, which he co-founded in 1986. Since his retirement from the land trust in 2010, he has pursued his passion for nature photography through PacificLight Images, a partnership with Michael Wing, dedicated to raising awareness of coastal ecology and the wildlife with whom we share the region’s estuaries, freshwater wetlands and forests. Their photography centers around coastal and Columbia River landscape, ecology and the rich estuary habitat with the surrounding wetlands and forest systems.

 

Habitat lectures by Neal Maine at Fairweather’s will return when it is safe to re-open the gallery.

 

Artists and speakers were booked for the exhibition, GATHER,  several booked more than one year ago, with some of art delivered before the gallery closed mid-March.

The April exhibition, titled GATHER, which was meant to open in the gallery April 4 and run through April 25, was canceled  due to the novel coronavirus.

 

Elk in the dunes by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images.  Proceeds in support of NCLC.

North Coast Land Conservancy/ reprint
Elk have been on the Oregon Coast a long, long, long, long time. Scientists believe elk migrated from Asia to North America over Beringia—better known as the Bering Land Bridge—some 120,000 years ago. The animals would have been a familiar sight to the first human hunters who migrated here tens of thousands of years later. Elk survived, and continue to survive, by being able to eat almost any kind of plant they can find, while we humans are limited to eating “soft fruits, a few easily digestible seeds, and the milk and flesh of our more versatile animal cousins,” as David Haskell writes in The Forest Unseen, one of naturalist and photographer Neal Maine’s favorite books.

 

 

Chasing the Light by Neal Maine/PacificLight Images.  Proceeds in support of NCLC.

We are all are holed up at home to slow the spread of the virus, hopefully,  this “Fairweather fix” will give moods and psyches a lift with some online R&R.

 

Watch time lapse video showing efforts in creating space for last year’s April exhibition, LIFE ABUNDANT.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dhKYvSZM3bg

Soon, when it is safe to re-open, we will be back in the gallery.

Stay safe at home, save lives.

Fairweather House and Gallery will continue to reach out with on-line blog articles about the arts.

And, too, on a regular basis, during these uncertain times, we will continue to re-post previous LIVE  Fairweather arts events…until it is safe to re-open the gallery.

http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

End note:

Flowers heal broken hearts.
https://youtu.be/ryUxrFUk6MY

 

Jan and Jay Barber, Mayor of Seaside, introducing wildlife photographer Neal Maine.

 

Neal Maine presenting a signed ArcticLight photograph to Nancy Holmes, lucky raffle winner.

 

Karen Doyle, Fresh Start featured artist,  with Saundra, Art Walk hostess, lecturing about her art painted for the exhibition.

 

Dorota Haber-Lehigh, Fresh Start featured artist, with Joan, Art Walk hostess, lecturing about her art created for the exhibition.

 

Gayle H. Seely, Fresh Start featured artist, with Kathy, Art Walk hostess, lecturing about her art created for the exhibition.

Neal Maine,  Seaside/ Gearhart naturalist, lectured about the new and fresh frames for a series of juvenile eagle images captured in the local habitat.

 

A poised and composed Shirley 88  caught in a pause from playing LIVE during the evening affair.

 

Fresh tidbits: grapes, pineapples, jelly cookies, sugar wafers, sponge cake, kisses, chocolate mints and sugar cookies. Thanks to K. Bowman, Fairweather’s Director of Hospitality.

 

Revealing a fresh take on Neal Maine’s famous “Elk Run” photo.  Custom order in a 38×48 size finished through a lot of collaboration with a fellow gallery owner from Necanicum Gallery. Indeed, the project involved more than four people  working together to complete the goal of enlarging an iconic image from the local habitat.  This image by Neal Maine, nature photographer, was published in the May-June 2015 issue of Bugle magazine (published by the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation). It is pictured in the story printed on page 62 about Gearhart, OR; which is #6 on the list of top ten “elkiest” places in America. The article is titled: Greetings from Elk City USA, pages 56-68. Neal Maine, a former educator,  devotes his time to observing the local wildlife and raising habitat awareness.

 

Fresh Start Exhibition and Sale

Through March 25

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside, OR  97138

“This exhibit’s  expectation lies in its possibility to present fresh, new perspectives, inspiration, experiences, reflection and even the possibility for transcendence in some way. Indeed, the meaning of “fresh start” is: the beginning of a new period or step,”   D. Fairweather, gallerist.

http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

Photos by Kemy Kay Kjemhus.

Original watercolor by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, handmade spring column candles, mouthblown glass, hand turned wood candle sticks, pottery by Suzy Holland, mouth blown stemware by Rox Heath, vintage bird feeder and bird house, silk and chenille throw pillows.

Pastel by Gretha Lindwood, pair of whimsical artworks by Marga Stanley, mouth blown art glass, hand made potter vase, hand wired silk iris stem, hand beeded flowers, contemporary floral by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett and art cards by Leah Kohlenberg, glassware by Robin and Rox Heath.

Art by Toni Avery, handmade tea pot by Kate Carlye, hand-forged candle sticks, fused glass by Carolyn Lindberg and mouth blown art vase

Pottery by Suzy Holland and oil painting by Carmela Newstead.

Art by Leah Kohlenberg, textile art by Linda Olson..

Handmade birdie pillow by Cherry Jones Harris, feather motif handmade journal by Christine Trexel, mouth blown art glass, pottery and platters hand made by Maria Hudson.

Handmade glass by Bob Heath.

Handmade glass by Sandy and Bob Lercari.

 

 

Handmade glass by Christine Downs, fused glass by Sandy and Bob Lercari, urchin rocks by Kandy Schwartz, and ocean oil by Sandy and Bob Lercari.

Outdoor garden **folly filled with  cattail dyed green spheres and handmade moss decorative moss spheres.

 

**Q:  What is a garden folly, you ask?

A: A garden folly is usually considered a building or structure that is designed for decoration with no other purpose than to add a touch of whimsy or extravagance to the surrounding landscape. The term began as “a name for any costly structure considered to have shown folly in the builder” and was often named after the individual who commissioned or designed the project. The connotations of silliness or madness in this definition are in accord with the general meaning of the French word “folie”; however, another older meaning of this word is “delight.”

Photos by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

 

“This exhibit’s expectation lies in its possibility to present fresh, new perspectives, inspiration, experiences, reflection and even the possibility for transcendence in some way. Indeed, the meaning of “fresh start” is the beginning of a new period or step.  The North Coast land, truly, is in full springtime bloom for FRESH START, Fairweather’s March exhibition.”

“Air Born” juvenile eagle by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images.

**Proceeds to support NCLC.

 

According to the National Eagle Center, juvenile bald eagles can appear larger than their parents can in the first year because of longer flight feathers that help the birds as they learn to fly. After the first molt, the wing feathers will be the same size as an adult eagle.

Juveniles have a brown body with brown and white mottled wings. The tail is also mottled with a dark band at the very tip, according to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

“The Eagle has Landed” juvenile eagle by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images.

**Proceeds to support NCLC.

 

Sometimes also called a sub-adult, a juvenile is typically an eagle in its first year that does not yet have full adult plumage.
Within a few years, juvenile eagles grow closer to the classic adult plumage. Most birds have the white head and tail feathers between their fourth and fifth year.

 

 

Photo by Neal Maine / PacificLight Images
Bald eagles on Clatsop Beach.

“Eagle Speak” pair of American Bald Eagles eagle by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images. A pair of eagles schooled a juvenile eagle who dared to arrive on the beach.  The takeaway… “we told you to do your own fly way, and no, we will not send you money.”

**Proceeds to support NCLC.

Bald Eagles were common in North America at the time of European colonization and were considered sacred by the Native Americans. They remained common up through the 18th and early 19th centuries, but due to habitat destruction and direct persecution their population was considerably reduced by the start of the 20th century. The boom in chemical pesticide use, particular DDT, during the mid- 20th century lead to a rapid crash in the Bald Eagle population. DDT in the fish that the eagles were eating was making their eggshells thinner causing them to break during incubation. DDT was banned in the 1970s and the Bald Eagle was placed under the protection of the new Endangered Species Act. The population recovered quickly and today the Bald Eagle is abundant across North America.

Neal Maine recent eagle back story:  The wildlife photographer grew up in Seaside, went to college and returned to Seaside as an educator.  It was not until his 20th year of teaching that he saw and  photographed an eagle at the coast.

 

Jan and Jay Barber, Mayor of Seaside, introduced the wildlife photographer Neal Maine during the opening reception of Fresh Start at Fairweather’s.

Fairweather House and Gallery

Through March 25

Fresh Start Exhibition

612 Broadway St.

Seaside, Oregon

“A Fresh Start” featuring artists Toni Avery, Bill Baily, Karen Doyle, Christine Downs, Bob HeathDorota Haber-Lehigh, Neal Maine, Gayle H. Seely and Bill Shumway.

“This exhibit’s expectation lies in its possibility to present fresh, new perspectives, inspiration, experiences, reflection and even the possibility for transcendence in some way,” D. Fairweather, gallerist.

 

Neal Maine lectured at 6:pm at Fairweather’s during the Seaside First Saturday Art Walk.

 

Read more about Neal Maine on the artist tab at http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

**Q: What is NCLC, you ask?

A: North Coast Land Conservancy (NCLC)  has been working since 1986 to conserve and connect the landscape of the Oregon Coast from the Columbia River to northern Lincoln County by acquiring or otherwise managing lands for their habitat value. With a portfolio of more than 50 fee-title properties in addition to more than a dozen conservation easements, NCLC has completed more fee acquisitions in Oregon than any other local land trust, ranking it alongside The Nature Conservancy and The Trust for Public Lands for statewide conservation impact. The nationally accredited private, non-profit land trust works to ensure that this extraordinary region is a place where healthy communities of people, plants and wildlife can all thrive.

 

 

Jay Barber, Mayor of Seaside, prepares to select at random a winner from eggs containing the 14 names of patrons who purchased the “Last Polar Bear” book…

 

Nancy Holmes won the raffle for a signed ArcticLight image by Neal Maine during a drawing at Fairweather’s on March 7.

Nancy Holmes selected the polar bear portrait, signed by Neal Maine, and later shared the display in her home with the “Last Polar Bear” book shown on the mantle.

 

The raffle, a fundraiser  for the Alaska Wilderness League, generated $420 in book sales at the gallery.  The Alaska Wilderness League is a nonprofit organization that works to protect Alaska’s most significant wild lands from oil and gas drilling and from other industrial threats.

Read more about doing good works at Alaska Wilderness Leaguewww.alaskawild.org

 

 

Arctic Light Photographers Daniel Dietrich and Neal Maine

Read more about ArcticLight images at:


‘Arctic Light’ draws attention to global warming Presentation …

http://www.discoverourcoast.com › coast-weekend › arts › article_1d181096-…
Feb 16, 2015 – Arctic Light‘ draws attention to global warming Presentation, photographic journey aim for wildlife. Neal Maine and Daniel Dietrich will speak …

Hood River by Bill Baily

Original watercolor, 22″ x 28″ framed in a black metal fame with double off white mats

 

About the artist.

Bill Baily lives with his wife, Donna, in Lake Oswego, Oregon.  They have a weekend place on the Oregon coast. Although he was a professional pharmacist, he has also been an artist for over forty-six years. Bill is now retired and he spends his time painting. His subject matter is impressionistic landscapes and seascapes as well as the more prevalent fruit and vegetable still lifes for which he is well known.

Bill studied with Nelson Sandgren, Charles Mulvey, Perry Acker, Phil Tyler and George Hamilton. He has had work included in the annual Northwest Watercolor Society Show in Seattle, Artists of Oregon Exhibit at the Portland Art Museum, and numerous Watercolor Society of Oregon Biannual exhibits. He has contributed his paintings to the Cascade Aids Auctions where his work was usually selected to be in their published catalogues.

 

Some of the permanent collections where his work can be found are those of Sunriver Lodge and Condominiums, Georgia-Pacific, Wells Fargo Bank, Lloyd Corporation, the Arlington Club, Good Samaritan Hospital, Nabisco, the Multnomah Athletic Club, Bank of America, Freightliner, Sisters of Providence Hospital, and Boise Cascade. Many private collectors in the United States, Japan and Western Europe also collect his paintings.

 

Bill Baily fruit studies in watercolor, art glass by Fedor Zubanov and Irina Nazarkina, mini fused glass trays by Rox Heath, and fresco painting by Agnus Field.

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

Through March 25

612 Broadway St.

Seaside, Oregon

“A Fresh Start” featuring artists Toni Avery, Bill Baily, Karen Doyle, Christine Downs, Bob Heath, Dorota Haber-Lehigh, Gayle H. Seely and Bill Shumway.

“This exhibit’s expectation lies in its possibility to present fresh, new perspectives, inspiration, experiences, reflection and even the possibility for transcendence in some way.”

Read more at http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

Bill Baily’s art is also shown at the Portland Art Museum.

http://apps.portlandartmuseum.org/rentalsalesgallery/artists/Bill-Baily/

Pamplin Media Group – Bill Baily’s art named ‘Best of Show’

https://pamplinmedia.com/lor/54…/358434-235902-bill-bailys-art-named-best-of-sho…

May 11, 2017 – BILL BAILY – The winners of the Lake Area Artists Show and Sale have been announced, based on the judging by the …

 

Previously, art by Bill Baily was selected to be in the 2019 Cannon Beach Arts Association Miniature Exhibition “Exploring the Extraordinary,” with three paintings under 36 square inches.

 

Most recently,  Bill Baily’s watercolor was selected  into the spring 2020 group show of 80 artists for the Watercolor Society of Oregon.

In addition, Mary Burgess, JoAnn Pari-Mueller  and Pam Haunschild, artists who exhibit art at Fairweather’s, were selected for the 2020 spring Watercolor Society of Oregon.

To read more about the artist, go to https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/category/artists/bill-baily/

 

To learn more about the gallery, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/

 

 

2018 opening spring reception art hostesses: Kay, Kathy, Sara, Joan and Denise.

 

Each new event is hosted by fabulous Art Walk hostesses. 

A new beginning, truly, a fresh start, surely, acts as an agent of change, serving as a language that accommodates experience and expands our view.  Through March 25, this spring, an exhibition titled a FRESH START at Fairweather House and Gallery opening March 7, embodies this definition of a new season.  A Fresh Start combines modern and traditional forms in order to create something wholly new.

 

Gallerist Denise Fairweather draws upon her earlier life in staging and high-design, principally as a senior level interior designer, allied member 1987-present/ American Society of Interior Designers.  She thinks still in terms of show house staging when designing many of her exhibits.  ‘I do see staging art as a kind of a set.  When an exhibit opens, complete with the proper lighting, signing and art on display, so to speak, I want there to be a perfect scene, for the artists, of course, but also for the art patrons.  The assembled accessories  placed to complement the art created with a specifically appointed theme … let us say …are an ensemble cast …all working together to make a perfect exhibition.”  

Watch time lapse video showing efforts in creating space for a spring exhibition in 2019. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dhKYvSZM3bg

 

2017 spring art walk hostesses Joan, Kathy, Denise, Kay, Kathy and Shirley posing just minutes before the opening reception..

In its fourteenth year, Fairweather House and Gallery, located at 612 Broadway in downtown Seaside, Oregon, has established itself as the nexus of the north coast’s art climate with a new exhibition each month.

 

In late 2019, the gallery gave artists the opportunity to select a themed month to exhibit. Regional artists looked over the various themes for 2020 and while, surely, all the themes were of interest, the March artists, truly, believed in the theme for Fresh Start exhibition.  Each artist stepped forward with the willingness to experiment, to try new materials.  For the upcoming exhibition “A Fresh Start” more than one hundred original works of art will be displayed throughout the gallery.

 

The Seaside First Saturday Art Walk on March 7 between the hours of 5-7: pm is all about the arts. Visitors may visit with artists, view an artist demonstration, listen to an art lecture or enjoy live performances in music. The downtown event, celebrating 16 years in 2020, is walk about in the historic district located between Holladay and Broadway. Free and open to the public.

Fairweather House and Gallery

March 7, 5-7:pm

612 Broadway St.

Seaside, Oregon

Opening reception for “A Fresh Start” featuring Northwest artists Toni Avery, Bill Baily, Karen Doyle, Christine Downs, Bob Heath, Dorota Haber-Lehigh, Gayle H. Seely and Bill Shumway.

“This exhibit’s expectation lies in its possibility to present fresh, new perspectives, inspiration, experiences, reflection and even the possibility for transcendence in some way. Indeed, the meaning of “fresh start” is: the beginning of a new period or step.  We, truly, expect the North Coast land to be in full springtime bloom for FRESH START, Fairweather’s March exhibition.”

Fresh Start slate includes:

An inspiring opening introduction with Denise Faiweather, gallerist

Greetings and meetings with featured artists

Flexible program tailored by the attending regional artists

Artist lectures at 5:30 pm

Local farm-to-table snacks

Time to connect and celebrate with friends and colleagues

Spring habitat talk and **raffle drawing for a signed photograph by naturalist Neal Maine at 6:00 pm

**Proceeds to support Alaska Wilderness League

LIVE music by Shirley 88

Read more at http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

About tab/ Blog tab/ Artists tab

http://www.facebook.com/ Seaside First Saturday Art Walk

Photos and video by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall

Canyon Creek Convergence by W. E. Shumway 16×16 acrylic

Lakeside View by W. E. Shumway 15×14 acrylic

River Reflections by W. E. Shumway 10.75×14.75 acrylic

 

William E. Shumway, artist

I was born in Amherst, MA. I grew up in a household full of music. I still seek a harmonic resonance between pictorial elements so that they resonate with the whole.

During my time earning an MA in painting at the University of Massachusetts, I apprenticed with master print maker, Jack Coughlin. I operated galleries and frame studios in Amherst, Northampton and Martha’s Vineyard, MA.

My artwork evolved rapidly towards abstract expressionism after studying with Hui Ming Wang, Leonard Baskin, Walter Kamys and Chuck Close. My graduate thesis works were based entirely on a single dream experience in which each art object was on display in a dream gallery. I measured and inspected how they were constructed and made notes. On waking, I transferred those notes to my drawing pad and made 20 painted canvas sculptures.

When I arrived in Corvallis, I was moved by the wildness of Oregon’s landscapes. I decided to open up to new ways of seeing and painting while incorporating the elements of abstraction that I had previously embraced. It was very humbling to be in a community where no one knew me as an artist and where I had no body of work, no studio, no tools or any supplies or connections. I shifted towards painting more directly and in the moment. At the same time, I experimented with all manner of processes and materials, like heated copy toners and teas, mixed media, such as carpenters’ crayons, acrylic and spray paints. Later, I discovered mica based interference pigments and still use them today to enhance luminosity and color shifting effects.

I operated Pegasus Gallery for 35 years until my retirement in August 2014. The gallery, which is now owned by my daughter Paige, served regional and international artists over the years and generated collaborative events with other galleries.

 

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

Through March 25

612 Broadway St.

Seaside, Oregon

 “A Fresh Start” featuring artists Toni Avery, Bill Baily, Karen Doyle, Christine Downs, Bob Heath, Dorota Haber-Lehigh, Gayle H. Seely and Bill Shumway.

“This exhibit’s expectation lies in its possibility to present fresh, new perspectives, inspiration, experiences, reflection and even the possibility for transcendence in some way.”

“I helped start and facilitate the Vistas & Vineyards en plein air program and co-chaired the art procurement for the Corvallis Arts Center. I introduced many downtown business owners to the concept of hosting art work in their establishments so that new artists could get a start in less competitive venues. Happily, local patrons now expect to mix art with their shopping and dining experiences,”  writes Bill Shumway.

Read more at http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com